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INFORMATION FOR

Office of Academic & Professional Development

About OAPD

Through programs that offer mentoring and leadership development, our goal is to provide resources to support all faculty in the School of Medicine from the beginning of their Yale careers through their transition to senior faculty leaders. The Office oversees faculty development programs in all departments, and provides regular consultation to faculty as they progress through the academic life-cycle.

Academic & Professional Development Leadership

  • Deputy Dean for Academic Affairs

    Harold W. Jockers Professor of Medicine, Deputy Dean for Academic Affairs

    Dr. Linda Bockenstedt is the Harold W. Jockers Professor of Medicine, Section of Rheumatology, and Deputy Dean for Faculty Affairs at Yale School of Medicine. She received her undergraduate degree in chemistry and physics from Harvard College and is a graduate of the Ohio State University School of Medicine. After completing residency training in medicine and serving as Chief Resident in Medicine at Yale, Dr. Bockenstedt obtained rheumatology clinical and research fellowship training at the University of California, San Francisco. She has been a faculty member at Yale School of Medicine since 1989, where she directs a research program devoted toward understanding the pathogenesis of Lyme disease, an infection-related rheumatic disease. Her research has been continually supported by the National Institutes of Health since 1990, and she is internationally recognized for her studies of the host immune response to spirochetal infection. She is also an active clinician and educator for medical trainees.Dr. Bockenstedt is an elected member of the Kunkel Society and the Interurban Clinical Club. She is a former standing member of the Immunity and Host Defense Study Section at NIH and former member of the Board of Directors for the American College of Rheumatology Research & Education Foundation. Since 2006 she has been active in faculty affairs at Yale School of Medicine, first as Director for Professional Development & Equity, then as an Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs at Yale School of Medicine,
  • Deputy Dean for Professionalism and Leadership

    Professor of Psychiatry, Associate Dean for Global Health Education, Deputy Dean for Professionalism and Leadership; Affiliated Faculty, Yale Institute for Global Health; Deputy Chair for Education and Career Development, Department of Psychiatry; Director, Office of International Medical Student Education, Yale School of Medicine

    A graduate of Franklin and Marshall College, Yale School of Medicine and the Yale Psychiatry residency and geriatric psychiatry fellowship programs, Dr. Rohrbaugh has been a member of the Yale Department of Psychiatry faculty since 1988. Early in his career, Dr. Rohrbaugh's clinical, educational and research interests were at the interface of geropsychiatry and medicine. He has been Chief of the Psychiatry Consult service at VA-Connecticut and developed the geropsychiatry service and the psychiatry primary care clinic at VA-Connecticut. He was the Clinical Director for VA-Connecticut Mental Health Service Line before leaving the VA to become the department's residency program director. Throughout his career Dr. Rohrbaugh has been active in medical student and residency education. He has been especially interested in teaching beginning clinicians how to listen to a patient's narrative, identify pertinent data, and use that data to develop a bio-psycho-social formulation and treatment plan. Dr. Rohrbaugh served as the Clerkship Director and Director of Medical Studies for medical student education and as Associate Program Director before assuming the Program Director role in 2008. In 2009, Dr. Rohrbaugh was named Deputy Chair for Education and Career Development, extending his role in education to faculty in the department. Most recently, Dr. Rohrbaugh has worked to educate Yale medical students and residents in global health and has worked with colleagues at Xiangya School of Medicine in Changsha, Hunan Province, PRC to develop a competency based model for post-graduate (residency) education. This model has heavily influenced the Chinese national model for residency training. He was named the Founding Director of the Yale School of Medicine's Office of International Medical Student Education in 2008. In 2015, having noted the irony that global health education is largely discussed by educators in high income countries, Dr. Rohrbaugh co-founded the Bellagio Global Health Education Initiative with an explicit goal of bringing global health education leaders from high, middle and low income countries together to developed global health curricula that could be implemented world-wide.
  • Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs

    Professor of Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation; Associate Dean, Faculty Affairs; Director of Orthopaedic Spine Service, Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation

    Dr. Grauer is Professor and Director of the Orthopaedic Spine Service for the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation at Yale School of Medicine. He received his Bachelor of Science degree from Tufts University, graduating summa cum laude and with Phi Beta Kappa. He received his Medical Doctorate from Yale School of Medicine, graduating cum laude and with Alpha Omega Alpha. He completed his Orthopaedic Surgery residency at Yale New Haven Hospital and a fellowship in spine surgery at the Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University. Clinically, Dr. Grauer specializes in the treatment of numerous conditions affecting the cervical, thoracic, and lumbosacral spine including degenerative disc disease, scoliosis, trauma, infections, and tumors. He believes in meeting patients' individual needs through evaluation and treatment designed to help them achieve active, pain-free lifestyles. His clinical practice is based out of Yale New Haven Hospital, and outpatients are seen at the Yale New Haven Hospital Spine Center.Academically, Dr. Grauer and the students and residents with whom he works have received numerous awards. He has authored or co-authored over 275 peer-reviewed scientific papers, 90 reviews, and 70 book chapters, and been a part of over 450 pore-reviewed scientific presentations, . He is on the boards of the North American Spine Society (NASS) and Lumbar Spine Research Society (LSRS), is editor-in-chief of their North American Spine Society Journal (NASSJ), as well as active with other academic societies.  Administratively, Dr Grauer is active with faculty affairs at the Yale School of Medicine.  He is a point of contact for departments with the Office of Academic and Professional Development (OAPD) and responsible for a number of related projects related to that office.
  • Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs

    Professor of Psychiatry; Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs, Dean's Office; Deputy Chair for Career Development, Psychiatry

    I am involved in the coordination of faculty development both within the Department of Psychiatry and in Yale School of Medicine with a focus of working with non-procedural and bridge departments. I have served in several research, education, and clinical leadership positions in the Department of Psychiatry and affiliated non-profit clinical, research, and policy organizations including The APT Foundation, Silver Hill Hospital, and The National Center of Addiction and Substance Abuse. I direct the faculty reappointment and promotion processes in my department and am involved in the development and evaluation of medical school-wide junior faculty mentoring programs. I am a trained mentor and professional coach and consult with junior faculty and departmental leaders on: promotion processes and readiness; incorporation into academic review processes improved assessments of clinical and educational excellence, professionalism, and diversity and inclusion activities, and; consultation on matters related to professional stress, burnout, and impairment. My clinical expertise is the treatment of patients with addiction and co-occurring personality disorders, and I have developed and conducted clinical trials on a specialized psychotherapy for these complex patients and founded a specialized residential treatment program for high functioning professionals (particularly physicians and attorneys) and executives suffering from these disorders. During the COVID-19 pandemic, I  developed and directed a 1:1 professional support provider services program for Yale  Medicine and Yale New Haven Health healthcare workers and their families.

