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Current Residents

  • First Year Residents (PGY-1)

    • As an undergraduate at Columbia University, I majored in Biomedical Engineering. My formative experience working in the Biomaterials and Interface Tissue Engineering Lab paired with my passion to help patients motivated me to become a physician-scientist. I joined the MD/PhD program at Columbia’s Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and completed my thesis work in Dr. Kam Leong’s lab onhow dual-purpose nanomaterials that can deliver chemotherapy and bind to inflammatory damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) thereby mitigating the metastatic spread of breast cancer. My research was funded by an NIH F31 Ruth L. Kirschstein Predoctoral Individual National Research Service Award in April 2021. As my desire to become a psychiatrist grew, I developed a novel research plan to test the influence of DAMP-scavenging nanoparticles on chemobrain side effects, particularly anxiety. My thesis work was awarded the Miriam Berkman Spotnitz Award in Oncology at Columbia’s medical school graduation in 2023. Going forward, I would like to conduct clinical research aimed at better understanding or improving treatments of women’s mental health and it’s incredible to have the opportunity to pursue this research at Yale.
    • Dr. Laelia Benoit is a Clinical Fellow (PGY-2) in the Solnit Integrated Training Program in Child, Adolescent, and Adult Psychiatry at the Yale Child Study Center. She is a French and Brazilian Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist (fully trained in France) and came to the U.S. in 2021 to work as a Fulbright Visiting Research Scholar at the Yale Child Study Center. Dr. Benoit maintains her affiliation with the French NIH (Inserm, CESP, Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Santé des Populations). Dr. Benoit is the co-director of QUALab, Qualitative and Mixed Methods Lab, a collaboration between the Yale Child Study Center (Dr. Andrés Martin), and the CESP (Dr. Bruno Falissard). Dr. Benoit's previous research focused on early intervention in psychosis, anxious school refusal, and access to care for minorities. Her current project assesses the impact of climate change on the mental health of children and adolescents in three countries (the US, Brazil, and France). Laelia Benoit favors citizen research approaches involving adolescents, their parents, professionals, and family support groups. Her teaching (Yale University, Universidade de São Paolo, University of Paris) focuses on qualitative methods for researchers and psychological and social science skills for caregivers and school professionals to help them support children's health and reduce inequities in health care. Professional honors: Yale International Physician-Scientist Resident and Fellow Research Award (2023), Fulbright (2021), Monahan Foundation (2021), Inserm Award (2016), Paris Public Hospital AP-HP Award (2016). Methods: Qualitative (Grounded theory), Social Science, Mixed-methods, Transcultural Keywords: Youth mental health, Climate Change, Access to care, School refusal, Migration, Early Intervention (Autism, Psychosis), Adoption. Books : "L'adolescent fragile, peut-on prédire en psychiatrie? (2016), "Phobie scolaire, retrouver le plaisir d'apprendre" (2020), "Infantisme" (2023). All publications. Researchgate
    • Amy was born and raised on Long Island, New York and graduated from Stony Brook University where she completed an honors thesis on taste processing in the gustatory cortex. She finished her MD/PhD at UMass Chan Medical School where her thesis work on understanding the role of the synaptic protein neurexin in serotonin signaling was supported by an F30 fellowship through the National Institute of Mental Health. Amy co-founded UMass MIND’s Community Intervention Program to work alongside community members with serious mental illness, local mental health organizations, and academic institutions. She co-developed the Food4Thought nutrition program and promoted creative expression for those living with serious mental illness and/or substance use disorders through arts-based programs. As a second-year psychiatry resident at Yale, Amy continues her passion for public psychiatry, community-based participatory efforts, mentorship, and stigma reduction. She currently leads the Public Psychiatry Interest Group and plans to continue her work in lifestyle psychiatry to advocate for a healthier New Haven. She serves as one of the resident representatives of the Medical Student Education Committee on the Psychiatry Residents’ Association. Outside of work, Amy enjoys all things food, staying active, and spending time with friends and family.
