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Neuroscience Track

The interdisciplinary research programs of Yale neuroscience faculty are central to the Neuroscience Track in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences program. The primary purpose of the Neuroscience Track is to provide students with maximum diversity and depth in the most important areas of neuroscience research. The Track draws on the knowledge and expertise of more than eighty faculty members, representing over twenty departments in both the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and the School of Medicine, ranging from Psychiatry to Pharmacology and from Cell Biology to Biomedical Engineering.

Neuroscience Track Leadership

  • Charles Greer

    Co-Director, Neuroscience Track

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Neuroscience; Co Vice Chair of Research, Neurosurgery; Director, Interdepartmental Neuroscience Graduate Program

    Research Interests
    • Central Nervous System
    • Neuroglia
    • Neurons
    • Nose
    • Gene Expression Profiling

    Dr. Charles A. Greer is the Vice Chair for Research and holds the rank of Professor of Neuroscience. Dr. Greer also serves as Director of the Yale Interdepartmental Neuroscience Graduate Program. He has served as the President of the Association for Chemoreception Sciences, Chair of National Institutes of Health Study Sections and recently completed a term on the Advisory Council for the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders.

    He has organized several national and international conferences and is frequently an invited speaker. Dr. Greer is an Associate Editor of The Journal of Comparative Neurology and Journal of Neuroscience and a member of the editorial boards of Frontiers in Neurogenomics, Frontiers in Neuroanatomy and Frontiers in Neuorgenesis and the Faculty of 1000. Dr. Greer has been the recipient of numerous awards recognizing his research accomplishments.

Registrar

Faculty

  • Nii Addy

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    • Behavioral Sciences
    • Electrochemistry
    • Neurobiology
    • Psychiatry
    • Signal Transduction
    • Substance-Related Disorders
  • Associate Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience; Director, Minority Recruitment, Psychiatry Department; Director, Postdoctoral Affairs, Psychiatry Department

    Research Interests
    • Acetylcholine
    • Electrophysiology
    • Glutamates
    • Interneurons
    • Memory
    • Neurobiology
    • Nicotine
    • Psychiatry
    • Puberty
    • Signal Transduction
    • Prefrontal Cortex
    • Kisspeptins
  • Alan Anticevic

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Division of Neurocognition, Neurocomputation, and Neurogenetics (N3), Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    • Affect
    • Mental Disorders
    • Cognition
    • Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted
    • Emotions
    • Memory, Short-Term
    • Schizophrenia
    • Computational Biology
    • Substance-Related Disorders
    • Neuroimaging

    Dr. Anticevic trained in Clinical Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience at Washington University in St. Louis where he trained with Drs. Deanna Barch and David Van Essen. Following graduate training, Dr. Anticevic completed his internship in Clinical Neuropsychology at Yale University. After internship, he joined the Yale University Department of Psychiatry as research faculty while concurrently serving as the Administrative Director for the Center for the Translational Neuroscience of Alcoholism. Subsequently, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology at the Yale University School of Medicine, where he directs a clinical neuroimaging laboratory focused on severe mental illness. Dr. Anticevic is a recipient of the NARSAD Young Investigator Award, the International Congress of Schizophrenia Research Young Investigator Award, the NIH Director's Early Independence Award, the NARSAD Independent Investigator Award and the Klerman Prize for Exceptional Clinical Research. He currently serves as the Director of the Division of Neurocognition, Neurocomputation, and Neurogenetics (N3) at Yale School of Medicine.

    His group's research focus is centered on computational and cognitive neuroscience of mental illness. Specifically, Dr. Anticevic's group is interested in characterizing neural mechanisms involved in higher order cognitive operations, such as working memory, as well as their interaction with neural systems involved in affective processes, with the aim of understanding how these computations may go awry in the context of severe mental illness . Methodologically, his group uses the combination of task-based, resting-state, pharmacological multi-modal neuroimaging, as well as computational modeling approaches to map neural alterations that lead to poor mental health outcomes. The overarching goal of the group is to develop neurobiologically principled and computationally grounded mapping between neural and behavioral levels of analyses in people to inform personalized and rational treatment design for mental health symptoms.

  • Amy Arnsten

    Albert E. Kent Professor of Neuroscience and Professor of Psychology; Member, Kavli Institute of Neuroscience at Yale University

    Research Interests
    • Aging
    • Alzheimer Disease
    • Behavioral Sciences
    • Psychology, Child
    • Mental Health
    • Neurobiology
    • Neurosciences
    • Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic
    • Prefrontal Cortex
    • Cognitive Science

    Dr. Arnsten was raised in Maplewood, N.J. where she attended Columbia High School. She received her B.A. in Neuroscience from Brown University in 1976, and her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from UCSD in 1981. She did post-doctoral research with Dr. Susan Iversen at Cambridge University in the UK, and with Dr. Patricia Goldman-Rakic at Yale. Dr. Arnsten's research examines the neural basis of higher cognition. Her work has revealed that the newly evolved cortical circuits that underlie higher cognition are uniquely regulated at the molecular level, conferring vulnerability in mental illness and age-related cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease. Arnsten's research has led to new treatments for cognitive disorders in humans, including the successful translation of guanfacine (IntunivTM) for the treatment of ADHD and related prefrontal cortical disorders.

