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In the right (lab) culture, mentorship flourishes — and science benefits

You might imagine a science lab looking a bit sterile and impersonal — little sunlight, masked figures in white coats pouring neon-colored liquid into beakers, all business. You might not expect to hear a science lab referred to as familial, where badminton tournaments, movie nights and barbeques are commonplace.

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  • When Cells Cycle Fast, Cancer Gets a Jumpstart

    The progression of cancer has been studied extensively, and the key steps in this journey have been well mapped, at least in some solid tumors: Lesions to genes that confer risk of cancer accumulate and alter normal cell behaviors, giving rise, scientists believe, to early stage cancer cells that eventually swamp normal cells and become deadly.

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  • Yale Scientists Win NIH Awards for Pioneering Work

    Yale School of Medicine’s Valentina Greco and Marina R. Picciotto are among the 11 recipients of the National Institutes of Health’s Pioneer Award, which recognizes scientists who have a history of creative research and who show promise in originating “pioneering approaches to major challenges.” Greco and Picciotto will each receive $3.5 million dollars of funding over the course of five years. In addition, four young Yale scientists will receive the NIH’s Innovator Award.

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  • Building a powerhouse microscope

    Joerg Bewersdorf has become an international expert in his own right in the field of super-resolution microscopy, which elevates the resolution of light microscopy to the scale of nanometers.

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  • Yale’s Rothman Named Fellow of Royal Society

    James Rothman, PhD, Sterling Professor of Cell Biology and professor of chemistry, has been named a fellow of the Royal Society, an honor bestowed to scientists in the United Kingdom and select foreign members.

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  • A Conversation with Dr. Jim Jamieson

    In August, Dr. Fred Gorelick and Sue Sansone went to visit Dr. Jim Jamieson at his home in Guilford, CT to to talk about the MD-PhD Program as it approaches its 50th anniversary.

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  • Colón-Ramos Awarded Landis Mentoring Award

    Daniel A. Colón-Ramos, PhD, associate professor of neuroscience and cell biology, has been selected for the Landis Award for Outstanding Mentorship, a new annual award from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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  • Function of gene mutations linked to neurological diseases identified

    Several gene mutations have been linked to Parkinson’s disease, but exactly how and where some of them cause their damage has been unclear. A new Yale study, published in The Journal of Cell Biology, shows that one of the genes whose mutations are responsible for a familial form of Parkinson’s encodes a protein that controls the transfer of lipids between membranes of cell organelles.

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