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INFORMATION FOR

David S. Russell, MD, PhD

Senior Director, Clinical Research, Translational Research; Director, Clinical Research, Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders; Assistant Clinical Professor

Contact Information

David S. Russell, MD, PhD

Mailing Address

  • Psychiatry

    Temple Medical Center, 60 Temple St., Suite 8B

    New Haven, CT 06510

    United States

Research Summary

Dr. Russell is a neurologist with training and extensive experience in movement disorders, dementias, and other neurodegenerative disorders. He also has a background in molecular biology and ran the Yale Movement Disorders Consultation Clinic prior to devoting his practice entirely to clinical research, where he feels his skills are best suited to combat these afflictions.

Coauthors

Research Interests

Alzheimer Disease; Huntington Disease; Movement Disorders; Parkinson Disease; Neurodegenerative Diseases

Selected Publications

  • Brain target occupancy of LY3372689, an inhibitor of the O‐GlcNAcase (OGA) enzyme, following administration of single and multiple doses to healthy volunteersKielbasa W, Shcherbinin S, Goldsmith P, Phipps K, Biglan K, Mancini M, Russell D, Constantinescu C, Gunn R, Nuthall H, Mergott D, Lowe S, Collins E. Brain target occupancy of LY3372689, an inhibitor of the O‐GlcNAcase (OGA) enzyme, following administration of single and multiple doses to healthy volunteers Alzheimer's & Dementia 2021, 17 DOI: 10.1002/alz.057774.
  • Brain target occupancy of LY3372689, an inhibitor of the O‐GlcNAcase (OGA) enzyme: Translation from rat to humanShcherbinin S, Kielbasa W, Dubois S, Lowe S, Phipps K, Tseng J, Kevin D, Natanegara F, Warner S, Dreyfus N, Lindsay‐Scott P, Hawk M, McDonald N, Zhang X, Gilmore J, Biglan K, Mergott D, Russell D, Gunn R, Constantinescu C, Nuthall H, Collins E. Brain target occupancy of LY3372689, an inhibitor of the O‐GlcNAcase (OGA) enzyme: Translation from rat to human Alzheimer's & Dementia 2020, 16 DOI: 10.1002/alz.040558.
  • Perfusion-Phase 18 F-PI-2620 Tau-PET Imaging as a Surrogate Marker of Neuronal InjuryBeyer L, Nitschmann A, Barthel H, van Eimeren T, Unterrainer M, Sauerbeck J, Song M, Schroeter M, Russell D, Stephens A, Herms J, Levin J, Classen J, H?glinger G, Bartenstein P, Villemagne V, Drzezga A, Seibyl J, Sabri O, Brendel M. Perfusion-Phase 18 F-PI-2620 Tau-PET Imaging as a Surrogate Marker of Neuronal Injury Nuklearmedizin - NuclearMedicine 2020, 59: 166. DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1708352.
  • Binding characteristics of 18 F-PI-2620 differentiate the clinically predicted tau isoform in suspected 3/4-repeat and 4-repeat tauopathiesSong M, Barthel H, van Eimeren T, Marek K, Beyer L, Sauerbeck J, Barbe M, Schroeter M, Russell D, Stephens A, Herms J, Levin J, Classen J, H?glinger G, Bartenstein P, Villemagne V, Drzezga A, Seibyl J, Sabri O, Brendel M. Binding characteristics of 18 F-PI-2620 differentiate the clinically predicted tau isoform in suspected 3/4-repeat and 4-repeat tauopathies Nuklearmedizin - NuclearMedicine 2020, 59: 106. DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1708171.
  • 18 F-PI2620 Tau-PET in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy ? A Multi-Center EvaluationBrendel M, Barthel H, van Eimeren T, Marek K, Beyer L, Song M, Sauerbeck J, Barbe M, Schroeter M, Russell D, Stephens A, Herms J, Levin J, Classen J, H?glinger G, Bartenstein P, Villemagne V, Drzezga A, Seibyl J, Sabri O. 18 F-PI2620 Tau-PET in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy ? A Multi-Center Evaluation Nuklearmedizin - NuclearMedicine 2020, 59: 89. DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1708120.
  • T156. IN VIVO CHARACTERIZATION OF THE FIRST AGONIST DOPAMINE D1 RECEPTORS PET IMAGING TRACER [18F]MNI-968 IN HUMANTamagnan G, Barret O, Alagille D, Carroll V, Madonia J, Constantinescu C, SanDiego C, Papin C, Morley T, Russell D, McCarthy T, Zhang L, Gray D, Villalobos A, Lee C, Chen J, Seibyl J, Marek K. T156. IN VIVO CHARACTERIZATION OF THE FIRST AGONIST DOPAMINE D1 RECEPTORS PET IMAGING TRACER [18F]MNI-968 IN HUMAN Schizophrenia Bulletin 2018, 44: s176-s176. PMCID: PMC5888516, DOI: 10.1093/schbul/sby016.432.
  • O4‐07‐06: Approaches to quantitative analysis of the PET tau radiotracer [18F]AV1451Seibyl J, Barret O, Alagille D, Jennings D, Russell D, Marek K, Tamagnan G. O4‐07‐06: Approaches to quantitative analysis of the PET tau radiotracer [18F]AV1451 Alzheimer's & Dementia 2015, 11: p285-p285. DOI: 10.1016/j.jalz.2015.07.386.
  • Molecular Imaging in Parkinson DiseasePfeiffer R, Wszolek Z, Ebadi M, Jennings D, Russell D, Marek K, Seibyl J. Molecular Imaging in Parkinson Disease 2012, 749-762. DOI: 10.1201/b12948-63.
  • IC‐P‐100: Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of florbetaben PET in adults with down syndromeJennings D, Sabbagh M, Pfefferer C, Fristch A, Russell D, Seibyl J, Marek K, Reininger C. IC‐P‐100: Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of florbetaben PET in adults with down syndrome Alzheimer's & Dementia 2011, 7: s49-s49. DOI: 10.1016/j.jalz.2011.05.065.
  • Corrigendum to “Voluntary exercise produces antidepressant and anxiolytic behavioral effects in mice” [Brain Res. 1199 (2008) 148–158]Duman C, Schlesinger L, Russell D, Duman R. Corrigendum to “Voluntary exercise produces antidepressant and anxiolytic behavioral effects in mice” [Brain Res. 1199 (2008) 148–158] Brain Research 2008, 1218: 313. DOI: 10.1016/j.brainres.2008.04.053.
  • Stress Vulnerability Induced by Neonatal Isolation and the Disturbance Between the Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation of CREBMorinobu S, Tsuji S, Takahashi M, Russell D, Takahashi J, Tanaka K, Fujimaki K, Yamawaki S, Endoh S, Endoh M. Stress Vulnerability Induced by Neonatal Isolation and the Disturbance Between the Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation of CREB 2006, 37-45. DOI: 10.1007/4-431-29567-4_4.
  • Antisense Oligonucleotides: New Tools for the Study of Brain FunctionRussell D, Widnell K, Nestler E. Antisense Oligonucleotides: New Tools for the Study of Brain Function The Neuroscientist 1996, 2: 79-82. DOI: 10.1177/107385849600200207.