Molecular Medicine, Pharmacology, and Physiology (MMPP) Track

MMPP Track Leadership

  • Kathryn M. Ferguson

    Co-Director of Graduate Admissions, MMPP Track

    Associate Professor of Pharmacology; Member, Yale Cancer Biology Institute

    Dr. Ferguson’s research focuses on extracellular control of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), aberrant activation of which can drive cancer and other diseases.  Dr. Ferguson obtained her Ph.D. from Yale in 1996, and completed postdoctoral training at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine.  She transitioned to an independent faculty position in the Department of Physiology at UPenn in 2003, returning to Connecticut in 2015 to join the Yale Cancer Biology Institute and Department of Pharmacology.

  • Qin Yan

    Co-Director of Graduate Admissions, MMPP Track

    Associate Professor of Pathology; Director, Epigenetics Program

    Dr. Qin Yan (严钦) is an Associate Professor of Pathology at Yale Medical School and a member of Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale Stem Cell Center. He directs a research laboratory to elucidate the roles of epigenetic mechanisms that drive tumor initiation and progression and to translate the findings to the clinic. His laboratory has made significant contributions to the understanding of KDM5 H3K4me3/2 histone demethylases. Dr. Yan received his B.S. degree from the University of Science and Technology of China. After his Ph.D. training on regulation of transcription and ubiquitination with Drs. Joan and Ronald Conaway at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation and Stowers Institute for Medical Research, he completed his postdoctoral training on cancer biology with HHMI Investigator Dr. William Kaelin at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School. He has received numerous awards including Era of Hope Scholar Award from DoD Breast Cancer Research Program, Stewart Scholar Award and V Scholar Award.

Faculty

  • Nii Addy

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Behavioral Sciences; Electrochemistry; Neurobiology; Psychiatry; Signal Transduction; Substance-Related Disorders
  • Claudio R. Alarcón

    Assistant Professor of Pharmacology

    Research Interests
    Neoplasm Metastasis

    Our lab uses multidisciplinary approaches to understand the impact of RNA metabolism in development, health and disease. We are primarily focused in identifying the physiological and pathophysiological roles of RNA modifications and non-coding RNAs at the molecular, cellular and organismal levels. Claudio, a native of Chile, obtained his Ph.D. from Cornell University in NYC. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Rockefeller University before joining Yale University in 2017.

  • Karen Anderson

    Professor of Pharmacology and of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry; Co-Director Therapeutics/Chemotherapy Program

    Research Interests
    Molecular Biology; Pharmacology; Anti-Retroviral Agents; HIV Reverse Transcriptase; Multifunctional Enzymes

    Karen S. Anderson is a Professor of Pharmacology and Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry. She is involved in teaching undergraduates and graduate students about drug discovery and structure-based drug design. She also serves as an undergraduate research mentor and is a fellow at Pierson College at Yale serving as a undergraduate freshman advisor. Dr. Anderson's research utilizes mechanistic enzymology and structure-based drug design. Her work focuses on understanding how enzymes, playing critical roles in such diseases as cancer and infectious diseases, including AIDS, work at a molecular level. She uses that information to develop new drug therapies. She has trained over 50 undergraduates, graduate students, M.D./Ph.D. students and postdoctoral students who have gone on to graduate school and medical school as well as successful careers in academia and industry and who are involved in biomedical research.




  • Peter S. Aronson

    C. N. H. Long Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) and Professor of Cellular And Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    Acid-Base Imbalance; Cell Membrane Permeability; Hyperoxaluria; Urinary Tract Physiological Phenomena; Water-Electrolyte Imbalance; Nephrolithiasis

    Dr. Aronson received his undergraduate education at the University of Rochester and his medical education at New York University. He was an internal medicine resident at the University of North Carolina and a research fellow at the National Institutes of Health before coming to Yale as a renal fellow in 1974. He was Chief of the Section of Nephrology at Yale from 1987-2002. Dr. Aronson has published articles and book chapters on the mechanisms regulating sodium, acid-base, and oxalate excretion by the kidney, particularly as related to the formation of kidney stones. He has received a number of awards for his research work, including the Young Investigator Award of the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) and American Heart Association in 1985, the Homer W. Smith Award of the ASN in 1994, election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2009, the Robert W. Berliner Award of the American Physiological Society (APS) in 2016, and the Walter B. Cannon Award of the APS in 2019. He served as President of the American Society of Nephrology in 2008. Dr. Aronson actively participates in the teaching of undergraduate, graduate and medical students, as well as residents and fellows. He was a co-recipient of the Charles W. Bohmfalk Teaching Prize in the Basic Sciences in 2005. Dr. Aronson is an Associate Director of the Yale M.D.-Ph.D. Program.

  • Slav Bagriantsev

    Associate Professor of Cellular & Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    Biochemistry; Biophysics; Ducks; Electrophysiology; Ion Channels; Mechanoreceptors; Neurosciences; Pacinian Corpuscles; Sensory Receptor Cells; Trigeminal Ganglion; Thermoreceptors; Potassium Channels; Anseriformes; Transient Receptor Potential Channels; Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels
  • Allen Bale

    Professor of Genetics; Director, DNA Diagnostic Lab

    Research Interests
    Congenital Abnormalities; DNA; Fanconi Syndrome; Genetics; Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia; Neoplastic Syndromes, Hereditary; Skin Neoplasms
  • Choukri Ben Mamoun

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbial Pathogenesis

    Research Interests
    Malaria; Plasmodium falciparum; Babesia microti; Infectious Disease Medicine
  • Jeffrey Bender

    Robert I. Levy Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) and Professor of Immunobiology; Associate Chief, Cardiovascular Medicine, Internal Medicine; Director, Yale Cardiovascular Research Center, Internal Medicine

    Research Interests
    Cardiology; Endothelium; Immune System; Inflammation; Macrophages; T-Lymphocytes; RNA Stability
  • Anton Bennett

    Dorys McConnell Duberg Professor of Pharmacology and Professor of Comparative Medicine; Co-Director, Program in Integrative Cell Signaling and Neurobiology of Metabolism; Director, BBS Minority Affairs

  • Ranjit S. Bindra

    Associate Professor of Therapeutic Radiology

    Research Interests
    DNA Repair; Glioma; Medical Oncology; Pediatrics; Radiology; Therapeutics; Central Nervous System Neoplasms; Radiation Oncology; Genomics; High-Throughput Screening Assays
  • Titus Boggon

    Associate Professor of Pharmacology and of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

    Research Interests
    Biochemistry; Crystallography; Molecular Biology; Protein Kinases; Substrate Specificity; Signal Transduction; Hemangioma, Cavernous, Central Nervous System

    Dr. Boggon is a structural biologist interested in the molecular basis of cytosolic signal transduction cascades. He completed his Ph.D. at the University of Manchester, U.K., and postdoctoral studies at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Columbia University and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (at Harvard Medical School). His lab is interested in understanding how RhoGTPase signal transduction pathways are regulated at the molecular level, and the molecular basis for acquisition of a  cerebrovascular disorder,  Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCM).

  • Angelique Bordey

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Cellular And Molecular Physiology; Co Vice Chair of Research, Neurosurgery

    Research Interests
    Autistic Disorder; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Malformations; Nervous System Diseases; Neurologic Manifestations; Neurosurgery; Physiology; Stem Cells; Diseases

    Dr. Angélique Bordey holds the rank of Professor of Neuroscience. Dr. Bordey is an active participant in teaching and training of graduate and medical students at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Bordey is the Editor-in-Chief of the journal Frontiers in Neurogenesis and an executive Editor of the journals Neuropharmacology, Glia, Neuroplasticity, AES Neuro, Neurogenesis, and Fronteirs in Neuroscience. She has served as an Ad Hoc member on several study sections and is presently a member of CMBG NIH study section . She has organized several national and international symposiums, and is frequently an invited speaker. Finally, she is a McKnight awardee and holds several grant fundings.

  • Marcus Bosenberg

    Professor of Dermatology, Pathology, and Immunobiology

    Research Interests
    Cell Biology; Dermatology; Melanoma; Neoplasm Metastasis; Pathology

    Marcus Bosenberg M.D., Ph.D., is a physician scientist who directs a leading melanoma research laboratory, is Co-Leader of the Genomics, Genetics and Epigenetics Program of the Yale Cancer Center, Co-Director of the Yale SPORE in Skin Cancer, and is a practicing dermatopathologist at Yale Dermatopathology through Yale Medicine.

    In his research, Dr. Bosenberg studies the genetics and cellular changes that result in melanoma, the leading cause of skin cancer deaths. His laboratory has developed several widely utilized mouse models in order to study how melanoma forms and progresses, to test new melanoma therapies, and how the immune system can be stimulated to fight melanoma. He works to translate basic scientific findings into improvements in melanoma diagnosis and therapy. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed articles, is a member of the Yale Cancer Center Executive Committee, and is a faculty member of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Institute for Biological, Physical, and Engineering Sciences.

    Dr. Bosenberg mentors undergraduate, graduate, medical, and MD-PhD students in his laboratory, teaches at Yale School of Medicine, and trains resident physicians, fellows, and postdoctoral fellows.

  • Demetrios Braddock

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Research Interests
    Calcification, Physiologic; Osteoarthropathy, Primary Hypertrophic; Pathology; Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum; Sickle Cell Trait; Rare Diseases; Vascular Calcification

    Demetrios Braddock was born in Tennessee, educated at the University of Chicago, trained at the NIH in Anatomic Pathology and Biophysical Chemistry, and came to Yale in 2004. He practices Hematopathology and leads a laboratory that studies the ENPP enzymes – a family of extracellular enzymes regulating hemostasis, bone mineralization, and vascular development. These studies have progressed to the development of biologic therapeutics for vascular calcification disorders.

  • Richard Bucala

    Waldemar Von Zedtwitz Professor of Medicine (Rheumatology) and Professor of Pathology and of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases); Deputy Chief, Section of Rheumatology

    Research Interests
    Africa; Epidemiology; Macrophage Migration-Inhibitory Factors; Malaria; Pathology; Public Health; Rheumatology; Stem Cells; Global Health; Communicable Diseases, Emerging; Infectious Disease Medicine

    Richard Bucala, MD, PhD, is a Professor of Medicine, Pathology, and Epidemiology & Public Health.  He studies the mechanisms by which protective immune responses lead to immunopathology, focusing on MIF-family cytokines and their genetics, which his group first cloned and characterized experimentally.  Currently, his laboratory is leading multidisciplinary efforts to develop immunotherapies tailored to an individual’s genetic makeup. An anti-MIF developed by the group is undergoing clinical testing in oncology, and an anti-MIF receptor antibody, recently FDA approved, is under evaluation in SLE. Dr. Bucala also is credited with the discovery of the fibrocyte, which is being targeted therapeutically in different fibrosing disorders.  He is a co-founder of Cytokine Networks and of MIFCOR, a biotechnology startup begun as a student-advised project.  Dr. Bucala was elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians. He is the Editor-in-Chief of Arthritis & Rheumatology and has served on numerous advisory boards for the NIH, the pharmaceutical industry, academia, and private foundations.

  • Cecilia Canessa

    Professor of Cellular And Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    Central Nervous System; Electrophysiology; Kidney; Nephrology; Physiology; Epithelial Sodium Channels
  • Lloyd G. Cantley

    C. N. H. Long Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) and Professor of Cellular And Molecular Physiology; Vice Chair, Research; Co-director of Education, Yale Center for Clinical Investigation

    Research Interests
    Epithelial Cells; Kidney; Macrophages; Morphogenesis; Nephrology; Physiology

    Dr. Cantley performed his clinical Internal Medicine training at the University of North Carolina followed by Nephrology fellowship training at the Beth Israel and Brigham and Women's Hospitals in Boston. He then entered research training at Harvard in the laboratories of Dr. Franklin Epstein and Dr. Guido Guidotti before accepting a faculty position at the Beth Israel. In 2000 Dr. Cantley moved from Harvard to Yale where he established his research focus on the reparative tubular responses to kidney injury.

  • Michael Caplan

    C. N. H. Long Professor of Cellular And Molecular Physiology and Professor of Cell Biology; Chair, Cellular and Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    Cell Biology; Epithelial Cells; Kidney; Polycystic Kidney Diseases; Physiology; Ion Pumps

    Michael J. Caplan received his bachelors degree from Harvard University and his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University in 1987. He joined Yale's Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology as a faculty member in 1988, and is currently the C.N.H. Long Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and Cell Biology.

    He has received fellowships from the Helen Hay Whitney Foundation, the David and Lucille Packard Foundation for Science and Engineering, and a National Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation. He has also received the Young Investigator Awards from the American Physiological Society and the American Society of Nephrologists.

    His work focuses on understanding the ways in which kidney cells organize and maintain their unique structures. His laboratory also studies the mechanisms responsible for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease, and is working to identify targets for new therapies.

