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Neuroscience Track

The interdisciplinary research programs of Yale neuroscience faculty are central to the Neuroscience Track in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences program. The primary purpose of the Neuroscience Track is to provide students with maximum diversity and depth in the most important areas of neuroscience research. The Track draws on the knowledge and expertise of more than eighty faculty members, representing over twenty departments in both the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and the School of Medicine, ranging from Psychiatry to Pharmacology and from Cell Biology to Biomedical Engineering.

Neuroscience Track Leadership

  • Charles Greer

    Co-Director, Neuroscience Track

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Neuroscience; Co Vice Chair of Research, Neurosurgery; Director, Interdepartmental Neuroscience Graduate Program

    Research Interests
    Central Nervous System; Neuroglia; Neurons; Nose; Gene Expression Profiling

    Dr. Charles A. Greer is the Vice Chair for Research and holds the rank of Professor of Neuroscience. Dr. Greer also serves as Director of the Yale Interdepartmental Neuroscience Graduate Program. He has served as the President of the Association for Chemoreception Sciences, Chair of National Institutes of Health Study Sections and recently completed a term on the Advisory Council for the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders.

    He has organized several national and international conferences and is frequently an invited speaker. Dr. Greer is an Associate Editor of The Journal of Comparative Neurology and Journal of Neuroscience and a member of the editorial boards of Frontiers in Neurogenomics, Frontiers in Neuroanatomy and Frontiers in Neuorgenesis and the Faculty of 1000. Dr. Greer has been the recipient of numerous awards recognizing his research accomplishments.

Registrar

Faculty

  • Nii Addy

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Behavioral Sciences; Electrochemistry; Neurobiology; Psychiatry; Signal Transduction; Substance-Related Disorders
  • Alan Anticevic

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Division of Neurocognition, Neurocomputation, and Neurogenetics (N3), Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Affect; Mental Disorders; Cognition; Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted; Emotions; Memory, Short-Term; Schizophrenia; Computational Biology; Substance-Related Disorders; Neuroimaging

    Dr. Anticevic trained in Clinical Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience at Washington University in St. Louis where he trained with Drs. Deanna Barch and David Van Essen. Following graduate training, Dr. Anticevic completed his internship in Clinical Neuropsychology at Yale University. After internship, he joined the Yale University Department of Psychiatry as research faculty while concurrently serving as the Administrative Director for the Center for the Translational Neuroscience of Alcoholism. Subsequently, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology at the Yale University School of Medicine, where he directs a clinical neuroimaging laboratory focused on severe mental illness. Dr. Anticevic is a recipient of the NARSAD Young Investigator Award, the International Congress of Schizophrenia Research Young Investigator Award, the NIH Director's Early Independence Award, the NARSAD Independent Investigator Award and the Klerman Prize for Exceptional Clinical Research. He currently serves as the Director of the Division of Neurocognition, Neurocomputation, and Neurogenetics (N3) at Yale School of Medicine.

    His group's research focus is centered on computational and cognitive neuroscience of mental illness. Specifically, Dr. Anticevic's group is interested in characterizing neural mechanisms involved in higher order cognitive operations, such as working memory, as well as their interaction with neural systems involved in affective processes, with the aim of understanding how these computations may go awry in the context of severe mental illness . Methodologically, his group uses the combination of task-based, resting-state, pharmacological multi-modal neuroimaging, as well as computational modeling approaches to map neural alterations that lead to poor mental health outcomes. The overarching goal of the group is to develop neurobiologically principled and computationally grounded mapping between neural and behavioral levels of analyses in people to inform personalized and rational treatment design for mental health symptoms.

  • Amy Arnsten

    Albert E. Kent Professor of Neuroscience and Professor of Psychology; Member, Kavli Institute of Neuroscience at Yale University

    Research Interests
    Aging; Alzheimer Disease; Behavioral Sciences; Psychology, Child; Mental Health; Neurobiology; Neurosciences; Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic; Prefrontal Cortex; Cognitive Science

    Dr. Arnsten was raised in Maplewood, N.J. where she attended Columbia High School. She received her B.A. in Neuroscience from Brown University in 1976, and her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from UCSD in 1981. She did post-doctoral research with Dr. Susan Iversen at Cambridge University in the UK, and with Dr. Patricia Goldman-Rakic at Yale. Dr. Arnsten's research examines the neural basis of higher cognition. Her work has revealed that the newly evolved cortical circuits that underlie higher cognition are uniquely regulated at the molecular level, conferring vulnerability in mental illness and age-related cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease. Arnsten's research has led to new treatments for cognitive disorders in humans, including the successful translation of guanfacine (IntunivTM) for the treatment of ADHD and related prefrontal cortical disorders.

  • Slav Bagriantsev

    Associate Professor of Cellular & Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    Biochemistry; Biophysics; Ducks; Electrophysiology; Ion Channels; Mechanoreceptors; Neurosciences; Pacinian Corpuscles; Sensory Receptor Cells; Trigeminal Ganglion; Thermoreceptors; Potassium Channels; Anseriformes; Transient Receptor Potential Channels; Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels
  • Anton Bennett

    Dorys McConnell Duberg Professor of Pharmacology and Professor of Comparative Medicine; Co-Director, Program in Integrative Cell Signaling and Neurobiology of Metabolism; Director, BBS Minority Affairs

  • Hal Blumenfeld

    Mark Loughridge and Michele Williams Professor of Neurology and Professor of Neuroscience and of Neurosurgery; Director, Yale Clinical Neuroscience Imaging Center (CNIC)

    Research Interests
    Electrophysiology; Epilepsy; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Neurobiology; Neurology; Neurosurgery; Behavioral Research; Neuroimaging

    Dr. Blumenfeld's clinical and research work focuses on epilepsy, cognition and brain imaging. He directs Yale's Clinical Neuroscience Imaging Center (CNIC), a new multi-disciplinary core facility for innovative study and treatment of brain disorders. Teaching activities include a textbook titled Neuroanatomy Through Clinical Cases, Sinauer Assoc., Publ. 2002, 2010.

  • Angelique Bordey

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Cellular And Molecular Physiology; Co Vice Chair of Research, Neurosurgery

    Research Interests
    Autistic Disorder; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Malformations; Nervous System Diseases; Neurologic Manifestations; Neurosurgery; Physiology; Stem Cells; Diseases

    Dr. Angélique Bordey holds the rank of Professor of Neuroscience. Dr. Bordey is an active participant in teaching and training of graduate and medical students at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Bordey is the Editor-in-Chief of the journal Frontiers in Neurogenesis and an executive Editor of the journals Neuropharmacology, Glia, Neuroplasticity, AES Neuro, Neurogenesis, and Fronteirs in Neuroscience. She has served as an Ad Hoc member on several study sections and is presently a member of CMBG NIH study section . She has organized several national and international symposiums, and is frequently an invited speaker. Finally, she is a McKnight awardee and holds several grant fundings.

  • William Cafferty

    Associate Professor of Neurology and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Brain Diseases; Demyelinating Diseases; Pain; Spinal Cord Injuries; Neurodegenerative Diseases
  • Jessica Cardin

    Associate Professor Term

    Research Interests
    Autistic Disorder; Cerebral Cortex; Electrophysiology; Epilepsy; Interneurons; Neurobiology; Neurosciences; Schizophrenia
  • John Carlson

    Eugene Higgins Professor of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

    Research Interests
    Arthropod Vectors; Drosophila; Smell; Taste
  • Sreeganga Chandra

    Associate Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience; Associate Professor, Neurology; Associate Professor of Neuroscience; Deputy Chair of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Neurology; Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses; Parkinson Disease; Synapses; Receptors, Presynaptic; Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Sreeganga S. Chandra received her Ph.D. in Chemistry from Purdue University. In her postdoctoral research, she pursued her interest in neuronal cell biology and neurodegeneration in the lab of Thomas C. Südhof at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. She is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Neurology, and Neuroscience. She is also the Deputy Chair for the Department of Neuroscience. 

  • Steve Chang

    Assistant Professor of Psychology and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Amygdala; Neuropharmacology; Neurophysiology; Social Behavior; Prefrontal Cortex; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Steve Chang is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Yale University. His research investigates the neural mechanisms of social cognition and social decision-making. Steve has been at the forefront of using live social interaction paradigms for studying the neural mechanisms underlying social decision-making and social gaze interactions. The ultimate goal of his research is to elucidate the neurophysiological and neuropharmacological mechanisms underlying social cognition and how these processes may be disrupted in psychiatric conditions with social deficits.

  • Marvin M Chun

    Dean of Yale College, Richard M. Colgate Professor of Psychology and Professor of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Attention; Decision Making; Memory; Neurobiology; Perception; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Marvin M. Chun is the Richard M. Colgate Professor of Psychology with a secondary appointment in the Yale School of Medicine Department of Neuroscience. He is also a member of the Yale Cognitive Science Program. He leads a cognitive neuroscience laboratory that uses brain imaging and machine learning to study how people see, attend, remember, and perform optimally.  One line of work uses brain imaging to read out perceptions and thoughts.  Another  focus is to use brain imaging to understand and predict what makes people different [projects] [press]. He received his B.A. from Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea, after having spent a junior year abroad at the University of California, Berkeley. He earned his Ph.D. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, followed by postdoctoral training at Harvard University, funded by an NIH NRSA. His research has been honored with a 2006 Troland Research Award from the US National Academy of Sciences, and a 2002 American Psychological Association Early Career Award. His laboratory is grateful to receive funding from the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation. In Yale College he teaches Introduction to Psychology, for which he received the Phi Beta Kappa William DeVane Award for Teaching and Scholarship and the Lex Hixon Prize for Teaching Excellence.

  • Damon Clark

    Associate Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology and of Physics and of Neuroscience

  • Lawrence B. Cohen

    Professor of Cellular And Molecular Physiology; Principal Scientist, Korea Institute of Science and Technology

    Research Interests
    Neurosciences

    Research Interests: Neuroscience; Olfactory processing; and Imaging brain activity

    My laboratory pioneered the development and use of optical methods for following, on a large scale, rapid electrical events that underlie brain activity and changes in ion concentration in biological systems. Some contemporary imaging methods of modern neurobiology and cardiac physiology are founded on these developments.

  • Daniel Alfonso Colón-Ramos

    Dorys McConnell Duberg Professor of Neuroscience and Cell Biology; Associate Professor of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Behavior; Brain; Cell Biology; Neurons

    Daniel Colón-Ramos was born and raised in Puerto Rico. He completed his B.A. at Harvard University, his PhD in the lab of Dr. Sally Kornbluth at Duke University and was a postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Dr. Kang Shen at Stanford University. The Colón-Ramos lab is interested in how synapses are precisely assembled to build the neuronal architecture that underlies behavior. To address this, they developed tools in the thermotaxis circuit of C. elegans. Their system enables unbiased genetic screens to identify novel pathways that instruct synaptogenesis in vivo, and single-cell manipulation of these pathways to understand how they influence behavior. As mechanisms underlying synapse structure and function are conserved, the research program seeks to enhance our understanding of synaptic cell biology in higher organisms, which may be important for disease.

  • Todd Constable

    Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging and of Neurosurgery; Director MRI Research

    Research Interests
    Anatomy; Diagnostic Imaging; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Neurosurgery; Radiology; Neuroimaging
  • Philip Corlett

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Dr. Philip Robert Corlett trained in Experimental Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychiatry with Professors Trevor Robbins and Paul Fletcher at the University of Cambridge. He won a Wellcome Trust Prize Studentship and completed his PhD on the brain bases of delusion formation in the Brain Mapping Unit, Department of Psychiatry. After a short postdoc, he was awarded the University of Cambridge Parke- Davis Exchange Fellowship in Biomedical Sciences which brought him to the Yale University Department of Psychiatry to explore the maintenance of delusions with Professors Jane Taylor and John Krystal. He was named a Rising Star and Future Opinion Leader by Pharmaceutical Marketing Magazine and joined the Yale faculty in 2011 where he will continue to explore the cognitive and biological mechanisms of delusional beliefs as well as predictive learning, habit formation and addiction.

