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Neuroscience Track

The interdisciplinary research programs of Yale neuroscience faculty are central to the Neuroscience Track in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences program. The primary purpose of the Neuroscience Track is to provide students with maximum diversity and depth in the most important areas of neuroscience research. The Track draws on the knowledge and expertise of more than eighty faculty members, representing over twenty departments in both the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and the School of Medicine, ranging from Psychiatry to Pharmacology and from Cell Biology to Biomedical Engineering.

Neuroscience Track Leadership

Faculty

  • Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    • Behavioral Sciences
    • Electrochemistry
    • Neurobiology
    • Psychiatry
    • Signal Transduction
    • Substance-Related Disorders

    Nii Addy is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and of Cellular and Molecular Physiology. He received his B.S. in Biology from Duke University and his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Yale University. Dr. Addy directs a federally funded research program investigating the neurobiological bases of substance use disorders, depression and anxiety. Dr. Addy’s team also studies the ability of tobacco product flavor additives to alter nicotine use behavior and addiction. He serves on the journal editorial board of Neuropsychopharmacology, Biological PsychiatryNicotine & Tobacco Research, and Neuropharmacology, and is a grant reviewer for the Neurobiology of Motivated Behavior (NMB) Study Section of the National Institutes of Health's Center for Scientific Review (CSR). Dr. Addy contributes to graduate student and postdoctoral training, faculty mentoring, and diversity, equity and inclusion programs and initiatives through his work on campus and his work in professional scientific societies. 

    In addition, Dr. Addy has built unique partnerships between scientists, clinicians, churches, faith leaders, entertainers, professional athletes, and community groups to address issues at the intersection of neuroscience, mental health, faith, culture and social justice. As the creator and host of town hall community events, he encourages and equips audiences to embrace the use of holistic, integrated tools to address mental health challenges. He has collaborated with Lecrae (Grammy Award-winning artist and NY Times Best Seller), Doug Middleton (Jacksonville Jaguars/ Dream the Impossible Initiative), Allan Houston (former NBA All-Star, NY Knicks/ FISLL Project), the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), the Veritas Forum, the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA), the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), the Yale University Chaplain's Office, Yale Well, the Salvation Army, Every Nation Church NYC, the American Bible Society and others. His research and community work have been featured by National Public Radio (NPR), Newsday, the National Football League Players Association (NFLPA), The Source Magazine, Chuck Norris, BoldTV, Legitimate Matters, and Relevant Magazine. He has presented scientific lectures at universities throughout the United States and Europe, and he serves on the Board of Trustees for The Carver Project, aimed at empowering and connecting individuals across university, church and society. 

  • Associate Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience; Director, Minority Recruitment, Psychiatry Department; Director, Postdoctoral Affairs, Psychiatry Department

    Research Interests
    • Acetylcholine
    • Electrophysiology
    • Glutamates
    • Interneurons
    • Memory
    • Neurobiology
    • Nicotine
    • Psychiatry
    • Puberty
    • Signal Transduction
    • Prefrontal Cortex
    • Kisspeptins
  • Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Division of Neurocognition, Neurocomputation, and Neurogenetics (N3), Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    • Affect
    • Mental Disorders
    • Cognition
    • Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted
    • Emotions
    • Memory, Short-Term
    • Schizophrenia
    • Computational Biology
    • Substance-Related Disorders
    • Neuroimaging

    Dr. Anticevic trained in Clinical Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience at Washington University in St. Louis where he trained with Drs. Deanna Barch and David Van Essen. Following graduate training, Dr. Anticevic completed his internship in Clinical Neuropsychology at Yale University. After internship, he joined the Yale University Department of Psychiatry as research faculty while concurrently serving as the Administrative Director for the Center for the Translational Neuroscience of Alcoholism. Subsequently, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology at the Yale University School of Medicine, where he directs a clinical neuroimaging laboratory focused on severe mental illness. Dr. Anticevic is a recipient of the NARSAD Young Investigator Award, the International Congress of Schizophrenia Research Young Investigator Award, the NIH Director's Early Independence Award, the NARSAD Independent Investigator Award and the Klerman Prize for Exceptional Clinical Research. He currently serves as the Director of the Division of Neurocognition, Neurocomputation, and Neurogenetics (N3) at Yale School of Medicine.

    His group's research focus is centered on computational and cognitive neuroscience of mental illness. Specifically, Dr. Anticevic's group is interested in characterizing neural mechanisms involved in higher order cognitive operations, such as working memory, as well as their interaction with neural systems involved in affective processes, with the aim of understanding how these computations may go awry in the context of severe mental illness . Methodologically, his group uses the combination of task-based, resting-state, pharmacological multi-modal neuroimaging, as well as computational modeling approaches to map neural alterations that lead to poor mental health outcomes. The overarching goal of the group is to develop neurobiologically principled and computationally grounded mapping between neural and behavioral levels of analyses in people to inform personalized and rational treatment design for mental health symptoms.