  • Rui Chang

    Assistant Professor in Neuroscience; Assistant Professor of Neuroscience and of Cellular and Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    Cardiovascular System; Cranial Nerves; Heart; Neural Pathways; Physiology; Vagus Nerve; Peripheral Nervous System; Ganglia, Sensory; Optogenetics

    Rui Chang received his B.S. in Biological Sciences and Biotechnology from Tsinghua University, China in 2005. He then studied sensory transduction with Emily Liman and earned his Ph.D. in Neuroscience at the University of Southern California in 2011. He completed his postdoctoral training with Stephen Liberles at Harvard Medical School, where he investigated how body sensory cues are monitored by the brain through the vagus nerve, and how these internal signals regulate whole body physiology. He joined both the Department of Neuroscience and the Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology at Yale University School of Medicine in January 2018.

    The Chang lab uses state-of-the-art molecular, genetic, and imaging approaches including single-cell gene expression profiling, virus-based anatomical mapping, in vivo imaging, optogenetics, and chemogenetics to reveal the physiological functions of diverse organ-to-brain circuits. The goal is to better understand the important body-brain interface, and to develop novel neuronal-based therapeutic strategies for disease intervention.

  • Sandy Chang

    Yale College Associate Dean for Science & Quantitative Reasoning Education, Professor of Laboratory Medicine, Pathology and Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry; Associate Director, Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory

    Research Interests
    DNA Damage; Molecular Biology; Pathology; Werner Syndrome; Telomere-Binding Proteins

    Dr. Chang graduated with a BS from Yale College in 1988, and obtained his MD from Cornell University Medical College and his PhD from Rockefeller University in 1997. He completed residency in Clinical Pathology at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, and did his postdoctoral fellowship with Dr. Ronald DePinho at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School. He was an Assistant and then Associate Professor in the Department of Genetics, MD Anderson Cancer Center, before joining the faculty at Yale Medical School as a tenured Associate Professor in 2010. Dr. Chang's research interests focuses on how telomeres, protein/DNA structures at the ends of chromosomes, are properly maintained to protect chromosome ends from engaging a DNA damage response.

    Dr. Chang is the recipient of numerous awards, including those from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Ellsion Medical Foundation, the Sidney Kimmel Foundation for Cancer Research, and the Ellis Benson Award from the Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists. He was elected into the American Society of Clinical Investigation in 2009.


  • Yung-Chi Cheng

    Henry Bronson Professor of Pharmacology; Chairman, Consortium for the Globalization of Chinese Medicine (CGCM)

    Research Interests
    China; Drugs, Chinese Herbal; Hong Kong; Medicine, Chinese Traditional; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Pharmacology

    The Cheng laboratory studies the action of antiviral drugs against HBV, HIV, EBV, and HCV, as well as the discovery of antivirals with unique mode of action against those viruses.

  • Jean-Ju Chung

    Assistant Professor of Cellular & Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    Fertility; Ion Channels; Reproduction; Sperm Capacitation; Sperm Motility; Signal Transduction; Membrane Microdomains

    Jean-Ju L. Chung received her bachelors and masters degree from Seoul National University, Korea and her Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University in 2007. She was a postdoctoral fellow with David E. Clapham in the Department of Neurobiology at Harvard Medical School. She joined Yale's Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology as a faculty member in September, 2015.

    Her research is devoted to investigating cellular signaling via the membrane receptors and ion channels, with a current emphasis on mature spermatozoan motility and fertilization capacity. She has focused her efforts on the primary calcium channel of spermatozoa, CatSper, and has defined its subunits, its distribution in spermatozoa, its function in capacitation, and its effects on fertility. The Chung laboratory applies novel technologies to sperm biology and reproductive research including super-resolution imaging methods, and is continuing to study physiologically relevant molecular changes during mammalian fertilization.

  • Joseph N. Contessa

    Professor of Therapeutic Radiology and of Pharmacology; Director, Central Nervous System Radiotherapy Program

    Joseph N. Contessa, MD, PhD, a radiation oncologist, is the director of Yale Medicine’s Central Nervous System Radiotherapy Program. He specializes in treating patients with primary tumors of the brain, head and neck, and at the base of the skull.  

    “Due to Yale's large referral base, I frequently see relatively rare tumors,” he says, including low-grade and malignant gliomas, ependymomas, high-grade meningiomas, hemangiopericytomas, paragangliomas, and schwannomas. His expertise in treating uncommon cancers benefits patients diagnosed with these tumor types.  “I look forward to helping patients have the best possible outcome when they are faced with a challenging diagnosis,” he says.

    Dr. Contessa is also an associate professor of therapeutic radiology and of pharmacology at Yale School of Medicine where he is part of a team of physicians and scientists who are actively researching the cellular mechanisms that tumors use to evade or “outsmart” standard cancer therapies in hopes of identifying new approaches that improve treatment.

    “We are all working together to increase our knowledge, improve our care and beat cancer,” Dr. Contessa says. 

  • Jose Costa

    Professor Emeritus of Pathology

    Research Interests
    Bone Neoplasms; Medical Oncology; Pathology; Precancerous Conditions; Molecular Diagnostic Techniques; Translational Medical Research

    José Costa, MD, FACP, is Professor Emeritus of Pathology at Yale University School of Medicine and Professeur Honoraire at the University of Lausanne Switzerland. Dr. Costa is an internationally renowned leader in the field of diagnostics of cancer and pathogenesis of tumor formation. Having contributed to the transition from opinion-based medicine to evidence-based diagnosis he is now making use of novel tools to practice integrative systems pathology, an approach that strives to enable a personalized, predictive and precise diagnosis.

    Prior his transition to Emeritus status April first 2018 at the Yale School of Medicine, Dr Costa served in several positions of leadership that include: Chief of the Anatomical Pathology Branch at the Clinical Center, NIH Bethesda Md (1980-83); Director of the Institute of Pathology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland (1983-1993); President of the Board of Directors of the Centre Pluridisciplinaire d’Oncologie, Lausanne Switzerland (1985-1992); Director of Anatomical Pathology Yale New-Haven Hospital (1993-2007); and Deputy Director of the Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center (1995-2007). He is a sought after advisor to several academic, research and health organizations has served or currently serves as board member or advisor to several institutions including the ISREC (Swiss Cancer Research Institut); the Ludwig Institut Branch in Lausanne; the Deutsche Krebs Forshung Zenter (Heidelberg); the Institut of Molecular Pathology at Porto (Portugal); The Catalan Institut of Oncology [ICO] Barcelona, Spain; the Centro Nacional de Investigacion en Oncologia[CNIO] Madrid,Spain, the Instituto Carlos III, Madrid, Spain, the Center for Virtual Tumor Modeling (Harvard); the NIH Consensus Pannels and the NCI’s EDRN in Bethesda, MD, USA.

    Throughout his career Dr. Costa has integrated advances in basic understanding of cancer to the clinical area of diagnosis, prognosis and early detection. He has contributed over 170 original publications to the technical literature, and is among a small group of investigators using evolutionary and ecological theory to predict tumor behavior. His laboratory investigates the micro-evolutionary dynamics involved in tumor formation and tumor progression using both experimental and theoretical modeling at the systems level. This work has identified novel and promising ways to detect early cancer and ways to follow the changes in tumors under therapy. Dr. Costa is co-inventor of two novel diagnostic technologies and has served in the oversight board of Yale’s Office of Cooperative Research. He has also been involved in the crafting of public-private joint ventures in Switzerland (IP-AMS Labs [1999]), the early launching of Curagen Corporation (New Haven, CT [1996]), the founding of Aureon Biosciences (Yonkers, NY [2001]), VCN (Barcelona, Spain [2005]), and PetaOmics (San Marcos, TX [2014]).

    The contributions of Dr Costa have been recognized by several awards including a Special Achievement Award from NIH, election as a Fellow to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2003); the Gold Medal of the International Academy of Pathology and the Trueta Medal from the Catalan government for contributions to public health.

    A firm believer in the dynamics coming from multi-disciplinarity and cooperation, Dr Costa continues to create an environment that will transform health care and set the standards for the 21st century. He is particularly interested in exploring synergies between academia, private industry, and governmental programs.

  • Joseph Craft

    Paul B. Beeson Professor of Medicine (Rheumatology) and Professor of Immunobiology; Paul B. Beeson Professor of Medicine; Program Director, Investigative Medicine

    Research Interests
    Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte; Autoimmune Diseases; Biology; Immunity; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Investigative Techniques; Rheumatology; Cytokines

    Dr. Joseph Craft is Paul B. Beeson Professor of Medicine and Professor of Immunobiology at the Yale University School of Medicine, and past chief of the Section of Rheumatology at Yale. He received his degrees in chemistry as a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and in medicine as an Alpha Omega Alpha graduate of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. Dr. Craft did postgraduate training in internal medicine and in rheumatology and immunology at Yale, and has been on the faculty at that institution since 1985. At Yale, he teaches undergraduate, graduate, and medical students. He directs a research laboratory devoted to understanding the immune response to pathogens and vaccines, and dissecting and treating autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, with a primary focus upon the differentiation, metabolism, and function and regulation of T cells that promote B cell maturation in secondary lymphoid organs. His research has been continually supported by the National Institutes of Health since 1985, and he is a two-time R37 (MERIT) Awardee. He has been a primary mentor for over 20 postdoctoral fellows and for 21 PhD and MD/PhD graduate students, including 7 graduate students currently in his lab. Dr. Craft is Director of the Investigative Medicine Program at Yale, a unique program designed to provide Ph.D. training for physicians, and in his capacity as Director of the program and its Director of Graduate Studies, has supervised training of over 50 Investigative Medicine PhD students. Dr. Craft is recipient of the Bohmfalk Teaching Prize at Yale School of Medicine for outstanding teaching in the basic sciences. He is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Kunkel Society. Dr. Craft also is a member of the Board of Lupus Therapeutics of the Lupus Research Alliance, devoted to initiating novel therapeutic trials in lupus, and past Chair of the Board of Scientific Counselors at the National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal, and Skin Diseases (NIAMS). He is former chair of the Immunological Sciences (now HAI) and current member of the Arthritis, Connective Tissue and Skin Diseases (ACTS) standing study sections at NIH, past chair of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Alliance for Lupus Research, and a former Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences and Kirkland Scholar. He is co-founder of L2Diagnostics, a company in New Haven, CT, formed in partnership with Yale University and devoted to discovery of new diagnostics and therapeutic targets for immunological and infectious diseases, and is currently a member of its Board of Directors.

  • Jonathan Demb

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, of Cellular And Molecular Physiology and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Adaptation, Physiological; Neurophysiology; Retinal Ganglion Cells; Synapses; Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells; Retinal Bipolar Cells

    Jonathan Demb is an Associate Professor in the Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Science with secondary appointments in the Department of Cellular & Molecular Physiology and the Department of Neuroscience. Dr. Demb obtained his doctoral degree from Stanford University and did postdoctoral training at the University of Pennsylvania. Demb was a faculty member at the University of Michigan before moving to Yale in 2011.

    The Demb lab investigates the basic mechanisms that enable healthy visual processing by the mammalian retina. Major accomplishments include identifying fundamental nonlinearities at retinal synapses that mediate specialized spatial processing by retinal ganglion cells; elucidating the role of disinhibition in visual contrast processing; characterizing asymmetries between the retina's ON and OFF pathways; determining roles of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in ganglion cell receptive fields; identifying characteristic properties of cone-mediated vision in the mouse retina; developing the use of a glutamate sensor (iGluSnFR) for study of retinal circuitry; identifying novel amacrine cell circuits using optogenetic technology; and testing experimental therapies in mouse models of retinal disease. Demb is a Reviewing Editor at the Journal of Neuroscience and is on the Editorial Board of PLoS Biology. He was awarded the Cogan Award in 2013 from the Associate for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) to recognize his contributions to the field of retinal neuroscience.

  • Michael DiGiovanna

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Medical Oncology); Chair, Breast Cancer Tumor Board, Yale Cancer Center; Curriculum Director, Office of Education; Thread Leader, Pharmacology, Office of Education; Master Course Co-Leader, Office of Education

    Research Interests
    Breast Neoplasms; Medical Oncology; Pharmacology; Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; Signal Transduction; Clinical Trial

    Dr. DiGiovanna is a native of Long Island, NY, who graduated from Cornell University in 1984 with a B.A. and a double major in the fields of biochemistry and music. He attended Yale University from 1984 through 1990 where he was earned the MD and PhD degrees, with his PhD in Pharmacology. He continued his post-graduate training at Yale, performing internship and residency in Internal Medicine, a research post-doctoral fellowship, and a clinical fellowship in Medical Oncology. He is currently an attending physician in Medical Oncology and Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and Pharmacology at Yale University. His clinical specialty is breast cancer and he conducts both clinical and laboratory-based research. His translational laboratory research focuses on signal transduction in breast cancer. He also has had many leadership roles in education at the Yale School of Medicine, including current roles as Co-Director of the Pre-Clerkship Curriculum, Pharmacology Thread Leader, and Co-Leader of the Genes & Development Master Course.

