News for the Kliman Research Group

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Autism Screening at Birth: New research identifies an early biomarker in the placenta of at-risk babies.

Harvey Kliman, MD, PhD, never planned on developing the first and only test that diagnoses autism risk at birth. "What I discovered was totally by accident," the research scientist in obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive sciences at Yale School of Medicine, revealed. Dr. Kliman, lead author of a new study published in the journal Biological Psychiatry, examined placentas and found that abnormal folds (called trophoblast inclusions) could predict whether children had a higher risk of aut

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    Genetic anomalies account for majority of miscarriages

    A substantial majority of miscarriages appear to be caused by genetic abnormalities rather than the usual suspects of thrombophilias, antiphospholipid syndromes, immunologic problems, or other maternal factors, study results suggest.

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    New York Times: Study Ties Autism Risk to Creases in Placenta

    After most pregnancies, the placenta is thrown out, having done its job of nourishing and supporting the developing baby. But a new study raises the possibility that analyzing the placenta after birth may provide clues to a child’s risk for developing autism.

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    Study: Placental folds tied to autism risk

    A new study co-authored by a doctor from Yale New Haven Hospital suggests that a new tool could help predict who is at risk for autism at the time of birth. NBC’s Brian Williams reports.

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    Yale Autism Study Gives Hope for Early Autism Diagnosis

    A new find by Yale researchers may give parents a chance to learn if their child is at risk for autism at birth. The potential breakthrough would give doctors and parents a chance to intervene much earlier. Most children currently are not diagnosed until they are toddlers or school-aged.

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    Autism risk spotted at birth in abnormal placentas

    Researchers at the Yale School of Medicine have figured out how to measure an infant’s risk of developing autism by looking for abnormalities in his/her placenta at birth, allowing for earlier diagnosis and treatment for the developmental disorder. The findings are reported in the April 25 online issue of Biological Psychiatry.

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  • Hope for women with recurring pregnancy losses

    For some, every pregnancy ends in a loss within six weeks. “These particular patients always have losses and they are not infertile. They get pregnant easily but they always have these losses,” says Dr. Harvey Kliman, director of the Reproductive and Placental Research Unit in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at Yale School of Medicine.

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