  • Kelly Cosgrove

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry, of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Alcoholism; Brain; Opioid-Related Disorders; Neurobiology; Nicotine; Radiology; Positron-Emission Tomography; Neuroimaging; alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor; Diseases; Chemicals and Drugs; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Dr. Cosgrove uses positron emission tomography (PET) to gain insights into the brains of people after they’ve stopped using alcohol and tobacco. Trained as a clinical psychologist who worked with individuals suffering from drug addiction, Dr. Cosgrove transitioned to conducting research in order to find more effective ways of helping patients recover from addiction and avoid relapse. Her laboratory develops and uses creative PET imaging paradigms to track changes in critical neurochemicals during the recovery from addiction.

  • Michael Crair

    William Ziegler III Professor of Neuroscience and Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science; Deputy Dean for Scientific Affairs (Basic Science Departments)

    Research Interests
    Brain; Cerebral Cortex; Child Development; Nervous System; Synaptic Transmission; Neuronal Plasticity; Neurosciences; Visual Cortex

    Michael C. Crair is the William Ziegler III Professor in the Department of Neuroscience, Professor of Ophthalmology & Visual Science and Deputy Dean for Scientific Affairs (Basic Science Departments). Dr. Crair obtained his doctoral degree in physics from the University of California, Berkeley, and did postdoctoral training in physics and neuroscience at Kyoto University and Kyoto Prefectural Medical School in Japan and in neuroscience at the University of California, San Francisco. He was a faculty member at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas before coming to Yale as a member of the Department of Neuroscience in 2007. He has directed Yale’s Vision Core Program, the Graduate Program in Neuroscience and was Deputy Chair of the Department of Neuroscience until 2017, when he became Deputy Dean for Scientific Affairs (Basic Science Departments).

    Dr. Crair maintains an active research program, developing advanced imaging techniques to study neural circuit development. He has made fundamental contributions to our understanding of neural activity in the developing brain, for instance by demonstrating that early spontaneous neuronal activity is an essential part of normal brain development. He is currently exploring the mechanisms by which this activity is generated and how it shapes brain circuit development. He has been awarded numerous honors for his research and teaching, including the Esther A. and Joseph Klingenstein Foundation Fellowship Award in the Neurosciences, the Marc Dresden Excellence in Graduate Education Award, and a NARSAD-Sidney R. Baer Jr. Foundation Young Investigator Award. He has also been named an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellow, a John Merck Fund Scholar and the March of Dimes Foundation's Basil O'Connor Fellow. 

  • Pietro De Camilli

    John Klingenstein Professor of Neuroscience and Professor of Cell Biology; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Chair, Department of Neuroscience; Director, Kavli Institute for Neuroscience and Program in Cellular Neuroscience, Neurodegeneration and Repair (CNNR)

    Research Interests
    Alzheimer Disease; Cell Membrane; Cell Biology; Endocytosis; Neurosciences; Parkinson Disease; Synapses; Lipid Metabolism; Neuroacanthocytosis

    A native of Italy, De Camilli studied at the Liceo Manzoni in Milan, earned his M.D. degree from the University of Milano in 1972 and obtained a postgraduate degree in medical endocrinology from the University of Pavia in Italy. He was a postdoctoral fellow (1978-79) with Paul Greengard in the Department of Pharmacology at Yale, and subsequently an assistant professor in the Yale Section of Cell Biology. Following a return of a few years to Milan, he moved back to Yale in the late 1980s, where he is now John Klingenstein Professor of Neuroscience. He became an Investigator in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in 1992. From 1997 to 2000 he served as Chair of the Department of Cell Biology and since 2005 he is Founding Director of the Yale Program in Cellular Neuroscience, Neurodegeneration and Repair. Since 2015, he serves as Chair of the Department of Neuroscience and Director of the Kavli Institute for Neuroscience.

    The De Camilli lab is interested in the cell biology of neuronal synapses. His studies on synaptic vesicle dynamics have contributed to the general fields of exocytosis and endocytosis. His research has provided insight into mechanisms of membrane fission and has revealed ways through which membrane-associated proteins can generate, sense and stabilize lipid bilayer curvature. His discovery and characterization of the role of phosphoinositide metabolism in the control of endocytosis have broad implications in the fields of phospholipid signaling and of membrane traffic. Building on this work, he has recently become interested in the role of membrane contact sites in the control of the homeostasis of bilayer lipids. His studies of synapses have also contributed to the elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms of human diseases. 



  • Jonathan Demb

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, of Cellular And Molecular Physiology and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Adaptation, Physiological; Neurophysiology; Retinal Ganglion Cells; Synapses; Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells; Retinal Bipolar Cells

    Jonathan Demb is an Associate Professor in the Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Science with secondary appointments in the Department of Cellular & Molecular Physiology and the Department of Neuroscience. Dr. Demb obtained his doctoral degree from Stanford University and did postdoctoral training at the University of Pennsylvania. Demb was a faculty member at the University of Michigan before moving to Yale in 2011.

    The Demb lab investigates the basic mechanisms that enable healthy visual processing by the mammalian retina. Major accomplishments include identifying fundamental nonlinearities at retinal synapses that mediate specialized spatial processing by retinal ganglion cells; elucidating the role of disinhibition in visual contrast processing; characterizing asymmetries between the retina's ON and OFF pathways; determining roles of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in ganglion cell receptive fields; identifying characteristic properties of cone-mediated vision in the mouse retina; developing the use of a glutamate sensor (iGluSnFR) for study of retinal circuitry; identifying novel amacrine cell circuits using optogenetic technology; and testing experimental therapies in mouse models of retinal disease. Demb is a Reviewing Editor at the Journal of Neuroscience and is on the Editorial Board of PLoS Biology. He was awarded the Cogan Award in 2013 from the Associate for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) to recognize his contributions to the field of retinal neuroscience.

  • Sabrina Diano

    Richard Sackler Family Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, and Professor of Comparative Medicine and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Endocrine System; Nervous System; Diseases

    Sabrina Diano, Ph.D.
    Professor
    Email: sabrina.diano@yale.edu
    Phone: 737-1216

    Dr. Sabrina Diano is a Tenure Professor in Departments of Cellular & Molecular Physiology, Neurobiology and Comparative Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine and Graduate School. She is also part of the Integrative Cell Signaling and Neurobiology of Metabolism (ICSNM), and Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program here at Yale. She graduated with honors from the University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy. She conducted her post doctoral studies here at Yale where she became faculty in 2000.

    Her research focuses on CNS (hypothalamic) mechanisms relating to the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. Her studies on hypothalamic inter- and intra-cellular mechanisms that regulates energy metabolism add critical information to the current understanding of the central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis and how alterations in stored energy are sensed in the hypothalamus. The results of her research have important implications for understanding the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, obesity and type 2 diabetes, disorders that are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the U.S., and the developed world in general, with the highest financial burden on the National economy.

    Selected Publications:


    Toda C, Santoro A, Kim JD, Diano S. (2017) POMC neurons: From birth to Death. Annu Rev Physiol. 79:209-236. doi: 10.1146/annurev-physiol-022516-034110. PMID: 28192062

    Santoro A, Campolo M, Liu C, Sesaki H, Meli R, Liu ZW, Kim JD, Diano S. (2017) DRP1 suppresses leptin and glucose sensing of POMC neurons. Cell Metab. 25(3):647-660. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2017.01.003. Epub 2017 Feb 9. PMID: 28190775

    Toda C, Kim JD, Impellizzeri D, Cuzzocrea S, Liu ZW, Diano S (2016) UCP2 regulates mitochondrial fission and ventromedial nucleus control of glucose responsiveness. Cell 164(5):872-83. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2016.02.010. PMID: 26919426

    Koch M, Varela L, Kim JG, Kim JD, Hernandez F, Simonds SE, Castorena CM, Vianna CR, Elmquist JK, Morozov YM, Rakic P, Bechmann I, Cowley MA, Szigeti-Buck K, Dietrich MO, Gao X-B, Diano S, Horvath TL (2015) Hypothalamic POMC neurons promote cannabinoid-induced feeding. Nature 519(7541):45-50. doi: 10.1038/nature14260. Epub 2015 Feb 18.

    Long L, Toda C, Jeong JK, Horvath TL, Diano S(2014) PPARg-deficient POMC neurons preserve weight control on obesogenic diet. J Clin Invest 124(9):4017-27. doi: 10.1172/JCI76220. PMID: 25083994

    Kim JD, Toda C, D'Agostino G, Zeiss CJ, DiLeone RJ, Elsworth JD, Kibbey RG, Chan O, Harvey BK, Richie CT, Savolainen M, Myöhännen T, Jeong JK, Diano S. (2014) Hypothalamic prolyl endopeptidase (PREP) regulates pancreatic insulin and glucagon secretion in mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 111(32):11876-81. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1406000111. PMID: 25071172

    Jeong JK, Diano S(2013) Prolyl carboxypeptidase and its inhibitors in metabolism. Trend in Endocrinology and Metabolism 24(2):61-7. doi: 10.1016/j.tem.2012.11.001. Epub 2012 Dec 12.PMID: 23245768.

    Diano S, Horvath TL (2012) Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 in glucose and lipid metabolism. Trends in Molecular Medicine 18(1):52-8.

    Diano S, Liu ZW, Jeong JK, Dietrich MO, Ruan HB, Kim E, Suyama S, Kelly K, Gyengesi E, Arbiser JL, Belsham DD, Sarruf DA, Schwartz MW, Bennett A, Shanabrough M, Mobbs CV, Yang X, Gao XB, Horvath TL (2011) Peroxisome proliferation-related hypothalamic control of ROS sets melanocortin tone and feeding in diet-induced obesity. Nature Medicine 2011 17(9):1121-7.

    Wallingford N, Perroud B, Gao Q, Coppola A, Gyengesi E, Liu ZW, Gao XB, Diament A, Haus KA, Shariat-Madar Z, Mahdi F, Wardlaw SL, Schmaier AH, Warden CH, Diano S. (2009) Prolylcarboxypeptidase regulates food intake by inactivating alpha-MSH in rodents. J Clin Invest. 119(8):2291-303.

    Andrews ZB, Liu ZW, Wallingford N, Erion DM, Borok E, Friedman JM, Tschoep MH, Shanabrough M, Cline GM, Shulman GI, Coppola A, Gao XB, Horvath TL, Diano S (2008) UCP2 mediates ghrelin’s action on NPY/AgRP neurons. Nature 454(7206):846-51.

    Gao Q, Mezei G, Nie Y, Rao Y, Choi CS, Bechmann I, Leranth C, Toran-Allerand D, Priest CA, Roberts JL, Gao XB, Mobbs C, Shulman GI, Diano S, Horvath TL. (2007) Anorectic estrogen mimics leptin's effect on the rewiring of melanocortin cells and Stat3 signaling in obese animals. Nature Medicine. 13(1):89-94.

    Coppola A, Liu ZW, Andrews ZB, Paradis E, Roy MC, Friedman JM, Ricquier D, Richard D, HorvathTL, Gao XB, Diano S. (2007) A central thermogenic-like mechanism in feeding regulation: an interplay between arcuate nucleus T3 and UCP2. Cell Metabolism 5:21-33.

  • Marcelo Dietrich

    Assistant Professor of Comparative Medicine and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Alzheimer Disease; Animals; Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms; Mental Disorders; Hypothalamus; Mental Health; Nervous System; Neurobiology; Neurosciences; Obesity; Synapses
  • Ralph DiLeone

    Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Feeding and Eating Disorders; Ethology; Neurobiology; Obesity; Psychiatry; Substance Abuse Detection; Natural History; Animal Nutrition Sciences
  • George Dragoi

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Behavior, Animal; Cognition; Electrophysiology; Hippocampus; Learning; Neuronal Plasticity; Spatial Behavior; Spatial Memory; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Dr. George Dragoi is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience in the Department of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, CT. He holds M.D. degree from the Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Iasi, Romania and Ph.D. degree in Behavioral and Neural Science from Rutgers University where he worked in the laboratory of Dr. Gyorgy Buzsaki. He completed his postdoctoral studies at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the laboratory of Dr. Susumu Tonegawa. Dr. Dragoi studies the neurophysiological basis of the organization of hippocampal neurons into cellular assemblies and their dynamic grouping during novel spatial exploration and in response to long-term synaptic plasticity. Recently, he revealed the existence of preconfigured cellular assemblies that pre-play in time the spatial sequences occurring during a future novel spatial experience in naive animals. Dr. Dragoi’ current research focuses on the role of neuronal activity and prior experience in cellular assembly organization and animal learning with implications for our better understanding of neuropsychiatric diseases.