Organizations on this page

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  • About OAPD: Faculty affairs staff

  • About OAPD: Professionalism and Leadership Team

    • Deputy Dean for Professionalism and Leadership

      Professor of Psychiatry, Associate Dean for Global Health Education, Deputy Dean for Professionalism and Leadership; Affiliated Faculty, Yale Institute for Global Health; Deputy Chair for Education and Career Development, Department of Psychiatry; Director, Office of International Medical Student Education, Yale School of Medicine

      A graduate of Franklin and Marshall College, Yale School of Medicine and the Yale Psychiatry residency and geriatric psychiatry fellowship programs, Dr. Rohrbaugh has been a member of the Yale Department of Psychiatry faculty since 1988. Early in his career, Dr. Rohrbaugh's clinical, educational and research interests were at the interface of geropsychiatry and medicine. He has been Chief of the Psychiatry Consult service at VA-Connecticut and developed the geropsychiatry service and the psychiatry primary care clinic at VA-Connecticut. He was the Clinical Director for VA-Connecticut Mental Health Service Line before leaving the VA to become the department's residency program director. Throughout his career Dr. Rohrbaugh has been active in medical student and residency education. He has been especially interested in teaching beginning clinicians how to listen to a patient's narrative, identify pertinent data, and use that data to develop a bio-psycho-social formulation and treatment plan. Dr. Rohrbaugh served as the Clerkship Director and Director of Medical Studies for medical student education and as Associate Program Director before assuming the Program Director role in 2008. In 2009, Dr. Rohrbaugh was named Deputy Chair for Education and Career Development, extending his role in education to faculty in the department. Most recently, Dr. Rohrbaugh has worked to educate Yale medical students and residents in global health and has worked with colleagues at Xiangya School of Medicine in Changsha, Hunan Province, PRC to develop a competency based model for post-graduate (residency) education. This model has heavily influenced the Chinese national model for residency training. He was named the Founding Director of the Yale School of Medicine's Office of International Medical Student Education in 2008. In 2015, having noted the irony that global health education is largely discussed by educators in high income countries, Dr. Rohrbaugh co-founded the Bellagio Global Health Education Initiative with an explicit goal of bringing global health education leaders from high, middle and low income countries together to developed global health curricula that could be implemented world-wide.
    • Director of Professional Standards

      Assistant Professor; Director of Professional Standards, Office of the Dean, School of Medicine

      Jessica Wilen, Ph.D., LCSW is an Assistant Professor at the Yale Child Study Center.  She manages the Viola W. Bernard Fund for Innovation in Mental Health Care, focused on promoting health equity and access for vulnerable children and their families.  Dr. Wilen also serves as the inaugural Director of Professional Standards for the School of Medicine.  In this role, she is responsible for fostering a shared community vision of professionalism, overseeing processes and mechanisms for reporting and resolving professionalism concerns (including investigations, climate assessments, and 360 evaluations), and mediating faculty disputes. Dr. Wilen previously served as the Assistant Dean of Students at Washington University in St. Louis, where she created and managed the University’s behavioral intervention team and case management services for students of concern.  She was also responsible for a number of high-level initiatives focused on cultivating an inclusive climate, including leading university-wide task forces on diversity & inclusion and sexual misconduct, creating and launching a campus-wide reporting system for discriminatory harassment, and creating gender-inclusive policies. She has prior experience as an organizational consultant, psychotherapist, and mediator.  Dr. Wilen maintains a private leadership coaching and consulting practice focused on the unique needs of working parents.
    • Director of Professionalism and Leadership

      Director, Professionalism and Leadership Development, YSM Office of Academic and Professional Development

      Andrea Terrillion, JD is the Director of Professionalism and Leadership Development in the Office of Academic and Professional Development (OAPD).  Ms. Terrillion partners with Deputy Dean for Professionalism and Leadership, Robert Rohrbaugh, MD to formulate the overarching principles and activities of OAPD related to professionalism and leadership, including enhanced interventions to strengthen professionalism and the design of value-based leadership development programs.   Ms. Terrillion has held various roles at Yale including director of employee relations and director of labor relations. She continues to play a role in investigating complex, high level and highly confidential matters across campus and supporting Employee Relations through her leadership and training efforts. Prior to joining Yale, Ms. Terrillion had extensive labor and employee relations consulting experience and practiced for many years as a labor and employment attorney.  In addition, she served as director of legal and labor relations education and consultation programming at the Outreach Division of Cornell University’s ILR School and has been a member of the adjunct faculty, as well.  Ms. Terrillion has lectured throughout the United States on various workplace law and employee relations issues and provided legal commentary for print, radio and television media.
    • Associate Research Scientist; Associate Director for Leadership Development, Office of Academic & Professional Development (OAPD) and Office of Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion (ODEI)

      Daryn H. David, Ph.D., is a licensed clinical psychologist, educator, and leadership development coach. At the Yale School of Medicine, Daryn is an Associate Research Scientist at the Child Study Center and serves as Associate Director for Leadership Development in the Offices of Academic & Professional Development (OAPD) and Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion (ODEI).Through dynamic pedagogy, leadership development coaching, and innovative programming, Daryn leverages her expertise to help academics and health care providers actualize their fullest professional potential. She also promotes the broader educational mission of Yale University by coaching high-impact leaders through the Yale Greenberg World Fellowship.In addition to her work in academia, Daryn maintains a niche psychotherapy and coaching practice devoted to supporting women professionals.Daryn holds a Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) degree in Social Studies from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in psychology from Yale University, where she also completed her predoctoral clinical internship and postdoctoral training. In addition, Daryn has held an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science & Technology Policy fellowship at the National Institutes of Health and completed the Playing Big Facilitators Training with Tara Mohr.
  • Senior Appointments & Promotions Committee

    • Committee Chair

      Jean and David W. Wallace Dean of the Yale School of Medicine and C.N.H. Long Professor of Internal Medicine

      Dr. Brown graduated from Yale College, where she majored in molecular biophysics and biochemistry. She earned her medical degree from Harvard University. She completed internship and residency programs in medicine at Vanderbilt University, where she also did a fellowship in clinical pharmacology. Dr. Brown joined the faculty of Vanderbilt in 1992 and held a number of leadership positions, serving as chief of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology, associate dean for clinical and translational scientist development, and Robert H. Williams professor before becoming the Hugh J. Morgan Chair of Medicine and physician-in-chief of Vanderbilt University Hospital in 2010. In 2020, she became Jean and David W. Wallace Dean of Medicine and C.N.H. Long Professor of Internal Medicine at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Brown has long been committed to medical education and mentorship. At Vanderbilt, she established the Elliot Newman Society to support the development of physician-scientists and co-founded the Vanderbilt Master of Science in Clinical Investigation program. Her research has defined the molecular mechanisms through which commonly prescribed blood pressure and diabetes drugs affect the risk of cardiovascular and kidney disease. In her clinical practice, she has treated patients with resistant and secondary forms of hypertension. Dr. Brown has served as a member of the NIH National Advisory Research Resources Council and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Advisory Council. She was president of the Association of Professors of Medicine. In 2019, she was elected a Master of the American College of Physicians.Her numerous awards include election to the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, and the National Academy of Medicine.   She is a member of the American Association of Arts and Sciences.
    • Committee Co-Chair

      Harold W. Jockers Professor of Medicine, Deputy Dean for Academic Affairs

      Dr. Linda Bockenstedt is the Harold W. Jockers Professor of Medicine, Section of Rheumatology, and Deputy Dean for Faculty Affairs at Yale School of Medicine. She received her undergraduate degree in chemistry and physics from Harvard College and is a graduate of the Ohio State University School of Medicine. After completing residency training in medicine and serving as Chief Resident in Medicine at Yale, Dr. Bockenstedt obtained rheumatology clinical and research fellowship training at the University of California, San Francisco. She has been a faculty member at Yale School of Medicine since 1989, where she directs a research program devoted toward understanding the pathogenesis of Lyme disease, an infection-related rheumatic disease. Her research has been continually supported by the National Institutes of Health since 1990, and she is internationally recognized for her studies of the host immune response to spirochetal infection. She is also an active clinician and educator for medical trainees.Dr. Bockenstedt is an elected member of the Kunkel Society and the Interurban Clinical Club. She is a former standing member of the Immunity and Host Defense Study Section at NIH and former member of the Board of Directors for the American College of Rheumatology Research & Education Foundation. Since 2006 she has been active in faculty affairs at Yale School of Medicine, first as Director for Professional Development & Equity, then as an Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs at Yale School of Medicine,
    • Term 2020-2023

      Professor, Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences; Director, Division of Reproductive Sciences, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences

      Dr Vikki Abrahams is a Professor and Director of the Division of Reproductive Sciences in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences.Dr Abrahams received her B.Sc. (hons) in Immunology in 1996, and was awarded a Ph.D. in Immunology in 2000, both from University College London. She continued her studies as a postdoctoral associate at Dartmouth Medical School and then at Yale University in the field of Reproductive Immunology. In 2004 she joined the faculty in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at Yale School of Medicine. Since 2006 she has also been an Honorary Lecturer in the Maternal and Fetal Health Research Center at The University of Manchester, UK. Dr Abrahams' research focuses on understanding the role of innate immune Toll-like receptor and Nod-like receptor family members in placental and maternal-fetal immune responses, and their role in regulating pregnancy outcome, including those complicated by infections and by autoimmune diseases. Studies from the Abrahams laboratory has characterized the mechanisms by which Toll-like receptors, Nod-like receptors, and the inflammasome function in the placental trophoblast and fetal membranes in response to both infectious and non-infectious stimuli.Dr Abrahams is a member of the American Association of Immunologists, International Society for Immunology of Reproduction, Society for Reproductive Investigation, and the American Society of Reproductive Immunology. Dr Abrahams is the Associate Editor for Reviews of the American Journal of Reproductive Immunology and also serves on the editorial boards for a number of other journals within the Reproductive Sciences field.
    • Term 2020-2023

      John and Hope Furth Professor of Psychiatric Neuroscience and Professor of Psychiatry, and in the Child Study Center and of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging; Director, Mood Disorders Research Program

      Dr. Hilary Patricia Blumberg is the John and Hope Furth Professor of Psychiatric Neuroscience, Professor of Psychiatry, Radiology and Biomedical Imaging and in the Child Center, and Director of the Mood Disorders Research Program, at the Yale School of Medicine. She graduated summa cum laude in neuroscience from Harvard University and completed her medical degree, psychiatry training and specialty training in brain scanning research at Cornell University Medical College. Dr. Blumberg’s research is devoted to understanding the brain circuitry differences that underlie mood disorders across the lifespan, with a focus on bipolar disorder and on suicide prevention. She directs the Mood Disorders Research Program at Yale that brings together a multi-disciplinary group of scientists to study the genetic, developmental and environmental factors that cause mood disorders to develop new methods for early detection, more effective interventions, and prevention of the disorders and their associated high risk for suicide. This research includes the use of new state-of-the-art brain scanning methods. The program is also known for training young scientists to be new leaders in the field. Dr. Blumberg has served as principal investigator on awards from the National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Department of Veterans Affairs, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, International Bipolar Disorder Foundation, For the Love of Travis Foundation, MQ Foundation, Stanley Medical Research Institute and Women’s Health Research at Yale. She has received numerous awards including the 2021 International Society of Bipolar Disorders Mogens Schou Award for Research in Bipolar Disorder, 2021 Sethi Award, 2018 American Psychiatric Association Blanche F. Ittleson Award for outstanding and published research in child and adolescent psychiatry and 2017 Brain and Behavior Foundation Colvin Prize for Research Achievement in Mood Disorders. In 2021, she was nominated for the Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award. She is a fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology and a member of the Society of Biological Psychiatry.
    • Term 2020-2023

      Professor of Surgery (Thoracic); Division Chief, Thoracic Surgery; Clinical Director, Center for Thoracic Cancers

      Daniel J. Boffa, MD, is a Professor of Thoracic Surgery at Yale School of Medicine. He earned his medical degree from the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine and is a Board Certified Surgeon and a Board Certified Thoracic Surgeon. His international work includes traveling to Leuven, Belgium, for a presentation for the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the ASN/ISN World Congress of Nephrology. He has written many papers and publications in his field and has received numerous awards and recognitions, including the Dr. Charles H. Bryan Clinical Excellence Award, Thoracic and Cardiovascular Research Award, and the American Association of Thoracic Surgery Resident Traveling Fellowship.Learn more about Dr. Boffa>>Dr. Boffa specializes in esophageal and lung cancer, achalasia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, hiatal hernia, esophageal diverticulum, and hyperhidrosis. As a highly skilled surgeon, Dr. Boffa performs the majority of his surgeries with minimally invasive procedures. Committed to increasing the survival rate of cancer patients, Dr. Boffa has focused his clinical research on the prevention of tumor metastasis and the early detection of lung cancer.Learn more about one of Yale Thoracic Surgery's surgeons.
    • Term 2022-2025

      Rothberg Professor of Neurosurgery; Co Vice Chair of Research, Neurosurgery

      Dr. Angélique Bordey holds the rank of Professor of Neurosurgery, and Cellular & Molecular Physiology. Dr. Bordey is an active participant in teaching and training of graduate and medical students at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Bordey is an  Editor for several journals and on the advisory board of CURE epilepsy and the TSC Alliance preclinical consortium. She has served as a permanent member on several grant review committees and NIH study sections. Finally, she is a McKnight awardee and holds several federal and foundation grants as well as patents for the treatment of epilepsy.
    • Term 2023-2026

      Professor of Surgery (Vascular) and of Cellular and Molecular Physiology; Vice Chair, Faculty Affairs, Surgery

      Dr. Alan Dardik is a surgeon-scientist who harnesses the power of molecular biology to achieve a modern understanding of vascular disease, and then use the basic science laboratory to ultimately benefit patients with vascular diseases.  Dr. Dardik trained at Yale, the University of Pennsylvania, and the Johns Hopkins Hospital before his appointment to the Yale faculty in 2001. Dr. Dardik focuses his clinical practice on teaching at the VA Connecticut, where he was formerly the Chief of Vascular Surgery.  Dr. Dardik has won the C. Elton Cahow Award for Outstanding Faculty Teaching from Yale’s Department of Surgery and the Faculty Teaching Award from St. Mary’s Hospital. Dr. Dardik is also a Vice Chair of Yale’s Department of Surgery where he is charged with Faculty Affairs, and he has served as Yale's Interim Division Chief of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery. The Dardik laboratory studies the healing and function of blood vessels, fistulae and vessel patches that are used in patients having vascular surgery. The laboratory is trying to understand the fundamental molecular mechanisms by which vein graft adaptation and arteriovenous fistula maturation result in positive remodeling and successful adaptation to the arterial environment, yet often proceed, in the long-term, to neointimal hyperplasia and failure. The laboratory also studies novel methods to deliver stem cells to diabetic wounds. The laboratory is funded from the NIH as well as Yale's Department of Surgery. Dr. Dardik currently serves as the Editor-in-Chief for the newly launched journal JVS-Vascular Science; he is the past President of the New England Society for Vascular Surgery, the Association of VA Surgeons as well as of the International Society for Vascular Surgery.  Dr. Dardik has run several national and international meetings, including the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Research Initiatives Conference, and has served on numerous peer review committees including review for the NIH, the VA, and Vascular Cures. Dr. Dardik has edited several textbooks including “Vascular Surgery: A Global Perspective” and “Stem cell therapy for vascular diseases.”
    • Term 2022-2025

      Professor of Psychiatry; Medical Director Hispanic Clinic and Latino Behavioral Health System; Associate Director Psychiatry Residency Program

      Esperanza Díaz M.D. attended Javeriana University in Bogotá, Colombia, and completed Psychiatry residency training at Yale. She graduated from the Western New England Institute for Psychoanalysis. As medical director of the Hispanic Clinic and its expansion to the community, mental health services for Limited English proficiency populations are a model. She founded the Hispanic Psychiatry Fellowship addressing mental health disparities in Latinos. Along with residents, she developed the Cultural Psychiatry curriculum, a predecessor of the Social Justice and Health Equity curriculum. Her work with the medical school Teaching and Learning Center addresses cultural sensitivity and microaggressions management training. Using an experiential model, she leads interviewing training for residents. She chairs the evaluation committee to review and revise the Yale Psychiatry evaluation system.
    • Term 2022-2025

      Professor of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology) and Neuroscience