  • Marie Egan

    Professor of Pediatrics (Respiratory) and of Cellular And Molecular Physiology; Director, Cystic Fibrosis Center; Vice Chair for Research, Department of Pediatrics

    Research Interests
    Bacterial Infections; Cystic Fibrosis; Epithelial Cells; Genetic Code; Immunity, Innate; Inflammation; Lung; Macrophages; Microbiology; Pediatrics; Physiology; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Clinical Trial; Macrophages, Alveolar; Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator; Adaptive Immunity; Airway Management
  • Barbara Ehrlich

    Professor of Pharmacology and of Cellular And Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    Calcium; Polycystic Kidney Diseases; Pharmacology; Physiology; Hermeneutics
  • Anne Eichmann

    Ensign Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) and Professor of Cellular And Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    Blood Vessels; Cardiology; Central Nervous System; Endothelium, Vascular; Physiology
  • Tore Eid

    Associate Professor of Laboratory Medicine, of Neurosurgery and of Molecular Physiology; Associate Director, Clinical Chemistry Laboratory, Yale-New Haven Hospital

    Research Interests
    Epilepsy; Immunohistochemistry; Neurosurgery; Mass Spectrometry; Medical Laboratory Science; Toxicology; Clinical Chemistry Tests
  • Jonathan Ellman

    Eugene Higgins Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Pharmacology

    Research Interests
    Chemicals and Drugs

    Jon was born and raised near Los Angeles and received his B.S. degree at MIT and his Ph.D. degree from Harvard University. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California at Berkeley and subsequently joined the faculty at the same institution. Prior to coming to Yale University, he was Professor in the Department of Chemistry at UC Berkeley and jointly held a faculty position in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology at UC San Francisco. He has published more than 290 research articles on the application of chemistry to biomedical research.

  • Jacob V.P. Eswarakumar

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation

    Research Interests
    Bone Development; Bone Diseases, Developmental; Bone Diseases, Metabolic; Bone Lengthening; Bone Marrow Cells; Signal Transduction; Drug Discovery
  • Kathryn M. Ferguson

    Co-Director of Graduate Admissions, MMPP Track

    Associate Professor of Pharmacology; Member, Yale Cancer Biology Institute

    Dr. Ferguson’s research focuses on extracellular control of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), aberrant activation of which can drive cancer and other diseases.  Dr. Ferguson obtained her Ph.D. from Yale in 1996, and completed postdoctoral training at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine.  She transitioned to an independent faculty position in the Department of Physiology at UPenn in 2003, returning to Connecticut in 2015 to join the Yale Cancer Biology Institute and Department of Pharmacology.

  • Carlos Fernandez-Hernando

    Professor of Comparative Medicine and of Pathology

    Research Interests
    Pathology; Atherosclerosis

    Carlos studied Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Universidad Autonoma of Madrid. From 1999 to 2004, he performed his PhD with Prof. Miguel Angel Lasuncion at Hospital Ramon y Cajal (Madrid). He did his postdoctoral training with Prof. William Sessa at Yale University (2005-2009). Then, Carlos started his laboratory in the Department of Medicine at NYU. He is currently an Associate Professor in the Comparative Medicine Department and a Member of the Vascular Biology & Therapeutics Program

  • Karin Finberg

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Research Interests
    Hematologic Diseases; Hemochromatosis; Anemia, Iron-Deficiency; Genetic Diseases, Inborn

    Karin Finberg received her B.S., M.D., and Ph.D. degrees from Yale. Her Ph.D. dissertation with Dr. Richard Lifton in the Department of Genetics focused on the genetic basis of an autosomal recessive disorder of systemic pH homeostasis, distal renal tubular acidosis with sensorineural deafness. After graduating from Yale, Karin completed residency training in Clinical Pathology at Massachusetts General Hospital and clinical fellowship training in the Harvard Medical School Molecular Genetic Pathology Training Program based at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She then completed postdoctoral research training in the laboratory of Dr. Nancy Andrews, first at Children’s Hospital Boston and later at Duke University Medical Center, where she employed genetic study of patients with an inherited form of iron deficiency anemia to shed insight into mechanisms of systemic iron regulation. In her research laboratory at Yale, Karin continues to investigate mechanisms of iron balance through genetic study of patients with iron-related phenotypes and through characterization of genetically targeted mouse models. She also contributes to patient care as a molecular genetic pathologist in the Molecular Diagnostics Unit of the Department of Pathology.

  • Biff Forbush

    Professor of Cellular And Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    Membrane Proteins; Physiology; Sodium-Potassium-Chloride Symporters; Muscle Cells
  • John Geibel

    Professor of Surgery (Gastrointestinal) and of Cellular And Molecular Physiology; Vice Chair, Surgery; Director, Surgical Research; American Gastroenterological Association Fellow; Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine

    Research Interests
    Diarrhea; Electrophysiology; Gastric Acid; Gastroenterology; Physiology; Bioprinting; Chemicals and Drugs

    John Geibel is Vice Chairman of the Department of Surgery at Yale University School of Medicine and Director of Surgical Research and Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology. His early research training was in Innsbruck Austria where he worked in the Physiology Department and investigated renal physiology on the isolated perfused tubule model. He holds a Bachelors of Science Degree in Physiology, an MD and DSc degree as well as a Master’s of Science, and a Master’s of Arts Degree. He has also obtained his Dozent in Medicine from the University of Innsbruck. After obtaining his Dozent he went to Yale University first as a visiting fellow and then joined the faculty in both Surgery and Cellular and Molecular Physiology where he rose through the ranks to Professor in both faculties.

    Academically, Professor Geibel’s active research interests are on the role of the Calcium Sensing Receptor (CaSR) in gastrointestinal physiology and pathophysiology. In addition, John Geibel has conducted research in fluid and electrolyte transport in the intestine where he was the first to identify that the colonic crypt can both actively secrete and absorb fluid. He has also identified 4 new transport pathways in the stomach that play important roles in acid secretion and may help to explain some of the hypersecretion of acid that occurs in patients. In addition he maintains a research program in the kidney where he was the first to identify a functional role for the H-ATPase in the proximal tubule; he was also the first to demonstrate a role for Angiotensin on the Na/H exchanger and Na/HCO3 and H-ATPase in the proximal tubule. Professor Geibel is the author of over 250 publications and presents his findings both nationally and internationally. He is the holder of 10 patents on the role of the calcium sensing receptor on gastrointestinal models and is currently actively working to begin clinical trials on a method to stop secretory diarrhea in the developing world based on targeting the calcium sensing receptor. He has also patented a new method to suppress acid secretion.

  • Sourav Ghosh

    Associate Professor of Neurology and Pharmacology

    Research Interests
    Glioblastoma; Immune System; Inflammation; Cell Death; Neurodegenerative Diseases; Neurodevelopmental Disorders
  • Pallavi Gopal

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Research Interests
    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Autopsy; Cell Biology; Neurons; Ribonucleoproteins; Neurodegenerative Diseases; RNA Transport; Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration; TDP-43 Proteinopathies

    Pallavi Gopal is a graduate of the Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia. Her Ph.D. thesis work in Neuroscience with Dr. Jeffrey Golden focused on understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that guide neuronal migration during forebrain development. After earning her M.D., Pallavi completed postgraduate clinical training in Anatomic Pathology and Neuropathology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. She did her postdoctoral research training with Dr. Erika Holzbaur at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Gopal is a recipient of the NINDS Clinical Scientist Research Career Development Award. She joined the Pathology Department at Yale School of Medicine in January 2018.

    The Gopal lab is broadly interested in mRNA transport, RNA metabolism and its regulation in healthy and diseased neurons. As a physician-scientist, Dr. Gopal’s research aims to bridge neuronal cell biology and neuropathology of neurodegenerative disease. Her post-doctoral research provided new insight into the biophysical properties of neuronal ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules and has shown that ALS-linked mutations fundamentally perturb the dynamic properties and transport of neuronal RNP complexes. The focus of the Gopal lab is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms driving neuronal RNP granule assembly, the spatiotemporal maturation and function of diverse RNP granules in neuronal physiology, and pathologic transitions in disease.

  • Elena Gracheva

    Associate Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Physiology, Comparative
  • Valentina Greco

    Carolyn Walch Slayman Professor of Genetics

    Research Interests
    Cell Biology; Dermatology; Genetics; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Regeneration; Stem Cells; Stem Cell Niche

    Valentina Greco was born in Palermo, Italy and earned her undergraduate degree in Molecular Biology at the University of Palermo, Italy. She earned her PhD with Suzanne Eaton at the EMBL/MPI-CBG, Germany (1998-2002) and her post-doc with Elaine Fuchs at the Rockefeller University (2003-2009). Dr. Greco is currently the Carolyn Slayman Professor of Genetics. She is also secondary faculty in Cell Biology and Dermatology Departments, and a member of the Yale Stem Cell Center and Yale Cancer Center at the Yale School of Medicine (2009-present).

  • Jaime Grutzendler

    Dr. Harry M. Zimmerman and Dr. Nicholas and Viola Spinelli Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience; Director, Center for Experimental Neuroimaging

    Research Interests
    Alzheimer Disease; Astrocytes; Axons; Blood-Brain Barrier; Capillaries; Cerebrovascular Circulation; Microscopy; Nerve Fibers, Myelinated; Neuronal Plasticity; Regional Blood Flow; Microglia; Neurodegenerative Diseases; Pericytes

    Dr. Grutzendler obtained his MD at Universidad Javeriana in Bogota, Colombia where he was born and raised. He completed a medical internship in Internal Medicine and a residency in Neurology at Washington University/Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis. This was followed by a combined clinical and research fellowship in the Alzheimer Disease Research Center and the Department of Neurobiology at Washington University and further neurobiology research training at the Skirball Institute of New York University. Dr. Grutzendler's clinical interests focus on neurodegenerative disorders with special emphasis in dementias such as Alzheimer's disease. He also leads a research laboratory focused on understanding brain function and the cellular basis of neurological diseases. His lab uses advanced microscopy to visualize neurons, endothelium, astrocytes, pericytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes in living animals with the goal of exploring their dynamic behavior and learning how cell-cell interactions develop. He aims to understand how these interactions are disrupted in disease states such as in Alzheimer's disease, stroke and demyelination with the ultimate goal of designing new therapies for these conditions.

  • Ya Ha

    Associate Professor of Pharmacology

    Research Interests
    Alzheimer Disease; Membrane Proteins; Pharmacology; Crystallography, X-Ray; Chemicals and Drugs
  • Shilpa Hattangadi

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology / Oncology) and of Pathology; Assistant Professor, Pathology

    Research Interests
    Disease Models, Animal; Erythropoiesis; Hematologic Diseases; Hematopoiesis; Heterochromatin; Histone Deacetylases; Histones; Microscopy, Confocal; Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins; Chromatin Immunoprecipitation; Erythroid-Specific DNA-Binding Factors

    Shilpa Hattangadi has an Electrical Engineering and Computer Science undergraduate degree from MIT. Her postdoctoral work at the Whitehead Institute in Harvey Lodish's lab spurred an interest in applying fundamental molecular biology to intriguing concenpts in red blood cell development. Her initial work on the dynamics of chromatin modifications during erythroid transcription transformed into a focus on erythroid nuclear development. Our laboratory now centers on the dynamics of chromatin during normal terminal erythroid differentiation, specifically chromatin condensation and enucleation, which is specific to mammalian red cell development, as well as the role of certain chromatin modifiers on erythroid nuclear development in diseases such as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS).

