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INFORMATION FOR

Reconsidering Family Engagement and Parent Leadership (Anne Henderson, Parent Leaders)

August 31, 2020
  • 00:00Hey everybody, welcome back.
  • 00:02I hope everyone got a chance
  • 00:05to take a little break.
  • 00:07Maybe grab and snack and I want
  • 00:10to thank everyone for joining
  • 00:12and thank all of our panelists
  • 00:15in today's last session of the
  • 00:17day is on family engagement and
  • 00:20specifically parent leadership,
  • 00:21which is a direction that are we,
  • 00:24presenter Anne Henderson has spent a
  • 00:26lot of time thinking about recently.
  • 00:29Family engagement as all of you.
  • 00:31Have experienced from one side
  • 00:33or the other as as an educator
  • 00:36or as a parent yourself.
  • 00:38Family engagement has recently been
  • 00:40flipped on its head and we have
  • 00:43families at home trying to act in
  • 00:46the best of their abilities as
  • 00:48educators and we also this flipped
  • 00:51model works in both directions where
  • 00:53we have families also appreciating
  • 00:55in a new light the job that teachers
  • 00:58do and teachers appreciating what
  • 01:00an invaluable resource.
  • 01:02Families can be so,
  • 01:03so in this panel we're going to mainly
  • 01:06here from three parent leaders,
  • 01:08and we've got no one.
  • 01:10No one better to tell the story
  • 01:12of family engagement during this
  • 01:14time then parents themselves.
  • 01:16But we are also very pleased
  • 01:18to be joined by Ann Henderson.
  • 01:20Ann is one of the foremost leaders
  • 01:22in the field of family engagement.
  • 01:25She's been involved from the inception
  • 01:27of it as as a growing field,
  • 01:30but continues to lead the way in.
  • 01:32New research,
  • 01:33and to that extent we're very
  • 01:35pleased that she's working on
  • 01:37a book with doctor Karen.
  • 01:39Map for us compiling some of the
  • 01:42latest and greatest research on the
  • 01:44evidence behind the effectiveness
  • 01:46of family engagement.
  • 01:47So welcome and thank you very much.
  • 01:50I'm in specialty is the relationship
  • 01:52between families and schools,
  • 01:54especially families,
  • 01:55who are often marginalized because of
  • 01:57low income, race, language and culture.
  • 02:00And she's written many books, including.
  • 02:02Which many of you may know beyond the
  • 02:05big sale and and other publications.
  • 02:08She's also a co-founder of nasci,
  • 02:10the National Association for family,
  • 02:12school, and community engagement.
  • 02:14So thank you Anne Anne Anne for panelists.
  • 02:17We have you here.
  • 02:18I can't see yet,
  • 02:20so I'll help you go has joined
  • 02:23and there you are.
  • 02:24How you go have the pleasure to meet you.
  • 02:28Go doing some practice sessions and
  • 02:30she's a proud parent of a rising 7th.
  • 02:34Greater choose one of the founding
  • 02:36members of the West Hartford
  • 02:38parent community equity,
  • 02:39diversity and inclusion group and
  • 02:41works with various parent leaders,
  • 02:43community organizations,
  • 02:44and the school district in West Hartford.
  • 02:48She's a former high school teacher,
  • 02:50so she knows this from both sides
  • 02:52in the Boston area and spent more
  • 02:54than a decade advocating for public
  • 02:56school students and families,
  • 02:58particularly in the Asian American community,
  • 03:00and continues to advocate for racial
  • 03:02and educational equity as a parent.
  • 03:05Over the last two years you have
  • 03:07been honing her parent leadership
  • 03:09skills that participating in parent
  • 03:11leadership Training Institute PLT,
  • 03:13an University of Connecticut's people,
  • 03:15empowering people program.
  • 03:16Thank you usually look forward
  • 03:18to hearing
  • 03:19from you in the discussion and we
  • 03:22also have Janine McMahon hi Deneen,
  • 03:24nice to see you not behind the wheel of
  • 03:28your car on zoom that was frightening.
  • 03:32It's great to see you, Janine is also
  • 03:35the mother of two living in Hartford.
  • 03:38Ann is apparent leadership coordinator,
  • 03:40a graduate and facilitator of PLT.
  • 03:42I and you can pass the same programs
  • 03:45that Yukio is involved with.
  • 03:47She's also apparent consultant in
  • 03:50Connecticut's two Gen Advisory Board and a
  • 03:53co-founder of the two Gen Parent Academy.
  • 03:55In addition, Janine is a national parent
  • 03:58advisor for ascend at the Aspen Institute.
  • 04:01Postsecondary success for parents initiative,
  • 04:02and just one last bit from Janine's
  • 04:05bio is that she is a mentor and
  • 04:08has worked on the race,
  • 04:10equity and parent leadership manifesto for
  • 04:12the Center for the study of social policy.
  • 04:15So thank you very much for joining our panel,
  • 04:18Janine, with a lot to learn from you.
  • 04:22Leo, nice to see you.
  • 04:24I'm Leo is married and the
  • 04:26father of four boys,
  • 04:28ranging in age ranging in age from 3 to 13.
  • 04:32He was in Fairfield,
  • 04:33CA and loves to go on trips and he's very
  • 04:36involved in helping his local community
  • 04:39and the Hispanic community in particular.
  • 04:42So welcome Ann and our Pam list
  • 04:44and I'll send it over to him.
  • 04:48OK. Next slide.
  • 04:54So what we're going to do today is
  • 04:57we consider family engagement and
  • 04:59parent leadership which is upping
  • 05:02the game on family engagement.
  • 05:04To really think about parent voice
  • 05:08and working with parents as partners.
  • 05:11And our parent leaders are
  • 05:12going to tell you the story.
  • 05:14I'm just going to spend a
  • 05:16couple of minutes framing it.
  • 05:18Next slide.
  • 05:21You can see our panelists names
  • 05:23are here and there spelling next.
  • 05:28So we're going to interview them
  • 05:30about their experience with this
  • 05:32whole New World of remote learning,
  • 05:35where parents are being put in a
  • 05:38much more educational role than
  • 05:41they have been used to doing an R.
  • 05:44Needing to work with teachers
  • 05:46as real partners all of a sudden
  • 05:50with no training last March.
  • 05:52And we're going to discuss how parent
  • 05:55educators collaboration can make
  • 05:57everybody's job easier and will take
  • 06:00some time to answer your questions.
  • 06:02Please put your questions in
  • 06:05the Q and a box and we will.
  • 06:09Address them as they come up,
  • 06:11but also have some time at the end of
  • 06:14this panel for some more discussion
  • 06:16between the panelists and our audience.
  • 06:19Next
  • 06:22I've just finished working on a major
  • 06:25study of parent leadership initiatives.
  • 06:27This is an area that has not been
  • 06:31well studied, but it turns out
  • 06:34is pervasive across the country.
  • 06:36There are literally hundreds of initiatives.
  • 06:39Some of them are local,
  • 06:41some of them are state to develop
  • 06:44parents as leaders in their community
  • 06:46as partners as people with ideas as
  • 06:49problem solvers as advocates next.