      Elizabeth Jonas received training in Neurology and Internal Medicine. She developed an interest in Neuroscience while studying as a medical student with Dr. Rodolfo Llinas at N.Y.U. and at the Marine Biological Laboratory. With Dr. Llinas she developed an interest in calcium control of synaptic transmission. She pursued this interest as a post-doctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Leonard Kaczmarek, Yale Pharmacology. Dr. Jonas developed a technique for recording from ion channels on intracellular membranes and has used this and other techniques to study mitochondria. Mitochondria are necessary for life and death of neurons and other cells. Regulation of mitochondrial metabolism is also key to energy efficiency in the nervous system. Dr. Jonas is now studying the role of mitochondria and energy efficiency in neurodegenerative disease states and in learning and memory formation in healthy brain. Her lab has recently characterized the molecular identity of the cell death channel known as the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and is now studying how inhibiting gating of the pore may ameliorate stroke, neurodegenerative and developmental brain diseases.
    • Term 2020-2023

      Professor of Medicine (Cardiology); Director, Cardiology; Director of Yale UCLP Clinical Research Program Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, The Barts Heart Center and Queen Mary University of London, Cardiology

      Alexandra J. Lansky, MD, is Professor of Medicine in the section of Cardiology at the Yale School of Medicine and a practicing cardiologist at Yale-New Haven Hospital, in New Haven, CT. Dr. Lansky joined Yale in 2010 as Director of the Yale Heart and Vascular Clinical Research Program and the Cardiovascular Research Center (YCRC), which specializes in the conduct of national and international cardiovascular clinical trials with specific expertise in the evaluation of interventional devices. She most recently received a dual appointment as Chair of Cardiovascular Research at Queen Mary University in London as part of the Yale and London based Barts Heart Center transatlantic research collaboration. From 2004 to 2010 Dr. Lansky was Associate Professor of Medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Director of Clinical Services at the Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, a practicing cardiologist at New York-Presbyterian, and Chief Scientific Officer of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation Clinical Trials Center.Prior to that she was an interventional cardiologist on faculty at Washington Hospital Center in Washington, DC, and at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York, NY. She has dedicated her career to leading clinical and angiographic evaluations of more than 500 clinical trials in a broad range of ischemic cardiovascular therapeutic areas, including pharmacologic and interventional device trials, many of which are landmark trials in the field and/or leading to FDA approval in the United States. She has served as the principal investigator on numerous national and international imaging studies, device, DES and neuroprotection trials. Dr. Lansky has authored and coauthored over 500 academic peer-reviewed manuscripts in the fields of interventional cardiology, angiography, and women’s cardiovascular health. She chaired the American Heart Association Statement on Interventions in Women and most recently the Academic Research Consortium defining Neurologic Endpoints in clinical cardiovascular trials.Dr. Lansky has been recognized for her outstanding clinical research contributions with several prestigious awards including: Masters of Arts Privatim from Yale University in 2017; Thompson Reuter’s 2014 and 2016 “Most influential Scientific Minds for Clinical Medicine”; 2012 Wenger Award of Clinical Excellence in Women’s health, Visiting Professor at Fu Wai Hospital, Bejing, China and Honorary Professor, University College London.Dr. Lansky is board certified in cardiovascular diseases. A graduate of the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond, VA, she received her residency training in internal medicine, cardiology, and interventional cardiology at Washington Hospital Center, Washington DC. Dr. Lansky is a Fellow of the European Society of Cardiology,the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association and the Society of Cardiac Angiography and Interventions.
    • Term 2020-2023

      Professor of Surgery (Transplant); Division Chair, Transplantation Surgery and Immunology, Surgery

      David C. Mulligan, MD, is an abdominal organ transplant surgeon performing both living and deceased donor liver, kidney, and pancreas transplants. He currently serves as Professor of Surgery, Transplantation and Immunology in the Department of Surgery at Yale School of Medicine/Yale New Haven Health System. His clinical and academic focus surrounds living donor liver transplantation, expanding donation, and working on ways to utilize ex-vivo organ perfusion systems to increase transplantation in the United States. Dr. Mulligan and his team are testing novel strategies in immunosuppression; improved biomechanical organ preservation methods to reduce ischemia/reperfusion injury and promote regeneration; and working in the field of 3D bioprinting to collaborate in finding ways to grow new organs from stem cell precursors. He has performed more than 250 living donor transplants and has authored more that 180 publications. He also has served on numerous editorial review boards and presented across the U.S. and internationally. Dr. Mulligan’s leadership in solid organ transplantation across national and international platforms has grown considerably and he now serves as Past President of the United Network of Organ Sharing (UNOS)/Organ Procurement Transplant Network (OPTN), Member at-large on the Governing Board of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Past Chair of the Advisory Council on Transplantation (ACOT) to the Secretary of HHS, special government employee for FDA Medical Device Advisory Committee and chair of the Business Practice Committee of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons. He also contributes to the oversight and recommendations regarding the impacts of COVID-19 on solid organ transplantation in the U.S. for both the AASLD and the ASTS. In these visionary roles, he has led major changes in organ allocation and distribution and will hopefully culminate in substantial increases in organ transplants. Passionate about patient-centered care and building more resilient teams, he makes time to share his enjoyment of spending time in nature, especially near the ocean, with his wife and three children.
    • Term 2022-2025

      Harris Professor in the Child Study Center; Director, Yale Developmental Disabilities Clinic; Director of Undergraduate Studies, Yale Child Study Center; Co-Director of Team Science, Yale Center for Clinical Investigation (YCCI)

      James C. McPartland, Ph.D., is Professor of Child Psychiatry and Psychology at the Yale Child Study Center. He is a licensed child psychologist and Director of the Yale Developmental Disabilities Clinic. He is Director of Undergraduate Studies at the Child Study Center and teaches an undergraduate seminar on autism spectrum disorder. Dr. McPartland’s program of research investigates the brain bases of neurodevelopmental conditions to develop biologically-based tools to improve detection and treatment. His research has been continuously supported since 2007 by both federal (NIMH, NICHD, NINDS, NIDCD; R21, R03, K23, R01, U19) and private research grants (NARSAD, the Autism Science Foundation, the Waterloo Foundation, Autism Speaks, the Patterson Trust, the Simons Foundation, the Nancy Taylor Foundation, the Alan B. Slifka Foundation, the Hilibrand Foundation). He is the Principal Investigator of the Autism Biomarkers Consortium for Clinical Trials, a US-based effort to identify biomarkers to support intervention research in autism. His contributions to the field have been recognized by multiple awards, including the NARSAD Atherton Young Investigator Award, the International Society for Autism Research Young Investigator Award, the Patterson Trust Clinical Research Award, the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation Klerman Prize, and the APA Sara S. Sparrow Early Career Research Award. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science and has published 5 books and over 170 scholarly works on autism and related topics. He has served on the executive boards of the International Society for Autism Research and the APA Division of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities/Autism Spectrum Disorder and is on the editorial boards of the Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, the Journal of Mental Health Research in Intellectual Disabilities, the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, and the Encyclopedia of Autism and Related Disorders.
    • Term 2020-2023

      Professor of Psychiatry; Chief of Psychiatry, VA Connecticut Healthcare System

      Dr. Petrakis is a Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine and the Director of the Mental Health Service Line at VA Connecticut Healthcare System (VACHS) since July 2010. Dr. Petrakis completed residency training at Yale School of Medicine and then a NIDA-funded addiction psychiatry clinical/research fellowship. She joined the faculty in 1992. Prior to July 2010, she was the Director of the Substance Abuse Treatment Program of the VACHS since 1996. Dr. Petrakis is also the Director of the Addiction Psychiatry Residency at Yale, an ACGME-accredited program and the PI of both an NIAAA-funded and a NIDA-funded training grant (T32).Her research interests are predominately two-fold: (1) finding appropriate treatments for dually diagnosed individuals and (2) understanding the neurobiological mechanisms underlying alcohol dependence. She has received funding from the Department of Defense, NIH-NIAAA, the VA, NARSAD and the Stanley Foundation.
    • Term 2022-2025