  • Erica Herzog

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary); Vice Chief for Basic and Translational Research, Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine; Director, The Yale Lung Repository, Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine; Deputy Director PCCSM Training Grant, Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine; Associate Director, Medical Research Scholars Program (MRSP), Graduate School of Arts and Sciences; Director, Yale Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) Center of Excellence, Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine; Director of Medical Student Research, Internal Medicine; Co-Director, Yale Fibrosis Program, Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine

    Research Interests
    Education, Medical; Fibrosis; Inflammation; Lung; Respiration; T-Lymphocytes; Lung Diseases, Interstitial; Semaphorins; Biomarkers, Pharmacological; Bioengineering; Translational Medical Research

    Dr. Herzog received her Bachelor's and MD degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After residency in Internal Medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center in NY, NY, Dr. Herzog came to Yale to pursue fellowship in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. During this time she also obtained her PhD in Investigative Medicine from Yale's graduate school of arts and sciences. Upon her graduation in 2005 Dr. Herzog joined faculty in the department of Internal Medicine in 2006, first as an instructor and then as assistant professor. Dr. Herzog's laboratory focuses on the relationship between chronic inflammation, neuronal guidance proteins, and lung fibrosis in a variety of fibrosing lung diseases including IPF, Scleroderma and sarcoidosis. Her unique translational approach to these diseases combines transgenic murine modeling and bioengineering with studies of primary human cells. Current areas of focus in the Herzog lab include the role of Semaphorin 7a/Plexin C1 signaling pathway in interstitial lung disease and how CD4+ T lymphocytes recruited from the blood regulate the fibrogenic phenotype of monocyte derived cells such as macrophages and fibrocytes. A third and related area involves the development of these areas as peripheral blood biomarkers of disease activity in IPF and scleroderma as well as in pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  • Shuta Ishibe

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Nephrology)

    Research Interests
    Nephrology; Nephrotic Syndrome; Physiology; Proteinuria; Podocytes; Glomerular Filtration Barrier
  • Ryan B. Jensen

    Associate Professor of Therapeutic Radiology and Pathology

    Research Interests
    Breast Neoplasms; DNA Damage; DNA Repair; Radiation Oncology; BRCA2 Protein; Genomic Instability
  • Nikhil Joshi

    Assistant Professor

    Research Interests
    Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung; T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer; Immunotherapy; Oncogenes; T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic; Genes, Tumor Suppressor; T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory; Tumor Microenvironment

    My laboratory uses intricate tumor models and advanced approaches to investigate immune cell interactions with developing tumors. My goal is to determine mechanistically why these interactions do not lead to more potent anti-tumor responses and to identify entry points for modulating these interactions through genetic manipulation and therapeutic intervention. My previous studies have focused on using established complex mouse models to investigate how subtypes of T cells in the tumor microenvironment impact tumor development. My laboratory will combine advanced genetic modeling of mice and immunologic techniques to address fundamental questions in tumor immunology.

  • Leonard Kaczmarek

    Professor of Pharmacology and of Cellular And Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    Ion Channels; Learning; Memory; Neurosciences; Pharmacology; Physiology
  • Kristopher Kahle

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery and of Cellular and Molecular Physiology; Pediatrics, and Cellular and Molecular Physiology; Director, Neonatal and Congenital Anomaly Neurosurgery

    Kristopher T. Kahle, M.D., Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery and Pediatrics and Cellular and Molecular Physiology at Yale University School of Medicine, and Director of Neonatal and Congenital Anomaly Neurosurgery in the Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery. He completed his MD and PhD degrees at the Yale School of Medicine under the mentorship of Richard Lifton, and neurosurgical residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital. After residency, Dr. Kahle completed his pediatric neurosurgery fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital and was Instructor at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Kahle completed a postdoctoral research fellowship with Stephen Elledge and David Clapham at Harvard University. Dr. Kahle’s primary clinical practice includes disorders of neurodevelopment (hydrocephalus, arachnoid cysts, congenital vascular malformations, chiari malformations, spina bifida, and tethered spinal cord) and tumors of the pediatric brain and spinal cord. Dr. Kahle trained in neuroendoscopy, including third ventriculostomy and choroid plexus coagulation, with Dr. Benjamin Warf at Harvard. Dr. Kahle is an attending physician at Yale-New Haven Hospital and the Yale-New Haven Children’s Hospital. Dr. Kahle’s research is devoted to identifying the genes and pathways that regulate ion and water homeostasis in the developing nervous system, and how genetically-encoded or maladaptive changes in these processes contribute to the cellular, circuit, and behavioral abnormalities in neurodevelopmental disorders and in the traumatized brain. He also uses molecular genetic tools such as whole exome and genome sequencing to discover the molecular determinants of neurodevelopmental diseases, such as congenital hydrocephalus. The goal of his work is to translate advances in basic science into novel therapeutic strategies for pediatric neurosurgical diseases.

  • Erdem Karatekin

    Associate Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

    Research Interests
    Exocytosis; Liposomes; Membrane Fusion; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Molecular Biology; Physiology; Secretory Vesicles; Microfluidics

    After obtaining his B.S. degree in chemical engineering from the University of Louisville, KY (where he studied thanks to a swimming scholarship) Dr. Karatekin went on to study soft matter physics and chemistry at Columbia University with N. J. Turro and B. O'Shaughnessy where he obtained his Ph.D. in 1999. He then gradually moved toward studying dynamics of lipid membranes, first during his post-doctoral stay at the Curie Institute (with F. Brochard-Wyart), and later as research faculty at the Laboratoire de Dynamique Membranaire (CNRS FRE 3146), both in Paris, France.

    Thanks to a long-term leave from the CNRS, he was a visiting research scientist in the laboratory of Dr. J. E. Rothman in Cell Biology at Yale during 2008-2011. He joined the Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology as an assistant professor in 2012.

  • Samuel Katz

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Research Interests
    Leukemia; Lymphoma; Stem Cells; Cell Death; Apoptosis; Genes, bcl-2; Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Samuel G. Katz graduated with a combined B.S./M.S. from Yale University in 1995. He then pursued dual M.D., Ph.D. training in the Health Sciences & Technology (HST) program jointly administered by MIT and Harvard. His Ph.D. thesis with Stuart H. Orkin focused on the transcriptional regulation of hematopoiesis. Sam then completed a residency in pathology and fellowship in hematopathology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He performed his post-doctoral studies on apoptosis with Loren D. Walensky at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. As an Assistant Professor of Pathology at Yale University, Dr. Katz manages a laboratory deciphering the basic mechanisms of cell death and contributes to patient care as an active hematopathologist.

  • Barbara Kazmierczak

    Gustavus and Louise Pfeiffer Research Foundation M.D.-Ph.D. Program Director and Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbial Pathogenesis; Professor, Microbial Pathogenesis; Director, MD-PhD Program, Yale University

    Research Interests
    Bacterial Infections; Education, Medical, Graduate; Immunity, Innate; Microbiology; Pseudomonas; Biomedical Research; Host-Pathogen Interactions; Infectious Disease Medicine

    Dr. Kazmierczak received her Ph.D. from Rockefeller University (1993) and her M.D. from Cornell University Medical College (1994), both in New York City. She completed an Internal Medicine residency and Infectious Diseases fellowship training at the University of California, San Francisco, and joined the Yale faculty in 2001.  She is currently a Professor of Medicine and Microbial Pathogenesis, and Director of the MD-PhD program at Yale.

    Dr. Kazmierczak's research program is broadly focused on bacterial and host factors that allow opportunistic infections to occur.  Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a clinically relevant model, her lab addresses fundamental questions of how cell-envelope spanning bacterial machines - the Type 3 secretion system, Type 4 pili and polar flagellum - are assembled, regulated, and used during infection.  She has also identified host responses directed at components of these virulence associated structures, in particular those mediated by the NLRC4 inflammasome. Inflammatory responses to bacteria are also a focus of her work on microbiome-host interactions in infants with Cystic Fibrosis, where her lab has used longitudinal data acquired over five years from cohorts of patients and controls to understand gut microbiome composition and the inflammatory and metabolic responses at this site. 

    Dr. Kazmierczak has been recognized as a Burroughs-Wellcome Fund Investigator in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Diseases (2007), a Donaghue Investigator (2002), and a Hellman Family Fellow (2002).  She is a Fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the American Academy for Microbiology.

  • Richard Kibbey

    Associate Professor of Medicine

    Research Interests
    Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2; Endocrinology; Glucose; Insulin; Metabolism; Mitochondria; Physiology; Mass Spectrometry

    Dr. Kibbey obtained his undergraduate degrees in music (B.A.) and an honors degree in biochemistry (B.S.) at Trinity University in San Antonio in 1991. He then obtained his combined M.D. and Ph.D. at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in 2000. His Ph.D. was in Cellular and Molecular Biophysics and involved determining the NMR structure of peptides from the LDL receptor under his mentors Drs. R.G.W. Anderson and L. Gierasch. Subsequently, he went to Yale University in where he was selected for the ABIM short-track in Categorical Internal Medicine. In 2002 he stayed on for his Endocrinology fellowship at Yale and is now board certified in Internal Medicine and Endocrinology. While in his fellowship he worked in the laboratory of Dr. Gerald Shulman on metabolism in the pathophysiology of Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus. Here he identified mitochondrial GTP as a metabolic signal in the mitochondria sensing flux in the pancreatic beta-cell as a crucial component of the signal to secrete insulin. His laboratory also has developed a novel platform using stable isotopes and mass spectrometry named Mass Isotopomer MultiOrdinate Spectral Analysis (MIMOSA) that measures the flow of metabolism inside and between tissues. He is now an Associate Professor in the Departments of Internal Medicine/Endocrinology and Cellular & Molecular Physiology. He continues to see patients at Yale Health and has an independent NIH-supported laboratory doing research on islet and whole body physiology in order to understand/prevent/treat Type-2 diabetes.

  • Yuval Kluger

    Professor of Pathology

    Research Interests
    Breast Neoplasms; Information Science; Pattern Recognition, Automated; Genetic Variation; Nevi and Melanomas; Genetic Structures; Mathematical Concepts
  • Diane Krause

    Professor of Laboratory Medicine, of Cell Biology and of Pathology; Assoc. Director, Yale Stem Cell Center; Assoc. Director, Transfusion Medicine Service; Medical Director, Clinical Cell Processing Laboratory; Medical Director, Advanced Cell Therapy Laboratory

    Research Interests
    Cell Biology; Hematology; Leukemia; Pathology; Stem Cells; Medical Laboratory Science; Gene Expression; Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Diane Krause MD, PhD is Professor of Laboratory Medicine, Pathology and Cell Biology at Yale University; Associate Director of the Yale Stem Cell Center; and Director of the Clinical Cell Processing Laboratory. She received an Sc.B. degree in Biology from Brown University, and an MD and PhD degree from the University of Pennsylvania. After completing a residency in Clinical Pathology at the University of Pennsylvania, she performed post-doctoral studies at Johns Hopkins University.

  • Gary Kupfer

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology / Oncology) and of Pathology; Section Chief, Pediatric Hematology/Oncology; Clinical Program Leader, Pediatric Hematology & Oncology Program, Smilow Cancer Hospital; Disease Aligned Research Team Leader, Pediatric Hematology & Oncology Program, Yale Cancer Center

    Research Interests
    Fanconi Anemia; Hematology; Medical Oncology; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Pediatrics; Therapeutics; Genomic Instability

    The Kupfer laboratory is working on HTLV I Tax protein, which has a unique kinase activation activity. They are harnessing this activity in order to chemosensitize p53 mutant tumor cells, thereby serving as an adjunct to enhance cancer therapy.<_o3a_p>

  • Themis Kyriakides

    Associate Professor of Pathology; Director Graduate Programs

    Research Interests
    Cell Fusion; Education, Medical; Extracellular Matrix; Foreign Bodies; Inflammation; Pathology; Wound Healing; Animal Experimentation; Nanomedicine; Translational Medical Research

    Dr. Kyriakides completed a PhD at Washington State University in 1993. He did a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Washington. His lab at Yale studies the molecular events that dictate the foreign body response to biomaterials. In addition, Dr. Kyriakides studies nanomaterials and cell interactions with a focus on biosensing. Finally, ongoing efforts in the lab include vascular engineering and engineering of tissue constructs to stimulate healing in diabetic wounds. He is Director of Graduate Studies for the Experimental Pathology PhD program. He also serves as a mentor for students from the School of Engineering and Applied Science.

  • Francis Lee

    Wayne O. Southwick Professor of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation; Professor, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences; with Tenure in Traditional Track; Professor in Department of Pathology, Secondary Appointment; Biological and Biomedical Science Program, YSM Postgraduate School; Wayne O. Southwick Endowed Professor in Orthopedics and Rehabilitation

    Research Interests
    Bone and Bones; Bone Diseases, Infectious; Bone Marrow; Fracture Fixation; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Orthopedics; Osteoarthritis; Osteoblasts; Osteoclasts; Stem Cells; Oncology Service, Hospital; Tissue Engineering
    • Affiliation: Professor with Tenure, Unmodified Title; Wayne O. Southwick Professor; Orthopedic Surgeon and Scientist, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, School of Medicine, Yale University (2016-Present); Professor in Pathology, Secondary Appointment, Yale University (2017-Present); Professor with Tenure and Robert Carroll & Jane Chace Carroll Professor, Columbia University, New York (2012-2016); Orthopaedic Attending & Chief of Orthopaedic Oncology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, New York (1999-2016)
    • Clinical Practice Locations: Greenwich Hospital, Stamford Office, and Yale New Haven Hospital System
    • Clinical Expertise: Complex Musculoskeletal Reconstruction in Adults and Children; Musculoskeletal Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors & Complex Limb Reconstruction in Adults and Children; Metastatic Cancers to Bone (Breast, Prostate, Thyroid and Others); Failed Knee & Hip Implants; Osteomyelitis; Pediatric Orthopedics; Osteoid Osteoma, Enchodroma, Osteochondroma, Metabolic and Genetic Bone Diseases, Spine Tumors
    • Research Interest: NIH R01-funded research programs in metastatic cancer-induced bone loss, fracture healing, regenerative orthopedics, and bone infection. Our lab is located in Tompkin 5 Orthopedic Research Laboratories.
    • Administration: Vice Chair of Academic, Scientific, and Research Affairs; Yale School of Medicine Admissions Committee; Yale University Advisor
    • Education: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Written Question Task Force, Orthopaedic Research Society Mentorship Committee, New York Orthopaedic Pathology Review Course
    • External Activities: NIH Skeletal Biology, Structure, and Regeneration (SBSR) Study Section Chair (2018-2020); Musculoskeletal Tumor Society Research Committee Chair (2017-2020); American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Research Development Committee Chair (2019-2022); Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation (OREF) Research Grant Committee Vice Chair (2019-2026)
    • Current Research Programs & Grants:

    - NIH/NIAMS R01 AR 073607 (2019-2024; PI: Francis Y. Lee, M.D.): PTH to rescue impaired fracture healing.