    • Lala L. Forrest was born on the ancestral land of the Hewisedawi people, in Alturas, California. She is a citizen of the Pit River Nation in Northern California and a descendant of the Modoc and Wintu people. Lala was the first in her family to graduate from a university and obtained a Bachelor of Science in Physiology and Neuroscience at the University of California, San Diego. During this time she was an active member of the California Native American Research Center for Health program, where she nurtured her passions for healing and discovery by exploring the intersections of medicine and research. With an interest in health equity, Lala pursued the Postbac Enrichment Program at the National Institutes of Health after graduating college. With the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp technique, she studied insulin sensitivity and resistance to explain the physiological basis for health disparities in Asian and African American communities. After participating in the Post Baccalaureate Program at the University of California, San Francisco, and working as an emergency medical technician in New Haven, Connecticut, Lala matriculated into medical school at the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University where she was awarded the Netter scholarship. While in medical school, Lala co-founded the Perspectives on Equity Advancement: Research and Learning Symposium where students receive grant funding to pursue DEI initiatives programs alongside a supportive mentorship team placement. With an interest in medical education, Lala served as the Assistant Editor for Trainee Engagement for the journal, Academic Medicine. She worked with Drs. Charles Odonkor and Erik Brodt to publish, "Representation of American Indian and Alaska Native Individuals in Academic Medical Training" in JAMA Network Open. In 2023, Lala received her Doctor of Medicine degree with a concentration in medical education and was a recipient of the "Excellence in Clerkship for Psychiatry." Currently, Lala is a We Are Healers Fellow and an active member of the Association of American Indian Physicians. She is interested in Indigenous mental health, the influence of structural racism on mental inequities, addiction medicine, child and adolescent psychiatry, and psychotherapy. Lala is also an athlete at Branford CrossFit, enjoys live music, attending the Yale Repertory Theatre, and playing with her dog, Tilly.
    • Simone graduated from Harvard College in 2016, where she received an A.B. in integrative biology. Her undergraduate thesis, which used diffusion tensor imaging to examine relationships between social functioning and white matter microstructural variation in typically developing children, was advised by Dr. Charles Nelson of Boston Children's Hospital and received the Thomas T. Hoopes prize. She now works on the Autism Biomarkers Consortium for Clinical Trials' Data Analytics and Acquisition Core analyzing EEG and eye-tracking data.
    • Henry Kietzman, MD, PhD, is a resident in Yale’s Neuroscience Research Training Program. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Swarthmore College with a B.A. in Neuroscience. He then enrolled in the Medical Scientist Training Program at Emory University. During medical school, he organized a resilience initiative to promote social connection and decrease burnout among medical students. He then transitioned to his dissertation work in the lab of Dr. Shannon Gourley, where he performed circuit-level analyses to understand how connectivity between the prefrontal cortex and the amygdala allow social experiences to shape behavior in rodents. At Yale, he aims to continue using rodent models to understand the neural building blocks of social cognition, while developing new pharmacological and psychological interventions for those with mental illness focused on improving social connectedness. This dovetails with a vested interest in understanding new patient-centered treatments to decrease mental illness burden in LGBTQ+ individuals.
    • Songjun William (Will) Li, MD, PhD, is a psychiatry resident in Yale’s Neuroscience Research Training Program. He graduated from Emory University with a bachelors degree double majoring in music performance as well as neuroscience and behavioral biology. There, he studied the neurobiological basis of relational memory formation in the Rhesus macaque model under the guidance of Dr. Beth Buffalo. After college, he joined Dr. Leslie Ungerleider’s lab at the NIMH to investigate facial processing using as a post-bacc fellow. Will then moved to Boston, where he continued his studies at the Boston University School of Medicine, and completed his PhD dissertation with Dr. Ziv Williams at Mass General Hospital evaluating single-neuronal responses during complex social decision making in mice. His research has, thus far, revealed a putative executive mechanism in the prefrontal cortical network that allows animals to evaluate social information about others that can adaptively influence pro-social decisions, competitive effort, and sociability. Will's current research interests aim to build upon our understanding of how the brain processes and encodes socially motivated behaviors, uncovering the mechanisms that go awry in psychosocial disorders using rodent models, and exploring novel treatment options – such as neuromodulation and psychedelics – to restore behavioral function. He is also interested in optimizing digital tools and wearable technologies to detect and track psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety, OCD, and PTSD.