      Elizabeth Mears and House Jameson Professor of Psychiatry; Deputy Chair for Translational Research, Psychiatry; Director, Clinical Neuroscience Research Unit, Psychiatry; Director, Yale Program for Psychedelic Science, Psychiatry; Director, Yale Center for Brain and Mind Health, Yale School of Medicine; Director, Yale OCD Research Clinic, Psychiatry; Director, Neuroscience Research Training Program, Yale Department of Psychiatry

      Chris Pittenger earned his MD and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University, where his graduate work was done with Nobel Prize recipient Eric Kandel. He returned to Yale University, his undergraduate alma mater, for residency and research training in psychiatry in 2003. He joined the faculty as an Assistant Professor in 2007 and is now Elizabeth Mears and House Jameson Professor of Psychiatry, Professor of Psychology and in the Child Study Center, and Deputy Chair for Translational Research in the Department of Psychiatry .Chris has always been fascinated by the question of how the brain, a complex but ultimately a physical structure, creates thought, feeling, consciousness, and other aspects of the mind.  As a psychiatrist he is additionally focused on how these processes go wrong - how brain dysregulation leads to dysregulated cognition, emotion, and behavior and to mental suffering, and how advancing our understanding of these relationships can guide us to new strategies to alleviate that suffering.  Much of his work has focused on obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette syndrome and on the cortico-basal ganglia circuitry that is implicated in their pathophysiology.  More recently he has co-founded the Yale Program for Psychedelic Science, focused on understanding how molecules like psilocybin and LSD can teach us about brain and behavior and may lead to new treatments for a range of neuropsychiatric pathology.  He is also one of the founding Directors of the Yale Center for Brain and Mind Health, which seeks to bridge disciplines and levels of analysis to bring new therapeutics to individuals suffering from disorders of the mind and brain.Dr. Pittenger's research and clinical work have been acknowledged by a number of prestigious awards, including grant funding from the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke, NARSAD, the Tourette Syndrome of America, the Doris Duke Charitable Trust, and other organizations.  He has won a number of awards, including from the National Institute of Mental Health, the Society for Neuroscience, the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, the American Psychiatric Association, and the American College of Psychiatrists. He is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the International OCD Foundation and Chair of both their Grant Review Committee and their Annual Research Symposium Planning Committee.  He is a Fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, the American Psychiatric Association, and the American Neurological Association.
  • TACBS Appointments & Promotions Committee

    • Tenure Appointments Committee Co-Chair

      Jean and David W. Wallace Dean of the Yale School of Medicine and C.N.H. Long Professor of Internal Medicine

      Dr. Brown graduated from Yale College, where she majored in molecular biophysics and biochemistry. She earned her medical degree from Harvard University. She completed internship and residency programs in medicine at Vanderbilt University, where she also did a fellowship in clinical pharmacology. Dr. Brown joined the faculty of Vanderbilt in 1992 and held a number of leadership positions, serving as chief of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology, associate dean for clinical and translational scientist development, and Robert H. Williams professor before becoming the Hugh J. Morgan Chair of Medicine and physician-in-chief of Vanderbilt University Hospital in 2010. In 2020, she became Jean and David W. Wallace Dean of Medicine and C.N.H. Long Professor of Internal Medicine at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Brown has long been committed to medical education and mentorship. At Vanderbilt, she established the Elliot Newman Society to support the development of physician-scientists and co-founded the Vanderbilt Master of Science in Clinical Investigation program. Her research has defined the molecular mechanisms through which commonly prescribed blood pressure and diabetes drugs affect the risk of cardiovascular and kidney disease. In her clinical practice, she has treated patients with resistant and secondary forms of hypertension. Dr. Brown has served as a member of the NIH National Advisory Research Resources Council and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Advisory Council. She was president of the Association of Professors of Medicine. In 2019, she was elected a Master of the American College of Physicians.Her numerous awards include election to the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, and the National Academy of Medicine.   She is a member of the American Association of Arts and Sciences.
    • Biological Sciences Area Chair

      Sterling Professor of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology and Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

      Dr. Breaker is a Sterling Professor of the Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology at Yale University, is jointly appointed as a professor in the Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, and is an Investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His graduate studies with Dr. Peter Gilham at Purdue University focused on the synthesis of RNA and the catalytic properties of nucleic acids. As a postdoctoral researcher with Dr. Gerald Joyce at The Scripps Research Institute, Dr. Breaker pioneered a variety of in vitro evolution strategies to isolate novel RNA enzymes and was the first to discover catalytic DNAs or “deoxyribozymes” using this technology. Since establishing his laboratory at Yale in 1995, Dr. Breaker has continued to conduct research on the advanced functions of nucleic acids, including ribozyme reaction mechanisms, molecular switch technology, next-generation biosensors, and catalytic DNA engineering. In addition, his laboratory has established the first proofs that metabolites are directly bound by messenger RNA elements called riboswitches. Dr. Breaker’s research findings have been published in more than 220 scientific papers, book chapters, and patent applications, and his research has been funded by grants from the NIH, NSF, DARPA, the Hereditary Disease Foundation, and from several biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. He is the recipient of fellowships from the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, and the Hellman Family Trust. In recognition of his research accomplishments at Yale, Dr. Breaker received the Arthur Greer Memorial Prize (1997), the Eli Lilly Award in Microbiology (2005), the Molecular Biology Award from the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (2006), and the Merck Award from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2016). Dr. Breaker was inducted into the U.S. National Academy of Sciences in 2014. He has cofounded two biotechnology companies and is a scientific advisor for industry and for various government agencies. He serves on the editorial board for the scientific journals RNA Biology, RNA, and Cell Chemical Biology.
    • Harvey and Kate Cushing Professor of Cell Biology, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, and Professor of Physics; Vice Chair for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, Cell Biology

      Joerg Bewersdorf is the Harvey and Kate Cushing Professor of Cell Biology and Professor of Biomedical Engineering and of Physics at Yale University. He received his Master's degree (Dipl. Phys., 1998) and his doctoral degree in physics (Dr. rer. nat., 2002) from the University of Heidelberg training with Dr. Stefan W. Hell at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Goettingen, Germany. Since 2009, after 4 years at The Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, he has been leading a research group at Yale University focusing on the development of new light microscopy techniques and their application to biomedical research. An optical physicist/biophysicist by training, Dr. Bewersdorf has been a long-time contributor to the field of super-resolution light microscopy development and the application of these techniques to cell biological questions.
    • John C. Malone Professor of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology and Professor of Chemistry, of Pharmacology, and of Management; Executive Director, Yale Center for Molecular Discovery

      Dr. Crews is the John C. Malone Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology and holds joint appointments in the departments of Chemistry and Pharmacology at Yale University. He graduated from the U.Virginia with a B.A. in Chemistry and received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in Biochemistry. Dr. Crews has a foothold in both the academic and biotech arenas; on the faculty at Yale since 1995, his laboratory has pioneered the use of small molecules to control intracellular protein levels. In 2003, he co-founded Proteolix, Inc., whose proteasome inhibitor, Kyprolis™ received FDA approval for the treatment of multiple myeloma. Since Proteolix’s purchase by Onyx Pharmaceuticals in 2009, Dr. Crews has focused on a new drug development technology, which served as the founding intellectual property for his latest New Haven-based biotech venture, Arvinas, Inc. Currently, Dr. Crews serves on several editorial boards and was Editor of Cell Chemical Biology (2008-2018). In addition, he has received numerous awards and honors, including the 2013 CURE Entrepreneur of the Year Award, 2014 Ehrlich Award for Medicinal Chemistry, 2015 Yale Cancer Center Translational Research Prize, a NIH R35 Outstanding Investigator Award (2015),  the AACR Award for Chemistry in Cancer Research (2017), Khorana Prize from the Royal Society of Chemistry (2018), Pierre Fabre Award for Therapeutic Innovation (2018), the Pharmacia-ASPET Award for Experimental Therapeutics (2019), the Heinrich Wieland Prize (2020) and the Scheele Prize (2021).  In 2019, he was named an American Cancer Society Professor and received the Connecticut Medal of Technology in 2022.
    • Professor of Neurosurgery and of Neuroscience; Co Vice Chair of Research, Neurosurgery; Director, Interdepartmental Neuroscience Graduate Program