  • Slav Bagriantsev

    Associate Professor of Cellular & Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    • Biochemistry
    • Biophysics
    • Ducks
    • Electrophysiology
    • Ion Channels
    • Mechanoreceptors
    • Neurosciences
    • Pacinian Corpuscles
    • Sensory Receptor Cells
    • Trigeminal Ganglion
    • Thermoreceptors
    • Potassium Channels
    • Anseriformes
    • Transient Receptor Potential Channels
    • Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels
  • Anton Bennett

    Dorys McConnell Duberg Professor of Pharmacology and Professor of Comparative Medicine; Co-Director, Program in Integrative Cell Signaling and Neurobiology of Metabolism; Director, BBS Minority Affairs

  • Hilary Blumberg

    John and Hope Furth Professor of Psychiatric Neuroscience and Professor of Psychiatry, and in the Child Study Center and of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging; Director, Mood Disorders Research Program

    Research Interests
    • Adolescent Psychiatry
    • Bipolar Disorder
    • Depression
    • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    • Psychiatry
    • Suicide
    • Mood Disorders
    • Diffusion Tensor Imaging
    • Neuropsychiatry

    Dr. Hilary Patricia Blumberg is the John and Hope Furth Professor of Psychiatric Neuroscience, Professor of Psychiatry, Radiology and Biomedical Imaging and in the Child Center, and Director of the Mood Disorders Research Program, at the Yale School of Medicine. She graduated summa cum laude in neuroscience from Harvard University and completed her medical degree, psychiatry training and specialty training in brain scanning research at Cornell University Medical College. Dr. Blumberg’s research is devoted to understanding the brain circuitry differences that underlie mood disorders across the lifespan, with a focus on bipolar disorder. She directs the Mood Disorders Research Program at Yale that brings together a multi-disciplinary group of scientists to study the genetic, developmental and environmental factors that cause mood disorders to develop new methods for early detection, more effective interventions, and prevention of the disorders and their associated high risk for suicide. This research includes the use of new state-of-the-art brain scanning methods. The program is also known for training young scientists to be new leaders in the field. Dr. Blumberg has served as principal investigator on awards from the National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Department of Veterans Affairs, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, International Bipolar Disorder Foundation, For the Love of Travis Foundation, MQ Foundation, Stanley Medical Research Institute and Women’s Health Research at Yale. She has received numerous awards including the 2017 Brain and Behavior Foundation Colvin Prize for Research Achievement in Mood Disorders and the 2018 American Psychiatric Association Blanche F. Ittleson Award for outstanding and published research in child and adolescent psychiatry. She is a fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and member of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology and Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  • Hal Blumenfeld

    Mark Loughridge and Michele Williams Professor of Neurology and Professor of Neuroscience and of Neurosurgery; Director, Yale Clinical Neuroscience Imaging Center (CNIC)

    Research Interests
    • Electrophysiology
    • Epilepsy
    • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    • Neurobiology
    • Neurology
    • Neurosurgery
    • Behavioral Research
    • Neuroimaging

    Dr. Blumenfeld's clinical and research work focuses on epilepsy, cognition and brain imaging. He directs Yale's Clinical Neuroscience Imaging Center (CNIC), a new multi-disciplinary core facility for innovative study and treatment of brain disorders. Teaching activities include a textbook titled Neuroanatomy Through Clinical Cases, Sinauer Assoc., Publ. 2002, 2010.

  • Angelique Bordey

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Cellular And Molecular Physiology; Co Vice Chair of Research, Neurosurgery

    Research Interests
    • Autistic Disorder
    • Central Nervous System Diseases
    • Nervous System Malformations
    • Nervous System Diseases
    • Neurologic Manifestations
    • Neurosurgery
    • Physiology
    • Stem Cells
    • Diseases

    Dr. Angélique Bordey holds the rank of Professor of Neuroscience. Dr. Bordey is an active participant in teaching and training of graduate and medical students at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Bordey is the Editor-in-Chief of the journal Frontiers in Neurogenesis and an executive Editor of the journals Neuropharmacology, Glia, Neuroplasticity, AES Neuro, Neurogenesis, and Fronteirs in Neuroscience. She has served as an Ad Hoc member on several study sections and is presently a member of CMBG NIH study section . She has organized several national and international symposiums, and is frequently an invited speaker. Finally, she is a McKnight awardee and holds several grant fundings.