    • Jada McMahon is a current psychiatry intern at Yale. She was born in Coney Island, NY and attended undergraduate and medical school in upstate New York. She currently serves on the Psychiatry Residents' Association as the PGY-1 representative on the Graduate Medical Education Committee (GMEC) and the co-PGY-1 representative on the Graduate Educational Committee (GEC). Jada is passionate about criminal-legal system reform, reproductive justice, and other forms of legislative advocacy particularly as it pertains to BIPOC youth.
    • Alyssa Nielsen is a first-year psychiatry resident at Yale. She grew up in Pensacola, FL and attended Tulane University where she studied neuroscience and dance. As a part of a 7-year combined B.S.-M.D. program, she transferred to the University of Florida. In medical school, Alyssa was elected to serve as a student representative on the curriculum committee and was heavily involved with a free, student-run clinic network (Equal Access Clinic Network). She directed a weekly primary care site specializing in gender affirming therapy and established a monthly psychiatry clinic. At Yale, Alyssa serves on the Psychiatry Residents' Association as a member of the Medical Student Education Committee. She is passionate about community psychiatry, medical education, and investigating patients' and caregivers' perspectives of mental health care.
    • Abiba Salahou is a resident physician in the Department of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine. She is currently a 2024-2025 APA SAMHSA Minority Fellow and a member of the national Gold Humanism Honor Society. Her clinical interests include childhood trauma, racial socialization, race-based trauma (RBT), acculturation stress, and immigrant mental health. She has a strong interest in narrative medicine and served as a 2022-2023 Doximity Op-Med Writing Fellow. She is also interested in medical education and serves as a mentor to premedical and medical students. She is passionate about community organizing, antiracism, restorative social justice work, and de-stigmatizing mental illness. She has presented her work at national conferences including the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP). She plans to serve diverse communities as a Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist. Abiba is currently enrolled in the Yale Young Physicians' Leadership Curriculum, is a mentor in the Yale Post Graduate Association MAP program, and is actively involved in the Yale Psychiatry Residents' Association (PRA) through leadership roles on the Social and Orientation Committees.
  • Second Year Residents (PGY-2)

    • As an undergraduate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, I majored in Chemistry and minored in Biology and Political Science. At MIT, I worked in Ed Boyden’s lab and used optogenetics approaches to silence epileptic seizures. I then joined the MD/PhD program at NYU, completing my thesis in Gord Fishell’s lab using single-cell genomics and lineage tracing approaches to study cortical interneuron development. Going forward, I hope to apply basic neuroscience research tools to better understand and treat neuropsychiatric illnesses. I am particularly interested in disorders with a developmental origin, including autism and schizophrenia. I am very excited to join the NRTP at Yale for residency, where I plan to continue my research on fetal brain development.
    • Howdy! I was born in Houston, TX to two immigrant parents from El Salvador. My senior year of high school I enlisted in the United States Marine Corps and two weeks after my eighteenth birthday I stepped on the yellow footprints to begin recruit training in San Diego. At the time I wanted to get away from my community because of the drugs, gangs, and ultimately following a visceral feeling telling me that there was something bigger out there for me. I was deployed twice in my four-year active-duty enlistment, including a combat deployment to Afghanistan. Within the same year of my return from Afghanistan I started my academic career at the University of Southern California (Fight On!) where I majored in Psychology and minored in Health Care studies. While there I was part of the Culture and Mental Health Research Lab at USC involved in multiple projects surrounding schizophrenia and its impact on Mexican-American families. I traded my shades and the view of palm trees for flannels and sunsets provided by Lake Champlain in Burlington, where I started medical school at the University of Vermont. My proudest accomplishment in medical school aside from being inducted into the Gold Humanism Honor Society and going to the Dominican Republic for a global health elective was being the founder and co-president of the Latino Medical Student Association (LMSA) chapter. As the first doctor in my family, I do hope to one day return to a community similar to the one that raised me and one I was running away from at the age of eighteen. In the meantime, I will continue to enjoy anything related to sports, music concerts nearby, and improve on the art of maintaining my plants alive.