      Dr. Charles A. Greer is the Vice Chair for Research and holds the rank of Professor of Neuroscience. Dr. Greer also serves as Director of the Yale Interdepartmental Neuroscience Graduate Program. He has served as the President of the Association for Chemoreception Sciences, Chair of National Institutes of Health Study Sections and recently completed a term on the Advisory Council for the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders. He has organized several national and international conferences and is frequently an invited speaker. Dr. Greer is an Associate Editor of The Journal of Comparative Neurology and Journal of Neuroscience and a member of the editorial boards of Frontiers in Neurogenomics, Frontiers in Neuroanatomy and Frontiers in Neuorgenesis and the Faculty of 1000. Dr. Greer has been the recipient of numerous awards recognizing his research accomplishments.
    • Professor of Microbial Pathogenesis

      Dr. Liu has been working in the field of electron microscopy for 20 years. In particular, he gained expertise in cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) after working with Prof. Ken Taylor at Florida State University and Dr. Sriram Subramaniam at NIH. Since he started his own laboratory in 2007, he has been dedicated to developing high-throughput cryo-ET pipeline in which both data collection and image analysis are streamlined and automated. The high-throughput cryo-ET pipeline is becoming increasingly powerful, enabling his laboratory to visualize over 100,000 cells from 100 different bacterial species. More importantly, the massive data from cryo-ET has been systematically utilized to gain structural insights into fundamental biological processes related to signaling transduction, flagellar assembly, protein secretion, phage adsorption DNA translocation, and host-pathogen interactions. Dr. Liu has published more than 60 papers in journals that include Nature, Science, PNAS, and Cell.
    • Joseph S. and Sophia S. Fruton Professor of Astronomy and Professor of Physics; Chair of Women Faculty Forum

      She is a theoretical astrophysicist interested in cosmology, gravitational lensing and black hole physics. Her research involves mapping the detailed distribution of dark matter in the universe exploiting the bending of light en-route to us from distant galaxies. In particular, she has focused on making dark matter maps of clusters of galaxies, the largest known repositories of dark matter. Gravitational lensing by clusters can also be utilized to constrain dark energy models and she has been developing the methodology and techniques to do so. Her work has demonstrated that cluster strong lensing offers a unique and potentially powerful laboratory to test evolving dark energy models.Priya is also actively engaged in deriving and understanding the mass assembly history of black holes over cosmic time. She is exploring a new channel for the formation of the first black holes and its observational consequences at high and low redshift. This channel produces massive seeds derived from the direct collapse of pre-galactic gas disks at the earliest epochs. This is in contrast to the conventional picture wherein light seeds are produced from the end state of the first stars. Current measurements of the masses of black holes hosted in nearby faint galaxies supports the existence of a massive seeding model. In earlier work, she argued for the existence of an upper limit to black hole masses in the universe by showing that black holes eventually stunt their own growth. This self-regulation implies the presence of ultra-massive black holes with capped masses in the centers of nearby galaxies that have since been observationally detected.In addition to her academic position at Yale, she also currently holds the Sophie and Tycho Brahe Professorship of the Dark Cosmology Center, Niels Bohr Institute, at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. She has been recently elected to an Honorary Professorship for life at the University of Delhi, India.
    • Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry and of Cell Biology; Director of Graduate Studies, Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry; Director, Yale Center for RNA Science and Medicine

      Karla Neugebauer holds a BS in Biology from Cornell University and a PhD in Neuroscience from UCSF. She switched gears to RNA biology as a postdoc with Mark Roth at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. There she participated in the initial description of the SR protein family of splicing regulators and was inspired to study RNA metabolism in vivo by combining imaging, genomics, and sequencing strategies. From 2001-2013 she was a Research Group Leader at the Max Planck Institute of Cell biology and Genetics in Dresden Germany. In 2013, she moved to Yale as a Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry and of Cell Biology. She has been the Director of the Yale Center for RNA Science and Biomedicine since 2018 and was recognized internationally for her work in RNA Biology by the RNA Society (2017 mid-career award). She has studied splicing in relation to nuclear speckles and discovered that most introns are removed during the process, or co-transcriptionally. Her lab has shown that snRNP assembly occurs in membraneless organelles called Cajal bodies (CBs) and that depletion of the CB scaffolding protein coilin is lethal in zebrafish embryos, due to a deficit in splicing. She is passionate about climate change, believing that everyone has something to contribute to meet its challenges. She is currently developing biochemistry curriculum to show the relevance of the discipline to meeting the current and future needs of our planet.
    • Professor of Genetics; Vice Chair, Genetics

      Valerie Reinke attended University of Illinois, receiving her B.S. in Genetics in 1990. She then went to University of Texas Health Sciences Center in Houston, Texas for graduate work in the laboratory of Gigi Lozano. There she studied mechanisms of tumor suppression by the factor p53, and received her PhD in Biomedical Sciences in 1996. Valerie performed her postdoctoral work in the laboratory of Stuart Kim at Stanford University in California, focusing on initiating genomic studies of a model organism, the nematode C. elegans. While there, she developed an interest in the role of gene expression in regulating C. elegans germline development. In 2000, she joined the faculty of the Department of Genetics at Yale School of Medicine, and continues to apply genome-wide technologies to understanding gene regulatory mechanisms in the germ line.
    • Anthony N. Brady Professor of Comparative Medicine and of Pathology; Deputy Chair, Comparative Medicine

      Yajaira studied Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University Autonoma of Madrid (1995). She did her PhD with Miguel Angel Lasuncion at the Hospital Ramón y Cajal and the University Autonoma de Madrid (Spain) (1996-2001). Yajaira also did two post-docs. The first one with Alberto Muñoz at the Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas "Alberto Sols" and the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas-Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain) (2002-2005) and the second one with Jordan Pober and Bill Sessa at Yale University School of Medicine (2005-2009). Yajaira initiated her independent research career in the Division of Cardiology at New York University School of Medicine in 2009. She joined the Yale faculty in 2013 as an Assistant Professor of Comparative Medicine and Pathology. Yajaira is currently Anthony N. Brady Professor of Comparative Medicine and also serves as Deputy Chair for the Department of Comparative Medicine.
    • Professor of Chemistry; Admission Committee Chair, Chemistry; Editorial Board Members, Biophysical Journal; Scientific Advisory Board Members, Polymer Research; Review Panelist, Molecular Architecture of Life

      Elsa Yan was born and grew up in Hong Kong. She graduated from the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 1995. Working with Kenneth Eisenthal on nonlinear optics and surface sciences, she obtained her Ph.D. at Columbia University in 2000. From 2000-2004, she was a postdoctoral fellow in Richard Mathies's lab at UC Berkeley and a visiting fellow in Thomas Sakmar's lab at the Rockefeller University. She combined Raman spectroscopy with techniques in molecular biology to understand the molecular mechanism of signal transduction in the G-protein coupled receptor rhodopsin. In 2004, she joined The Rockefeller University, where she continued to develop methods in expression and purification of membrane proteins. In 2007, Elsa became an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Yale. She was promoted to Associate Professor in 2012 and Full Professor in 2014.
  • Term (Clinical) Appointments & Promotions Committee