    - NIH/NIAMS R01 (2015-2021; PI: Francis Y. Lee, M.D.): Infection and bone destruction; Eradication of bone destruction

    - NIH/NCI R01 (2015-2021; PI: Francis Y. Lee, M.D.): Interactions between metastatic cancers and bone; Bone loss

    - NIH/NIAMS R01 (2009-2019; PI: Francis Y. Lee, M.D.): Inflammation and bone loss; Osteoclastogenesis

    - NIH/NIBIB R01 (Completed; 2007-2018; PI: Francis Y. Lee, M.D.): Biomaterials interface biology

    - Musculoskeletal Transplantation Foundation (2013-2018): Enhanced Allograft Incorporation with Growth Factors

    - NIAMS Mentored K08 Award (2017-2022; Mentor for PI Dr. David Koveacevic): Shoulder Inflammation

    - Department of Defense (Completed; 2010-2015; PI: Francis Y. Lee, M.D.): 3D printed scaffolds for bone and     cartilage defects

    • External Scholarly Activities:  Musculoskeletal Tumor Society Executive Committee member and Research Committee Chair (2017-2020); National Institute of Health Skeletal Biology, Structure and Regeneration(SBSR) Study Section Permanent Member (2015-2020) and Study Section Chair (2018-2020); Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) Research Committee Chair (2018-2020); AAOS Tumor Program Committee (2016-2019); AAOS Research Development Committee Chair (2019-2022); Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation (OREF) Research Grant Committee Vice Chair (2018-2025); Orthopaedic Research Society/International Society for Fracture Repair (ISFR) Board Member (2019-2021)
    • Interactions with Undergraduate Students, YSM Medical Students, M.D.-Thesis Medical Students, M.D.-Ph.D. Candidate, Graduate Students, and Post-doctoral Fellows: Please send inquiries to francis.lee@yale.edu for research and clinical opportunities. Summer Research Fellow and One-Year YSM-sponsored Fellowships are provided.
    • Mentoring and Supporting Junior Faculty, Fellows, and Residents: Assisting Career Development Awards or Grants. Academic Promotion Guidance; Primary Mentorship for NIAMS K08 Career Development Award for an Orthopaedic Surgeon at Yale Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation (2017-2022); Mentorship for OREF Residents & Faculty Award
    • Yale University (2016 - Present): Yale University Saybrook College Fellow; Admissions Committee; Biological and Biomedical Science Program; Faculty, Yale university Art and Science Graduate School
    • Columbia University, New York, and New York Presbyterian Hospital (1999 - 2016): Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery with Tenure (2012-2016), Robert Carroll and Jane Chace Carroll Professor (2014-2016), Associate Professor with Tenure (2009-2012), Associate Professor (2005-2009), Assistant Professor (1999-2005); Orthopedic Surgeon, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York; Columbia University Senate Budget Review Committee (2011-2015)
  • Mark A Lemmon

    David A. Sackler Professor of Pharmacology; Co-director, Cancer Biology Institute

    Mark Lemmon, PhD was appointed the Co-Director of the Cancer Biology Institute and the David A. Sackler Professor of Pharmacology in 2015. Dr. Lemmon returns to Yale, where he completed his PhD in 1993, from the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine. At UPenn, he was the George W. Raiziss Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics as well as Chair of the department and an Investigator at the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute. Dr. Lemmon’s research focuses on the signaling pathways of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), which, when mutated cause cancers and other diseases.

  • Morgan Levine

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Research Interests
    Aging; Algorithms; Demography; Epidemiology; Life Expectancy; Longevity; Genetic Variation; Proportional Hazards Models; DNA Methylation; Computational Biology; Gene Expression Profiling; Gene Regulatory Networks; Biostatistics

    Morgan Levine is a ladder-rank Assistant Professor in the Department of Pathology at the Yale School of Medicine and a member of both the Yale Combined Program in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, and the Yale Center for Research on Aging. Her work relies on an interdisciplinary approach, integrating theories and methods from statistical genetics, computational biology, and mathematical demography to develop biomarkers of aging for humans and animal models using high-dimensional omics data. As PI or co-Investigator on multiple NIH-, Foundation-, and University-funded projects, she has extensive experience using systems-level and machine learning approaches to track epigenetic, transcriptomic, and proteomic changes with aging and incorporate this information to develop measures of risk stratification for major chronic diseases, such as cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. Her work also involves development of systems-level outcome measures of aging, aimed at facilitating evaluation for Geroprotective Interventions. A number of the existing biological aging measures she has developed are being applied in both basic and observational research. Finally, her lab is also involved in a number of collaborations to examine shared molecular signatures in normal aging and cancer.

  • George Lister

    Jean McLean Wallace Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Cellular And Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    Anemia; Cardiac Output, Low; Hypoxia, Brain; Critical Care; Education, Medical; Pediatrics; Physiology; Sudden Infant Death

    Dr. Lister is the Jean McLean Wallace Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology at Yale School of Medicine. He was formerly Chair of Pediatrics at Yale School of Medicine and Chair of Pediatrics and an Associate Dean for Education at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Dr. Lister received his medical education at Yale School of Medicine. He obtained his residency training at Yale-New Haven Hospital and fellowship education at the University of California San Francisco, and the Cardiovascular Research institute in Pediatric Cardiology and Neonatology. He is certified in the specialties of Pediatrics, Pediatric Cardiology, Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, and Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. He has been elected to a number of national offices including President of the Society for Pediatric Research, President of the American Pediatric Society, and Chair of the Board of Directors of the American Board of Pediatrics. He has served as Editor-in-Chief of Pediatric Research, a Senior Editor of Rudolph’s Pediatrics textbook. He is a member of The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas, the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering, and the National Academy of Medicine.

  • Yansheng Liu

    Assistant Professor of Pharmacology

    Dr. Liu received his PhD of Biomedical Sciences at Shanghai Institute for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Dr. Liu completed a post-doctoral research fellowship (May 2011 - October 2017) in the Proteomics Laboratory of Dr. Ruedi Aebersold in the Institute of Molecular Systems Biology, ETH Zurich, Switzerland. Dr. Liu joined Yale Cancer Biology Institute as an Assistant Professor of Pharmacology in December 2017. His research group at Yale aims to contribute to the development of Data independent acquisition (DIA) mass spectrometry and other proteomic techniques and their applications in Cancer Biology and Systems Biology studies. 

  • Elias Lolis

    Professor of Pharmacology; Director of Graduate Studies

    Research Interests
    Education; Immune System Diseases; Inflammation; Neoplasms; Parasitic Diseases; Pharmacology; Crystallography, X-Ray; Enzymes and Coenzymes; High-Throughput Screening Assays

    Elias Lolis received his PhD in 1989 from MIT in Chemistry/Biochemistry studying the three-dimensional structure and mechanism of triosephosphate isomerase. He was a postdoctoral associate at the Laboratory of Medical Biochemistry at Rockefeller University studying the functional interaction between advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and the immune system. He joined the Yale faculty in 1991 as an Assistant Professor focusing on the structure, mechanism, and inhibition of chemokines, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and their receptors. He has received a

    Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association Faculty Development Award in Basic Pharmacology, the Donaghue Young Investigator Award, and the GlaxoWellcome Award in Drug Discovery.

  • Kathleen Martin

    Professor

    Research Interests
    Cardiology; Cardiovascular Diseases; Pharmacology; Vascular Diseases; Signal Transduction
  • Wei Mi

    Assistant Professor

    Wei Mi obtained his PhD degree in structural biology at Peking University, Beijing, China. Fascinated by structures of membrane proteins, he came to the US and received postdoctoral training at Purdue University, the University of Washington and Harvard Medical School (HMS). At HMS, he joined the laboratory of Dr. Maofu Liao and used single particle cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) to determine structures of ATP-binding cassette transporters in lipid bilayer environment. In 2019, Dr Mi joined the Department of Pharmacology at Yale University School of Medicine. The focus of his research is to dissect mechanisms of membrane proteins with biochemical and structural approaches.

  • Wang Min

    Professor of Pathology

    Research Interests
    Heart Diseases; Vascular Diseases; Cardiovascular Abnormalities

    Wang Min, Ph.D., received his B.S. degree in Microbiology from Wuhan University in 1984, his M.S degree in Cell Biology at Shanghai Institute of Cell Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, in 1989, and his Ph.D degree in Genetics at University of Wales, Swansea, U.K., in 1993. He then performed 4-year post-doctoral training in vascular biology and immunology at the Department of Pathology, Yale School of Medicine. He became a Senior Scientist and Project Leader at GeneMedicine, Inc., in 1997 and then an Assistant Professor at University of Rochester, NY, in 1999. In 2003, he was recruited back to Department of Pathology and Vascular Biology Program at Yale School of Medicine, where he was promoted to Professor with Tenure in 2013. Dr. Min is a member of NAVBO, AHA, Yale Stem Cell Center and Yale Cancer Center. The goal in Dr. Min's lab is to dissect the signaling pathways, establish mouse models, and define the fundamental mechanisms involved in vascular development, remodeling, and repair related to human diseases such as vascular malformation, ischemia, and stroke. Dr. Min's lab has extensively employed biochemical, cell biological, and mouse genetic approaches to define the critical molecules mediating vascular development, remodeling, and repair. Dr. Min serves on the editorial board of Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology and Frontiers in Physiology. Dr. Min has been the recipient of many awards, including the Irvine H. Page Young Investigator Research Award, the AHA Established Investigator Award, the JACC Parmley Award, and CT Stem Cell EIA Award.

  • Pramod Mistry

    Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) and of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology); Professor of Cellular & Molecular Physiology; Director of Yale Lysosomal Disease Center and Gaucher Disease Treatment Center

    Research Interests
    China; Digestive System Diseases; Egypt; Gastroenterology; Gaucher Disease; Genotype; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; India; Pediatrics; Phenotype; Physiology; Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    I was born in Kenya and grew up in England. At College I majored in Biochemistry and for my PhD project, I focused on effects of dietary cholesterol on LDL receptor activity in healthy individuals. I was deeply inspired by the research from Brown and Goldstein lab, that set me on path to a career as a physician/scientist doing translational research. My clinical, research and educational activities center around inherited metabolic liver diseases and in particular on Gaucher disease. Yale has provided me with a rich environment to develop a nationally recognized clinical program for Gaucher disease and exciting collaborations that have led to the first authentic conditional KO mouse model of Gaucher disease and the first GWAS study in search for genetic modifiers of this extraordinary diverse Mendelian disease. I am proud for the opportunity to serve this patient population through membership of the advisory boards of National Gaucher Foundation (USA) and Project Hope's Humanitarian Program for children of the world suffering from Gaucher disease.

  • Jon Morrow

    Raymond Yesner Professor of Pathology; Chair, Department of Pathology; Chief of Pathology at YNHH

    Research Interests
    Autopsy; Computer-Assisted Instruction; Medical Informatics; Pathology; Spectrin; Telepathology
  • Mandar Deepak Muzumdar

    Assistant Professor

    Research Interests
    Adaptation, Biological; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung; Obesity; Oncogenes; Precancerous Conditions; Genes, Tumor Suppressor; MAP Kinase Signaling System; Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal; Animals, Genetically Modified; Cell Proliferation

    Dr. Muzumdar graduated from Harvard College and received his Doctorate of Medicine from the Stanford University School of Medicine. He completed his internship and residency in Internal Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital and a fellowship in Medical Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital. He completed a postdoctoral research fellowship at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology before joining the Yale faculty.