    • Daniel (Dan) F. Camacho, MD, PhD, is a Yale Psychiatry resident in the Neuroscience Research Training Program. He attended the University of Michigan, where he received a BS in Chemistry, with distinction, and an MS in Biomedical Engineering. He earned his MD and PhD degrees from the University of Chicago’s Medical Scientist Training Program with a specialization in immunology.  Dan’s professional interests include patient care, research, science communication, and science outreach. His previous research has advanced our understanding of how allergic responses are triggered and how communication between cells of the body can allow cancer cells to grow unchecked. His current research aims to help us understand how interactions between immune cells and the nervous system contribute to mental health and psychiatric illness.
    • Joe Luchsinger, MD, PhD, is a resident in Yale’s Neuroscience Research Training Program. He completed a BS in neuroscience and psychology and BA in physics at Baldwin Wallace University. During that time, he worked in the Mickley lab studying PTSD and unofficially broke the world record for the world’s longest handshake.  Joe then moved to Vanderbilt University for his MD-PhD. While there, he was the president of his medical school class and the medical school wine club. Towards the end of medical school, his peers elected him into the honor society Alpha Omega Alpha. He also spent much time on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, and locally advocating for increased federal investment in biomedical research.  He completed his PhD in the Winder, where he had an NIH fellowship to use preclinical models to study the neurobiology of stress and its relationship to addiction. He aims to continue to use preclinical models to better our understanding of psychiatric illness and improve its treatment.
    • I am a Psychiatry Resident at Yale University, with clinical experiences in Brazil and the U.S. After medical school, I completed a postdoctoral research fellowship at the Stanford University Center for Clinical Research, where I studied shared decision-making and disparities. There, I was awarded for achievements in clinical trial equity, diversity, and inclusion. Now at Yale, my interests lie at the intersection of addiction psychiatry and chronic pain. I am a part of the Pain and Addiction Interaction Neurosciences (PAIN) Laboratory, where we research pharmacological treatments for patients with chronic pain and substance use disorders. I am particularly interested in how health-care disparities affect pain management for persons living with addiction disorders. For my work, I received awards from the National Institute on Drug and Alcohol and the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry. Most recently, I was selected for the Leadership Fellowship of the American Psychiatric Association Foundation. I have an additional passion for medical education and mentoring, and I was awarded the departmental Resident Teaching Award in 2023. Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=HmVy8lwAAAAJ&hl=en
  • Third Year Residents (PGY-3)

    • I am a physician-economist interested in the neurobiological underpinnings (“neuro-microfoundations”) of economic and health inequality.  My PhD dissertation, guided by David Cutler, Nathan Nunn and David Laibson, examined the impact of post-discharge surgical prescribing on long-term opioid use through an instrumental variables technique.  I have served on faculty of Harvard Medical School, Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, and the Harvard Department of Economics, where I teach The Economics of Development and Global Health. Clinically, I am interested in severe mood disorders and suicidality, as well as in traumatic and psychotic pathologies and their links to chronic homelessness. I completed an intern year in General Surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital before moving to Psychiatry Residency.  My work has been published in the Journal of Economic Literature, the New England Journal of Medicine, and the Journal of Orthopedic Trauma. I previously served as a Consultant to the President of the World Bank under Jim Kim, as a Fulbright fellow in Malawi, and a co-editor of the textbook “Reimagining Global Health” (University of California Press, 2013) with Paul Farmer, Jim Kim and Arthur Kleinman.
    • Shivani Bhatt is an MD-PhD candidate investigating the neural stress and immune systems in Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) using Positron Emission Tomography in the laboratory of Dr. Kelly Cosgrove. Shivani's research projects reflect her clinical interests in stress-related psychiatric disorders including PTSD and addiction, and their intersections with chronic medical illness in the primary care setting. Both have been informed by her experience working as a student provider with underserved populations in Wednesday Evening Clinic, HAVEN Free Clinic, and Yale Refugee Clinic for 3 years. Additionally, Shivani has been involved in shaping medical school curriculum around early professional identification, structural determinants of health, and mental health and burnout in medicine, and is part of current leadership efforts in the Yale MD-PhD Program's Committee on Diversity and Inclusion.Fun Fact: Shivani is a singer in an MD and MD-PhD student Jazz Band, the Railboys.