  • Ronald Duman

    Elizabeth Mears and House Jameson Professor of Psychiatry and Professor of Neuroscience; Director, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities

    Research Interests
    Antidepressive Agents; Depression; Molecular Biology; Neurobiology; Psychiatry; Stress, Psychological; Signal Transduction; Gene Expression

    Dr. Duman received his doctorate degree from the University

    of Texas in Houston and conducted postgraduate work at Yale University before

    joining the faculty there. He has written and/or co-authored over 300 original

    papers, reviews and book chapters, and has presented over 250 invited lectures.

    Dr. Duman is also on the editorial board of several prestigious journals and

    serves as a consultant for a number of biotech and pharmaceutical companies.

    Dr. Duman has received several awards for his work, including the Anna-Monika Prize, Nola Maddox Falcone Prize, Janssen Prize, NIMH MERIT Award, and a NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Award

    Studies from Dr. Duman’s laboratory have contributed to characterization of the molecular and cellular actions of stress, depression, and antidepressant treatments, providing the basis for a neurotrophic and synaptic hypothesis of depression. He has also studied the role of the innate immune system in the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. These findings represent major advances in our understanding of the effects of antidepressants and provide a framework for the development of novel therapeutic agents.

  • Barbara Ehrlich

    Professor of Pharmacology and of Cellular And Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    Calcium; Polycystic Kidney Diseases; Pharmacology; Physiology; Hermeneutics
  • Tore Eid

    Associate Professor of Laboratory Medicine, of Neurosurgery and of Molecular Physiology; Associate Director, Clinical Chemistry Laboratory, Yale-New Haven Hospital

    Research Interests
    Epilepsy; Immunohistochemistry; Neurosurgery; Mass Spectrometry; Medical Laboratory Science; Toxicology; Clinical Chemistry Tests
  • Paul Forscher

    Professor of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

    I did my PhD thesis work in the Neuroscience Graduate Program at UNC Chapel Hill from 1979-1985. In Dr. Gerry Oxford’s lab I received training in classical excitable membrane biophysics and used the then emergent technology of “patch clamping” to investigate the mechanism of voltage dependent Calcium channel modulation by biogenic amines in dorsal root ganglion (sensory) neurons.

    In 1985, I joined Dr. Stephen Smith’s lab in the Section of Molecular Neurobiology and HHMI at YaleUniversity for post doctoral work. I maintained a keen interest in Calcium as a signaling molecule and was hoping to gain some experience in Calcium imaging to compliment my electrophysiological studies; however, by a quirk of scientific fate I began investigating neuronal growth cone motility using high resolution video enhanced DIC microscopy. This unexpected turn of events led me directly into the study of cell motility –a descriptive field of research at the time, especially when compared to the quantitative realm of ion channel biophysics which I was accustomed to. Working in cell motility necessitated learning about cytoskeletal protein dynamics and function, and I embarked on the road to becoming a cell biologist.

    In 1989 I started my lab in the Department of Biology (now the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology) at Yale University. Our research initially focused on characterizing the cytoskeletal protein dynamics and molecular motor activity underlying growth cone motility. Over the years I have maintained an interest in understanding how classical signal transduction pathways (Ca, PKC, PKA, etc.) modulate cytoskeletal machinery to affect axon growth and guidance.

    To investigate mechanisms of growth cone guidance, we developed an in vitro turning assay using silica bead substrates coated with attractive cell adhesion molecules. These bioassays were first used to identify signal transduction pathways involved in substrate dependent growth cone turning and to characterize the role traction forces play in axon advance. A role for src family tyrosine kinases as mechano-transduction sensors emerged from this work.

    Recently we have been developing biophysical methods for measuring traction forces that growth cones exert on the underlying substrate while co-assessing cytoskeletal dynamics with fluorescently tagged proteins. These studies yield quantitative data amenable to mathematical modeling of the fundamental processes underlying neuronal growth and regenerative processes.

  • Jason Gerrard

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery and of Neuroscience; Chief, Functional Neurosurgery; Chief, Trauma Neurosurgery, YNHH

    Research Interests
    Anatomy; Information Science; Diseases; Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment

    Dr. Jason Gerrard is an Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery specializing in Epilepsy Surgery as well as Functional Neurosurgery. He is the Chief of the Functional and Stereotactic and Neurotrauma Sections of the Yale School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery. He is a member of the Yale Comprehensive Epilepsy Program as part of the Epilepsy Surgery team. He is fellowship trained in both Functional Neurosurgery and Epilepsy Surgery. Dr. Gerrard's area of clinical interest include the treatment of intractable epilepsy and movement disorders such as Parkinson's Disease and Essential Tremor via deep brain stimulation. He also provides surgical options for functional pain syndromes such as trigeminal neuralgia and intractable back pain.

    Dr. Gerrard also conducts both translational and basic science research in a full-time laboratory at the Yale School of Medicine. His PhD thesis focused on the neural network mechanisms within the hippocampus in learning and memory. Presently, his laboratory focuses on understanding the network processes underlying epileptogenesis and seizure propagation in new animal models of epilepsy. There is a strong emphasis on the design of intelligent brain-machine interfaces to advance the understanding of neurological diseases and bring new and improved treatments to our patients with epilepsy and other neurological disorders.

  • Sourav Ghosh

    Associate Professor of Neurology and Pharmacology

    Research Interests
    Glioblastoma; Immune System; Inflammation; Cell Death; Neurodegenerative Diseases; Neurodevelopmental Disorders
  • Pallavi Gopal

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Research Interests
    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Autopsy; Cell Biology; Neurons; Ribonucleoproteins; Neurodegenerative Diseases; RNA Transport; Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration; TDP-43 Proteinopathies

    Pallavi Gopal is a graduate of the Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia. Her Ph.D. thesis work in Neuroscience with Dr. Jeffrey Golden focused on understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that guide neuronal migration during forebrain development. After earning her M.D., Pallavi completed postgraduate clinical training in Anatomic Pathology and Neuropathology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. She did her postdoctoral research training with Dr. Erika Holzbaur at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Gopal is a recipient of the NINDS Clinical Scientist Research Career Development Award. She joined the Pathology Department at Yale School of Medicine in January 2018.

    The Gopal lab is broadly interested in mRNA transport, RNA metabolism and its regulation in healthy and diseased neurons. As a physician-scientist, Dr. Gopal’s research aims to bridge neuronal cell biology and neuropathology of neurodegenerative disease. Her post-doctoral research provided new insight into the biophysical properties of neuronal ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules and has shown that ALS-linked mutations fundamentally perturb the dynamic properties and transport of neuronal RNP complexes. The focus of the Gopal lab is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms driving neuronal RNP granule assembly, the spatiotemporal maturation and function of diverse RNP granules in neuronal physiology, and pathologic transitions in disease.

  • Elena Gracheva

    Associate Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Physiology, Comparative
  • Charles Greer

    Co-Director, Neuroscience Track

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Neuroscience; Co Vice Chair of Research, Neurosurgery; Director, Interdepartmental Neuroscience Graduate Program

    Research Interests
    Central Nervous System; Neuroglia; Neurons; Nose; Gene Expression Profiling

    Dr. Charles A. Greer is the Vice Chair for Research and holds the rank of Professor of Neuroscience. Dr. Greer also serves as Director of the Yale Interdepartmental Neuroscience Graduate Program. He has served as the President of the Association for Chemoreception Sciences, Chair of National Institutes of Health Study Sections and recently completed a term on the Advisory Council for the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders.

    He has organized several national and international conferences and is frequently an invited speaker. Dr. Greer is an Associate Editor of The Journal of Comparative Neurology and Journal of Neuroscience and a member of the editorial boards of Frontiers in Neurogenomics, Frontiers in Neuroanatomy and Frontiers in Neuorgenesis and the Faculty of 1000. Dr. Greer has been the recipient of numerous awards recognizing his research accomplishments.

  • Jaime Grutzendler

    Dr. Harry M. Zimmerman and Dr. Nicholas and Viola Spinelli Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience; Director, Center for Experimental Neuroimaging

    Research Interests
    Alzheimer Disease; Astrocytes; Axons; Blood-Brain Barrier; Capillaries; Cerebrovascular Circulation; Microscopy; Nerve Fibers, Myelinated; Neuronal Plasticity; Regional Blood Flow; Microglia; Neurodegenerative Diseases; Pericytes

    Dr. Grutzendler obtained his MD at Universidad Javeriana in Bogota, Colombia where he was born and raised. He completed a medical internship in Internal Medicine and a residency in Neurology at Washington University/Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis. This was followed by a combined clinical and research fellowship in the Alzheimer Disease Research Center and the Department of Neurobiology at Washington University and further neurobiology research training at the Skirball Institute of New York University. Dr. Grutzendler's clinical interests focus on neurodegenerative disorders with special emphasis in dementias such as Alzheimer's disease. He also leads a research laboratory focused on understanding brain function and the cellular basis of neurological diseases. His lab uses advanced microscopy to visualize neurons, endothelium, astrocytes, pericytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes in living animals with the goal of exploring their dynamic behavior and learning how cell-cell interactions develop. He aims to understand how these interactions are disrupted in disease states such as in Alzheimer's disease, stroke and demyelination with the ultimate goal of designing new therapies for these conditions.

  • Murat Gunel

    Nixdorff-German Professor of Neurosurgery and Professor of Genetics and of Neuroscience; Chair, Department of Neurosurgery; Chief, Neurosurgery, Yale New Haven Health System; Chair, Perioperative Executive Leadership Committee; Director, Residency Program; Member, National Academy of Medicine; Co-Director, Yale Program on Neurogenetics

    Research Interests
    Aneurysm; Brain; Genetics; Molecular Biology; Neurobiology; Neurosurgery; Hemangioma, Cavernous, Central Nervous System

    Dr. Murat Gunel, Professor of Neurosurgery, assumed the position of chief of Neurovascular Surgery Program in January of 2001. Dr. Gunel is a board certified neurosurgeon and is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons. He has special interest in treating brain aneurysms and vascular malformations with special emphasis on arterio-venous malformations and cavernous malformations. He also has expertise in occlusive vascular disorders such as carotid disease and gamma knife surgery (radiosurgery).

    His laboratory interests parallel his expertise in clinical neurovascular surgery and focus on gene discovery in disorders of the nervous system and its vasculature. Dr. Gunel's lab completed the two largest genome wide association studies (GWAS) aimed at understanding common variants that underlie intracranial aneurysm genetic risk based on the analysis of over 20,000 subjects. In addition, he is interested in the identification of genes important in human brain development through the study of rare, consanguineous families with recessive forms of malformations of cortical development.

  • Junjie Guo

    Assistant Professor of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Neurons; RNA; Motor Neuron Disease; RNA-Binding Proteins; Computational Biology; Neurodegenerative Diseases; Genomics; RNA Transport; Frontotemporal Dementia; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing

    A native of Guangzhou, China, Junjie Guo received his B.A. in Biology from Peking University (Beijing). He completed his Ph.D. thesis in the Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, working with Hongjun Song on neuronal DNA methylation in the adult brain. During his postdoctoral training in David Bartel's laboratory at the Whitehead Institute/MIT,  Guo developed a series of high-throughput computational and experimental methods to investigate circular RNAs and intracellular RNA folding. He joined the Department of Neuroscience at Yale School of Medicine in Fall 2017. 

    The Guo lab is broadly interested in questions at the intersection of RNA biology and neuroscience, with an emphasis on developing and applying new tools to investigate RNA-based gene regulatory mechanisms in the nervous system. Research in the lab aims to understand how these mechanisms may be specialized in the nervous system as well as their roles in neurological diseases.