  • Albert E. Kent Professor of Neuroscience and Professor of Psychology; Member, Kavli Institute of Neuroscience at Yale University

    Research Interests
    • Aging
    • Alzheimer Disease
    • Behavioral Sciences
    • Psychology, Child
    • Mental Health
    • Neurobiology
    • Neurosciences
    • Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic
    • Prefrontal Cortex
    • Cognitive Science

    Dr. Arnsten is an international expert on the molecular regulation of higher cortical circuits, and a member of the National Academy of Medicine. She received her B.A. in Neuroscience from Brown University in 1976 (where she created the Neuroscience major), and her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from UCSD in 1981. She did post-doctoral research with Dr. Susan Iversen at Cambridge University in the UK, and with Dr. Patricia Goldman-Rakic at Yale. Dr. Arnsten's research examines the neural basis of higher cognition. Her work has revealed that the newly evolved cortical circuits that underlie higher cognition are uniquely regulated at the molecular level, conferring vulnerability in mental illness and age-related cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease. Arnsten's research has led to new treatments for cognitive disorders in humans, including the successful translation of guanfacine (IntunivTM) for the treatment of ADHD and related prefrontal cortical disorders.

  • Associate Professor Tenure

    I am an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Yale UniversityMy group studies computer architectures and systems for platforms ranging from data center servers to brain-computer interfaces. I am part of Yale's Computer Systems Lab and Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, and am also a Fellow of Grace Hopper College.

    Modern computer systems integrate diverse accelerators and memory technologies, offering significant performance but complicating the programming models that software developers are familiar with. We build systems abstractions to improve hardware programmability, and architect hardware and systems software support to implement these abstractions efficiently.

    We have worked on the virtual memory abstraction with contributions to translation contiguitymemory transistency, and GPU address translation. Our work on coalesced TLBs has been integrated into AMD's chips, and our large page optimizations are now in Linux. Our work on giving GPUs direct access to storage, networking, and memory management services has influenced Radeon Open Compute's hyperscale computing stack.

    We have also been building heterogeneous architectures that advance the brain sciences to help treat neurological disorders and offer a path towards more explainable and transparent AI. In our HALO project, we are taping out ultra-low-power and flexible chips for brain-computer interfaces and evaluating them using data collected on non-human primates and epilepsy patients.

  • Assistant Professor

    The Bhattacharyya Lab studies molecular mechanism of kinase signaling, especially in the context of learning, memory and neuropathological conditions. Dr. Bhattacharyya received her PhD in Computational Biophysics at the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore where she used molecular dynamics simulations and graph theory to study allosteric communication in proteins and its complexes with RNA/DNA. She made a transition into experimental biology during her postdoctoral studies at the University of California Berkeley as a Human Frontier Science Program Long Term Fellow. She used structural biology, single-molecule microscopy, and native mass spectrometry along with computational techniques to study the molecular mechanism of regulation in a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase that is critical for learning and memory. The Bhattacharyya Lab takes an integrative approach to understand the molecular mechanism of cellular signaling using both experimental and computational techniques.

  • Associate Professor of Neurology

    Research Interests
    • Biochemistry
    • Central Nervous System
    • Neurology
    • Neurosciences
    • Synapses

    Thomas Biederer received his Ph.D. in Cell Biology from the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany. Thomas Biederer then pursued postdoctoral training with Dr. Thomas Südhof at the UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas to investigate mechanisms of synapse formation. He started his research group in 2003 as faculty member at Yale University, was 2013-2019 at Tufts University, and joined the Yale faculty again in 2019.

    Dr. Biederer’s multidisciplinary research is motivated by his deep-seated interest in the biology of synapses, the cellular structures that connect neurons into networks. His long-term goals are to define how synapses develop, understand their roles in cognition, and investigate the profound disease relevance of synaptic aberrations. Progress from his group is providing insights into trans-synaptic complexes and how they dynamically organize synapse formation and maturation in vitro and in vivo. Attaining these goals is of importance to human health as altered synapse formation and stability underlie devastating brain disorders, including those that are neurodevelopmental diseases and related to drugs of abuse.

  • John and Hope Furth Professor of Psychiatric Neuroscience and Professor of Psychiatry, and in the Child Study Center and of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging; Director, Mood Disorders Research Program

    Research Interests
    • Adolescent Psychiatry
    • Bipolar Disorder
    • Depression
    • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    • Psychiatry
    • Suicide
    • Mood Disorders
    • Diffusion Tensor Imaging
    • Neuropsychiatry