    • For the past fifteen years, I have worked as a pediatrician, researcher, educator, and public health practitioner focused on designing, delivering & evaluating interventions to improve outcomes for children and families affected by HIV in Malawi. I am the Co-Founding Director of Tingathe (meaning "together we can" in the local Chichewa language), a program which has been supporting HIV and psychosocial programming and implementation research at >120 health facilities in Malawi. In this role, I secured funding for and managed a portfolio of clinical and research programming (KO1, RO1), as well as a research fellowship program that sought to support and develop young scientists in Malawi. I led some of the first studies in Malawi examining adolescent depression, healthcare worker burnout, intimate partner violence, adverse childhood events, and the impact of a tele-mental health support program. I also served for the past six years as the Research and Implementation Director for the USAID funded Technical Support program, which sought to apply best practices and lessons learned from our programming in Malawi to improve policy and HIV care and treatment implementation in nine other Sub-Saharan African countries. Now, with further clinical and research training in psychiatry, I hope to build on this foundation to explore novel interventions in psychiatry and further promote access to critical mental health services in resource limited settings around the globe.
    • Dr. Yang Jae Lee graduated Phi Beta Kappa and Magna Cum Laude double majoring in International Area Studies: Development and Biology from Washington University in St. Louis. In 2015, he developed a deep interest in the Busoga region of Uganda, where he conducted a research project on traditional medicines. Concurrently, he authored a journalism project for which he was awarded the Mark of Excellence Award from the Society of Professional Journalists for producing the best journalism nationally among students in his category. He continued engaging with the Busoga region, initiating several collaborative projects with academicians, local government, and community members on various public health interventions and development initiatives. In 2018, he founded the 501(c)3 organization Empower Through Health, where he serves as the Executive Director and Chairperson. Empower Through Health is a non-profit organization that provides medical care to a catchment area of 70,000 people and psychiatric care to a catchment area of over 400,000 people. Alongside their medical and research endeavors, they created equitable educational opportunities for both Ugandan and American pre-doctoral students, while also aspiring to establish a leading global mental health hub. Since arriving at Yale, he has concentrated on two primary research objectives: diminishing the stigma associated with mental illness; and, cultivating robust systems of care through working with existing community structures to provide effective mental healthcare in rural areas of low-income countries. Through addressing these crucial issues, he aims to make a meaningful contribution towards enhancing the overall well-being of marginalized communities.
    • Marcos Antonio Moreno, MD, was born and raised in a small community in southern Arizona known as the Pascua Yaqui Reservation and is an enrolled member of the Pascua Yaqui Tribe. He received his Bachelor of Science degrees from Cornell University where he studied Neuroscience and Human Development and earned his Doctor of Medicine degree from UND- School of Medicine & Health Sciences​. Dr. Moreno has published work in academic journals on a variety of topics including substance abuse, social media addiction, neuropsychiatry, Covid-19 health policy, and environmental health policy. He has an interest in public health and medicine for underserved populations and has been involved in medical mission trips to Africa and Latin America with the Global Medical Brigades and has assisted in health needs assessments and health quality improvement projects for Native American communities. He currently serves a board member for the University of Arizona’s Wassaja Moctezuma Center for Native American Health where he and others work to assist in improving community healthcare, policy, education and wellness programs for Native Americans. Dr. Moreno has written extensively about the challenges faced by Native American communities, including a chapter for the United Nations-sponsored book Global Indigenous Youth and another chapter on modern day Indigenous disparities titled “Bridging the Gap” in the book American Indian Health Disparities in the 21st Century. His work has been recognized with several awards including the National Udall Healthcare Award, Cornell’s Henry Ricciuti Award, and the Solomon Cook Award for Engaged Research and Scholarship. During his time at Yale, he has been selected as recipient of several national fellowships including the Ginsburg Fellowship through the Group for Advancement of Psychiatry, the Climate & Health Equity Fellowship through the Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health, and the American Psychiatric Association Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Fellowship.