  • David A. Hafler

    William S. and Lois Stiles Edgerly Professor of Neurology and Professor of Immunobiology; Chair, Department of Neurology; Neurologist-in-Chief, Yale New Haven Hospital

    Research Interests
    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome; Genetics; HIV; Immune System; Multiple Sclerosis; Neurology; Autoimmunity

    Dr. Hafler is the William S. and Lois Stiles Edgerly Professor and Chairman Department of Neurology, Yale School of Medicine and is the Neurologist-in-Chief of the Yale-New Haven Hospital. He graduated magna cum laude in 1974 from Emory University with combined B.S. and M.Sc. degrees in biochemistry, and the University of Miami School of Medicine in 1978. He then completed his internship in internal medicine at Johns Hopkins followed by a neurology residency at Cornell Medical Center-New York Hospital in New York.

    Dr. Hafler received training in immunology at the Rockefeller University then at Harvard where he joined the faculty in 1984. He was one of the Executive Directors of the Program in Immunology at Harvard Medical School and was on the faculty of the Harvard-MIT Health Science and Technology program where he was actively involved in the training of graduate students and post-doctoral fellows.

    Hafler, in many respects, is credited with identifying the central mechanisms underlying the likely cause of MS. His early seminal work demonstrated that the disease began in the blood, not the brain, which eventually led to the development of Tysabri to treat the disease by blocking the movement of immune cells from the blood to the brain. He was the first to identify myelin-reactive T cells in the disease, published in Nature, showing that indeed, MS was an autoimmune disorder. He then went on to show why autoreactive T cells were dysregulated by the first identification of regulatory T cells in humans followed by demonstration of their dysfunctional state in MS. As a founding, Broad Institute member, Hafler identified the genes that cause MS, published in the New England Journal of Medicine and Nature. More recently, he identified the key transcription factors and signaling pathways associated with MS genes as potential treatment targets. Finally, he recently discovered that salt drives induction of these pathogenic myelin reactive T cells, both works published in Nature. Hafler was the Breakstone Professor of Neuroscience at Harvard, and became Chairman of Neurology at Yale in 2009, where he has built an outstanding clinical and research program that strongly integrates medical sciences. He has received numerous honors including the Dystel Prize from the AAN for his MS research and is among the most highly cited living neurologists.

  • Marc Hammarlund

    Associate Professor of Genetics and Neuroscience; Director of Graduate Studies, Genetics

    Research Interests
    Axons; Cell Biology; Nerve Regeneration; Gene Expression; Caenorhabditis elegans

    Marc did his doctoral work with Erik Jorgensen, studying genetics and synaptic transmission. In his postdoc with Mike Bastiani he pioneered the study of axon regeneration in C. elegans and discovered the DLK regeneration pathway.


    The Hammarlund lab develops novel ways to study the cell biology of neurons in vivo. We study how neurons prevent degeneration, repair injury, and maintain circuit function. Please visit our web site: hammarlab.org.

  • Michael Higley

    Associate Professor of Neuroscience; Member, Program in Cellular Neuroscience, Neurodegeneration and Repair (CNNR); Member, Kavli Institute for Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Autistic Disorder; Behavior; Dendrites; Electrophysiology; Neurobiology; Neurodegenerative Diseases; Microscopy, Fluorescence, Multiphoton

    Dr. Higley studied behavioral neuroscience at Cornell University. He then completed his MD and PhD in the MSTP Program and the laboratory of Dr. Diego Contreras at the University of Pennsylvania. He continued his scientific training as a postdoctoral fellow with Dr. Bernardo Sabatini at Harvard Medical School and joined the faculty of the Yale Department of Neuroscience in 2010.

  • Joy Hirsch

    Elizabeth Mears and House Jameson Professor of Psychiatry and Professor of Comparative Medicine and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Neurosciences
  • Ellen J. Hoffman

    Assistant Professor in the Child Study Center and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Autistic Disorder; Child Psychiatry; Genetics; Neurobiology; Neuropharmacology; Neurosciences; Pharmacology; Zebrafish; Translational Medical Research

    Ellen J. Hoffman, M.D., Ph.D. was appointed as Assistant Professor in the Child Study Center in July 2015. Ellen is a child psychiatrist, psychiatric geneticist and neurobiologist, and a graduate of the Investigative Medicine PhD Program at Yale, who specializes in the functional analysis of genes in neurodevelopmental disorders. The Hoffman laboratory conducts translational research aimed at understanding the biological mechanisms underlying autism spectrum disorders and discovering new pharmacological treatments. Ellen's research focuses on investigating the function of genes that are strongly associated with autism to determine how disruption of these genes alters brain development and the neural circuits underlying simple behaviors. The long-term goal of her research is to use this gene-based approach to identify relevant biological pathways and novel pharmacological treatments that target these pathways. Ellen also works clinically as a child psychiatrist and as an attending supervising Yale child psychiatry fellows.

  • Avram Holmes

    Assistant Professor of Psychology and of Psychiatry

    Dr. Holmes earned a Bachelors degree in psychology from Pennsylvania State University (1998), a PhD in Clinical Psychology from Harvard University (2009), and received his clinical training at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University (2008-2009). Prior to joining the faculty at Yale, Dr. Holmes completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Harvard University Center for Brain Science (2009-2012) and served as an Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School (2012-2014).

  • Tamas Horvath

    Jean and David W. Wallace Professor of Comparative Medicine and Professor of Neuroscience and of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences; Chair, Department of Comparative Medicine; Director, Yale Program in Integrative Cell Signaling and Neurobiology of Metabolism

    Research Interests
    Neuroendocrinology; Obesity; Physiology

    Tamas Horvath is Professor and Chair of the Department of Comparative Medicine and Professor of Neurobiology and Ob/Gyn at Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. He is also the Director for the Yale Program on Integrative Cell Signaling and Neurobiology of Metabolism. He received a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.) degree from the Faculty of Veterinary Sciences in Budapest, Hungary, and a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree from the University of Szeged in Hungary. His research has been focusing on neuronal circuitries that support physiological and pathological homeostatic conditions, including processes associated with reproduction, energy metabolism and neurodegeneration.

  • Arthur Horwich

    Sterling Professor of Genetics and Professor of Pediatrics; Investigator HHMI

    Research Interests
    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Genetics; Motor Neurons; Neurosciences; Pediatrics; Superoxide Dismutase; Protein Folding; Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Horwich received undergraduate and M.D. degrees from Brown University, trained in Pediatrics at Yale, was then a postdoctoral fellow first at Salk Institute in the Tumor Virology Laboratory, and then in Genetics at Yale, then joined the Yale faculty. His work was initially involved with protein import into mitochondria and resulted in discovery of a "folding machine" inside mitochondria, Hsp60. He has used genetic, biochemical, and biophysical tools to study the mechanism of action of these ring shaped so-called chaperonin machines that provide essential assistance to protein folding in many cellular compartments. More recently he has focused on neurodegenerative disease as caused by protein misfolding, seeking to understand how misfolded SOD1 enzyme in the cytosol of motor neurons leads to one form of ALS. His lab is modeling mutant SOD1-linked ALS in mice transgenic for a mutant SOD1-YFP, the YFP moiety offering a fluorescent reporter of the mutant protein and “tag” for biochemical studies. The transgenic mutant strain presents YFP fluorescent aggregates in motor neurons by the time of weaning, develops muscle weakness, and paralyzes by 6 months of age. By contrast, a wtSOD1-YFP transgenic strain with the same amount of total SOD1-YFP protein in spinal cord remains asymptomatic even after two years, and the cord remains free of aggregates. The nature of injury to the motor system of the mutant mice is under study, particularly at the level of lower motor neurons, examining their dendritic arbors, cell bodies, axons, and neuromuscular junctions, using both morphologic and electrophysiologic approaches. What is the most immediate target of the misfolded protein, and at what level in the motor system? Notably, endogenous molecular chaperones, Hsc70 and Hsp110, associate with the misfolded protein – they are obviously not able to fully protect the system. Can their overexpression alter the progression of motor dysfunction?

  • Joe Howard

    Eugene Higgins Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry and Professor of Physics; co-Director, Quantitative Biology Institute

    Research Interests
    Biophysics; Cilia; Microtubules; Mitosis; Neurobiology; Physics; Molecular Motor Proteins; Nanotechnology

    Jonathon (Joe) Howard is the Eugene Higgins Professor of Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry and a Professor of Physics at Yale University. He is best known for his research on motor proteins and the cytoskeleton, and the development of techniques for observing and manipulating individual biological molecules. Brought up in Australia, where he studied at the Australian National University, he has had a distinguished career in the United States—he was a professor of physiology and biophysics at the University of Washington Medical School in Seattle—and in Germany, where he played a key role, as Director, in establishing the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden, one of the most successful research institutes in Europe. In 2013 he returned to the United States where he enjoys teaching, writing and new research projects on cell motility and neuronal morphology.

  • D. S. Fahmeed Hyder

    Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging and of Biomedical Engineering; Technical Director, Magnetic Resonance Research Center (mrrc.yale.edu); Program Director, Core Center for Quantitative Neuroscience with Magnetic Resonance (qnmr.yale.edu)

    Research Interests
    Biomedical Engineering; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neurosciences; Radiology; Molecular Probes

    Dr. Hyder is director of high-field horizontal small-bore systems at Yale’s MRRC, one of the most reputed in vivo magnetic resonance centers in the world conducting translational in vivo neuroscience and metabolism research. He is also founder and director of Yale’s QNMR Core Center, the only NIH-supported programmatic effort at Yale on neuroimaging with magnetic resonance technologies. He received a bachelor’s degree in physical chemistry in 1990 from Wabash and a doctoral degree in biophysical chemistry from Yale in 1995. He has been a faculty at Yale since 1999 and currently holds dual professor appointments in Diagnostic Radiology and Biomedical Engineering. He is a founding member of Yale’s Department of Biomedical Engineering. His work has produced over a hundred peer-reviewed publications. He has written and edited books on functional brain imaging. He holds several magnetic resonance patents on molecular imaging. He has had continuous NIH support since becoming an investigator. He has renewed grants from different scientific funding agencies. He has received early career awards from various scientific societies and funding scientific agencies. He sits on editorial boards of several international scientific journals and he reviews for many scientific journals spanning several disciplines. He has delivered numerous invited presentations around the globe. He serves on advisory panels of several scientific funding agencies.

  • Monika P. Jadi

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Autistic Disorder; Cerebral Cortex; Dendrites; Electrophysiology; Interneurons; Neurobiology; Neurosciences; Schizophrenia; Models, Statistical; Computational Biology

    Monika Jadi obtained her Ph.D. in Neuroengineering at the University of Southern California and did her postdoctoral training at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in the Computational Neurobiology Laboratory. At Yale, she is an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Neuroscience. 

    Dr. Jadi’s research involves discovering computational principles that are critical for flexible information processing in the brain, using cross-disciplinary approaches from applied physics and computer science.  Her doctoral research resulted in the first characterization of computational flexibility mediated by location-specificity of synaptic inhibition in active dendrites of neurons, a ubiquitous anatomical signature in cortical circuits. She has studied models of cortical networks during her postdoctoral work, and proposed a novel mechanism of cortical oscillations that is controlled by the direct and indirect stimulation of inhibitory neurons. Subsequently, she has explored mechanisms of flexible modulation of cortical dynamics that are mediated by different inhibitory neuronal classes in the cortex. Complementing her computational modelling work, she has used novel data analysis methods to explore the temporal dynamics of population coding in the visual cortex. The current focus of her lab is using computational modeling as well as data modeling tools such as machine learning to study computations, information flow, temporal dynamics of population codes and role of neuromodulation in canonical columnar circuits of the cortex. Dr. Jadi is a recipient of the NIH Pathway to Independence award during her postdoctoral and early faculty years.