  • 06:54So this book is the story about how people
  • 06:58who saw themselves as just apparent.
  • 07:01Became transformed into powerful leaders
  • 07:03and have made important major changes
  • 07:06in their families and communities,
  • 07:08and they define themselves as parent leaders
  • 07:12as people who take action who do things
  • 07:15and who mobilize others to solve problems.
  • 07:19People who become experts on their
  • 07:21families and their community and have
  • 07:24valuable information to share with public
  • 07:27officials and other community leaders.
  • 07:29And as we looked at what?
  • 07:32These parent leaders have accomplished.
  • 07:35It's really astonishing.
  • 07:37More funding for schools,
  • 07:39new community facilities,
  • 07:41community education programs,
  • 07:43expanded early childhood programs,
  • 07:45changes in policy's that were hindering
  • 07:50parents and children from advancing.
  • 07:53The list goes on,
  • 07:55but let's think about this in the
  • 07:58context of our current dilemma,
  • 08:01which is moving from.
  • 08:03A public education system where
  • 08:05children go to school everyday with
  • 08:08teachers and parents go to work to
  • 08:11one where parents may be working
  • 08:13remotely may have lost their jobs.
  • 08:16May be single parents.
  • 08:17Their children are at home,
  • 08:19teachers are trying to reach
  • 08:21them in various ways,
  • 08:23mostly using technology and we've
  • 08:25all been trying to figure out how
  • 08:28to make this work so our children
  • 08:31are learning what they need to
  • 08:33know or not falling behind.
  • 08:35And parents can somehow manage
  • 08:38this feat at home next.
  • 08:44My organization, the National Association
  • 08:47family school community engagement just
  • 08:50did a survey of families and teachers
  • 08:52and people who are hired in the education
  • 08:56system to work with families and what
  • 08:58they found is that there's just a
  • 09:01groundswell of support and appreciation
  • 09:04for family and community engagement.
  • 09:06But they feel the policies and practices are
  • 09:10not keeping pace with what needs to happen.
  • 09:14And all of this has revealed deep in
  • 09:18equities in our education system,
  • 09:21including families access to
  • 09:22technology and broadband,
  • 09:24and to devices that can access that
  • 09:28and be used at home.
  • 09:31So technology is a vital tool for
  • 09:33bridging these barriers and also for
  • 09:35bridging cultural and language barriers.
  • 09:37Just think of this pandemic had
  • 09:40happened 30 years ago and we had.
  • 09:42We just didn't have this technology at all.
  • 09:45Where would we be?
  • 09:48And community partners are playing
  • 09:50a vital role in providing resources
  • 09:52for engaging families.
  • 09:54So working with them as well as with
  • 09:57families in schools is vitalie important net.
  • 10:00Text.
  • 10:03So let's hear from our panel.
  • 10:06We're going to ask them about the
  • 10:09challenges they've experienced,
  • 10:10what they wish their schools and
  • 10:13districts do to support them,
  • 10:16and how parent leaders can help
  • 10:18schools cope with this crisis.
  • 10:21So you go.
  • 10:23As we think about moving forward
  • 10:25into a new school year,
  • 10:28we have to reflect on this abrupt
  • 10:30moves that we went into last spring,
  • 10:33and what we've learned from it.
  • 10:36What would you say are the
  • 10:38top challenges you and your
  • 10:41family experienced last spring?
  • 10:43Great
  • 10:44thank you everyone for joining us today.
  • 10:46Anan for listening to
  • 10:48parent voice as a part of.
  • 10:51Your professional development,
  • 10:52or just knowledge,
  • 10:54and so the two things for us.
  • 10:57We have an only child and
  • 10:59she's a middle schooler,
  • 11:01and the academics were OK,
  • 11:03but it was that social, emotional,
  • 11:06and like the social interaction
  • 11:08piece that that she felt a really
  • 11:11deep deep sense of loss for an
  • 11:13myself being Asian immigrant,
  • 11:16I am no role model for self
  • 11:19care and mental health.
  • 11:21And so for me,
  • 11:23as a parent trying to support
  • 11:25my daughter transition from,
  • 11:27you know,
  • 11:28being this lively environment
  • 11:30where she has these relationships
  • 11:32in the middle school setting
  • 11:34and new friendships to just
  • 11:36being at home by yourself,
  • 11:38you know, facing the computer,
  • 11:40that was kind of hard.
  • 11:42But thankfully,
  • 11:43as one of
  • 11:44her remotes classes
  • 11:46she had help.
  • 11:47So she was kind of forced
  • 11:50to talk about her own.
  • 11:52You know emotions and practice
  • 11:54mindfulness and different coping skills,
  • 11:56so I think that was really helpful that
  • 11:59she was a little bit forced to do that
  • 12:02because I know that I wasn't able to
  • 12:05fully tend to those aspects because
  • 12:08I really wasn't sure how to do it.
  • 12:11And also I was really appreciative of
  • 12:13the school being cognizant of the fact
  • 12:16that that this is emotionally draining
  • 12:18for our children and they did send age
  • 12:22appropriate information and resources for.
  • 12:24How to talk to your middle schooler about
  • 12:27their emotions or what they're going through,
  • 12:30and you know what kinds of things to
  • 12:33lookout for and how to keep them on a on
  • 12:37a physically and mentally healthy place.
  • 12:40So those were really great aspects of the
  • 12:43communication that came out of the school.
  • 12:46But even before school shut down
  • 12:48one of the other challenges that
  • 12:50were that was really on my mind was
  • 12:54the rise in Anti Asian racism.
  • 12:56Because of Kovid and.
  • 13:02In Connecticut, so we're from Connecticut.
  • 13:04In Connecticut, there's a cross
  • 13:06state why there's about 5% that
  • 13:08identify as Asian or Asian American,
  • 13:11and in our district there's
  • 13:13about 10% and we are.
  • 13:16In terms of demographics,
  • 13:17it goes white as the largest Hispanic.
  • 13:20Latino is the next Asian Asian American
  • 13:23and then black and African American in.
  • 13:25That's the order of,
  • 13:27like the number of students and
  • 13:29families that identify as such an,
  • 13:32even though we are in a district that has
  • 13:34a pretty large Asian American population.
  • 13:40I kept waiting for that
  • 13:42communication from the district.
  • 13:43You know, as they were.
  • 13:46Just canceling large scale events
  • 13:48and ultimately closing schools.
  • 13:49And I was just waiting for that like hey,
  • 13:53we see you, we acknowledge this
  • 13:55is a hard time for our community
  • 13:58members and we've got your back
  • 14:01and that didn't quite come out.
  • 14:04And so I was able to organize some
  • 14:07Asian American parents to meet with
  • 14:09district leadership and say how is the
  • 14:12district going to support our Asian
  • 14:15and Asian American educators students?
  • 14:17And families through the racial trauma
  • 14:20and job loss because many of our
  • 14:23parents are small business owners.