    • Max Rolison, MD is a clinical fellow in the Albert J. Solnit Integrated Child, Adolescent, and Adult Psychiatry program. He received his B.S. with distinction in Psychology (Neuroscience) from Yale University and his M.D. Cum Laude from Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Rolison previously worked as a Sara S. Sparrow Fellow in Clinical Neuroscience in the McPartland Lab and Developmental Disabilities Clinic at the Yale Child Study Center. Since a young age, he has been interested in the care of children and teens with autism spectrum disorder. He has worked for many years with children with autism and other neurodevelopment disorders and their families. Dr. Rolison's research has focused on understanding the neurobiological bases of autism spectrum disorder through electroencephalogram, eye-tracking, and functional magnetic resonance imaging. He aims to apply our knowledge of biomarkers in autism to develop better treatments and best individualize treatment interventions.
  • Fourth Year Residents (PGY-4)

    • Solnit Integrated Child, Adolescent, and Adult Psychiatry Program (2020-2026)After growing up in Ann Arbor, MI, I attended college at Yale and haven’t left since, although I’m still a Midwesterner at heart! My broad research interest is in applying experimental and computational genomics approaches to better understand the etiologies of early-onset neuropsychiatric disorders. I currently am in clinical training as a combined adult and child psychiatry resident at the Yale Child Study Center. I also work in the lab of Dr. Tom Fernandez to identify genes and rare genetic variants that contribute to OCD and Tourette’s. Outside of medicine, I enjoy running, playing touch rugby, and working on art/film projects.
    • My work focuses on translational neuro-PET imaging of PTSD in to further understand the pathophysiology and effects of trauma on the epigenetic enzymes within the brain and neuroimmune system.
    • As a clinician scientist with a strong interest in Psychiatry and Neurology, I perform basic and translational research to elucidate immunologic mechanisms of diseases at the intersection of these two fields.  My research prior to and during medical school investigated imaging biomarkers in traumatic brain injury and schizophrenia. Upon graduating Harvard Medical School with Honors in Research, I completed a Neurology residency at Yale Medical School and board certification in Neurology. During this time, I was awarded an NIH R25 Development Award to study transcriptional profiles at the single cell level in autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system (CNS). In the hopes of developing strategies to treat the many psychiatric and neurologic manifestations of immune-mediated diseases such as multiple sclerosis and autoimmune encephalitis, in 2021, I joined the Neuroscience Research Training Program (NRTP) of the Psychiatry Residency Program and the Neuroimmunology Fellowship Program at Yale School of Medicine. I look forward to providing excellent integrated clinical care and to building a translational research program that will elucidate immunologic mechanisms as well as develop targeted CNS therapeutics.
    • My interest in neuroscience and understanding the neurobiology of psychiatric diseases began when I worked the University of Pennsylvania for several years prior to medical school. I worked in a translational neuroscience laboratory using cell lines derived from patients with psychiatric disorders to identify disease- and treatment-specific molecular changes in glucocorticoid signaling pathways. During this time, I became particularly interested in MDD and in understanding the heterogeneous symptomatology of this disorder. As an MD-PhD candidate, my dissertation research focused on effects of GABAergic neurotransmission and subsets of GABAergic neurons on anxiety- and depression-related phenotypes using rodent models. I also studied the role of GABAergic transmission in ketamine’s rapid antidepressant effects. Upon entering the NRTP at Yale, I became interested in the neurobiological mechanisms of psychedelics and their use as potential therapeutics for depressive disorders. I’ve been fortunate to benefit from the input of several mentors including Alex Kwan, Marina Picciotto and Al Kaye. My current work focuses on structural plasticity in the mouse frontal cortex with psychedelic compounds. I’m generally interested in the effects of psychedelics on circuits and brain regions important for depressive disorder and what drives the timescale of their clinical effects. Clinically, I am interested in interventional psychiatry and mood disorders. In my free time, I enjoy biking, rock climbing, playing touch rugby, and spoiling my two cats.