    The Jadi Lab

  • Elizabeth Jonas

    Professor of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology) and Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Endocrinology; Mitochondria; Nervous System; Synaptic Transmission; Neurobiology; Apoptosis

    Elizabeth Jonas received training in Neurology and Internal Medicine. She developed an interest in Neuroscience while studying as a medical student with Dr. Rodolfo Llinas at N.Y.U. and at the Marine Biological Laboratory. With Dr. Llinas she developed an interest in calcium control of synaptic transmission. She pursued this interest as a post-doctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Leonard Kaczmarek, Yale Pharmacology. Dr. Jonas developed a technique for recording from ion channels on intracellular membranes and has used this and other techniques to study mitochondria. Mitochondria are necessary for life and death of neurons and other cells. Regulation of mitochondrial metabolism is also key to energy efficiency in the nervous system. Dr. Jonas is now studying the role of mitochondria and energy efficiency in neurodegenerative disease states and in learning and memory formation in healthy brain. Her lab has recently characterized the molecular identity of the cell death channel known as the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and is now studying how inhibiting gating of the pore may ameliorate stroke, neurodegenerative and developmental brain diseases.

  • Leonard Kaczmarek

    Professor of Pharmacology and of Cellular And Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    Ion Channels; Learning; Memory; Neurosciences; Pharmacology; Physiology
  • Kristopher Kahle

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery and of Cellular and Molecular Physiology; Pediatrics, and Cellular and Molecular Physiology; Director, Neonatal and Congenital Anomaly Neurosurgery

    Kristopher T. Kahle, M.D., Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery and Pediatrics and Cellular and Molecular Physiology at Yale University School of Medicine, and Director of Neonatal and Congenital Anomaly Neurosurgery in the Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery. He completed his MD and PhD degrees at the Yale School of Medicine under the mentorship of Richard Lifton, and neurosurgical residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital. After residency, Dr. Kahle completed his pediatric neurosurgery fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital and was Instructor at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Kahle completed a postdoctoral research fellowship with Stephen Elledge and David Clapham at Harvard University. Dr. Kahle’s primary clinical practice includes disorders of neurodevelopment (hydrocephalus, arachnoid cysts, congenital vascular malformations, chiari malformations, spina bifida, and tethered spinal cord) and tumors of the pediatric brain and spinal cord. Dr. Kahle trained in neuroendoscopy, including third ventriculostomy and choroid plexus coagulation, with Dr. Benjamin Warf at Harvard. Dr. Kahle is an attending physician at Yale-New Haven Hospital and the Yale-New Haven Children’s Hospital. Dr. Kahle’s research is devoted to identifying the genes and pathways that regulate ion and water homeostasis in the developing nervous system, and how genetically-encoded or maladaptive changes in these processes contribute to the cellular, circuit, and behavioral abnormalities in neurodevelopmental disorders and in the traumatized brain. He also uses molecular genetic tools such as whole exome and genome sequencing to discover the molecular determinants of neurodevelopmental diseases, such as congenital hydrocephalus. The goal of his work is to translate advances in basic science into novel therapeutic strategies for pediatric neurosurgical diseases.

  • Erdem Karatekin

    Associate Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

    Research Interests
    Exocytosis; Liposomes; Membrane Fusion; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Molecular Biology; Physiology; Secretory Vesicles; Microfluidics

    After obtaining his B.S. degree in chemical engineering from the University of Louisville, KY (where he studied thanks to a swimming scholarship) Dr. Karatekin went on to study soft matter physics and chemistry at Columbia University with N. J. Turro and B. O'Shaughnessy where he obtained his Ph.D. in 1999. He then gradually moved toward studying dynamics of lipid membranes, first during his post-doctoral stay at the Curie Institute (with F. Brochard-Wyart), and later as research faculty at the Laboratoire de Dynamique Membranaire (CNRS FRE 3146), both in Paris, France.

    Thanks to a long-term leave from the CNRS, he was a visiting research scientist in the laboratory of Dr. J. E. Rothman in Cell Biology at Yale during 2008-2011. He joined the Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology as an assistant professor in 2012.

  • Co-Director, Neuroscience Track

    Professor of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology; Co-Director, Yale Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program

  • In-Jung Kim

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science

    Research Interests
    Anatomy; Neurobiology; Neurosciences; Ophthalmology; Vision, Ocular
  • Hedy Kober

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and of Psychology; Adjunct Associate Professor of Law; Director, Clinical and Affective Neuroscience Lab

    Research Interests
    Cognition; Emotions; Thinking; Smoking Cessation; Meditation; Substance-Related Disorders; Mindfulness
  • Jeffery Kocsis

    Professor of Neurology and of Neuroscience; Director , Postdoctoral Studies; Associate Director, Yale Center for Neuroscience and Regeneration Research; Senior Medical Research Career Scientist, Department of Veterans Affairs

    Research Interests
    Central Nervous System; Ion Channels; Nerve Regeneration; Neurology; Neurosciences; Spinal Cord; Spinal Cord Injuries; Veterans; Cell Transplantation
  • Michael Koelle

    Professor

    Research Interests
    Biochemistry; Biophysics; Molecular Biology; Neurobiology; Serotonin; Caenorhabditis elegans; Neurotransmitter Agents; RGS Proteins

    1986 BS, Biology, University of Washington
    1986 BS, Math, University of Washington
    1992 PhD, Biochemistry, Stanford University
    1992-1996 Postdoctoral Researcher, MIT
    1996-2001 Assistant Professor, Yale University
    2001- Associate Professor, Yale University

  • Anthony Koleske

    Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Biochemistry; Biophysics; Molecular Biology; Morphogenesis; Schizophrenia; Stress, Physiological

    Anthony J. Koleske is an expert in understanding the biochemical mechanisms that control changes in cell shape and movement. After receiving a B.S. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Dr. Koleske performed his Ph.D. studies with Dr. Richard Young at the Whitehead Institute/Massachusetts Institute of Technology. For his Ph.D. thesis, Dr. Koleske discovered the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme, an important advancement in understanding how gene transcription is turned on. Dr. Koleske went on to do a postdoctoral fellowship with Nobel Laureate Dr. David Baltimore at M.I.T., where he began his work studying cellular functions of Abl family kinases, which his laboratory has shown are essential regulators of the cytoskeleton in diverse cell types. Dr. Koleske joined the Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry at Yale University in 1998, where he currently is Professor and holds a joint appointment in the Department of Neurobiology. Dr. Koleske is the recipient of numerous awards including a Jane Coffin Childs Postdoctoral Fellowship, Special Fellowship and Scholar Awards from the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, a NARSAD Young Investigator Award, and an Established Investigator Award from the American Heart Association.He has served widely on review panels, including terms as Chair of the Basic Science Study Section for the American Heart Association and the Neurodifferentiation, Plasticity, Repair, and Rhythmicity Study Section of the NIH. He currently directs the combined Ph.D. programs in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences at Yale, the China Scholarship Council-Yale World Scholars Program, and co-directs (with Mike Nitabach) the Medical Research Scholars Program at Yale. He is married to Ruth Koleske and is father to twins Ben and Emily.

  • Smita Krishnaswamy

    Assistant Professor of Genetics and of Computer Science

    Research Interests
    Genetics; Computational Biology; Single-Cell Analysis

    Smita Krishnaswamy was trained as a computer scientist with a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan's EECS department where her research focused on algorithms for automated synthesis and verification of nanoscale logic circuits that exhibit probabilistic effects. During her Ph.D., she received a best paper award at DATE 2005 (a top conference in the field of design automation), and an outstanding dissertation award. She published numerous first-author papers on probabilistic network models and algorithms for VLSICAD. In addition, her dissertation was published as a book by Springer in 2013. Following her Ph.D., she joined IBM's TJ Watson Research Center as a scientist in the systems division, where she focused on formal methods for automated error detection. Her Deltasyn algorithm was eventually utilized in IBMs p and z series high-performance chips. She then switched her research efforts to biology. Her postdoctoral training was completed at Columbia University in the systems biology department where she focused on learning computational models of cellular signaling from single-cell mass cytometry data.

    Although technologies such as mass cytometry, and single-cell RNA sequencing, are able to generate high-dimensional high-throughput single-cell data, the computational, modeling and visualization techniques needed to analyze and make sense of this data are still lacking. Smita's research addresses this challenge by developing scalable computational methods for analyzing and learning predictive network models from massive biological datasets. Her methods for characterizing interactions in cellular signaling networks, published in a recent Science paper, reveal the computation performed by cells as they process signals in terms of stochastic response functions. Smita, along with experimental collaborators, have applied these methods to T cell signaling and have found that signaling response functions are reconfigured through differentiation and disease. For example, Smita and her collaborators found that subtle alterations in receptor-proximal signaling in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice are amplified through signaling cascades leading to larger defects in downstream signals responsible for damping immune response. Her ongoing work involves creating more sophisticated and accurate models of transformational biological processes by combining both single-cell signaling and genomic data. At Yale, she is creating a forward-looking and interdisciplinary research group that is focused on developing computational techniques to solve today’s challenging biological and medical problems.

  • John Krystal

    Robert L. McNeil, Jr. Professor of Translational Research and Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience; Chair, Department of Psychiatry; Chief of Psychiatry, Yale-New Haven Hospital; Director: NIAAA Center for the Translational Neuroscience of Alcoholism; Director, Clinical Neuroscience Division, VA National Center for PTSD

    Research Interests
    Alcoholism; Drug Therapy; Genetics; Neurobiology; Psychiatry; Schizophrenia; Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic; Veterans; Neuroimaging

    Dr. Krystal is a leading expert in the areas of alcoholism, post-traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia, and depression. His work links psychopharmacology, neuroimaging, molecular genetics, and computational neuroscience to study the neurobiology and treatment of these disorders. He is best known for leading the discovery of the rapid antidepressant effects of ketamine in depressed patients.

    He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Medicine. He also serves in a variety of advisory and review capacities for NIAAA, NIMH, Wellcome Trust, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, the Broad Institute, and the Karolinska Institutet.

    Dr. Krystal previously served on the National Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Advisory Council (NIAAA), the Department of Defense Psychological Health Advisory Committee, and the NIMH Board of Scientific Counselors (chair, 2005-2007). He has led the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (president, 2012), and International College of Neuropsychophamacology (president, 2016-2018).

    Currently, he is co-chair of the Neuroscience Forum (NeuroForum) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, a member of the NIMH National Mental Health Advisory Council, and he edits the journal, Biological Psychiatry (impact factor: 11.982).

  • Alex Kwan

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Decision Making; Depressive Disorder; Electrophysiology; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Schizophrenia; Prefrontal Cortex; Executive Function

    Dr. Kwan received a B.A.Sc. in Engineering Physics from Simon Fraser University and a Ph.D. in Applied Physics from Cornell University. At Cornell, he developed nonlinear optical microscopy methods in the laboratory of Watt Webb. In 2009, he went to the University of California, Berkeley to work in the laboratory of Yang Dan, where he studied cortical GABAergic interneurons. He joined the Yale School of Medicine faculty in 2013.

    Research in the Kwan lab focuses on the mouse prefrontal cortex. We are interested in how cortical circuits enable flexible decision-making, and how dendritic dysfunctions underlie neuropsychiatric disorders. Our expertise lies in developing and applying optical methods to record and control neural activity in behaving mice.

  • Robert LaMotte

    Professor of Anesthesiology and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Anesthesiology; Nervous System; Neurochemistry; Neurons; Neurophysiology; Pain; Nociceptive Pain

    Our laboratory uses the methods of single-cell electrophysiology and sensory psychophysics to study the peripheral neural mechanisms of pain and itch in humans and animals.

  • Daeyeol Lee

    Professor Adjunct in Neuroscience

    Daeyeol Lee is the Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience and Psychological and Brain Sciences in the Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University.

    Daeyeol Lee is Professor Adjunct of Neuroscience at Yale University.

    Dr. Lee received his bachelor’s degree in Economics from Seoul National University in Korea and his PhD in Neuroscience from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He then received a postdoctoral training in neurophysiology at the University of Minnesota. His current research focuses on the brain mechanisms of decision making, in particular the role of the prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia in reinforcement learning and economic choices. His laboratory also investigates how timing and numerical information is represented and transformed in the brain. His research employs diverse methods developed in economics, psychology, and neuroscience. He is also an expert in statistical modeling of behavioral and neurophysiological data. He has published over 90 original research articles. He was the recipient of the Fellowship for Prominent Collegians from Korea Foundation for Advanced Studies, University Fellowship from the University of Illinois, and the James S. McDonnell Foundation Cognitive Neuroscience Grant. His research has been funded by the National Institute of Health continuously since 1999.