  • 14:26Anna lot of the Asian restaurants were
  • 14:29getting hit even before March and so
  • 14:33we were able to have that conversation.
  • 14:37But it was just so much more going on.
  • 14:42And it still continues to be one of
  • 14:44the things that we are, you know,
  • 14:46fighting for and advocating for, but.
  • 14:49But at least you know I had access
  • 14:51to the right people to be able to
  • 14:54start that conversation in getting
  • 14:56the ball rolling
  • 14:57on that. So you go, that's important example
  • 15:00of what parent leaders can do to call out
  • 15:04issues like that and raise awareness of
  • 15:06them with the schools in the district.
  • 15:09Because, as Michelle Obama said,
  • 15:10the other night, what when we go high?
  • 15:13That doesn't mean ignoring things like that.
  • 15:16It means calling them
  • 15:18out and doing something.
  • 15:20And so thank you for that, Leo.
  • 15:22Thank you. Tell us about your
  • 15:25challenges for boys at home.
  • 15:27I have two grandkids who are here and there.
  • 15:30Adorable but driving me nuts.
  • 15:32How have you managed 3 for children at home?
  • 15:36With remote learning,
  • 15:38what were your challenge is definitely.
  • 15:41Definitely and in appreciate the time right?
  • 15:45Everyone is here to here as his parents.
  • 15:50An yeah like you measure right there,
  • 15:53there's four. We have four boys,
  • 15:55three of them are in school at Little.
  • 15:58One is in a adult school program,
  • 16:00so it was kind of hard
  • 16:02to keep him up with pie.
  • 16:04So much attention that he needs to three
  • 16:07years old while the same time have to
  • 16:10having to manage with or or first grade
  • 16:13at that time because being a first
  • 16:15grader right requires also a lot of.
  • 16:19Hand holding being there constantly
  • 16:21with that with him and or later
  • 16:25what they have anything.
  • 16:28Nothing to do but just to come in
  • 16:30and I know he's been scrolling.
  • 16:32I mean, I'm there.
  • 16:35So that's what that that's one
  • 16:38of the challenges.
  • 16:40Other challenges where you know,
  • 16:42obviously tried to format schedule.
  • 16:47At that time there was not much structure
  • 16:51that that that was able to be share.
  • 16:54There was a. I learning experience.
  • 16:58Obviously technology was a was a challenge.
  • 17:03I had to be working.
  • 17:08But it's in time I had to be helping.
  • 17:11The kids and then my wife
  • 17:14to navigate through the.
  • 17:16Challenges of getting to
  • 17:18learn how to navigate.
  • 17:20In our case, Google Classroom
  • 17:21Google needs and and all those
  • 17:23tools that our district uses.
  • 17:28Yeah. Thank you and it must
  • 17:32have been very interesting.
  • 17:33Did that? Did the children sort
  • 17:35of help each other at all?
  • 17:39Yeah or? At that time world now 4th
  • 17:44grader and 2nd grader 4th grader helps
  • 17:48or second grader a lot reference to
  • 17:51help him navigate on how to utilize
  • 17:54the tools and then or 8th grader,
  • 17:57now is the oldest is the more tech savvy.
  • 18:01He I leveraged his knowledge and.
  • 18:06Interesting technology to go and help
  • 18:08out when I'm not really needed, right?
  • 18:11'cause obviously that takes away from
  • 18:13me to be doing other important things.
  • 18:16So yeah, I definitely did the delegates,
  • 18:19right? I learn to delegate who my kids.
  • 18:23It's something that I definitely want
  • 18:26to continue doing my Commission right
  • 18:29before I went to also empower them to
  • 18:32be able to solve some of the problems
  • 18:35to have that direct connection with
  • 18:38their teachers to make sure they are.
  • 18:41Uh, even the communication and
  • 18:44go into the expert, right?
  • 18:47Yeah.
  • 18:48My goodness and did you have enough?
  • 18:53Connectivity in your Wi-Fi for.
  • 18:56You know you and three kids
  • 18:58to all be on at the same time,
  • 19:01and enough devices that. How did
  • 19:04that work? Yeah, that's a challenge.
  • 19:07Or our Internet has range here at House.
  • 19:10I've been having some issues with
  • 19:13expanding the Internet so they all
  • 19:15can be spread out specially now
  • 19:18you know before it was more of A.
  • 19:22Not too much live interaction meetings,
  • 19:24but today they just started,
  • 19:26so it's been kind of a crazy
  • 19:28morning and all of them had to be
  • 19:31on meetings at the same time 'cause
  • 19:33we have my knees here helping her,
  • 19:35so that's four little ones.
  • 19:38That they are in their learning, so it.
  • 19:41But but we need that that space we need
  • 19:43their room so they can be spread out and nut.
  • 19:46It's doing feedback with each other, right?
  • 19:48When they're in the clouds and
  • 19:50obviously there something somewhere
  • 19:52to range or in, and it has.
  • 19:54The speed is fine. It's
  • 19:55the the range, etc. Yeah,
  • 19:57thank you Leo. Mean. What about you?
  • 20:01What were the challenges you faced?
  • 20:08Hi Good afternoon everyone
  • 20:09and thank you for having me be
  • 20:12apart of this important discussion.
  • 20:14One of my main challenges.
  • 20:16I have a 17 year old who was about
  • 20:19to finish high school and I have a 9
  • 20:22year old who is in the third one was
  • 20:26in the third grade and one of the
  • 20:29main challenges is just having two
  • 20:31kids in two totally different grades,
  • 20:33learning totally different things
  • 20:35and knowing how to support them.
  • 20:37Each that's the main one.
  • 20:39The second one was trying to learn
  • 20:42an navigate Google Classroom along
  • 20:44with the multiple other apps that
  • 20:46we had to tap into to complete
  • 20:49the course work on a daily basis.
  • 20:51I am pretty computer savvy for the
  • 20:54most part an I had difficulty,
  • 20:56so I oftentimes thought about
  • 20:58other parents and other families
  • 21:01that might not be as savvy with
  • 21:03the with technology who might have
  • 21:05had the same struggles over worse.
  • 21:08Because there's you know,
  • 21:09like they had no real experience,
  • 21:12experiences navigating Google
  • 21:14Classroom and these other apps so
  • 21:17that those were my main challenges
  • 21:19and my ultimate challenge was.
  • 21:22Router my router not having that
  • 21:25bandwidth to support everybody
  • 21:26working at home at the same time.
  • 21:28So I live in a three family house.
  • 21:31I'm on one floor.
  • 21:32My mom's on the other and then I
  • 21:35have a tenant downstairs so we
  • 21:37had my mom working from home.
  • 21:39My little brother who was about
  • 21:41to graduate Wesleyan University
  • 21:43working from home.
  • 21:44My son,
  • 21:44my daughter and myself all at the
  • 21:47same time and I would constantly
  • 21:49get kicked off of the Internet.
  • 21:51I may have been running.