    His laboratory is interested in understanding the mechanisms by which genetic and environmental factors contribute to cancer initiation, progression, and maintenance. Leveraging a combination of sophisticated genetically-engineered cell and animal models, the lab seeks to define the molecular basis for the tumor cell and host adaptations that drive cancer progression. Furthermore, the lab uses genetic and pharmacologic approaches combined with novel nanoparticle-based delivery methods to augment or impede these adaptations and determine the consequences on cancer development in these models. The ultimate goal of this research is to identify novel approaches for cancer prevention and treatment.

  • Peggy Myung

    Assistant Professor of Dermatology and of Pathology

    Research Interests
    Dermatology; Epidermis; Homeostasis; Pathology; Regeneration; Stem Cells; Wound Healing; Carcinogenesis

    Peggy Myung is interested in hair follicle development and regeneration. Currently, she studies hair follicle development in mice and has a focus on how the dermal niche regulates hair follicle cell fate decisions. In particular, her work is centered on understanding the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions that regulate epithelial growth and differentiation in an effort to re-purpose these same molecular mechanisms to suppress aberrant growth in carcinogenesis.

  • Angus Nairn

    Charles B. G. Murphy Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Dopamine; Huntington Disease; Parkinson Disease; Protein Kinases; Psychiatry; Schizophrenia; Signal Transduction

    Angus Nairn did his undergraduate training in biochemistry at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland and his PhD in muscle biochemistry in the laboratory of Professor Sam Perry at Birmingham University, England. He then carried out postdoctoral research in molecular neuroscience with Professor Paul Greengard at Yale, and moved with Professor Greengard to Rockefeller University in 1983 as a faculty member. He moved back to Yale University in 2001, where he is currently the Charles B.G. Murphy Professor of Psychiatry. He also holds a joint appointment in the Department of Pharmacology and is co-director of the Yale/National Institute of Drug Abuse Neuroproteomics Center at the Yale School of Medicine.

  • Michael Nathanson

    Gladys Phillips Crofoot Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) and Professor of Cell Biology; Director, Yale Liver Center; Director, Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging

    Research Interests
    Cell Nucleus; Cell Biology; Digestive System Diseases; Liver; Calcium Signaling; Hepatocytes
  • Don Nguyen

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Research Interests
    Inflammation; Lung Neoplasms; Neoplasm Metastasis; Pathology; Genomics; Neoplasm Micrometastasis
    • B.S., Microbiology and Immunology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. 1998.
    • Ph.D., Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY. 2004
    • Post-doctoral fellow, Cancer Biology and Genetics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Institute, New York, NY. 2004-9.
  • Michael Nitabach

    Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, of Genetics and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Behavior, Animal; Decision Making; Genetics; Ion Channels; Neuropeptides; Neurophysiology; Neurotoxins; Physiology

    Michael Nitabach JD, PhD is faculty member of Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics and Development, Molecular Medicine, Pharmacology and Physiology, and Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program. He is affiliated with the Program in Cellular Neuroscience, Neurodegeneration and Repair. He received a PhD from Columbia University and a JD from New York University.

  • Elijah Paintsil

    Professor; Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases), Pediatrics; Professor of Public Health, School of Public Health; Professor of Management, School of Management; Professor of Pharmacology, Molecular Medicine, Pharmacology, and Physiology

    Research Interests
    Brazil; Ghana; Hepatitis C; HIV; Pediatrics; Pharmacology; Molecular Epidemiology; HIV Reverse Transcriptase; Infectious Disease Medicine

    The Paintsil laboratory focuses on increasing our understanding of the host determinants of individual differences in response to antiretroviral therapy; biomarkers and pathogenesis of increasing incidence of cancers in HIV treatment-experienced individuals.

  • Rachel Perry

    Assistant Professor

    Dr. Rachel Perry is an Assistant Professor in Medicine/Endocrinology and Cellular & Molecular Physiology at the Yale University School of Medicine. Rachel's background is in the use of hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps and stable isotope infusions to assess insulin sensitivity, having earned her B.S. in Biomedical Engineering, Ph.D. (with Distinction) in Cellular & Molecular Physiology, and performed her postdoctoral training in Medicine/Endocrinology, all in the laboratory of Dr. Gerald Shulman. Rachel's CV includes first-author papers in Nature, Cell (2), Science, JCI, Nature Medicine (2), Nature Communications (3), JBC, Cell Metabolism (2), and AJP-Endocrinology. 

    Dr. Perry's laboratory focuses on applying stable isotope tracer methods to understand obesity-associated alterations in metabolic flux pathways that occur with obesity. She and her colleagues have recently identified hyperinsulinemia-induced increases in tumor glucose uptake and oxidation as a critical driver of colon cancer in two mouse models of the disease, and mitochondrial uncoupling as a potential therapeutic strategy against the disease (Wang et al. Cell Reports 2018). Future work from the Perry lab will seek to elucidate potential alterations in tumor immunometabolism that may contribute to tumor progression, and the impact of cancer therapy on substrate preference in immune cells.

  • Marina Picciotto

    Charles B. G. Murphy Professor of Psychiatry and Professor in the Child Study Center, of Neuroscience and of Pharmacology; Deputy Chair for Basic Science Research, Dept. of Psychiatry; Deputy Director, Kavli Institute for Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Alcohol Drinking; Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms; Mental Disorders; Nervous System Diseases; Neurobiology; Neurosciences; Nicotine; Pharmacology

    Dr. Picciotto joined the Yale faculty in 1995, after completing a postdoctoral fellowship with Jean-Pierre Changeux in the Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience at the Institut Pasteur in Paris. She earned a Ph.D. in Molecular Neurobiology at The Rockefeller University in New York City in 1992, where she worked in the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience under Paul Greengard. She received a B.S. degree in biological sciences from Stanford University, Stanford, California, in 1985.

    Dr. Picciotto is currently Editor-in-Chief of The Journal of Neuroscience. She served on the Scientific Council of the National Institute on Drug Abuse from 2010-2014, was Treasurer of the Society for Neuroscience from 2014-2015, and President of the Society for Research on Nicotine & Tobacco from 2018-2019. She has been a Handling Editor for the Journal of Neuroscience, the Journal of Nicotine and Tobacco Research, the Journal of Neurochemistry and Neuroscience Letters. She is currently Chair of the MNPS NIH Study Section and is a past member of the Neurobiology of Motivated Behavior. In 2000 she was awarded the Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering by President Clinton and in 2007, she was honored with the Jacob P. Waletzky Memorial Award for Innovative Research in Drug Addiction and Alcoholism by the Society for Neuroscience. She was elected to the National Academy of Medicine and the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering in 2012 and as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2014, where she is currently Chair of the Neuroscience Section. 

  • Vincent Pieribone

    Professor of Cellular And Molecular Physiology and of Neuroscience; Director, The John B. Pierce Laboratory, Inc.; Fellow, John B. Pierce Laboratory

    Research Interests
    Biomedical Engineering; Biotechnology; Cnidaria; Drug Therapy; Electrophysiology; Epilepsy; Neuropharmacology; Neurophysiology; Neurosciences; Optics and Photonics

    Vincent Pieribone attended New York University College of Arts and Sciences where he received a baccalaureate degree in Biology and Chemistry in 1986. He then attend New York University's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and received his doctorate in Philosophy in 1992 in neuroanatomy and neurophysiology.

    From 1990 to 1992 he was a National Science Foundation and Fogarty International Fellow at the Nobel Institute of Neurophysiology at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm Sweden. From Sweden Vincent did post-doctoral work at The Rockefeller University in New York from 1992 to 1995 and became an Assistant Professor there in 1995. Vincent joined the Pierce laboratory in December 1997.  Vincent is currently a Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and Neuroscience and is also a Fellow and Director of the John B. Pierce Laboratory.

  • Jordan Pober

    Bayer Professor of Translational Medicine and Professor of Immunobiology, Pathology and Dermatology; Director, Human and Translational Immunology Program; Vice-Chair, Dept. of Immunobiology for the Section of Human and Translational Immunology

    Research Interests
    Immune System; Transplantation Immunology; Cytokines; Endothelial Cells; Translational Medical Research

    Dr. Pober was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1949 and grew up in the New York City metropolitan area. He attended Haverford College, graduating summa cum laude in 1971 with high honors in Biology, Chemistry and History. He was admitted to Yale’s Medical Scientist Training Program, receiving his MD and his PhD in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry with Prof. Lubert Stryer in 1977. He completed his first year of pathology residency at Yale-New Haven Hospital in 1978, was a post-doctoral fellow with Prof. Jack Strominger in the Department of Biochemistry at Harvard University from 1978 through 1980, and completed pathology training at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in 1981. He worked as an attending Pathologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital from 1981-1991, serving as an Assistant Professor and then Associate Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School during the same period.

    He returned to Yale Medical School in 1991 as a Professor of Pathology and Immunobiology, and also became a Professor of Dermatology in 1998. Dr. Pober was named the Director of the Molecular Cardiobiology Program at the Boyer Center for Molecular Medicine in 1991 and founded the Vascular Biology and Transplantation (VBT) Program, which succeeded Molecular Cardiobiology, in 1999. In 2007, he stepped down as the director of the VBT program, becoming Professor and Vice-Chair of the Department of Immunobiology for the Section of Human and Translational Immunology. He was named Ensign Professor of Immunobiology in 2011 and Bayer Professor of Translational Medicine in 2012. Dr. Pober has been honored as a Searle Scholar, an Established Investigator of the American Heart Association and a MERIT awardee of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. He received the Warner Lambert-Parke Davis award in 1988 and the Rous Whipple Award in 2011 from the American Society of Investigative Pathology, the Earl Benditt award from the North American Vascular Biology Organization in 2014 and the Basic Science Established Investigator Award from the American Society of Transplantation in 2018. He has served as an Editor of Immunity and Co-Editor-in Chief of Laboratory Investigation, leading immunology and pathology journals, respectively. He also has served as President of the North American Vascular Biology Organization. He is co-founder and co-director of the Joint Yale-Cambridge University Biomedical Research Program, is a visiting fellow in the Dept. of Medicine at the University of Cambridge, and was elected a Fellow Commoner of Trinity Hall, University of Cambridge in 2012. .

    Dr. Pober’s research involves understanding the functions of blood vessels and vascular cells in human inflammatory and immune responses and, reciprocally, how inflammation and immunity affect vascular health and function. He is particularly interested in how insights from experiments with human cells and tissues and with humanized mice can be used to improve organ replacement therapy, to improve tissue engineering and to regenerate injured tissues.

  • Katerina Politi

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Research Interests
    Cell Transformation, Neoplastic; Lung Neoplasms; Pathology; Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor; Molecular Targeted Therapy

    Katerina Politi studied Biology at the University of Pavia in Italy. She then moved to New York, where she obtained her PhD in Genetics and Development working with Argiris Efstratiadis at Columbia University. Following graduate school, she joined Harold Varmus's lab at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and began her work on the molecular basis of lung cancer. She continues this work at Yale as an Associate Professor in the Department of Pathology and the Yale Cancer Center.

  • Yibing Qyang

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) and of Pathology; Section of Cardiovascular Medicine

    Research Interests
    Cardiology; Cardiovascular Diseases; Heart; Physiology; Stem Cells; Tissue Engineering

    Yibing Qyang obtained his B.S. degree from the Department of Biochemistry, Nanjing University, China and subsequently pursued graduate studies at the Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Then he joined the Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. After receiving his M.S. degree from Dr. Michele Sawadogo’s laboratory, and his Ph.D. from Dr. Stevan Marcus’s lab, he spent the next year conducting postdoctoral research at Baylor College of Medicine, where he studied myeloproliferative diseases with a mouse model of Presenilin deficiency. He next joined Dr. Kenneth R. Chien's laboratory at the University of California, San Diego and then the Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Stem Cell Institute. He has been studying the renewal and differentiation of cardiovascular progenitor cells, marked by Isl1, a LIM-Homeodomain transcription factor, as well as cardiovascular disease mechanisms using human stem cell and animal models. In October 2008, Dr. Qyang became a principal investigator at the Yale Cardiovascular Research Institute and Section of Cardiology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, and Yale Stem Cell Center. Since 2010, he has been Director of the Yale Stem Cell Research Forum.

    Currently, the Qyang laboratory has the following members:

    1. Yongming Ren, Ph.D. (Associate Research Scientist; Yale entry level faculty position), graduated from Tsinghua University, China, in 2007. Dr. Ren was awarded a Connecticut Stem Cell grant ($200,000; 11/1/2012 – 10/30/2014).

    2. Oscar Bartulos-Encinas, Ph.D. (Associate Research Scientist; Yale entry level faculty position), graduated from University of Madrid, Spain, in 2009. Dr. Bartulos was awarded a Connecticut Stem Cell grant ($200,000; 11/1/2013 – 10/30/2015).