  • Ifat Levy

    Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Basal Ganglia; Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms; Central Nervous System; Cerebral Cortex

    I am interested in the neural mechanisms underlying decision-making in humans, in individual differences in these mechanisms, and in the possible contribution of decision traits to pathological behavior. Our research focuses on decision-making under uncertainty, and on value learning and encoding. To study these topics we combine behavioral economics methods with functional MRI, as well as eye tracking and physiological measurements.

  • Chiang-Shan Ray Li

    Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Alcohols; Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms; Mental Disorders; Biological Therapy; Central Nervous System; Nervous System; Nervous System Diseases; Psychological Phenomena; Therapeutics; Behavior Control; Research Subjects; Drug Users; Chemicals and Drugs; Psychiatry and Psychology

    I am a Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience at Yale University School of Medicine. I graduated from National Taiwan University College of Medicine and California Institute of Technology and has been a faculty member at Yale since 2003. My earlier work employed non-human primate models to understand the neural bases of cognition. Current research in my laboratory continues to focus on systems neuroscience. By combining psychophysics, computational modeling and brain imaging we explore the circuit mechanisms of a multitude of cognitive constructs, including self control, affect regulation, and reward-related processes. The primary goals are to understand systems neural bases of these cognitive processes and how these neural processes contribute to the etiology of psychiatric and neurological illnesses, with a specific emphasis on addiction.

  • Janghoo Lim

    Associate Professor of Genetics and Neuroscience; Member, Program in Cellular Neuroscience, Neurodegeneration and Repair (CNNR)

    Research Interests
    Mental Disorders; Developmental Disabilities; Neuromuscular Diseases; Motor Neuron Disease; Neurodegenerative Diseases; Spinocerebellar Ataxias

    Janghoo Lim received his undergraduate and master’s degrees in South Korea. He then completed his Ph.D. and postdoctoral trainings at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. He joined Yale in 2010 and is currently an Associate Professor in the Departments of Genetics and of Neuroscience.

  • Angeliki Louvi

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Brain; Microcephaly; Morphogenesis; Nervous System Diseases; Neurosurgery; Hemangioma, Cavernous, Central Nervous System; CADASIL; Diseases

    Dr. Angeliki Louvi (Ph.D. Columbia P&S, 1997) is Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurobiology and member of the Yale Program on Neurogenetics and the Yale Interdepartmental Neuroscience PhD Program. She is currently researching the molecular mechanisms governing the development of the mammalian brain. She is particularly interested in addressing how the perturbation of basic biological mechanisms leads to clinically significant brain pathologies. Working closely with other research groups in the Yale Program on Neurogenetics, she studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying cerebrovascular and structural disorders associated with specific genetic lesions. Insight into these questions will shed light on fundamental neurodevelopmental processes and provide information relevant for the design of rational therapeutic approaches.

  • Henry Ford II Professor of Psychology

    Research Interests
    Brain; Electrophysiology; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Psychology, Applied
  • David McCormick

    Professor Emeritus of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Attention; Axons; Brain; Memory; Neurobiology; Neurosciences; Synapses

    B.A., B.S. 1979 Mathematics and Psychology from Purdue University
    Ph.D. 1983 from Stanford University
    Faculty, Yale University School of Medicine 1987 to present.

    Interests: Cellular mechanisms by which the cerebral cortex operates, both normally and abnormally, using a variety of electrophysiological and advanced imaging techniques.

  • James McPartland

    Associate Professor in the Child Study Center and of Psychology; Associate Director, Developmental Electrophysiology Lab; Director of Undergraduate Studies, Yale Child Study Center; Director, Yale Developmental Disabilities Clinic

    Research Interests
    Autistic Disorder; Child Development; Developmental Disabilities; Child Development Disorders, Pervasive; Psychology, Child; Evoked Potentials; Psychophysiology; Social Perception; Event-Related Potentials, P300; Asperger Syndrome

    James C. McPartland, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Child Psychiatry and Psychology at the Yale Child Study Center. He is a licensed child psychologist and Director of the Yale Developmental Disabilities Clinic. He is Director of Undergraduate Studies at the Child Study Center and teaches an undergraduate seminar on autism spectrum disorder. Dr. McPartland’s program of research investigates the brain bases of neurodevelopmental disabilities to develop biologically-based tools to improve detection and treatment. His research has been continuously supported since 2007 by both federal (NIMH, NICHD, NINDS; R21, R03, K23, R01, U19) and private research grants (NARSAD, the Autism Science Foundation, the Waterloo Foundation, Autism Speaks, the Patterson Trust, the Simons Foundation, the Nancy Taylor Foundation, the Alan B. Slifka Foundation, the Hilibrand Foundation). He is the Principal Investigator of the Autism Biomarkers Consortium for Clinical Trials, a US-based effort to identify biomarkers to support intervention research in autism. His contributions to the field have been recognized by multiple awards, including the NARSAD Atherton Young Investigator Award, the International Society for Autism Research Young Investigator Award, the Patterson Trust Clinical Research Award, the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation Klerman Prize, and the APA Sara S. Sparrow Early Career Research Award. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association Division of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorder and has published 5 books and over 120 scholarly works on autism and related topics. He has served on the executive boards of the International Society for Autism Research and the APA Division of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities/Autism Spectrum Disorder and is currently an Associate Editor for the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders and on the editorial boards of the Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, the Journal of Mental Health Research in Intellectual Disabilities, and the Encyclopedia of Autism and Related Disorders.  

  • Ross Granville Harrison Professor of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology and Professor of Cell Biology; and Pathlogy

  • Evan Morris

    Professor; Co-director for Imaging, Yale PET Center

    Morris specializes in using kinetic modeling and image processing to extract physiological information from dynamic PET images. His current projects include:

    • Modeling and texture analysis to image Non-small cell lung cancer with tyrosine kinase inhibitor tracers
    • Novel kinetic modeling to image dyskinesias in Parkinson's
    • Continued Optimization of Dopamine Movies to study Addiction and Behavior
    • Applying principles in functional connectivity and machine learning to analyze dopamine movies
    • Imaging new targets in Depression, Alcoholism

    Morris and his group continue to refine mathematical and statistical aspects of their techniques for making "dopamine movies" of the brain. With their dopamine movies, Morris and colleague Kelly Cosgrove and their team discovered sex differences in brains of smokers smoking cigarettes (J Neurosci Dec 10, 2014).

  • John D Murray

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, of Neuroscience and of Physics

    Research Interests
    Cognition; Computer Simulation; Decision Making; Interneurons; Memory, Short-Term; Schizophrenia; Prefrontal Cortex; Computational Biology; Functional Neuroimaging

    Dr. John D. Murray is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Murray trained in Physics and Mathematics at Yale University. For his PhD in Physics, he worked with Dr. Xiao-Jing Wang in the field of Computational Neuroscience. Following his graduate training, he was a Postdoctoral Associate at New York University in the Center for Neural Science. He joined the faculty at Yale in 2015, where he directs a computational neuroscience lab with interests in leveraging computational modeling to understand psychiatric disorders in a framework for Computational Psychiatry.

  • Angus Nairn

    Charles B. G. Murphy Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Dopamine; Huntington Disease; Parkinson Disease; Protein Kinases; Psychiatry; Schizophrenia; Signal Transduction

    Angus Nairn did his undergraduate training in biochemistry at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland and his PhD in muscle biochemistry in the laboratory of Professor Sam Perry at Birmingham University, England. He then carried out postdoctoral research in molecular neuroscience with Professor Paul Greengard at Yale, and moved with Professor Greengard to Rockefeller University in 1983 as a faculty member. He moved back to Yale University in 2001, where he is currently the Charles B.G. Murphy Professor of Psychiatry. He also holds a joint appointment in the Department of Pharmacology and is co-director of the Yale/National Institute of Drug Abuse Neuroproteomics Center at the Yale School of Medicine.

  • Anirvan Nandy

    Assistant Professor in Neuroscience; Assistant Professor, Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Attention; Macular Degeneration; Neurobiology; Neurons; Visual Cortex

    I have a broad background in signal processing, psychophysics and computational modeling from pre-doctoral and doctoral work. My doctoral research resulted in the first comprehensive model of visual crowding, a ubiquitous phenomenon in peripheral vision that severely degrades our ability to identify objects in clutter. Crowding is especially detrimental in patients with central vision loss. We also demonstrated that the oculomotor system has a remarkable ability to rapidly and persistently adapt to simulated central vision loss in normally sighted human subjects. During my post-doctoral training at the Salk Institute, I employed advanced electrophysiological and optogenetic techniques in the alert non-human primate to investigate the neuronal mechanisms of shape processing and attention in the visual cortex. My research has uncovered the detailed spatio-temporal structure of shape processing in neurons in visual area V4, a critical area for both shape processing and attention. Our results force us to reconsider the established notion that neuronal invariance increases as one traverses the cortical hierarchy. I have investigated the causal role of low-frequency correlated variability in neural activity on attentive behavior. Further, I have uncovered the cortical layer-specific organization of attentional modulation in the visual cortex. Together, these studies promise to significantly advance our current understanding of the cortical circuits of attention.

  • Dhasakumar Navaratnam

    Associate Professor of Neurology and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Postural Balance; Hearing; Neurobiology; Neurology; Neurosciences

    Dhasakumar Navaratnam MD, PhD is a neurotologist and neurologist who provides advanced comprehensive evaluation and treatment for patients with hearing and balance problems. He received his MD from the University of Colombo and his PhD from the University of Oxford. He completed his residency in neurology and post-doctoral training in hearing research at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Dr. Navaratnam is funded by the NIH and performs basic science research on aspects of hearing and balance, and regeneration in the auditory and vestibular systems.

  • Michael Nitabach

    Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, of Genetics and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Behavior, Animal; Decision Making; Genetics; Ion Channels; Neuropeptides; Neurophysiology; Neurotoxins; Physiology

    Michael Nitabach JD, PhD is faculty member of Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics and Development, Molecular Medicine, Pharmacology and Physiology, and Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program. He is affiliated with the Program in Cellular Neuroscience, Neurodegeneration and Repair. He received a PhD from Columbia University and a JD from New York University.

  • In-Hyun Park

    Associate Professor of Genetics and Associate Professor in the Child Study Center; Yale Stem Cell Center

    Research Interests
    Cells; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System; Stem Cells; Pluripotent Stem Cells; Embryonic Stem Cells; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells; Neural Stem Cells; Psychiatry and Psychology
  • Marina Picciotto

    Charles B. G. Murphy Professor of Psychiatry and Professor in the Child Study Center, of Neuroscience and of Pharmacology; Deputy Chair for Basic Science Research, Dept. of Psychiatry; Deputy Director, Kavli Institute for Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Alcohol Drinking; Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms; Mental Disorders; Nervous System Diseases; Neurobiology; Neurosciences; Nicotine; Pharmacology

    Dr. Picciotto joined the Yale faculty in 1995, after completing a postdoctoral fellowship with Jean-Pierre Changeux in the Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience at the Institut Pasteur in Paris. She earned a Ph.D. in Molecular Neurobiology at The Rockefeller University in New York City in 1992, where she worked in the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience under Paul Greengard. She received a B.S. degree in biological sciences from Stanford University, Stanford, California, in 1985.

    Dr. Picciotto is currently Editor-in-Chief of The Journal of Neuroscience. She served on the Scientific Council of the National Institute on Drug Abuse from 2010-2014, was Treasurer of the Society for Neuroscience from 2014-2015, and President of the Society for Research on Nicotine & Tobacco from 2018-2019. She has been a Handling Editor for the Journal of Neuroscience, the Journal of Nicotine and Tobacco Research, the Journal of Neurochemistry and Neuroscience Letters. She is currently Chair of the MNPS NIH Study Section and is a past member of the Neurobiology of Motivated Behavior. In 2000 she was awarded the Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering by President Clinton and in 2007, she was honored with the Jacob P. Waletzky Memorial Award for Innovative Research in Drug Addiction and Alcoholism by the Society for Neuroscience. She was elected to the National Academy of Medicine and the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering in 2012 and as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2014, where she is currently Chair of the Neuroscience Section. 