    • As a predoctoral candidate, my dissertation research focused on the functional neural circuitry underlying dual-diagnosis substance use disorders (SUD) with other psychiatric disorders – primarily depression and PTSD. I used resting-state and task fMRI to identify altered functional connectivity in the brains of individuals with dual-diagnoses compared to individuals with either disorder type alone. Elaborating on those findings, I studied the relationship between childhood trauma and the uniquely altered functional connectivity in individuals with dual-diagnoses. I then used machine learning to classify the resting-state fMRI of individuals with psychiatric disorders vs. individuals without psychopathology.I am currently working with Ben Kelmendi, MD to study the neurobiology underlying the therapeutic effect of psilocybin on OCD by applying my skill set in neuroimaging and machine learning to brain scans pre and post psilocybin administration. I plan to apply similar techniques to study the potential therapeutic effect of psychedelics on substance use disorders (SUD). Clinically I am interested in addiction and community psychiatry, and working to develop community-based models for the prevention and maintenance of SUD. In pursuit of this goal, I am additionally studying how psychedelics can be developed in an equitable manner, so that as they become available to the general public, they will be accessible and affordable for all people. I am involved in both science and mental health advocacy and have experience advocating at both the local and national level through organizations like the National Alliance on Mental Illness, and the Society for Neuroscience. In my free time I like to paint, hike, kayak, cook, and read/ watch all things sci-fi.
    • Michael McClurkin, MD, MPP is a PGY-4 resident in the Neuroscience Research Training Program at Yale School of Medicine, a commissioned officer in the US Army Reserve, and a graduate student in the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Pennsylvania. He earned his medical degree from Harvard Medical School and was a Zuckerman Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School.
    • Dr. Sondalle is a Solnit Integrated Fellow in Child, Adolescent, and Adult Psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine. He grew up in rural Wisconsin. As a first-generation college graduate, he majored in both Biology and Chemistry at Ripon College in Wisconsin. He participated in summer research as an undergraduate in the Chemistry department at UW-Madison and at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. Dr. Sondalle completed his M.D. and Ph.D. training in the Medical Scientist Training Program at the Yale University School of Medicine. His Ph.D. research in Genetics investigated the biological process of making ribosomes, the cellular machines responsible for protein production, and how defects in this process cause human disease. As a resident and fellow, Dr. Sondalle has diverse interests, including psychoanalysis, the treatment of trauma, and the interplay between inflammation and psychiatric illness.
    • By the mid-20th century, physicians and scientists were discovering antimetabolites and chemotherapeutics to augment the surgeries which had become a mainstay in cancer treatment. The approach to oncologic disease grew in its comprehensiveness—identifying environmental and genetic risk factors, developing screening measures, improving histological and surgical techniques, combining radiation therapy. We continue to improve our approach in fighting cancer; I’m lucky to find myself at a point in time when we know that psychiatric treatment is a valuable tool in improving both quality of life and survival. That’s what drew me to psychiatry. I’ve been looking for ways to improve the lives of those struggling with cancer, and any other serious medical illness, by targeting the inherent, accompanying disconnectedness—a construct that plays out in most ailments mental, physical, environmental, or spiritual.And then, I joined the field of psychiatry and the magnitude and pervasiveness of suicidality in humankind appealed to that desire to target disconnectedness. Suicidality marks a penultimate stage in disconnectedness. Suicide is an alarming epidemic, and we desperately need to improve our approach. I have hope that we will, and I’m lucky to find myself at a point in time when we have started to accept and explore the potential of psychedelic treatments; I’m equally lucky to find myself with incredible support at an institution where many wonderful people have been critically thinking about healing in these areas. Our research aims at constructs contributing to suicidality and a possible application of psychedelic therapies—I am currently conceptualizing a role for MDMA within the stress-diathesis model of suicide with Ben Kelmendi. I’ll be additionally exploring ways to honor and translate a history of humans and psychedelics in a contemporary-digestible medium with NRTP co-resident, Brad Martins.