    3. Jiesi Luo, Ph.D. (Postdoc), graduated from Michigan State University, USA in 2014.

    4. Jinkyu Park, Ph.D. (Postdoc), graduated from Seoul National University, South Korea in 2013.

    5. Liqiong Gui, Ph.D., Associate Scientist, graduated from University of Rochester, USA in 2006, and a supported collaborator.

    6. Lingfeng Qin, M.D., Research Scientist, and a supported collaborator.

    7. Xia Li, M.D., visiting scholar from China.

    8. Nicole Boardman, Yale Junior Undergraduate Student.

    Previous Qyang lab members:

    1. Min Young Lee, D.V.M, Ph.D. (graduated from Chonnam National University, Korea), postdoc training in Qyang lab (2009-2012), now Assistant Professor in Department of Molecular Physiology, College of Pharmacy, Kyungpook National University , South Korea.

    2. Esra Cagavi Bozkulak, Ph.D. (graduated from University of California, Los Angeles, USA), postdoc training in Qyang lab (2010-2012), now Assistant Professor in Gebze Institute of Technology, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, K:141, 41400, Gebze-Kocaeli, Turkey.

    3. Xin Ge, Ph.D., (graduated from University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, USA), postdoc training in Qyang lab (2010-2013). Dr. Ge was awarded a Brown-Coxe postdoctoral fellowship ($50,000; 7/1/2011 – 6/31/2012). Dr. Ge is now an Assistant Professor in Shanghai Jiaotong University, China.

    4. Peter John Amos, Ph.D., (graduated from University of Virginia), postdoc training in Qyang lab (2010-2013), now a scientist at University of Washington Seattle, Dr. Amos was awarded a Connecticut Stem Cell grant ($200,000; 9/1/2011 – 6/30/2013) during his training in Qyang lab.

    5. Biraja Dash, Ph.D., graduated from Network of Excellence in Functional Biomaterials, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland in 2014, trained in Qyang lab (2013-2016), now a scientist at Department of Surgery, Yale University.

    6. Zhengxin Jiang, Ph.D. (graduated from Baylor College of Medicine, USA), postdoc training in Qyang lab (2013-2015), now a scientist at Northwestern University.

    7. Ting Yi, Ph.D. (Postdoc), graduated from University of Vermont, USA in 2013, trained in Qyang lab (2013-2015), now pursuing a MBA degree at Quinnipiac University.

    8. Carol Suh, graduate student who obtained a M.S. degree (2012-2014). She obtained her B.S. from Harvard University in 2011.

    9. Hongwei Wu, M.D., visiting student who obtained Ph.D. degree (2011-2014). He was from The Third Xiangya Hospital of Central South University.

    10. Yan Xu, M.D., visiting scholar (2014) from The Third Xiangya Hospital of Central South University.

    11. Jessica Tuan, Master Student at Yale Biomedical Engineering (2011-2012), now a medical student at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science.

    12. Caroline Greenberg, Summer Intern 2011, Medical Student in Yale School of Medicine.

    13. Andre Alcon, Summer Intern 2011, Medical Student in Yale School of Medicine.

    14. Grant Senyei, Yale Undergraduate student (2008-2010), now a medical student at Northwestern University School of Medicine

    15. Karen Xiao, Summer Intern 2012, undergraduate student at Georgetown University.

    16. Zelun Wang, undergraduate summer student 2013 from Rice University.

    17. Mengyan Liu, undergraduate summer student 2014 from University of New Haven.

    18. Hong Wu, Ph.D., visiting scholar from China.

  • David Rimm

    Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Medical Oncology); Director of Pathology Tissue Services; Director of Translational Pathology

    Research Interests
    Breast Neoplasms; Immunohistochemistry; Medical Oncology; Melanoma; Pathology; Biomarkers, Pharmacological

    David Rimm is a Professor in the Department of Pathology at the Yale University School of Medicine. He completed an MD-PhD at Johns Hopkins University Medical School followed by a Pathology Residency at Yale and a Cytopathology Fellowship at the Medical College of Virginia. He is board certified in Anatomic Pathology and Cytopathology. At Yale since 1994, Dr. Rimm is the Director of Yale Pathology Tissue Services and the Yale Tissue Microarray Facility. He is a member of the Executive Team in Pathology and serves as the Director of Translational Pathology. His lab group focuses on quantitative pathology using the AQUA® technology invented in his lab with projects related to predicting response to therapy or recurrence or metastasis in breast and lung cancer.The technology has also been used in a series of efforts related to biospecimen science. The work is supported by grants from the NIH, BCRF, and sponsored research agreements from biopharma. He is a member of a number of correlative science committees for multi-institutional breast cancer clinical trials including SWOG, ALLTO, and TEACH.He also serves on the Molecular Oncology committee for the College of American Pathologists (CAP).He is an author of over 300 peer-reviewed papers and 8 patents.He has served on advisory boards for Amgen, Genentech, Novartis, BMS, Perkin Elmer, Dako, ACD, Biocept, OptraScan and Genoptix.He was a scientific co-founder of HistoRx, a digital pathology company (sold to Genoptix in 2012) and Metamark Genetics, a prognostic determinant company.

  • Jesse Rinehart

    Associate Professor

    Research Interests
    Biochemistry; Biotechnology; Hypertension; Molecular Biology; Phosphoproteins; Proteomics

    Dr. Jesse Rinehart is an Associate Professor in the Department of Cellular & Molecular Physiology at the Yale University School of Medicine with a joint appointment in the Systems Biology Institute. Dr. Rinehart’s research aims to understand and “decode” the roles of protein phosphorylation in humans. His laboratory uses an innovative combination of quantitative phosphoproteomics and synthetic biology study protein phosphorylation in single proteins and protein networks. Recently, research in Dr. Rinehart’s laboratory has been accelerated by their Escherichia coli based technology that enables site-specific incorporation of phosphoserine into human proteins. Dr. Rinehart received his PhD in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry from Yale in 2005. He studied protein synthesis and the evolution of the genetic code during his graduate work with Dr. Dieter Söll. His did his postdoctoral research with Richard Lifton in the Department of Genetics at the Yale University School of Medicine and focused on understanding the role of protein phosphorylation in physiological systems.

  • Aaron Ring

    Assistant Professor of Immunobiology

    Aaron Ring received his undergraduate training at Yale University and entered the Stanford Medical Scientist Training Program for his MD and PhD degrees. At Stanford, he worked in the laboratories of K. Christopher Garcia and Irving Weissman to use structure-based protein engineering to develop new cytokine and immune checkpoint therapies for cancer. He additionally developed novel methodologies in protein engineering to create biologic agents against challenging targets such as G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Aaron joined the faculty of the Yale Department of Immunobiology in 2016 as the Robert T. McCluskey Yale Scholar. The focus of his research is to understand and manipulate the activity of immune receptors using structural and combinatorial biology approaches.

  • Gary Rudnick

    Professor of Pharmacology

    Research Interests
    Biochemistry; Neurobiology; Neurochemistry; Neuropharmacology

    Professor Rudnick is a graduate of Antioch College, where he received a B.S. in Chemistry in 1968. He performed graduate studies in the enzymology of amino acid racemases in the laboratory of Robert H. Abeles in the Graduate Department of Biochemistry at Brandeis University, receiving a Ph.D. in Biochemistry in 1974. His graduate studies led to an understanding of the structure and mechanism of proline racemase that was confirmed by the crystal structure of a homologous protein in 2006. From 1973-1975, Professor Rudnick performed postdoctoral research on lactose permease with H. Ronald Kaback at the Roche Institute of Molecular Biology. This work provided a greater understanding of binding and transport reactions using photoaffinity reagents and substrate analogs. In 1975, he left Roche to become an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmacology at Yale, and was promoted to Associate Professor in 1980 and Professor in 1991.

    Professor Rudnick’s research at Yale has focused on the mechanism and structure of mammalian serotonin transporter (SERT). He developed a system of platelet plasma membrane vesicles with which to study the bioenergetics and mechanism of transport. These studies provided an understanding of the coupling of ion gradients to serotonin accumulation and also identified SERT as the molecular target for the antidepressant imipramine and the psychostimulant MDMA (ecstasy).

    Beginning in the 1990s, Professor Rudnick’s laboratory has been studying the molecular characteristics of SERT and other neurotransmitter transporters expressed in cultured cells. These studies led to the identification of the serotonin binding site in SERT and of regions in the protein undergoing conformational changes during transport. The availability of a crystal structure for a homologous bacterial transporter in 2005 allowed Professor Rudnick and his colleagues to use the conformational changes to propose a conformational mechanism of transport that is gaining wide acceptance. Because SERT is structurally related to many other transporters, the proposed mechanism is likely to apply to transporters functioning in many diverse biological systems.

    In addition to these mechanistic studies, Professor Rudnick’s laboratory has been investigating a spontaneously occurring SERT mutant associated with several psychiatric disorders. The mutation apparently inhibits removal of a phosphate group added to SERT by cGMP-dependent protein kinase. The mechanism by which this phosphate increases SERT activity is an active area of investigation.

  • W. Mark Saltzman

    Goizueta Foundation Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and of Chemical Engineering, Head of Jonathan Edwards College; Department Chair, Biomedical Engineering

  • Joseph Santos-Sacchi

    Professor of Surgery (Otolaryngology), of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Hair Cells, Auditory; Ear, Inner; Neurosciences; Otolaryngology; Physiology

    Dr. Joseph Santos-Sacchi, Professor, works on understanding how outer hair cells (OHC) help us hear so well. His lab focuses on electrophysiological assessment of hair cell function and molecular manipulations of the proteins that are important for hearing.

  • Kurt Schalper

    Assistant Professor of Pathology; Director, Translational Immuno-oncology Laboratory

    Research Interests
    Breast Neoplasms; Pathology

    I trained as cell biologist, surgical pathologist and served in clinical molecular diagnostics. In addition, during my postdoctoral work at Yale I focused in developing strategies to objectively and quantitatively measure key immunotherapy related biomarkers in immune cells and cancer tissues. Most of this work has been performed in close collaboration with other Yale researchers and published in peer-reviewed journals. Recently, I was appointed to lead the Translational Immuno-Oncology Laboratory (T.I.L.) in the Yale Cancer Center, that aims to produce and support high quality translational research in immuno-oncology through standardized analyses of biomarkers and cross-integration with other Yale resources. 

  • Curt Scharfe

    Associate Professor of Genetics

    Research Interests
    Biotechnology; Cystic Fibrosis; DNA; DNA Virus Infections; Heart Defects, Congenital; Infant, Newborn, Diseases; Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Prenatal Diagnosis; Genomics; Molecular Diagnostic Techniques; Mitochondrial Diseases; Proteomics; Microarray Analysis; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
  • William Sessa

    Alfred Gilman Professor of Pharmacology and Professor of Medicine (Cardiology); Vice Chairman, Pharmacology; Director, Vascular Biology & Therapeutics Program

    Research Interests
    Cardiovascular Diseases; Cell Membrane Permeability; Circulatory and Respiratory Physiological Phenomena; Neoplasms; Chemicals and Drugs
  • Gerald Shulman

    George R. Cowgill Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology) and Professor of Cellular And Molecular Physiology; Investigator, Internal Medicine; Co-Director, Yale Diabetes Research Center, Internal Medicine; Director, Yale Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Center, Internal Medicine

    Research Interests
    Endocrine System Diseases; Chemicals and Drugs; Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment

    Dr. Shulman is the George R. Cowgill Professor of Medicine, Cellular & Molecular Physiology and Physiological Chemistry at Yale University, where he serves as Co-Director of the Yale Diabetes Research Center. Dr. Shulman has pioneered the use of magnetic resonance spectroscopy to non-invasively examine intracellular glucose and fat metabolism in humans for the first time. Using this approach he has conducted ground breaking basic and clinical investigative studies on the cellular mechanisms of insulin resistance that have led to several paradigm shifts in our understanding of type 2 diabetes. Dr. Shulman has authored and co-authored over 450 peer-reviewed publications, and he has also trained more than 70 postdoctoral fellows and graduate students, many of whom now direct their own independent laboratories around the world. Dr. Shulman is a Master of the American College of Endocrinologists, Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and he has been elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine and the National Academy of Sciences.

  • Frederick Sigworth

    Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and of Biomedical Engineering and of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

    Research Interests
    Biomedical Engineering; Electrophysiology; Ion Channels; Microscopy, Electron; Physiology; Xenopus; Potassium Channels; Sodium Channels; Patch-Clamp Techniques; Potassium Channels, Voltage-Gated; Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    Fred Sigworth studied applied physics at Caltech and was a graduate student at Yale, working in the neuroscience laboratory of Charles F. Stevens. He received the PhD in physiology from Yale in 1979 and was a postdoc in the laboratory of Erwin Neher in Göttingen, Germany where he was a co-developer of patch-clamp techniques for single-channel electrophysiology. He returned to Yale as a faculty member at Yale in 1984. His current research is in the structural biology of ion-channel proteins, making use of novel cryo-EM methods. "How do I see the scientific enterprise? An old book puts it this way: one generation commends God's works to another. It is a great privilege to unravel the workings of ion channels, and to pass on the excitement about these molecular machines to students, colleagues and anyone else who will listen!"