  • Vincent Pieribone

    Professor of Cellular And Molecular Physiology and of Neuroscience; Director, The John B. Pierce Laboratory, Inc.; Fellow, John B. Pierce Laboratory

    Research Interests
    Biomedical Engineering; Biotechnology; Cnidaria; Drug Therapy; Electrophysiology; Epilepsy; Neuropharmacology; Neurophysiology; Neurosciences; Optics and Photonics

    Vincent Pieribone attended New York University College of Arts and Sciences where he received a baccalaureate degree in Biology and Chemistry in 1986. He then attend New York University's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and received his doctorate in Philosophy in 1992 in neuroanatomy and neurophysiology.

    From 1990 to 1992 he was a National Science Foundation and Fogarty International Fellow at the Nobel Institute of Neurophysiology at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm Sweden. From Sweden Vincent did post-doctoral work at The Rockefeller University in New York from 1992 to 1995 and became an Assistant Professor there in 1995. Vincent joined the Pierce laboratory in December 1997.  Vincent is currently a Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and Neuroscience and is also a Fellow and Director of the John B. Pierce Laboratory.

  • Associate Professor of Linguistics

    Pinango's lab works on the neurological underpinnings of the combinatorial mechanisms (morphological, syntactic and semantic) involved in language use and how the output of this mechanisms is linked to the larger conceptual system. This research is carried out by means of normal-brain based models and lesion-based models (i.e., focal brain lesions resulting from vascular disease). The methods used range from strictly behavioral (e.g., judgments, picture-matching tasks), to online methods (e.g., eye-tracking, cross-modal lexical decision) to neuroimaging (fMRI) (Eye-tracking and fMRI are done in collaboration with Dave Brazie at Haskins labs and Todd Constable at the Anlyan center, respectively).
  • Christopher Pittenger

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Assistant Chair for Translational Research, Psychiatry; Director, Yale OCD Research Clinic; Co-Director, Neuroscience Research Training Program

    Research Interests
    Basal Ganglia Diseases; Tourette Syndrome; Learning; Molecular Biology; Neuroanatomy; Neurobiology; Neurophysiology; Neurosciences; Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder; Phobic Disorders; Psychopharmacology; Trichotillomania

    Christopher Pittenger earned his MD and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University, where his graduate work was done with Nobel Prize recipient Eric Kandel. He returned to Yale University - where he had done his undergraduate studies - for residency and research training in psychiatry in 2003. He joined the faculty as an Assistant Professor in 2007 and was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor in 2013.

    During his Ph.D. studies in basic neurobiology, he became fascinated by the brain's ability to go on autopilot -- to perform complex series of actions or thoughts, after sufficient rehearsal, with almost no conscious effort. Then, during his clinical training, he recognized how this process, when disrupted by disease, can lead to the maladaptive and disruptive automaticity seen in many neuropsychiatric disorders. His research, both with patients and in animal models, aims to elucidate the mechanisms of learned automatic behaviors and to better understand the consequences when they go awry, with the ultimate goal of developing new understandings and better treatments for a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions.

    Dr. Pittenger's research and clinical work have been acknowledged by a number of prestigious awards, including grant funding from the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke, NARSAD, the Tourette Syndrome of America, and the Doris Duke Charitable Trust.  He has won a number of honorific awards, including from the National Institute of Mental Health, the Society for Neuroscience, the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, the American Psychiatric Association, and the American College of Psychiatrists. He is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the International OCD Foundation and an active member of the Society for Neuroscience, the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, the Society of Biological Psychiatry, the American Neurological Association, the American Psychiatric Association, and other groups. 

  • Marc Potenza

    Professor of Psychiatry, in the Child Study Center and of Neuroscience; Director, Center of Excellence in Gambling Research; Director, Yale Program for Research on Impulsivity and Impulse Control Disorders; Director, Women and Addictive Disorders, Women's Health Research at Yale

    Research Interests
    Child Psychiatry; Gambling; Disruptive, Impulse Control, and Conduct Disorders; Neurobiology; Psychiatry; Psychotherapy; Substance-Related Disorders; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Dr. Potenza is a board-certified psychiatrist
    with sub-specialty training and certification in addiction psychiatry. He has trained at Yale University receiving
    a combined BS/MS with Honors in Molecular Biochemistry and Biophysics and a PhD
    in Cell Biology, the latter concurrent with the MD through the Medical
    Scientist Training Program. He
    completed internship, psychiatric residency and addiction psychiatry fellowship
    training at Yale. Currently, he is
    a Professor of Psychiatry, Child Study and Neurobiology at the Yale University
    School of Medicine where he is Director of the Problem Gambling Clinic, the
    Center of Excellence in Gambling Research, and the Women and Addictive
    Disorders Core of Women's Health Research at Yale, and Senior Scientist at the Connecticut Council on Problem Gambling. He is on the editorial boards of fifteen
    journals (including editor-in-chief of Current Addiction Reports) and has received multiple national and international awards for
    excellence in research and clinical care.
    He has consulted to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services
    Administration, National Registry of Effective Programs, National Institutes of
    Health, American Psychiatric Association and World Health Organization on
    matters of addiction.

  • Pasko Rakic

    Dorys McConnell Duberg Professor of Neuroscience and Professor of Neurology

    Research Interests
    Central Nervous System; Neurobiology; Neurology; Apoptosis; Cell Proliferation
  • Gary Rudnick

    Professor of Pharmacology

    Research Interests
    Biochemistry; Neurobiology; Neurochemistry; Neuropharmacology

    Professor Rudnick is a graduate of Antioch College, where he received a B.S. in Chemistry in 1968. He performed graduate studies in the enzymology of amino acid racemases in the laboratory of Robert H. Abeles in the Graduate Department of Biochemistry at Brandeis University, receiving a Ph.D. in Biochemistry in 1974. His graduate studies led to an understanding of the structure and mechanism of proline racemase that was confirmed by the crystal structure of a homologous protein in 2006. From 1973-1975, Professor Rudnick performed postdoctoral research on lactose permease with H. Ronald Kaback at the Roche Institute of Molecular Biology. This work provided a greater understanding of binding and transport reactions using photoaffinity reagents and substrate analogs. In 1975, he left Roche to become an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmacology at Yale, and was promoted to Associate Professor in 1980 and Professor in 1991.

    Professor Rudnick’s research at Yale has focused on the mechanism and structure of mammalian serotonin transporter (SERT). He developed a system of platelet plasma membrane vesicles with which to study the bioenergetics and mechanism of transport. These studies provided an understanding of the coupling of ion gradients to serotonin accumulation and also identified SERT as the molecular target for the antidepressant imipramine and the psychostimulant MDMA (ecstasy).

    Beginning in the 1990s, Professor Rudnick’s laboratory has been studying the molecular characteristics of SERT and other neurotransmitter transporters expressed in cultured cells. These studies led to the identification of the serotonin binding site in SERT and of regions in the protein undergoing conformational changes during transport. The availability of a crystal structure for a homologous bacterial transporter in 2005 allowed Professor Rudnick and his colleagues to use the conformational changes to propose a conformational mechanism of transport that is gaining wide acceptance. Because SERT is structurally related to many other transporters, the proposed mechanism is likely to apply to transporters functioning in many diverse biological systems.

    In addition to these mechanistic studies, Professor Rudnick’s laboratory has been investigating a spontaneously occurring SERT mutant associated with several psychiatric disorders. The mutation apparently inhibits removal of a phosphate group added to SERT by cGMP-dependent protein kinase. The mechanism by which this phosphate increases SERT activity is an active area of investigation.

  • W. Mark Saltzman

    Goizueta Foundation Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and of Chemical Engineering, Head of Jonathan Edwards College; Department Chair, Biomedical Engineering

  • Joseph Santos-Sacchi

    Professor of Surgery (Otolaryngology), of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Hair Cells, Auditory; Ear, Inner; Neurosciences; Otolaryngology; Physiology

    Dr. Joseph Santos-Sacchi, Professor, works on understanding how outer hair cells (OHC) help us hear so well. His lab focuses on electrophysiological assessment of hair cell function and molecular manipulations of the proteins that are important for hearing.

  • Michael Schwartz

    Associate Professor of Neuroscience; Director, Medical Studies in Neuroscience, Department of Neuroscience; Associate Dean for Curriculum, YSM

    Research Interests
    Hypoxia, Brain; Cerebral Cortex; Education, Medical; Neurobiology; Neurosciences
  • Hyojung Seo

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Behavior, Animal; Learning; Memory; Neurophysiology; Psychiatry; Schizophrenia; Prefrontal Cortex

    Dr. Hyojung Seo received her bachelor and master's degree in Psychology from Seoul National University in the Republic of Korea. She then completed her Ph.D. in behavioral neuroscience with her thesis research on the neurophysiology of the oculomotor system. Dr. Seo continued her research in decision neuroscience as a post-doctoral fellow and associate research scientist at Yale University and joined the Department of Psychiatry at Yale University as an assistant professor in 2016.

  • Nenad Sestan

    Harvey and Kate Cushing Professor of Neuroscience, and Professor of Comparative Medicine, of Genetics and of Psychiatry; Executive Director, Genome Editing Center

  • Gordon Shepherd

    Professor Emeritus in the Department of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Anatomy; Dendrites; Information Science; Interneurons; Nervous System; Neurons; Synapses; Pyramidal Cells; Dendritic Spines; Organisms; Phenomena and Processes

    Gordon M. Shepherd grew up in Iowa, and received his B.S. at Iowa State College in 1955, M.D. at Harvard in 1959, and D.Phil. at Oxford in 1962. After postdoctoral training at NIH, MIT and the Karolinska Institute he joined the faculty at Yale Medical School, where he is Professor of Neuroscience. He introduced the olfactory system as a model for analyzing the properties of neurons and synapses in the brain and the formation of neural images of olfactory molecules. His research has contributed to properties of neuronal dendrites and spines, olfactory processing, and development of the new fields of computational neuroscience, brain microcircuits, neuroinformatics, and neurogastronomy. He has trained over 70 graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and visiting scientists, and published over 280 articles and reviews, with continuous grant support since 1966. His books include The Synaptic Organization of the Brain (5 ed.), Neurobiology (3 ed.), Handbook of Brain Microcircuits, and Neurogastronomy; in the history of neuroscience are Foundations of the Neuron Doctrine, Creating Modern Neuroscience, and Mosso's Circulation of Blood in the Human Brain. He has been chief editor of the Journal of Neurophysiology and Journal of Neuroscience. Visiting positions have included the University of Pennsylvania, College de France, Simon Fraser University, Santa Fe Institute, Ecole Normale Superieure, Institute Pasteur, and Oxford University. He served as a Deputy Provost of Yale University, received honorary degrees from the Universities of Copenhagen and Pavia, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and past president of the Association for Chemoreception Sciences and the Cajal Club.

  • Frederick Sigworth

    Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and of Biomedical Engineering and of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

    Research Interests
    Biomedical Engineering; Electrophysiology; Ion Channels; Microscopy, Electron; Physiology; Xenopus; Potassium Channels; Sodium Channels; Patch-Clamp Techniques; Potassium Channels, Voltage-Gated; Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    Fred Sigworth studied applied physics at Caltech and was a graduate student at Yale, working in the neuroscience laboratory of Charles F. Stevens. He received the PhD in physiology from Yale in 1979 and was a postdoc in the laboratory of Erwin Neher in Göttingen, Germany where he was a co-developer of patch-clamp techniques for single-channel electrophysiology. He returned to Yale as a faculty member at Yale in 1984. His current research is in the structural biology of ion-channel proteins, making use of novel cryo-EM methods. "How do I see the scientific enterprise? An old book puts it this way: one generation commends God's works to another. It is a great privilege to unravel the workings of ion channels, and to pass on the excitement about these molecular machines to students, colleagues and anyone else who will listen!"