  • 21:53Meeting zoom meetings with some of
  • 21:55my parent leaders or doing a panel
  • 21:58like this and I've got kicked off
  • 22:00at the same time my daughter is
  • 22:02working on some school work and is
  • 22:04needing that assistance and that
  • 22:06attention and I wasn't able to
  • 22:08provide exactly what she needed
  • 22:10at that given point in time.
  • 22:11I also did not have that connection with
  • 22:14the teacher that I hoped I would have.
  • 22:17I was able to email call every now and again,
  • 22:20but the teachers I think could
  • 22:22have connected a little bit more
  • 22:24with the children they did.
  • 22:26'cause I think every Tuesday and Thursday.
  • 22:28From 10:00 to 10:30.
  • 22:29So it was a half an hour for 20 something.
  • 22:33Kids to engage, you know, on a weekly basis.
  • 22:37So in total,
  • 22:38one hour a week for these children
  • 22:40to interact with their their peers,
  • 22:43an interact with their teachers.
  • 22:45And I didn't think that that was sufficient.
  • 22:48And just like Ukyo,
  • 22:49there was that social emotional aspect to it.
  • 22:52My daughter had many breakdowns.
  • 22:54She was talking to friends who had cousins,
  • 22:57who was also her friends,
  • 22:59and they were at each others houses.
  • 23:02She didn't have those luxuries.
  • 23:03She was at home by herself and
  • 23:06would oftentimes end up crying like
  • 23:08she would be crying hysterically
  • 23:10because she wasn't engaging and
  • 23:12interacting with her friends.
  • 23:14She's in cheerleading.
  • 23:15She was unable to connect with her
  • 23:17cheerleading team,
  • 23:18so she went through a lot.
  • 23:20It was. It was a lot.
  • 23:22It was difficult.
  • 23:24And I think of myself as as us as a.
  • 23:27You know, like middle income family
  • 23:29with access to a lot of different things.
  • 23:33And we struggled through that that process,
  • 23:35so I only could imagine what other
  • 23:38families went through as well,
  • 23:39yeah? So what do you wish that schools
  • 23:43would do to improve the way they're
  • 23:48working as partners with parents?
  • 23:51But I heard you say you wanted more time
  • 23:54to to be able to talk to the teacher
  • 23:57you wanted your your kids to have
  • 24:00more instruction time with teachers.
  • 24:02What else? One
  • 24:03of the things I would love schools to realize
  • 24:07is that parents are now assuming a new role.
  • 24:10This is unique to their parenting on a
  • 24:13regular basis and and we all say that
  • 24:16parents that the child's first teacher.
  • 24:18However they are not doing
  • 24:21this educational piece.
  • 24:22You know what I mean?
  • 24:24So like they're teaching them about how
  • 24:26to engage in community and other things,
  • 24:29they might assist them with homework,
  • 24:31but now they're stepping into
  • 24:33this role of being that Childs
  • 24:35instructor with no real training.
  • 24:38So I think one of the things
  • 24:40that schools could brainstorm or
  • 24:41think about is possibly doing the
  • 24:44professional development for students.
  • 24:46I mean, sorry for teachers and
  • 24:48parents simultaneously so that they
  • 24:50are learning from one another.
  • 24:52And then also providing some level
  • 24:54of training for parents so that
  • 24:57parents know how to really effectively
  • 24:59engage with their children at home.
  • 25:02Yeah, thank you Janine Leo.
  • 25:04What would have helped you?
  • 25:06What do you wish that your school had done?
  • 25:11I like a lot versioning said,
  • 25:15you know that that a resource.
  • 25:20And I think teachers and parents
  • 25:21and both have a value interest in
  • 25:24helping price the kiss which is
  • 25:26the stake holders of our schools?
  • 25:30Why not do the interactive
  • 25:33piece where we can develop each?
  • 25:36We can do that development
  • 25:39and see that communication.
  • 25:41Yeah indefinitely other.
  • 25:44They're separate resources that a
  • 25:47district could perhaps offer will be.
  • 25:50Uh. And I saw that I saw in the in
  • 25:55the during the spring up person and
  • 25:58enough they still doing it right,
  • 26:00but that person over a couple of
  • 26:03persons dedicated to the support
  • 26:04of making sure if the kids are not
  • 26:07attending there following up to that
  • 26:09the personal do either site visits
  • 26:11or or visits perior calling right to
  • 26:14make sure there's some type of follow
  • 26:17up to understand why is that kid pool enough?
  • 26:20Is it so for their support that is needed?
  • 26:24And again,
  • 26:25right could be that that's happening,
  • 26:27I just I know it was
  • 26:29happening during the screen.
  • 26:31Now that I visit part,
  • 26:32but it could be that site base it degraded.
  • 26:35I like the speech that was given
  • 26:38that very first power of this
  • 26:40where the person going to speech
  • 26:42nation the the time the teacher
  • 26:44should spend a little more about
  • 26:46building the relationships with.
  • 26:49With their families over oriented student,
  • 26:52yeah.
  • 26:54Ukiah, what about you? What do you wish?
  • 26:58With the schools would do more of.
  • 27:01Work partners with families. Yeah,
  • 27:04I think I think there should be a little
  • 27:07bit of a distinction made between what's
  • 27:11happening at the micro level, right?
  • 27:14Like your individual situation,
  • 27:16with an educator in your school building
  • 27:20versus what the district the macro
  • 27:23level is doing to engage families.
  • 27:27'cause I think for the most part
  • 27:30educators that your kids have access
  • 27:32to on a day to day basis are pretty
  • 27:35responsive or have been pretty good about.
  • 27:39You know. Checking in with kids,
  • 27:41checking in with families.
  • 27:43And again this probably varies,
  • 27:45but you know, for our school of 900
  • 27:48some middle schoolers I got a personal
  • 27:52call from the principle at one point
  • 27:55during when school was closed.
  • 27:57Into just know that that someone
  • 27:59was thinking about you in that way,
  • 28:02even though I did I,
  • 28:03I didn't necessarily call her
  • 28:05back to engage with her,
  • 28:07but just knowing that they knew you
  • 28:09existed was really, really helpful.
  • 28:11Ann. And this is all relational Ann,
  • 28:13and about trust,
  • 28:14and so just having her leave a
  • 28:16voicemail saying, hey, you know,
  • 28:18like thank you so much for doing something
  • 28:21something like right before school closed,
  • 28:23you know, like we're here.
  • 28:25If you need something.
  • 28:26It made me feel really seen.
  • 28:28Even though I am one of 900,
  • 28:32something right?
  • 28:34But?
  • 28:35That level, yeah,
  • 28:36in that you know in that level is very
  • 28:40different than right now here and now.
  • 28:43While schools are really,
  • 28:45the district is really making decisions
  • 28:49about policy and about how to go
  • 28:51back to school and how to reopen.
  • 28:54Or in Leo's case,
  • 28:56school has already started.
  • 28:57But these are huge policy pieces
  • 29:00about the day-to-day of our educators,
  • 29:03an our children and we.
  • 29:05As parent leaders and as community
  • 29:07members all working towards ensuring
  • 29:10that that all their kids have,
  • 29:12you know,
  • 29:13a safe environment and and
  • 29:15equitable access to education.