  • William Cafferty

    Associate Professor of Neurology and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    • Brain Diseases
    • Demyelinating Diseases
    • Pain
    • Spinal Cord Injuries
    • Neurodegenerative Diseases
  • Jessica Cardin

    Associate Professor Term

    Research Interests
    • Autistic Disorder
    • Cerebral Cortex
    • Electrophysiology
    • Epilepsy
    • Interneurons
    • Neurobiology
    • Neurosciences
    • Schizophrenia
  • John Carlson

    Eugene Higgins Professor of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

    Research Interests
    • Arthropod Vectors
    • Drosophila
    • Smell
    • Taste
  • Sreeganga Chandra

    Associate Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience; Associate Professor, Neurology; Associate Professor of Neuroscience; Deputy Chair of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    • Neurology
    • Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses
    • Parkinson Disease
    • Synapses
    • Receptors, Presynaptic
    • Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Sreeganga S. Chandra received her Ph.D. in Chemistry from Purdue University. In her postdoctoral research, she pursued her interest in neuronal cell biology and neurodegeneration in the lab of Thomas C. Südhof at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. She is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Neurology, and Neuroscience. She is also the Deputy Chair for the Department of Neuroscience. 

  • Rui Chang

    Assistant Professor in Neuroscience; Assistant Professor of Neuroscience and of Cellular and Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    • Cardiovascular System
    • Cranial Nerves
    • Heart
    • Neural Pathways
    • Physiology
    • Vagus Nerve
    • Peripheral Nervous System
    • Ganglia, Sensory
    • Optogenetics

    Rui Chang received his B.S. in Biological Sciences and Biotechnology from Tsinghua University, China in 2005. He then studied sensory transduction with Emily Liman and earned his Ph.D. in Neuroscience at the University of Southern California in 2011. He completed his postdoctoral training with Stephen Liberles at Harvard Medical School, where he investigated how body sensory cues are monitored by the brain through the vagus nerve, and how these internal signals regulate whole body physiology. He joined both the Department of Neuroscience and the Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology at Yale University School of Medicine in January 2018.

    The Chang lab uses state-of-the-art molecular, genetic, and imaging approaches including single-cell gene expression profiling, virus-based anatomical mapping, in vivo imaging, optogenetics, and chemogenetics to reveal the physiological functions of diverse organ-to-brain circuits. The goal is to better understand the important body-brain interface, and to develop novel neuronal-based therapeutic strategies for disease intervention.

  • Steve W. C. Chang

    Assistant Professor of Psychology and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    • Amygdala
    • Neuropharmacology
    • Neurophysiology
    • Social Behavior
    • Prefrontal Cortex
    • Psychiatry and Psychology

    Steve Chang is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Yale University. His research investigates the neural mechanisms of social cognition and social decision-making. Steve has been at the forefront of using live social interaction paradigms for studying the neural mechanisms underlying social decision-making and social gaze interactions. The ultimate goal of his research is to elucidate the neurophysiological and neuropharmacological mechanisms underlying social cognition and how these processes may be disrupted in psychiatric conditions with social deficits.

  • Marvin M Chun

    Dean of Yale College, Richard M. Colgate Professor of Psychology and Professor of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    • Attention
    • Decision Making
    • Memory
    • Neurobiology
    • Perception
    • Psychiatry and Psychology

    Marvin M. Chun is the Richard M. Colgate Professor of Psychology with a secondary appointment in the Yale School of Medicine Department of Neuroscience. He is also a member of the Yale Cognitive Science Program. He leads a cognitive neuroscience laboratory that uses brain imaging and machine learning to study how people see, attend, remember, and perform optimally.  One line of work uses brain imaging to read out perceptions and thoughts.  Another  focus is to use brain imaging to understand and predict what makes people different [projects] [press]. He received his B.A. from Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea, after having spent a junior year abroad at the University of California, Berkeley. He earned his Ph.D. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, followed by postdoctoral training at Harvard University, funded by an NIH NRSA. His research has been honored with a 2006 Troland Research Award from the US National Academy of Sciences, and a 2002 American Psychological Association Early Career Award. His laboratory is grateful to receive funding from the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation. In Yale College he teaches Introduction to Psychology, for which he received the Phi Beta Kappa William DeVane Award for Teaching and Scholarship and the Lex Hixon Prize for Teaching Excellence.

  • Damon Clark

    Associate Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology and of Physics and of Neuroscience

  • Lawrence B. Cohen

    Professor of Cellular And Molecular Physiology; Principal Scientist, Korea Institute of Science and Technology

    Research Interests
    • Neurosciences

    Research Interests: Neuroscience; Olfactory processing; and Imaging brain activity

    My laboratory pioneered the development and use of optical methods for following, on a large scale, rapid electrical events that underlie brain activity and changes in ion concentration in biological systems. Some contemporary imaging methods of modern neurobiology and cardiac physiology are founded on these developments.