  • Michael Simons

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiology)

    Dr. Simons is a graduate of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Yale School of Medicine. He completed his clinical training in internal medicine at the New England Medical Center in Boston and cardiology training at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. He completed a postdoctoral fellowships in molecular cardiology at National Heart Lung and Blood Institute in Bethesda and in vascular biology at MIT. In 1993 he joined faculty at Harvard Medical School as an Assistant Professor of Medicine and rose through the ranks to become an Associate Professor of Medicine, Director of the Morse Coronary Care Unit and Director of Angiogenesis Research Center. In 2001 he was recruited to Dartmouth as AG Huber Professor of Medicine and Chief of Cardiology, subsequently becoming Director of Dartmouth Cardiovascular Center.

    Dr. Simons’ research focuses on biology of arterial vasculature and spans basic, translational and clinical areas of investigations. He led the first trials of therapeutic angiogenesis in the USA and his basic research discoveries have played an important role in moving the field forward. Dr. Simons has an extensive track record of NIH funding including multiple R01s and he has served as a Principal Investigator of the NHLBI SCOR program in endothelial biology. Recently, he has been awarded a Leducq Transatlantic network grant to build and lead the ARTEMIS arteriogenesis network composed of investigators in USA, UK, Belgium and France. Dr. Simons also leads an NHLBI PPG program focused on arteriogenessi. He has published over 270 research papers and reviews and has been elected to a number of honorary societies including Association of American Physicians, American Society of Clinical Investigations and Association of University Cardiologists. He also a Fellow of the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology and the American Society of Physiology.

  • Jeffrey Sklar

    Professor of Pathology and of Laboratory Medicine; Director, Molecular Diagnostics Research Program

    Research Interests
    Chromosomes; Genetics; Immunogenetics; Neoplasms by Site; Pathology; Medical Laboratory Science; Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures; Molecular Diagnostic Techniques

    Jeffrey Sklar, M.D., Ph.D., received a B.A. in Biology from Haverford College, an M.D. from Yale School of Medicine, and a Ph.D. in Molecular Biophysics/Biochemistry from Yale University. He completed his residency in pathology at Stanford University Medical Center and his post-doctoral fellowship (in Biochemistry) at Stanford University.

    He served as Assistant Professor and then Associate Professor of Pathology with tenure at Stanford University School of Medicine, 1981-89; then as Associate Professor and then Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School, 1989-2003. Currently, he is Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Yale School of Medicine (2003-present).

    Clinical interests: Molecular diagnostics.
    Research Interests: Molecular biology of human disease, especially cancer; gene regulation; chromosome structure and chromosomal aberrations in human disease; trans-splicing of RNA; genetic predisposition to type 2 diabetes; immunogenetics.

    The lab is presently particularly interested in two genes, JAZF1 and JJAZ1/SUZ12, which we discovered to be fused in the cells of certain uterine tumors. JJAZ1 is a Polycomb group gene, the product of which is essential for histone methylations that regulate chromatin remodeling and activity. We have investigated how the JAZF1-JJAZ1 fusion functions in oncogenesis and found that its action has features not previously described in cancer. Recently, we discovered that JAZF1-JJAZ1 RNA is produced by hormonally regulated trans-splicing between the pre-mRNAs for the two genes in normal endometrium. This discovery has led us to explore other examples of recombination between RNAs, which is much more common than previously thought. Relative to JJAZ1, little is known about the function of JAZF1, although single nucleotide polymorphisms in this gene are associated with altered risk for type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer. We are currently investigating the mechanisms of these associations.

    Selected publications:

    Koontz JI, Soreng AL, Nucci M, Kuo FC, Pauwels P, van den Berghe H, Dal Cin P, Fletcher JA, Sklar J. Frequent fusion of the JAZF1 and JJAZ1 genes in endometrial stromal tumors. Proc Natl Acad of Sci USA 2001; 98: 6348-6353.

    Li H, Ma X, Wang J, Koontz J, Nucci M, Sklar J. Effects of rearrangement and allelic exclusion of JJAZ1/SUZ12 on cell proliferation and survival. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2007; 104: 20001-20006.

    Li H, Wang J, Mor G, Sklar J. A neoplastic gene fusion mimics trans-splicing of RNAs in normal cells. Science 2008; 321: 1357-1361.

  • Stefan Somlo

    C. N. H. Long Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) and Professor of Genetics; Chief, Section of Nephrology

    Research Interests
    Cilia; Genetics; Kidney Diseases; Liver Diseases; Nephrology; TRPP Cation Channels
  • Professor of Chemistry

    David A. Spiegel was born in New York City, and grew up in Teaneck, New Jersey. From a very young age, he was fascinated by the chemistry and biology of small molecules, and at 16 began doing research in a neuroanesthesiology laboratory at the University of Iowa. He went on to attend Harvard University where he conducted research under the guidance of Professor Yoshito Kishi. After graduating from Harvard, David began in Yale University’s M.D./Ph.D. program. There he conducted graduate research in Professor John Wood’s laboratory focusing on developing synthetic approaches toward the phomoidrides. During the course of these studies, he discovered that trialkylborane-water complexes could function as H-atom donors in free radical reactions. Following graduation from Yale, Professor Spiegel moved back to Harvard for postdoctoral studies under the guidance of Professor Stuart L. Schreiber. There he focused on developing an oligomer-based method for small-molecule synthesis to enable the rapid assembly of skeletally diverse small molecules starting from simple monomers. David began as an assistant Professor at Yale in June of 2007. Since that time, he has been fortunate to be named recipient of the Camille and Henry Dreyfus New Faculty Award, the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, Ellison Foundation New Scholar Award, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundations Grand Challenges Explorations Award and is the recipient of an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellowship.
  • David Stern

    Professor of Pathology; Associate Director, Shared Resources, Yale Cancer Center; Co-Leader, Signal Transduction Research Program, Yale Cancer Center

    Research Interests
    Breast Neoplasms; DNA Damage; Melanoma; Neoplasms; Pathology; Signal Transduction

    Dr. Stern earned a BS in Biology at MIT in 1976. He received a PhD in Biology in 1983 at University of California, San Diego, and the Salk Institute with S.I.T. Kennedy and Bart Sefton for dissertation research that elucidated the coronavirus lytic cycle. Dr. Stern returned to R.A. Weinberg’s lab at the MIT Cancer Center and Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in 1983. There, Dr. Stern’s postdoctoral work pioneered analysis of neu/ErbB2/HER2, an important human oncogene. As a Yale Pathology faculty member since 1988, Dr. Stern’s research has focused on the roles of eleven growth factors and four receptors of the EGF family in malignant transformation, especially in breast cancer, and he has also made significant contributions to the understanding of DNA damage response signaling pathways. Dr. Stern’s current work in breast cancer and melanoma includes developing approaches to countering rapid resistance to anti-cancer agents that target cancer signaling pathways. Dr. Stern is active in cancer training at Yale and in the Yale Cancer Center scientific leadership. He is co-leader of the Signal Transduction Research Program and Associate Director of Shared Resources of the Yale Cancer Center.

  • Yajaira Suarez

    Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine and of Pathology

    Yajaira studied Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University Autonoma of Madrid (1995). She did her PhD with Miguel Angel Lasuncion at the Hospital Ramón y Cajal and the University Autonoma de Madrid (Spain) (1996-2001). Yajaira also did two post-docs. The first one with Alberto Muñoz at the Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas "Alberto Sols" and the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas-Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain) (2002-2005) and the second one with Jordan Pober and Bill Sessa at Yale University School of Medicine (2005-2009). In 2009, she was recruited as Research Assistant Professor in the Division of Cardiology at New York University School of Medicine and then promoted to Assistant Professor of Medicine and Cell Biology in 2010. Yajaira is currently an Assistant Professor of Comparative Medicine and Pathology at Yale University School of Medicine (2013- ).

  • Carson Thoreen

    Associate Professor Term of Cellular & Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    Biochemistry; Metabolism; Physiology; Translations
  • Susumu Tomita

    Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Biochemistry; Brain; Electrophysiology; Molecular Biology; Synaptic Transmission; Physiology
  • Benjamin Turk

    Associate Professor of Pharmacology

    Research Interests
    Pharmacology; Protein Kinases; Protein Engineering; Peptide Library; Proteomics; Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action; Carcinogenesis
  • Silvia Vilarinho

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) and of Pathology

    Research Interests
    Consanguinity; Genotype; Liver; Liver Diseases; Phenotype; Genetic Variation

    Silvia Vilarinho is a physician-scientist who uses genetics, genomics and human samples to investigate the molecular basis of various liver diseases of unknown etiology. Using these approaches, we have identified a new mendelian form of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension, a novel bile acid disorder due to ACOX2 deficiency and a new cholestatic disorder due to mutations in KIF12. Our research goal is to discover new genes important in liver function both in health and disease and to use cell biology and animal models to determine the specific mechanism(s) linking mutant gene to disease, with potential diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic applications.

  • Sherman Weissman

    Sterling Professor of Genetics

    Research Interests
    Genetics; Globins; Histocompatibility; Lymphocytes; Stem Cells; Transcription Factors; Chromosome Structures
  • Dianqing (Dan) Wu

    Gladys Phillips Crofoot Professor of Pharmacology

    Research Interests
    Chemotaxis; Inflammation; Pharmacology; Stem Cells; Signal Transduction; GTP-Binding Proteins; Chemicals and Drugs
  • Qin Yan

    Co-Director of Graduate Admissions, MMPP Track

    Associate Professor of Pathology; Director, Epigenetics Program

    Research Interests
    Gene Expression Regulation; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasms; Stem Cells; Neoplastic Stem Cells; Histone Demethylases; Epigenomics

    Dr. Qin Yan (严钦) is an Associate Professor of Pathology at Yale Medical School and a member of Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale Stem Cell Center. He directs a research laboratory to elucidate the roles of epigenetic mechanisms that drive tumor initiation and progression and to translate the findings to the clinic. His laboratory has made significant contributions to the understanding of KDM5 H3K4me3/2 histone demethylases. Dr. Yan received his B.S. degree from the University of Science and Technology of China. After his Ph.D. training on regulation of transcription and ubiquitination with Drs. Joan and Ronald Conaway at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation and Stowers Institute for Medical Research, he completed his postdoctoral training on cancer biology with HHMI Investigator Dr. William Kaelin at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School. He has received numerous awards including Era of Hope Scholar Award from DoD Breast Cancer Research Program, Stewart Scholar Award and V Scholar Award.

  • Xiaoyong Yang

    Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine

    Research Interests
    Biochemistry; Circadian Rhythm; Diabetes Mellitus; Genetics; Molecular Biology; Neoplasms; Physiology; Signal Transduction; Genomics; Proteomics; Systems Biology

    Dr. Xiaoyong Yang is an Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine and of Cellular & Molecular Physiology at Yale University School of Medicine. He received B.S. from Nankai University, M.S. from Peking University, and Ph.D. from University of Alabama at Birmingham with Dr. Jeffrey Kudlow. He completed his postdoctoral training with Dr. Ronald Evans at The Salk Institute. Dr. Yang has published in Nature, Cell, Cell Metabolism, Molecular Cell, Genes & Development, PNAS, etc., and been frequently invited to speak at national and international conferences and academic institutions. Dr. Yang serves on scientific review panels for the NIDDK, NIGMS, NASA, American Diabetes Association, American Cancer Society, The Medical Research Council, The Wellcome Trust, National Natural Science Foundation of China, etc. Research in his laboratory is supported by The National Institutes of Health, The State of Connecticut, American Diabetes Association, American Heart Association, American Cancer Society and Ellison Medical Foundation.

  • Lawrence Young

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) and of Cellular And Molecular Physiology

    Research Interests
    Cell Survival; Diabetes Mellitus; Insulin Resistance; Myocardial Ischemia; Apoptosis; Glucose Transporter Type 4; AMP-Activated Protein Kinases
  • David Zenisek

    Director of Graduate Studies, MMPP Track

    Professor of Cellular And Molecular Physiology, of Ophthalmology and Visual Science and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Cell Biology; Endocytosis; Exocytosis; Ophthalmology; Physiology; Presynaptic Terminals; Retinal Bipolar Cells
  • Z. Jimmy Zhou

    Marvin L. Sears Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science and Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology and Professor of Neuroscience; Vice Chairman and Director of Research, Ophthalmology and Visual Science

    Research Interests
    Neurobiology; Ophthalmology; Physiology; Retina; Retinal Diseases