  • 29:17We need to be at that table to be
  • 29:19able to collaborate and share in the
  • 29:23power of making those vital decisions.
  • 29:26And so I think the micro level
  • 29:29for the most part.
  • 29:31Educators are trying the best that they
  • 29:34can to connect with families and students,
  • 29:38and I hope that this time has really
  • 29:42made the districts aware that they
  • 29:45cannot make these policy changes
  • 29:47indecisions without engaging fully an
  • 29:50authentically with all stakeholders
  • 29:52and that includes parents, students,
  • 29:55educators, community organisations.
  • 29:57Because we're all working together
  • 29:59to provide.
  • 30:00Access to basic needs to education so.
  • 30:07I think there's you know I.
  • 30:08I think there's more that at the
  • 30:10district level that leadership can do.
  • 30:14That's a really good point,
  • 30:15because the two levels are very different,
  • 30:18and they're not necessarily
  • 30:19working that closely together.
  • 30:21Anna lot of districts aren't. Prepared.
  • 30:24Haven't really even thought about how
  • 30:26to engage their community in a deeper
  • 30:29way other than just putting out the
  • 30:31usual PR stuff about the district.
  • 30:33So as we were saying at the very beginning,
  • 30:37this pandemic is revealed a lot of
  • 30:39deep in equities and problems in the
  • 30:42way schools relate and districts
  • 30:44relate to families that are revealed.
  • 30:46Or, you know, just laid bare for right now.
  • 30:50Now the last question I want to ask you.
  • 30:55Is how parent leaders can help.
  • 30:59People at the school level and at the
  • 31:01district level cope with this crisis.
  • 31:03What do they have to offer?
  • 31:05What can they do? So I'll start with you.
  • 31:08You go since we have you and then
  • 31:11I'll move onto Janine and Leo.
  • 31:13Great.
  • 31:16I
  • 31:16think parent leaders are everywhere, right?
  • 31:19It's not just in your traditional
  • 31:22environments that parent leaders exist
  • 31:24and we all have expertise and we all
  • 31:28have various networks to pull from.
  • 31:31And so I think.
  • 31:34Because education is so relational.
  • 31:38Relying on parent leaders to
  • 31:40help with that community building
  • 31:43in to do the outreach to those
  • 31:46people that the schools or the
  • 31:49district can't necessarily reach.
  • 31:51I think is 1 powerful way that we can be
  • 31:55that connection between families and schools.
  • 32:00And just, you know?
  • 32:04And I think because all three of us,
  • 32:08Leo, Janine and I have gone through
  • 32:10these parent leadership institutes.
  • 32:12We can also offer some of that
  • 32:16mentorship and some of the.
  • 32:18The connection to learning and advocacy,
  • 32:21and we can impart some of those
  • 32:24knowledges to to some parents that
  • 32:26don't necessarily have like the 20
  • 32:29weeks to invest in a program like that.
  • 32:32And so I think we we are everywhere
  • 32:36and we are ready to be activated and
  • 32:39we're excited to be able to help.
  • 32:42Our educators are district or families
  • 32:44so that our kids all our kids can
  • 32:48be really successful in whatever
  • 32:50educational environment there is.
  • 32:52Yeah,
  • 32:53and of course you are the experts on
  • 32:55what the situation is in your homes
  • 32:58and schools just often have no idea
  • 33:01they don't know their families well
  • 33:03enough to know who was a single mother.
  • 33:06Who is like Janine living in sort of
  • 33:09a multi generational household and has
  • 33:12you know a lot of people there who can
  • 33:16help but also people who have needs and
  • 33:19you know broadband users of their own.
  • 33:21So Janine what would you add
  • 33:24to what you go said about?
  • 33:27How parent leaders can help?
  • 33:29So schools need to be thinking of
  • 33:31parents not as just passive recipients
  • 33:34of information and people who
  • 33:36have all the time in the world to
  • 33:39just educate their kids at home to
  • 33:41understanding what the situation is
  • 33:43with families and to listen to families.
  • 33:46Ideas about what can help like the
  • 33:48best ways to communicate and so on.
  • 33:51So
  • 33:52I think parent leaders have this really
  • 33:55unique position where they understand
  • 33:58systems and policies and then they also
  • 34:02live like they walk the walk right
  • 34:04or walk the talk so they understand
  • 34:08what other families and communities
  • 34:10are experiencing and they're able to
  • 34:13talk to those systems and policies and
  • 34:16bring those experiences to the people
  • 34:19who can actually affect change, right?
  • 34:21But then as Ukyo said,
  • 34:23we can also use our experiences to help
  • 34:27those parents to learn how to frame
  • 34:29their story and how to tell their story
  • 34:32so that their stories are indeed effective.
  • 34:36So icy parent leaders as that bridge between
  • 34:39community and some of the powers that be.
  • 34:42But I think it's also understanding that
  • 34:45all parents are leaders in their own right,
  • 34:48so they might not have done
  • 34:51any formal leadership training.
  • 34:52But they are indeed leaders,
  • 34:54so honing in on that help we as
  • 34:57parent leaders could help them to
  • 35:00identify their strengths and then
  • 35:02they could give us the information
  • 35:04that we need that could help systems
  • 35:07and policies to understand some of
  • 35:10the changes that are necessary.
  • 35:12So I think that's how the partnership
  • 35:15between parent leaders and people of
  • 35:17authority can work and how we can help
  • 35:20to influence and improve the situation
  • 35:22that we're currently going through.
  • 35:25It's so unique we've never been.
  • 35:27We've never had this experience before.
  • 35:30We're all learning together,
  • 35:31so like that's for me that simultaneous
  • 35:34learning is is pivotal for us.
  • 35:37To ensure that the kids are
  • 35:39receiving exactly what they need,
  • 35:41the the families are receiving
  • 35:43the support that they need.
  • 35:45And I think it's also important for
  • 35:48us as leaders to help school officials
  • 35:51to understand and identify that where
  • 35:54we are embracing this unique role.
  • 35:56Teachers are also embracing this
  • 35:58unique role as well.
  • 35:59So,
  • 36:00as Yukio talked about the teachers on
  • 36:02the individuals on the micro level,
  • 36:04doing their due diligence to reach out
  • 36:06to parents, maybe another portion of it,
  • 36:09and it might be a daunting task on teachers.
  • 36:12I'm not sure,
  • 36:13but maybe what they can do is equip
  • 36:15themselves with some knowledge and
  • 36:17information of resources so that if
  • 36:20families open up to them they can
  • 36:22give them information on where they
  • 36:24can go to address some of the issues
  • 36:26and challenges that they are facing.
  • 36:28And that might actually help to
  • 36:30put them in a mind frame to better
  • 36:32help their children at home.
  • 36:34That's those are really good points.
  • 36:37Janine about the critical and pivotal
  • 36:40role the parent leaders can play
  • 36:42and connecting people in school and
  • 36:45district with other parents and
  • 36:47relaying their concerns and information.