    Dr. Hilary Patricia Blumberg is the John and Hope Furth Professor of Psychiatric Neuroscience, Professor of Psychiatry, Radiology and Biomedical Imaging and in the Child Center, and Director of the Mood Disorders Research Program, at the Yale School of Medicine. She graduated summa cum laude in neuroscience from Harvard University and completed her medical degree, psychiatry training and specialty training in brain scanning research at Cornell University Medical College. Dr. Blumberg’s research is devoted to understanding the brain circuitry differences that underlie mood disorders across the lifespan, with a focus on bipolar disorder. She directs the Mood Disorders Research Program at Yale that brings together a multi-disciplinary group of scientists to study the genetic, developmental and environmental factors that cause mood disorders to develop new methods for early detection, more effective interventions, and prevention of the disorders and their associated high risk for suicide. This research includes the use of new state-of-the-art brain scanning methods. The program is also known for training young scientists to be new leaders in the field. Dr. Blumberg has served as principal investigator on awards from the National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Department of Veterans Affairs, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, International Bipolar Disorder Foundation, For the Love of Travis Foundation, MQ Foundation, Stanley Medical Research Institute and Women’s Health Research at Yale. She has received numerous awards including the 2017 Brain and Behavior Foundation Colvin Prize for Research Achievement in Mood Disorders and the 2018 American Psychiatric Association Blanche F. Ittleson Award for outstanding and published research in child and adolescent psychiatry. She is a fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and member of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology and Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  • Mark Loughridge and Michele Williams Professor of Neurology and Professor of Neuroscience and of Neurosurgery; Director, Yale Clinical Neuroscience Imaging Center (CNIC)

    Research Interests
    • Electrophysiology
    • Epilepsy
    • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    • Neurobiology
    • Neurology
    • Neurosurgery
    • Behavioral Research
    • Neuroimaging

    Dr. Blumenfeld's clinical and research work focuses on epilepsy, cognition and brain imaging. He directs Yale's Clinical Neuroscience Imaging Center (CNIC), a new multi-disciplinary core facility for innovative study and treatment of brain disorders. Teaching activities include a textbook titled Neuroanatomy Through Clinical Cases, Sinauer Assoc., Publ. 2002, 2010, 2020.

  • Professor of Neurosurgery and of Cellular And Molecular Physiology; Co Vice Chair of Research, Neurosurgery

    Research Interests
    • Autistic Disorder
    • Central Nervous System Diseases
    • Nervous System Malformations
    • Nervous System Diseases
    • Neurologic Manifestations
    • Neurosurgery
    • Physiology
    • Stem Cells
    • Diseases

    Dr. Angélique Bordey holds the rank of Professor of Neurosurgery, and Cellular & Molecular Physiology. Dr. Bordey is an active participant in teaching and training of graduate and medical students at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Bordey is an  Editor for several journals, including Epilepsy Currents, Glia, Neuroplasticity, Neurogenesis, Frontiers in Neuroscience, and Frontiers in Neurogenesis. She has served as a permanent and ad hoc member on several grant review committees and NIH study sections. Finally, she is a McKnight awardee and holds several federal and foundation grants .

  • Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    • Biological Psychiatry
    • Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Kristen Brennand, PhD is a new faculty member at the Yale School of Medicine, having recently moved her laboratory from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York, NY.  Her research integrates stem cell-based approaches with CRISPR-mediated genomic engineering strategies, in order to study the impact of patient-specific variants across and between the cell types of the brain. The goal of her research is to uncover the convergence and synergy arising from the complex interplay of the many risk variants linked to brain disease. Dr. Brennand’s work is funded by the National Institutes of Health, the New York Stem Cell Foundation, the Brain Research Foundation, and the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation.

  • Assistant Professor of Pharmacology

    Research Interests
    • Biochemistry
    • Biophysics
    • Electrophysiology
    • Pharmacology
    • Smell
    • Taste
    • Cryoelectron Microscopy
    • Ligand-Gated Ion Channels

    Joel received his undergraduate degree from the University of Alberta, Canada, and his Ph.D. from Columbia University. He received postdoctoral training in the MacKinnon and Ruta Laboratories at The Rockefeller University before joining the Department of Pharmacology at Yale in 2020. As a postdoc, Joel used single-particle cryo-electron microscopy to determine the first high-resolution structure of an olfactory receptor, the insect Orco. At Yale, Joel is continuing to study smell and taste receptors to elucidate the elementary principles of chemosensory detection.

  • Professor

    BJ Casey, Ph.D., a Professor of Psychology at Yale, is a world leader in the field of developmental neuroscience. She has pioneered the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the human brain and developmental transitions across the life span, particularly during adolescence. Her scientific discoveries on brain and behavioral development have been published in over 200 peer-reviewed articles in high profile journals including Nature Medicine, Nature Neuroscience, Neuron, PNAS and Science and cited over 60,000 times and highlighted by NPR, PBS, and National Geographic. She has received numerous honors including the Thomson Reuters World’s Most Influential Minds Award, the Association for Psychological Science Lifetime Achievement Mentor Award and has served on several National Institutes of Health and  National Academy of Sciences committees and advisory boards. 

  • Associate Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience; Associate Professor, Neurology; Associate Professor of Neuroscience; Deputy Chair of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    • Neurology
    • Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses
    • Parkinson Disease
    • Synapses
    • Receptors, Presynaptic
    • Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Sreeganga S. Chandra received her Ph.D. in Chemistry from Purdue University. In her postdoctoral research, she pursued her interest in neuronal cell biology and neurodegeneration in the lab of Thomas C. Südhof at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. She is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Neurology, and Neuroscience. She is also the Deputy Chair for the Department of Neuroscience.