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An open-access plug-in program for 3D modelling distinct material properties of cortical and trabecular bone

The authors demonstrate the development and use of a pre-processing plug-in program with a 3D modelling image processing software suite (Synopsys Simpleware, ScanIP) to assist with identifying, isolating, and defining cortical and trabecular bone material properties from patient specific computed tomography scans. The workflow starts by calibrating grayscale values of each constituent element with a phantom – a standardized object with defined densities. Using an established power law equation, we convert the apparent density value per voxel to a Young’s Modulus. The resulting “calibrated” scan can be used for modeling and in-silico experimentation with Finite Element Analysis.

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  • Evaluating surface coatings to reduce bone cement adhesion to point of care 3D printed molds in the intraoperative setting

    Polymethyl methacrylate, or “bone cement,” can be used intraoperatively to replace damaged or diseased bone and to deliver local antibiotics. 3D printed molds allow surgeons to form personalized and custom shapes with bone cement. One factor hindering the clinical utility of anatomically accurate 3D printed molds is that cured bone cement can be difficult to remove due to the strong adhesion between the mold and the bone cement. One way to reduce the adhesion between the 3D printed mold and the cured bone cement is with the use of a surface coating, such as a lubricant. This study sought to determine the optimal surface coating to prevent bone cement adhesion to 3D printed molds that could be utilized within a sterile operating room environment.

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  • Adult Reconstruction Division Welcomes Ansab Khwaja, MD as 2022-23 Total Joint Replacement Surgery Fellow

    Ansab Khwaja, MD, was born in Karachi, Pakistan, and moved to Seattle with his family when he was 10 years old. While receiving a degree in philosophy from the University of Washington, he worked with the school’s athletic trainers, giving him his first glimpse into orthopaedics. He earned early distinction as the ‘Outstanding First Year Sports Medicine Intern.’ He then remained at the University of Washington for medical school where he was a leader in the Orthopaedic Interest Group and his extensive volunteerism earned him a community service award.

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  • A Guide to Arthritis: How To Manage Pain by Body Part

    Anyone who struggles to button a shirt or get up from a chair because of arthritis knows how painful and limiting the condition can be. Symptoms worsen with age, but if you’re young and think you are still years away from experiencing them, you may be surprised to learn that although the onset of arthritis is typically after age 40, even people in their 20s can develop it.

    Source: Yale Medicine
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  • Patient Demographic and Socioeconomic Factors Associated with Physical Therapy Utilization after Uncomplicated Meniscectomy

    Meniscal tears are common orthopaedic injuries that may be caused by trauma or degenerative changes in the knee joint. The extent to which physical therapy (PT) is used after meniscectomy is unknown. The objective of this study was to estimate the extent to which PT is implemented after meniscectomy and to identify factors associated with its utilization.

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  • Predictors of Physical Abuse in Elder Patients with Fracture

    Elder abuse is a public health issue requiring attention. Unlike abuse in the pediatric population, predictors of elder abuse in patients with fracture have not been well defined. Elderly patients with physical abuse and fracture were abstracted using the 2007 to 2017 National Emergency Department Sample database. Univariate comparisons, multivariate regression, and adjusted odds ratios were used to determine independent predictors of elder abuse compared with nonabuse fracture controls.

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  • How Do I Know If I Need a Cortisone Shot?

    If you’re an athlete prone to overuse injuries or if you have a chronic condition like arthritis, chances are you’ve had a cortisone injection—or at least discussed the treatment with your medical provider. Cortisone injections are most commonly delivered to joints, including those in the hip, knee, shoulder, spine, or wrist, to tamp down inflammation and pain—with the goal of getting people back to their everyday activities.

    Source: Yale Medicine
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