    • Committee Chair

      Harold W. Jockers Professor of Medicine, Deputy Dean for Academic Affairs

      Dr. Linda Bockenstedt is the Harold W. Jockers Professor of Medicine, Section of Rheumatology, and Deputy Dean for Faculty Affairs at Yale School of Medicine. She received her undergraduate degree in chemistry and physics from Harvard College and is a graduate of the Ohio State University School of Medicine. After completing residency training in medicine and serving as Chief Resident in Medicine at Yale, Dr. Bockenstedt obtained rheumatology clinical and research fellowship training at the University of California, San Francisco. She has been a faculty member at Yale School of Medicine since 1989, where she directs a research program devoted toward understanding the pathogenesis of Lyme disease, an infection-related rheumatic disease. Her research has been continually supported by the National Institutes of Health since 1990, and she is internationally recognized for her studies of the host immune response to spirochetal infection. She is also an active clinician and educator for medical trainees.Dr. Bockenstedt is an elected member of the Kunkel Society and the Interurban Clinical Club. She is a former standing member of the Immunity and Host Defense Study Section at NIH and former member of the Board of Directors for the American College of Rheumatology Research & Education Foundation. Since 2006 she has been active in faculty affairs at Yale School of Medicine, first as Director for Professional Development & Equity, then as an Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs at Yale School of Medicine,
    • Term 2022-2025

      Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology and Visual Science; Chief, Yale New Haven Health/Bridgeport Hospital; Vice Chairman of Faculty Affairs, Ophthalmology; Affiliated Faculty, Yale Institue for Global Health

      Dr. Brian DeBroff specializes in cataract and IOL implantation surgery. He has particular clinical and research interests in Femtosecond Laser Assisted Cataract Surgery, Optiwave Refractive Analysis using intraoperative wave front analysis for optimizing refractive results with implant surgery, multifocal and diffractive IOL’s after cataract surgery.  He is a preceptor to train other Ophthalmologists in the Catalys Precision Laser Cataract System.  He was appointed Director of cataract and IOL implant surgery at the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science at the Yale School of Medicine in 1999.Dr. DeBroff graduated from the Tufts University School of Medicine where he was inducted in the Sir William Osler and Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Societies.  He is Chief of Ophthalmology at Yale New Haven Health/Bridgeport and has served as Vice Chairman, Residency Program Director, and Board of Permanent Officers at Yale University.  He was presented with the Yale Resident Teaching Award in 1998 and 2008. Dr. DeBroff has over 100 publications including a book on phacoemulsification, and he has written seven book chapters and has lectured nationally and internationally.  He is Editor-in-Chief of Advances in Ophthalmology & Visual Science and is on the editorial board/Senior Reviewer for the Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, Archives of Ophthalmology, and British Journal of Ophthalmology.  Dr. DeBroff was inducted in the IIIC (International Intra-Ocular Implant Society) founded by Sir Harold Ridley and has received awards by Best Doctors, Castle Connolly, Connecticut Magazine, and New York Magazine.
    • Term 2023-2026

      Professor of Clinical Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

      Mark H. Schoenfeld, MD, FACC ,FAHA, FHRS has been a Clinical Professor of Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine for nearly 2 decades as well as a Fellow of Saybrook College, Yale University, and Professor in the Dept of Cardiovascular Medicine at Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine, Quinnipiac University. After graduating from Yale College and Harvard Medical School he was a medical resident, cardiac fellow and one of the earliest fellows in cardiac electrophysiology and pacing at the Massachusetts General Hospital before returning to Yale. He established the Cardiac Electrophysiology and Pacing Laboratories at both the Hospital of St Raphael (New Haven) and St Mary's Hospital (Waterbury). He has been involved in numerous clinical trials, having been one of the original investigators of the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and multiple elaborations of this technology thereafter including transvenous devices and cardiac resynchronization therapy and his involvement with catheter ablation for the management of cardiac arrhythmias extends back more than 3 decades. He served as President of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), the international organization dedicated to improving the care of patients with cardiac arrhythmias by promoting research, education and optimal health care policies and standards, and has served as the Governor of the Connecticut Chapter of the American College of Cardiology (ACC). Beyond caring for thousands of patients, being involved in clinical research and  in teaching, he has helped to develop ACC/AHA/HRS  medical guidelines to guide practitioners on the management of patients with cardiac arrhythmias. He has been active in health care policy and regulatory affairs as relates to cardiology and cardiac electrophysiology, working with the FDA on drug/device approval and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) by serving on the Relative Value Scale Update Committee (RUC) of the American Medical Association which advises CMS on reimbursement.
    • Term 2023-2026

      Professor of Clinical Medicine (Medical Oncology); Associate CEHE Director, Clinical Research

      Dr. Silber is the Associate CEHE Director for Clinical Research. As a medical oncologist who serves as the Medical Director and Physician Champion of the Centers for Disease Control/Connecticut Department of Public Health's 5-year provider supported grant at Yale New Haven Hospital entitled, The Connecticut Cancer Screening Program (CCSP), she designed the Comprehensive Breast Cancer Outreach and Support Program for Underserved Women, which is a culturally competent program supported by the Breast Cancer Alliance of Greenwich. She has supervised Community Health Educators dating back to 1996, when she received a national Komen award for the Sister to Sister Program, and has been recognized for expertise in breast cancer among African American women. She has directed a cancer clinic for the uninsured and underinsured for two decades and have formed community relationships, which require many years to nurture and demonstrate constancy. This year, she became the principal investigator of the Avon-Pfizer Metastatic Breast Cancer Grants Program: Identify-Amplify-Unify. This program assists organizations that provide information and services to help patients in navigating the medical and emotional challenges associated with their disease. Dr. Silber was awarded this grant from a highly competitive pool of 23 non-profit organizations nationally. Also, this year, CT Health and Educational Facilities Authority (CHEFA) awarded a grant to fund a novel program called “Breast Cancer S.W.A.T. Team- We’ve got your back!”. Learn more about Dr. Silber>>As a principal investigator, she assists economically disadvantaged breast cancer patients to adhere to treatment using medical legal partnership. This year, she was selected to participate as a leadership fellow of the Connecticut Health Foundation. The fellowship was established in 2005, and brings together diverse individuals from multiple sectors who are dedicated to achieving health equity. Each year, the foundation selects up to 20 participants into this competitive ten-month program. Throughout this program, her project has been to increase clinical trial participation among ethnic minorities and capitalize on opportunities created by the Affordable Care Act.  On May 1, 2015, she was named Assistant Clinical Director for Diversity and Health Equity at Yale Cancer Center and focuses on engagement with community partners in improving education for prevention and screening and access to cancer care for diverse populations within the local community as well as Greater New Haven area.
    • Term 2022-2025

      Professor of Clinical Medicine

      Dr. Wu directs the recruitment and training of 200 faculty involved in the clinical skills training and interprofessional education in undergraduate medical education of medical, nurse practitioner and physician associate students. He also co-directs the Connecticut Older Adult Collaboration for Health (COACH) 4M to enhance the geriatric workforce in primary care. He is Chair of the Health Committee for the Yale China Association and collaborated on a model of residency training at Xingaya Hospitals adopted by the government of China.
  • Term Appointments & Promotions Committee

    • Committee Chair

      Harold W. Jockers Professor of Medicine, Deputy Dean for Academic Affairs

      Dr. Linda Bockenstedt is the Harold W. Jockers Professor of Medicine, Section of Rheumatology, and Deputy Dean for Faculty Affairs at Yale School of Medicine. She received her undergraduate degree in chemistry and physics from Harvard College and is a graduate of the Ohio State University School of Medicine. After completing residency training in medicine and serving as Chief Resident in Medicine at Yale, Dr. Bockenstedt obtained rheumatology clinical and research fellowship training at the University of California, San Francisco. She has been a faculty member at Yale School of Medicine since 1989, where she directs a research program devoted toward understanding the pathogenesis of Lyme disease, an infection-related rheumatic disease. Her research has been continually supported by the National Institutes of Health since 1990, and she is internationally recognized for her studies of the host immune response to spirochetal infection. She is also an active clinician and educator for medical trainees.Dr. Bockenstedt is an elected member of the Kunkel Society and the Interurban Clinical Club. She is a former standing member of the Immunity and Host Defense Study Section at NIH and former member of the Board of Directors for the American College of Rheumatology Research & Education Foundation. Since 2006 she has been active in faculty affairs at Yale School of Medicine, first as Director for Professional Development & Equity, then as an Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs at Yale School of Medicine,
    • Term 2022-2025