  • 36:50Leo, I know you do a lot of work
  • 36:53with your Hispanic community in your
  • 36:55neck of the Woods in California.
  • 36:58What are some of the.
  • 37:01Unique issues that.
  • 37:02Families in your community or facing?
  • 37:06And how can parent leaders help schools?
  • 37:09Understand what that is
  • 37:11and be more responsive.
  • 37:20Yeah, great question. So
  • 37:23a lot of the challenges that I that I hear
  • 37:26and see it's obviously language barrier,
  • 37:29but at the same time this year
  • 37:31in the Hispanic community or
  • 37:34migrate community, right?
  • 37:35It's cool, it's cool if they still see
  • 37:38it as a government entity and their
  • 37:41stuff here right to be able to reach
  • 37:44out to the school district and not
  • 37:47understanding that it won't affect right?
  • 37:49There won't be judged for that one affect.
  • 37:53The IT won't matter there there
  • 37:55there if there's an issue with
  • 37:57the legal status or not.
  • 38:01And so this is something that
  • 38:03obviously we're current leader,
  • 38:05so I can help communicate and and
  • 38:08can help educate or parents and
  • 38:11share information that look at.
  • 38:14This is the kisses.
  • 38:16Are there stakeholder?
  • 38:17Serious that there's no issues with.
  • 38:21Or or there so close earned
  • 38:23at that you that you need
  • 38:25to have and there's No Fear,
  • 38:27you should feel right to be able to
  • 38:30reach out and speak up for children.
  • 38:35So that that's a little bit about
  • 38:38the the issues that I see here.
  • 38:40Obviously there's all
  • 38:42the things we let it too,
  • 38:44and I think I shared this with US.
  • 38:47Story of key just moved to US from Guatemala.
  • 38:51Get bumped from 3rd grade to 5th grade
  • 38:53and the parents were Dennis speak English.
  • 38:57They speak English because they just
  • 38:59move and I'm sure there's many stories
  • 39:02like that where the kids maybe.
  • 39:05Left out in situations like we are
  • 39:08today simply because there's there's no
  • 39:10knowledge of what needs to happen at.
  • 39:13Parents are working right to two
  • 39:15jobs or three jobs,
  • 39:17and they may be totally out
  • 39:20and their young siblings,
  • 39:21the one that may be in charge.
  • 39:27It said that that story
  • 39:30that that sticks out an.
  • 39:33Other things that that they may come
  • 39:36up in reference to. Challenges is.
  • 39:40Uh, probably child care resources, right?
  • 39:43One of the parents have to be there.
  • 39:48Spell childcare said to to
  • 39:50help out on the parents,
  • 39:52maintained a pairing that is in charge.
  • 39:54May not be the one that may have the.
  • 39:59At any call, knowledge or.
  • 40:00And a academic knowledge to be
  • 40:02able to help that the kid was the
  • 40:05language barrier couple that.
  • 40:08Yeah. So it's.
  • 40:12It's a big deal this whole thing,
  • 40:15and the complications arise.
  • 40:16I know in the special needs community
  • 40:18how to children with special needs.
  • 40:21Get that extra support that they need.
  • 40:24And I know parents with younger
  • 40:26children or telling me that their
  • 40:29kids need a lot more support from
  • 40:31their parents to do the work that
  • 40:34the school sends home for them to do.
  • 40:37To watch the YouTube videos to go on,
  • 40:39to connect to the classroom,
  • 40:41to do the worksheets or whatever
  • 40:43that have been sent home.
  • 40:45And yet when I talk to parents who have
  • 40:50older children you know those those
  • 40:52kids in high school and middle school,
  • 40:54you think?
  • 40:54Well, at least you know they
  • 40:56know how to sort of operate the
  • 40:58computer and do their stuff,
  • 40:59and they can be more independent.
  • 41:00But I'm hearing well, yeah,
  • 41:02but they seem to be spending a
  • 41:03lot of time on their screens
  • 41:05doing stuff that doesn't look
  • 41:07like it's academically related.
  • 41:09How do you monitor that?
  • 41:11And then you're dealing with us.
  • 41:13All of you have said so eloquently.
  • 41:16The whole social and emotional
  • 41:18implications of this and how.
  • 41:20Hard it is for children to go
  • 41:22from being with their friends and
  • 41:25their kids and having that all of
  • 41:27those social connections to just
  • 41:30being home at law alone or with
  • 41:32siblings that they you know may
  • 41:35not be getting along that well
  • 41:37within close quarters etc.
  • 41:39Um?
  • 41:40So I want to thank you all for
  • 41:42the things that you said and all
  • 41:45the things that you're doing.
  • 41:47I see that we have some Q&A's and
  • 41:49I'm going to ask Karen to relay
  • 41:51some of those questions to us.
  • 41:55Hi everybody, thank you so much
  • 41:58for that informative discussion.
  • 41:59You were really wonderful.
  • 42:01I have one quick question from
  • 42:03myself and then some better
  • 42:05coming in from the audience.
  • 42:07But how many schools have lost
  • 42:10reopening with complicated plans of,
  • 42:12you know some families coming and
  • 42:14staggered schedules and then only to
  • 42:17be open briefly and have to shut down
  • 42:20again for maybe 2 weeks and then decide
  • 42:23to reopen my question to you is like.
  • 42:26Need to in order to successfully gather
  • 42:29that input from families in real time.
  • 42:33As situations change.
  • 42:34How would you recommend the educators
  • 42:37who are listening today that they
  • 42:40best get that sort of rapid and
  • 42:43sensitive feedback from families?
  • 42:45As our situation continues to change?
  • 42:53You go, you wanna
  • 42:55tackle that? So that's
  • 42:56kind of a big question.
  • 43:02Yeah well so.
  • 43:06If you are a educator or a school or
  • 43:09a district that has been really open
  • 43:13about getting feedback and having
  • 43:16that communication that two way
  • 43:19communication and families are used to it,
  • 43:23I think that's great, right?
  • 43:26But a lot of the information from schools and
  • 43:30districts have been a lot of top down right,
  • 43:34and there hasn't been that aspect of,
  • 43:37you know, we want to hear
  • 43:40from you traditionally,
  • 43:41so it's a little hard to, you know,
  • 43:44because of Kovid because of
  • 43:47pandemic it because of racism.
  • 43:49Because of all this, like uncertainty,
  • 43:51to start trying to put those
  • 43:54practices in place of here, you know.
  • 43:57Is information that we're putting out.
  • 44:00We'd love to hear back from you.
  • 44:03I think it's hard to make that
  • 44:06switch suddenly, right.
  • 44:07If you don't have that in process already,
  • 44:11and I think because there are so
  • 44:13many different families in different
  • 44:16ways that communication is taken in.
  • 44:18So anytime you can do any sort of
  • 44:22multi modal would be wonderful.
  • 44:24Not just one email.
  • 44:27You know,
  • 44:28rely on those community leaders
  • 44:30to to be like that phone chain
  • 44:32that we used to have, right?
  • 44:36To check in and disperse the message
  • 44:39and really have a consistent
  • 44:42plays in a consistent way too.