  • Satinder Singh

    Associate Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    Antidepressive Agents; Depression; Dopamine; Epilepsy; gamma-Aminobutyric Acid; Glycine; Lipid Bilayers; Neurobiology; Neuropharmacology; Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder; Schizophrenia; Serotonin; Synaptic Vesicles; Antipsychotic Agents; X-Ray Diffraction; Biogenic Monoamines; Protein Structure, Tertiary; Neurotransmitter Transport Proteins; Neuropsychiatry

    Satinder was born in Boston, MA and moved, as a teenager, to Minneapolis, MN, with her family. She received her doctoral degree in Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics from the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, supported by an HHMI Predoctoral Fellowship. She has had a long-standing interest in the molecular mechanisms of neuropsychiatric disease, particularly in the role that the biogenic amines play. As a postdoctoral fellow, she combined her knowledge of neuropsychopharmacology and enzymology with X-ray crystallography to develop molecular models of transport and inhibition for LeuT, a bacterial orthologue of neurotransmitter sodium symporters (NSS). At Yale, Satinder has been concentrating on eukaryotic NSS members, specifically those that transport the biogenic amines serotonin (SERT) and dopamine (DAT).

  • Dana Small

    Professor of Psychiatry and Professor of Psychology; Director, Modern Diet and Physiology Research Center

    Research Interests
    Dopamine; Motivation; Neurophysiology; Obesity; Psychophysics; Stress, Psychological; Neuroimaging; Psychiatry and Psychology

    I am a psychologist and neuroscientist with graduate degrees in Neuroscience and Clinical Psychology from McGill University.  My research focuses on understanding how sensory, metabolic and neural signals are integrated to determine food choices and on how the dysregulation of these systems contribute to the development of obesity, diabetes and cognitive impairment. My group primarily uses neuroimaging, neuropsychological and metabolic methodologies in humans; however, we also have collaborations with a number of basic research labs at Yale and abroad where we use a revere translational approach to pursue mechanistic questions in rodent models that arise from findings in humans.  My laboratory generally consists of 1-2 phd students; 3-4 post-docs; a research associate professor and a handful of international interns and Yale undergraduates. I have trained 5 PhD students, 12 post-doctoral fellows and over 40 undergraduates and medical students. The  lab has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health since 2003.

    In addition to my activities at Yale, I am also involved in a number of initiatives related to advancing knowledge and treatment of diabetes and obesity. I am co-leading a National Institutes of Health workgroup developing a neuropsychological battery for use in obesity and diabetes trials and chairing the annual meeting for the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior. I am executive editor at Appetite and Biological Psychiatry and a member of the National Academy of Sciences Board on Behavior, Cognitive and Sensory Sciences. 

  • Stephen Strittmatter

    Vincent Coates Professor of Neurology and Professor of Neuroscience; Director, Cellular Neuroscience, Neurodegeneration and Repair; Director, Memory Disorders Clinic; Director, Yale Alzheimer's Disease Research Center

    Research Interests
    Alzheimer Disease; Axons; Dementia; Spinal Cord Injuries; Motor Neuron Disease; Regenerative Medicine

    Stephen M. Strittmatter earned his undergraduate degree from Harvard College, summa cum laude, in 1980. He completed M.D. and Ph.D. training at Johns Hopkins in 1986 with mentorship from Solomon H. Snyder, M.D. He then moved to Massachusetts General Hospital for a medical internship and an Adult Neurology residency. While at Massachusetts General Hospital, he worked as a Research Fellow with Mark Fishman, M.D., exploring the molecular basis of axonal guidance. After a year as Fellow, he served briefly as an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School before moving to Yale University in 1993.

    He currently holds the Vincent Coates Professorship of Neurology and co-founded the Yale Program in Cellular Neuroscience, Neurodegeneration and Repair. His research on axonal growth during development and regeneration has been recognized by honors from the Ameritec Foundation, the John Merck Fund, the Donaghue Foundation, the McKnight Foundation, the Jacob Javits Award of the NINDS and the American Academy of Neurology.

  • Jane Taylor

    Charles B. G. Murphy Professor of Psychiatry, of Psychology and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Behavior; Mental Disorders; Motivation; Neurobehavioral Manifestations
  • Susumu Tomita

    Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Biochemistry; Brain; Electrophysiology; Molecular Biology; Synaptic Transmission; Physiology
  • Flora Vaccarino

    Harris Professor in the Child Study Center; Professor in the Department of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Central Nervous System Diseases; Mice, Inbred Strains; Mice, Transgenic; Neuroanatomy; Neurosciences; Patients; Regeneration; Developmental Biology; Living Donors; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Dr. Flora Vaccarino graduated in Medicine at Padua University in Italy and studied neuropharmacology and cell biology at NIH as a research fellow before starting her Residency in Psychiatry at Yale University. After her residency, she studied developmental biology and genetics and was appointed Assistant Professor at Yale University. Her interests are the development of the mammalian the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and connected forebrain regions as well as the regulation of neural stem cells in both embryonic and postnatal periods. Her lab has been investigating how genetic (i.e., tyrosine growth factor receptors like Fibroblast Growth Factors) and epigenetic factors (i.e., perinatal hypoxia, environmental enrichment) affect the proliferation the maturation of neural progenitor cells in mouse models. Recently she has been exploring how induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be used to model developmental neuropsychiatric disorders including autism and Rett syndrome. With a group of colleagues, Dr. Vaccarino, now a full Professor at Yale University School of Medicine, founded in 2009 the “Program in Neurodevelopment and Regeneration” (https://medicine.yale.edu/neurodevelopment/index.aspx), a collaborative interdepartmental program at Yale University that is leading interdisciplinary studies on iPSCs, neural stem cells and human development.Dr. Vaccarino is a Fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the PsychENCODE and the Brain Somatic Mosaicism Consortia.

  • Christopher Van Dyck

    Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Neuroscience; Director, Alzheimer's Disease Research Unit; Director, Yale Alzheimer's Disease Research Center; Director, Division of Aging and Geriatric Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Aging; Alzheimer Disease; Drug Therapy; Genetics; Neurobiology; Neurology; Psychiatry; Positron-Emission Tomography; Neuroimaging

    Christopher H. van Dyck, MD, is Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Neuroscience, Director, Division of Aging and Geriatric Psychiatry; Director of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Unit; Director, Yale Alzheimer's Disease Research Center

    His research interests include therapeutic, neuroimaging and genetic studies of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy cognitive aging. Dr. van Dyck is very active in AD therapeutic research. Since 1992 he has participated in 80+ multicenter clinical trials for AD and MCI and has authored several of the trial publications. He serves on the Steering Committees of the NIA Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study (ADCS) and Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Dr. van Dyck’s other significant scholarly contributions include dopamine transporter imaging in healthy aging and the apolipoprotein E e4 Phenotype of AD. In 2005 he received the "Compassion and Cure" Award from the Alzheimer's Association.

  • Justus Verhagen

    Associate Professor of Neuroscience; Associate Fellow, The John B. Pierce Laboratory

    Research Interests
    Neural Pathways; Neurobiology; Smell; Taste; Optical Imaging; Optogenetics

    email: jverhagen@jbpierce.org

  • Stephen Waxman

    Bridget M. Flaherty Professor of Neurology and of Neuroscience; Director, Center for Neuroscience and Regeneration Research

    Research Interests
    Axons; Electrophysiology; Ion Channels; Multiple Sclerosis; Neurology; Neurosciences; Sodium Channels; Stroke

    Stephen G. Waxman, MD, PhD

    Stephen Waxman exemplifies the bridge between basic research and clinical medicine. He is the Bridget Flaherty Professor of Neurology, Neurobiology, and Pharmacology at Yale University. He served as Chairman of Neurology at Yale from 1986 until 2009. He founded and is Director of the Neuroscience & Regeneration Research Center at Yale. He also holds an appointment as Visiting Professor at University College London. Prior to moving to Yale, Dr. Waxman worked at Harvard, MIT, and Stanford.

    Dr. Waxman received his BA from Harvard, and his MD and PhD degrees from Albert Einstein College of Medicine. His research, which uses tools from the “molecular revolution” to find new therapies that will promote recovery of function after injury to the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves, has received international recognition.

    Dr. Waxman’s research has defined the ion channel architecture of nerve fibers, and demonstrated its importance for axonal conduction (Science, 1985). He demonstrated increased expression of sodium channels in demyelinated axons (Science, 1982), identified the channel isoforms responsible for this remarkable neuronal plasticity which supports remission in multiple sclerosis (PNAS, 2004), and delineated the roles of sodium channels in axonal degeneration (PNAS, 1993). He has made pivotal discoveries that explain pain after nerve injury. Most recently, in translational leaps from laboratory to humans, he carried out molecule-to-man studies combining molecular genetics, molecular biology, and biophysics to demonstrate the contribution of ion channels to human pain (Trends in Molec.Med, 2005; PNAS, 2006), led an international coalition that identified sodium channel mutations as causes of peripheral neuropathy (PNAS, 2012) and has used atomic-level modeling to advance pharmacogenomics (Nature Comm., 2012). A new class of pain medications without central side-effects or addictive potential, based on his work, is currently in clinical trials.

    Dr. Waxman has published more than 600 scientific papers. He has as edited nine books, and is the author of Spinal Cord Compression and of Clinical Neuroanatomy (translated into eight languages). He has served on the editorial boards of many journals including The Journal of Physiology, Brain, Annals of Neurology, Trends in Neurosciences, Nature Reviews Neurology, and Trends in Molecular Medicine, and is Editor-in-Chief of Neuroscience Letters. He has trained more than 150 academic neurologists and neuroscientists who lead research teams around the world.

    A member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, Dr. Waxman’s many awards include the Tuve Award (NIH), the Distinguished Alumnus Award (Albert Einstein College of Medicine), the Dystel Prize and Wartenberg Award (American Academy of Neurology), and the Middleton Award and Magnuson Award of the Veterans Administration. He received the Annual Prize of the British Physiological Society, an honor he shares with his heroes, Nobel Prize laureates Andrew Huxley, John Eccles, and Alan Hodgkin.

    4/17/13

  • Shaul Yogev

    Assistant Professor of Neuroscience and of Cell Biology

    Research Interests
    Axonal Transport; Cell Biology; Cytoskeleton; Neurons; Synapses; Motor Neuron Disease

    Shaul got his BSc and MSc from Paris VII University in France, and his PhD from the Weizmann Institute in Israel, where he studied EGFR signaling with Benny Shilo. As a postdoc with Kang Shen at Stanford he developed imaging tools that enable using forward genetic approaches to study neuronal microtubules and axonal transport in live animals with single cell resolution.

    The lab is interested in neuronal cell biology. We want to understand how the architecture of the neuronal cytoskeleton is established and how it supports polarized traffic in order to maintain structures such as synapses, which are found at a large distance from the cell body, over the lifetime of a neuron.

  • David Zenisek

    Professor of Cellular And Molecular Physiology, of Ophthalmology and Visual Science and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Cell Biology; Endocytosis; Exocytosis; Ophthalmology; Physiology; Presynaptic Terminals; Retinal Bipolar Cells
  • Jiangbing Zhou

    Associate Professor Term

    Research Interests
    Biocompatible Materials; Biomedical Engineering; Brain Injuries; Brain Neoplasms; Genetic Therapy; Drug Delivery Systems; Stroke; Nanomedicine; Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy

    Dr. Jiangbing Zhou is an Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and of Biomedical Engineering. His research centers on developing translational nanomedicine, gene therapy, and stem cell therapy for treatment of neurological disorders, including brain cancer, stroke, and traumatic brain injury, through a unique combination of material science, biology, and engineering. The ultimate goal of Zhou lab research is to combine these advances to establish more effective approaches to treating patients with these diseases.

  • Z. Jimmy Zhou

    Marvin L. Sears Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science and Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and Professor of Neuroscience; Vice Chairman and Director of Research, Ophthalmology and Visual Science

    Research Interests
    Neurobiology; Ophthalmology; Physiology; Retina; Retinal Diseases
  • Steven Zucker

    David and Lucille Packard Professor of Computer Science and Professor of Biomedical Engineering

    Research Interests
    Biomedical Engineering; Computers; Mathematical Computing; Mathematics; Neurophysiology; Neurosciences; Robotics; Biomedical Research