      Professor of Pediatrics (Emergency Medicine) and of Emergency Medicine; CT Center Director- EMSC EIIC, Pediatrics; Director, Pediatric Simulation, Yale Center for Medical Simulation

      Marc is a Professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine at Yale. He is the Director of Pediatric Simulation at the Yale Center for Medical Simulation and was the founding co-chair of INSPIRE, the world’s largest simulation-based research network.  His academic work focuses on the use of innovative techniques and technologies, such as simulation, to measure and improve the quality of pediatric emergency care. His overarching goal is to ensure that all children, no matter where they live, go to school or travel, receive the highest quality emergency medical care.  In July 2020 Marc started in a national role with EMSC on the EIIC executive committee and co-leading the EIIC Knowledge Management and State Partnership Domains as the Connecticut Center Director.Prior to this role he served as the CT EMSC State Partnership Grant Medical Director for seven years and as an investigator on four different EMSC targeted issues grants and the leader on the EIIC Prehospital Emergency Care Collaborative. His projects involve working closely with prehospital and hospital emergency care coordinators leading pediatric efforts in community EDs and community EMS agencies.  In addition Marc is an active member of the PECARN PRIME node, the chair of the AAP SOEM Pediatric Readiness Subcommittee, and is actively working on multiple initiatives through other organizations (including SAEM, Pediatric Trauma Societies, American Heart Association, Emergency Nurses Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, NASEMSO). Marc serves as the PI of the ImPACTS study, a national effort to describe, measure and improve the quality of care provided to critically ill and injured pediatric patients in emergency departments using simulation. Marc completed a K30 Masters of Science in Clinical Investigation with a focus in translational medicine at New York University and post-graduate course work on simulation at Harvard’s Center for Medical Simulation. He has substantial leadership experiences in trauma and simulation research as a board member of the International Pediatric Simulation Society, co-chair of the Pediatric Academic Society’s Special Interest Group on Simulation-Based Research and as a leader on the Pediatric Trauma Society’s Guideline Committee. He has served as the principal investigator on multiple funded trauma and simulation research projects to ensure the optimal care for ill and injured children. This includes a grant-funded project using simulation training for disaster preparedness, a regional trauma simulation program, a local office based preparedness program.
    • Term 2022-2025

      Professor of Internal Medicine (General Medicine); Section Chief of General Internal Medicine VA Connecticut Healthcare System; Director, Pain Research, Informatics, Multimorbidities, and Education (PRIME) Center

      I began my 31 year research career at Duke University and the Durham VA in 1991 and moved to VA Connecticut and University of Connecticut in 2012. In January 2016, I was appointed Section Chief of Chief of General Internal Medicine at VA Connecticut in West Haven and Professor of Medicine at Yale. In this role, I oversee the academic development and clinical productivity of the hospitalists, primary care, and research faculty based at VA Connecticut. I also serve as the Director and Principal Investigator of the Pain Research, Informatics, Multimorbidities, and Education (PRIME) Center of Excellence at VA Connecticut. This is a  VA HSR&D center grant providing over 7 million in infrastructure support for multidisciplinary research focusing on improving pain in Veterans.
    • Term 2020-2023

      Professor Adjunct

      Dr. Hendrickson is a pediatric hematologist and transfusion medicine specialist. Her clinical interests include factors influencing alloimmunization (particularly red blood cell alloimmunization), as well as strategies to minimize the formation and dangers of such antibodies. Her translational research interests include investigating the induction and consequences of red blood cell alloantibodies in transfusion and pregnancy situations, in murine models and in the clinical setting.
    • Term 2021-2024

      Professor; Director of Allergy & Immunology, Internal Medicine

      Dr. Insoo Kang is Professor of Medicine (Rheumatology, Allergy & Immunology) at Yale University School of Medicine. He completed his post-graduate training in rheumatology and immunology research at Yale. He has been on the faculty at Yale School of Medicine since 1999. He is a physician scientist with a research interest in understanding the human immune system using biological samples and clinical data. In particular, Dr. Kang has defined subsets of T cells with distinct cellular characteristics based on the expression of cytokine receptors on T cells in health and disease as well as the interactions of such cell subsets with monocytes and other immune cells.
    • Term 2023-2026

      Professor of Psychiatry; Deputy Director, The Consultation Center, Psychiatry

      Joy S. Kaufman, PhD is a Professor of Psychiatry (Psychology Section), Yale School of Medicine and Deputy Director at the Yale Consultation Center where she also directs the areas of Program and Service System Evaluation and Evaluation Research. Trained as a Clinical and Community Psychologist, Dr. Kaufman conducts large-scale, multi-level evaluations of health service delivery systems, provides consultation to governmental and community organizations regarding these evaluations, and carries out related research. These evaluations take place in under-resourced communities; involve close partnerships with state and municipal governments, community organizations, and other public stakeholders; and generate data that informs program and policy development. A unique feature of her work is the training of public stakeholders to evaluate the services they receive or to utilize data so that they can provide rigorous and systematic feedback to improve services and participate in decision-making about their community. Dr. Kaufman's research interests include the identification of contextual factors that impact outcomes for individuals with emotional and behavioral difficulties.
    • Term 2022-2025

      Professor of Pathology; Director, Renal,Transplant Pathology and Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Pathology; Director, Renal & Genitourinary Fellowship Program, Pathology

      Dr. Moeckel graduated magna cum laude from Ludwig Maximillians University in Munich, Germany. He trained in anatomic and clinical pathology at the University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ and was on faculty in the Department of Pathology at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN prior to his recruitment as Director of the Renal Pathology and Electron Microscopy Laboratory at Yale University. His academic interests are in clinical renal pathology and research of mechanisms of kidney injury repair and progression of chronic kidney disease. Dr Moeckel is a fellow of the American Society of Nephrology and a Diplomat of the American Board of Pathology. He has published numerous papers in peer reviewed journals and has received private industry and federal grants to support his research.
    • Term 2022-2025

      Professor of Medicine (General Medicine) and of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases

      Dr. Andre Sofair is a Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the Yale Medical School and holds a secondary appointment in the School of Public Health’s Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases. He went to medical school at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (1986) and completed his Master’s in Public Health at the Yale School of Public Health in 1997. He is an attending physician and Firm Chief at Yale New-Haven Hospital. He is also a lead organizer for the medical chief residency program at the University of Rwanda. In addition to leading many studies in hepatitis and clinical care, he has lectured widely on biomedical ethics and eugenic sterilization.  He serves as co-director of the viral hepatitis clinic at the St. Raphael Campus.
    • Term 2021-2024

      Professor of Psychiatry; Medical Director, Connecticut Mental Health Center; Director, Yale Fellowship in Public Psychiatry; Co-Director, Yale Division of Public Psychiatry

      Dr. Steiner serves as the Medical Director of the CT Mental Health Center, where she oversees programs in quality improvement, clinical risk management, and medical staff affairs. She is involved in initiatives to improve the health of individuals with serious mental illness who are served by the center and throughout the public system in CT. She is the Director for the Yale Fellowship in Public Psychiatry, which provides advanced training to psychiatrists who have an interest in pursuing careers in psychiatric administration within the public sector and Director of the Public Psychiatry Track within the Yale Psychiatry Residency Program. She is the Co-editor of the Yale Textbook in Public Psychiatry, and Co-Director of the Yale Division of Public Psychiatry.