  • Child and Adult Integrated Residents

    • Solnit Integrated Child, Adolescent, and Adult Psychiatry Program (2020-2026)After growing up in Ann Arbor, MI, I attended college at Yale and haven’t left since, although I’m still a Midwesterner at heart! My broad research interest is in applying experimental and computational genomics approaches to better understand the etiologies of early-onset neuropsychiatric disorders. I currently am in clinical training as a combined adult and child psychiatry resident at the Yale Child Study Center. I also work in the lab of Dr. Tom Fernandez to identify genes and rare genetic variants that contribute to OCD and Tourette’s. Outside of medicine, I enjoy running, playing touch rugby, and working on art/film projects.
    • Amanda Joy Calhoun, MD, MPH is Chief Resident of the Yale Albert J. Solnit Integrated Adult/Child Psychiatry program. She received her BA in Spanish from Yale University and her MD and MPH from Saint Louis University. Amanda J. Calhoun is currently a Viola W. Bernard Social Justice and Health Equity Fellow, a Diversity Equity and Inclusion Emerging Leaders Fellow with American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and an American Medical Association and Satcher Health Leadership Institute Medical Justice in Advocacy Fellow. Dr. Calhoun has authored over 30 publications, 19 of which she is has first-authored, and has presented abstracts and oral presentations in numerous conferences. Her research focuses on the mental health sequelae of anti-Black racism in children and has been funded by the Yale Child Study Center Pilot Research Award and is the recipient of prestigious National Institute of Health Loan Repayment Program award. Dr. Calhoun also specializes in the effects of medical anti-Black racism. She writes for the general press and has published over 20 op-eds in the past 2 years, including, but not limited to, Boston Globe, TIME magazine, Washington Post, and HuffPost. She has been interviewed on countless radio shows and TV platforms, including CBS News, PBS Newshour, and MSNBC, discussing how racism affects the health of Black Americans and most importantly, what we can do about it.
    • Max Rolison, MD is a clinical fellow in the Albert J. Solnit Integrated Child, Adolescent, and Adult Psychiatry program. He received his B.S. with distinction in Psychology (Neuroscience) from Yale University and his M.D. Cum Laude from Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Rolison previously worked as a Sara S. Sparrow Fellow in Clinical Neuroscience in the McPartland Lab and Developmental Disabilities Clinic at the Yale Child Study Center. Since a young age, he has been interested in the care of children and teens with autism spectrum disorder. He has worked for many years with children with autism and other neurodevelopment disorders and their families. Dr. Rolison's research has focused on understanding the neurobiological bases of autism spectrum disorder through electroencephalogram, eye-tracking, and functional magnetic resonance imaging. He aims to apply our knowledge of biomarkers in autism to develop better treatments and best individualize treatment interventions.
    • Andrew Sheldon received his undergraduate training at the University of California Berkley with a concentration in Physics before attending the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health for his M.D. PhD where he applied computational methods and modeling to neuroimaging data to better understand the interactions between attention and working memory. After completing this work in 2019, he was accepted into the Solnit integrated research track combined residency and fellowship in adult and child psychiatry, where he currently works in the Al Powers lab using computational modeling approaches to understand the neural mechanisms underlying hallucinations, in addition to his clinical psychiatry duties caring for children and adolescents through the Yale Child Study Center and Yale New Haven Children's hospital.
    • Dr. Sondalle is a Solnit Integrated Fellow in Child, Adolescent, and Adult Psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine. He grew up in rural Wisconsin. As a first-generation college graduate, he majored in both Biology and Chemistry at Ripon College in Wisconsin. He participated in summer research as an undergraduate in the Chemistry department at UW-Madison and at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. Dr. Sondalle completed his M.D. and Ph.D. training in the Medical Scientist Training Program at the Yale University School of Medicine. His Ph.D. research in Genetics investigated the biological process of making ribosomes, the cellular machines responsible for protein production, and how defects in this process cause human disease. As a resident and fellow, Dr. Sondalle has diverse interests, including psychoanalysis, the treatment of trauma, and the interplay between inflammation and psychiatric illness.