  • 44:45Collect that feedback.
  • 44:49So you know it's consistency,
  • 44:52I think.
  • 44:54Frequent, consistent in multimodal.
  • 44:56Those are those are good
  • 44:58takeaways for district leaders.
  • 45:00On the on, the on the Symposium.
  • 45:03Here's the question from an audience member.
  • 45:06It focuses on English language
  • 45:08learners and says that we have so
  • 45:11many kids from different countries,
  • 45:13cultures and backgrounds.
  • 45:14So to most of them the isolation
  • 45:17from Covid is not their first
  • 45:20experience with isolation.
  • 45:21Please let me know how to support them.
  • 45:25Through this pandemic, I'm so.
  • 45:27Do you have any advice for the?
  • 45:31I guess the educators of families
  • 45:33of ELL students or Ald student?
  • 45:41Leo Leo Tiana or Janine Janine sure.
  • 45:45Of the things I think is great,
  • 45:48I think teachers play this really
  • 45:51important role right now and I
  • 45:53think teachers are able to identify
  • 45:56some of the parents that are
  • 45:58multilingual or bilingual, right?
  • 46:00And they could possibly try to peer
  • 46:03them with other parents that might
  • 46:06struggle with English as a first
  • 46:08language or whatever the case is,
  • 46:11and maybe start doing some type of
  • 46:13peer or mentoring between families.
  • 46:16To help, yeah, right?
  • 46:17I think doing some unique and innovative
  • 46:20things like Ukyo said like a lot
  • 46:22of stuff has not happened before,
  • 46:24but because this is a new normal
  • 46:27we have to think of some new
  • 46:29ways to kind of group parents.
  • 46:31So maybe it's them.
  • 46:35Integral. Learning together,
  • 46:37working together,
  • 46:38sharing their experiences and
  • 46:40building relationships to
  • 46:41help address that situation.
  • 46:45Leora here, already
  • 46:46doing some of that work,
  • 46:49connecting with other families.
  • 46:52Who are new to the guy
  • 46:54helping them through this?
  • 46:57No, no, just me directly
  • 47:00right but. Also have.
  • 47:05I have a good contact with the
  • 47:08person special certificates from the
  • 47:10district that that wasn't working.
  • 47:12Testing situation, call their families
  • 47:14and helping with the make sure they
  • 47:18understand the technical piece.
  • 47:20Uh, the kids I've been.
  • 47:23I've been trying to or understand.
  • 47:26I will try this just trying to
  • 47:29understand what the district is
  • 47:32doing for ESL learning learners.
  • 47:35Maybe I, I know that something
  • 47:38that was starting I I I didn't.
  • 47:41But clearly understood that
  • 47:43part of plantation.
  • 47:44But I know that that's definitely
  • 47:47a discussion had just taken
  • 47:49place as a district level.
  • 47:52Terms of what can be done due
  • 47:54to help from my perspective.
  • 47:58This time I don't think
  • 48:00I have any ideas, but.
  • 48:04Something that perhaps that that.
  • 48:08That I know my district that was
  • 48:11happening right by that Leah.
  • 48:13Some personal that support person with
  • 48:15this because I know some districts are
  • 48:17you did action funds to have that person
  • 48:20that is actually contacting families.
  • 48:22Make sure that they understand how to do it.
  • 48:26I think is important.
  • 48:27Find who that person is Indiana
  • 48:30if that person is not in place.
  • 48:32Definitely have teachers and
  • 48:34parents advocate to have at least
  • 48:36one or two person right there.
  • 48:38That is doing that back technical work.
  • 48:43Yeah, this is one of the equities that
  • 48:45were in equities that we're discovering.
  • 48:48Karen, other questions. Sure,
  • 48:52this is a question that may be
  • 48:54difficult for you all to answer.
  • 48:56I'm not sure if it's appropriate,
  • 48:58but some of you may have a good
  • 49:00response to this woman writes in
  • 49:02that millions of children are
  • 49:04influenced by domestic violence.
  • 49:06An covid makes that situation even worse.
  • 49:08Do you have any advice to moms who
  • 49:10are struggling to break out of the
  • 49:12relationships but still live with the
  • 49:14abuser in this special situation?
  • 49:16How can moms protect their children
  • 49:18from a bad role model and tell
  • 49:20right from wrong as they are
  • 49:22greatly influenced by the abuser?
  • 49:24And ultimately be compassionate to others
  • 49:27so I know this is a real issue that many,
  • 49:30many districts are dealing
  • 49:32with with their families,
  • 49:33as has anyone on this camel have any
  • 49:36ideas for our audience member about this?
  • 49:41You know, as it happens, my daughter,
  • 49:44who has a Masters in social work is
  • 49:47the director of victim assistance
  • 49:49unit in the Brooklyn District
  • 49:52Attorney's office and a great deal
  • 49:54of what they are dealing with now
  • 49:57is a spike in domestic violence.
  • 50:00And so. Parents need to know who they.
  • 50:03There's help available.
  • 50:04No, via phone and and so on and
  • 50:08services in their communities.
  • 50:10And that's something that school
  • 50:12districts need to help parents gain
  • 50:14access to that information Janine or me.
  • 50:17Or you go. Do you have other?
  • 50:21Are you dealing with this in
  • 50:23your communities? Well,
  • 50:24I'm not dealing with this personally,
  • 50:27but this is one of the reasons why
  • 50:29I suggested that teachers will play
  • 50:32this unique role where they're like.
  • 50:34They're like this information hub or
  • 50:37resource hub, and could, you know,
  • 50:39align parents with resources based on
  • 50:41the information that the parents share
  • 50:44with them and justice have making sure
  • 50:47that they are equipped with some of
  • 50:49that information so that it's quick.
  • 50:52It's in real time,
  • 50:53and they can actually communicate
  • 50:55with the parents and follow up.
  • 50:56Maybe do a little bit of case
  • 50:58management there not case managers,
  • 51:00but they might be playing a role
  • 51:02of such to a degree.
  • 51:04So that was one of the reasons why I
  • 51:06talked about teachers being equipped
  • 51:08with resources and being able to
  • 51:11align parents to resources because I
  • 51:13do know and I have heard that that is
  • 51:15something that families are facing right now.
  • 51:18I don't know if anyone that's
  • 51:20currently dealing with that.
  • 51:22Specific issue,
  • 51:22but I think that would be
  • 51:24something that might be helpful,
  • 51:26and then maybe just like openly
  • 51:28sharing the information so that
  • 51:30it's available because folks might
  • 51:32not be willing to open up about
  • 51:34those situations at home,
  • 51:35especially if they are working at
  • 51:37home and the abuser is right there,
  • 51:40but just having access to
  • 51:41the information would
  • 51:42be really helpful.
  • 51:44It's really good point.
  • 51:45Thank you, thank you.
  • 51:47Hey, I say something.
  • 51:49I say something. Yeah
  • 51:51sure, not not. Not that I have any.
  • 51:54I seen this happening but I know our
  • 51:57County right has what we call family
  • 52:00Research Center in our district.
  • 52:02Specifically they are the one they run.
  • 52:05This family Research Center which is a
  • 52:09research point for families in our schools.
  • 52:13I understand and I'm I'm strong in
  • 52:16her believer in delegate right and
  • 52:19leave the information to the expert.
  • 52:21Features may not have all the
  • 52:25resources but can can the teachers
  • 52:28be a bridge to be able to?
  • 52:32You know direct parents to places
  • 52:34where those resources can be found,
  • 52:36like or family resource centers where
  • 52:38there's a lot of information that and
  • 52:41they actually funded by the District,
  • 52:43County and the County have a lot of those
  • 52:47resources related to mental health.
  • 52:49In our situation, right?
  • 52:50So yes, the teacher perhaps
  • 52:52may not have the resources,
  • 52:54but at least I think it's a good
  • 52:57idea to build those communities
  • 52:59and relationships to be able to.
  • 53:02Guide the parent is.
  • 53:04If somebody comes in with asking
  • 53:06for help or if the teacher rise
  • 53:09concern on one of their student
  • 53:11and want to do more to help the
  • 53:14students find out what's happened.
  • 53:16So just that that that that needs to
  • 53:19build those communities from teachers too.
  • 53:23We will be able to.
  • 53:26Get support from experts and notice
  • 53:29there's nothing new for the teacher
  • 53:31to be the the you know the person
  • 53:33knows everything resources but build
  • 53:36those relationships with communities.
  • 53:38I think it's important.
  • 53:40Thank you, Leo. That idea of having
  • 53:43family resource centers is vital.
  • 53:45Really, every school or every community
  • 53:47should have one of those with easy
  • 53:50access for families and students.
  • 53:52Sometimes it's students who report
  • 53:54the domestic violence, not the parent.
  • 53:59And I think the role of an educator in
  • 54:01the school system has changed drastically
  • 54:04from just like the academic piece to
  • 54:08really supporting the whole child
  • 54:10and the whole family at this point,
  • 54:13because the schools have become
  • 54:16such a hug for, you know,
  • 54:18taking care of the basic needs during
  • 54:21this time when we are not in school,
  • 54:25they have become like the
  • 54:27resource clearinghouse and and.
  • 54:29And I I'd like to really acknowledge
  • 54:33the pressure that that these educators
  • 54:36are under in trying to really support.
  • 54:39The students,
  • 54:40which also means supporting the families,
  • 54:43and that's an you know an added layer to
  • 54:46their responsibilities and so you know,
  • 54:49thank you for for sticking and
  • 54:52being in this field.
  • 54:54Still, despite this whole last
  • 54:56six months and salute Lee.
  • 54:59It's a hard job and I think the district
  • 55:02also just having a clear guideline
  • 55:06around mandated reporters is also important,
  • 55:09especially in this time of distance learning,
  • 55:12and we're not physically together.
  • 55:15What does that look like?
  • 55:17Or how can?
  • 55:21You know students approach
  • 55:22educators are social workers.
  • 55:24Or how can schools with the
  • 55:26resources to translate in some
  • 55:28places be that clearinghouse of the
  • 55:31information that comes out of state
  • 55:34organisations around domestic abuse?
  • 55:36Or, you know, hotlines to help
  • 55:39parents just talk it out so you know,
  • 55:42I'm sorry to put a lot more responsibility.
  • 55:46No schools, but but this is
  • 55:48another way that we can really
  • 55:51be innovative in how we leverage
  • 55:54everyone's expertise and skills.
  • 55:56I think and not just rely
  • 55:58solely on educators.
  • 56:00That's why it's important to have
  • 56:02something like a family Resource Center,
  • 56:05so it's not all falling on teachers as
  • 56:08we want to make teachers jobs easier,
  • 56:11not harder, and we want to support them,
  • 56:14and I've heard so many wonderful
  • 56:16comments from parents I've talked to
  • 56:19about all the efforts that teachers
  • 56:21are making now and principles to make
  • 56:24this work and connect with families.
  • 56:30OK, thank you all.
  • 56:31You both in such a great job of
  • 56:33helping show us the difference
  • 56:35between family engagement,
  • 56:37an parent leadership.
  • 56:38I think before this panel I wasn't quite
  • 56:40sure what that differences and now we can.
  • 56:43I think all see it very clearly.
  • 56:46So thank you.
  • 56:47Thank you so much for being parent leaders
  • 56:49and and for for leading the way before
  • 56:52ioffer some like closing remarks for the day.
  • 56:55Do you have anything else
  • 56:57you and that you want to?
  • 56:59Sage wrap things up for your discussion.
  • 57:03At the at the close of my PowerPoint,
  • 57:06slides are a number of useful resources,
  • 57:08OK, and I'm hoping that the slides will be
  • 57:11available to all participants and their,
  • 57:13and they're putting the slides
  • 57:15up and I both know posted those
  • 57:17links in the chat and I'll post them
  • 57:20again in the chat so that people
  • 57:22will post them in the chat right
  • 57:24now so people can copy them and we
  • 57:27will share the slides as well.
  • 57:29OK, that's wonderful because
  • 57:31we're in a moment now that.
  • 57:33So many things are happening in coming
  • 57:36together and we're realizing how deep
  • 57:38and pervasive the problems in our
  • 57:41society are and there seems to be a
  • 57:43coming together of people about we're
  • 57:45going to do something about this.
  • 57:48So we need to turn this moment
  • 57:50into a movement and we can't do
  • 57:53that without our parent leaders.
  • 57:55It's in fact investing in developing
  • 57:57parent leaders and hearing their
  • 57:59voice and inviting them to the
  • 58:01table when the problems are being.
  • 58:03Raffled within SMS.
  • 58:04That's going to make the difference
  • 58:07in our country going forward.
  • 58:10So thank you everybody.
  • 58:14Thank you Ann and thank you
  • 58:16to all our our panelists,
  • 58:19an audience members.
  • 58:20We invite you all to come
  • 58:23back tomorrow at 10:00 AM.
  • 58:25We have three sessions tomorrow.
  • 58:27The 1st one is on ensuring equity
  • 58:30and access in a changing climate.
  • 58:33Then we have a panel.
  • 58:35After that an education in the anxious
  • 58:38child and then we have a closing
  • 58:41panel with educators and experts.
  • 58:44From Scholastic in yell answering,
  • 58:45audience questions about the reopening,
  • 58:47so we also just encourage you all to
  • 58:50share the link to others you know
  • 58:53who may want to register for tomorrow
  • 58:55and if you have a question that was
  • 58:58unanswered and you're in the audience,
  • 59:00I invite you to go to the collaborative for
  • 59:03child and family resilience as a website,
  • 59:06and that website has a help dev where
  • 59:09you can submit any questions and we will
  • 59:12get answers from the experts at yeah once.
  • 59:15Elastic and get them back to you directly
  • 59:17and we also have an email address there,
  • 59:20so please go to our website and look
  • 59:22forward to seeing you back here tomorrow.
  • 59:25So thank you everyone.