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Members

  • Associate Professor of Medicine

    Dr. Assis received his M.D. from Jefferson Medical College followed by internship and residency at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia, where he was also Chief Resident. He completed training in gastroenterology and hepatology followed by transplant hepatology fellowships at Yale University.

    His clinical and research interests are in autoimmune liver diseases. Specifically, he treats patients with autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cholangitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis at his liver clinic. He also performs translational and basic research on autoimmune hepatitis using patient biospecimens in addition to work with animal models. He is investigating the link between the pro-inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and autoimmune hepatitis, and the effect of psychological stress on autoimmune hepatitis.

    In addition, Dr. Assis is an active member of the Adult Cystic Fibrosis Program at Yale. In this role, he evaluates and treats patients with Cystic Fibrosis who have GI or liver complications of their disease. He also consults on patients from outside Yale's Cystic Fibrosis program who have these complications.

  • Ensign Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases); Emeritus Director, Yale Liver Center

    Dr. James L. Boyer is the Ensign Professor of Medicine and Emeritus Director of the Liver Center at Yale School of Medicine. He is a graduate of Haverford College (1958) and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (1962). From 1982 until 1996 he directed a combined Digestive Disease Section in the Department of Medicine. He was the founding Director of the NIDDK funded Liver Center at Yale since 1984. and former Director of the NIEHS Center for Membrane Toxicity Studies at the Mt Desert Island Biological Laboratory in Salsbury Cove, ME where he was also Chairman of their Board of Trustees from 1995 to 2003 and again from 2011-2013. He is also past Chair, Board of Directors of the American Liver Foundation and a current member of Board of Mangers of Haverford College. Dr. Boyer has a broad interest in all aspects of basic and clinical hepatology. His laboratory's major efforts have been the study of mechanisms of bile formation and cholestasis , previously supported by  MERIT awards from NIDDK. He is a member of the AASLD, ASCI, AAP,APS and ACCA and past president of both the American and the International Association for the Study of Liver Disease. He is the recipient of Distinguished Achievement Awards from the AGA, AASLD and American Liver Foundation .He is a member of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine  Society of Scholars and the 2020 recipient of the European Association for the Study of Liver Disease's  International Recognition Award.

  • Waldemar Von Zedtwitz Professor of Medicine (Rheumatology) and Professor of Pathology and of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases); Chief, Rheumatology, Allergy, & Immunology; Rheumatologist in Chief, Rheumatology

    Richard Bucala, MD, PhD, is a Professor of Medicine, Pathology, and Epidemiology & Public Health.  He studies the mechanisms by which protective immune responses lead to immunopathology, focusing on MIF-family cytokines and their genetics, which his group first cloned and characterized experimentally.  Currently, his laboratory is leading multidisciplinary efforts to develop immunotherapies tailored to an individual’s genetic makeup. An anti-MIF antibody developed by the group is undergoing clinical testing in oncology, and an anti-MIF receptor antibody, recently FDA approved, is under evaluation in SLE. Dr. Bucala also is credited with the discovery of the fibrocyte, which is being targeted therapeutically in different fibrosing disorders.  He is a co-founder of Cytokine Networks and of MIFCOR, a biotechnology startup begun as a student-advised project.  Dr. Bucala was elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians. He is the Editor-in-Chief of Arthritis & Rheumatology and has served on numerous advisory boards for the NIH, the pharmaceutical industry, academia, and private foundations.

  • Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology)

    I have been involved in Patient-Oriented Research in the field of Childhood Obesity and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) in youth for the past 25 years. Realizing the need to understand the pathophysiology and to find better treatments for  T2D in Obese Youth,  I have been investigating the role of insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction at the earliest stage of T2D, namely Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT).  My research in pre-diabetes in obese children and adolescents has brought into focus at the national level the magnitude of the obesity problem in children in the US. This research demonstrated a much faster tempo of progression of beta-cell failure in obese adolescents, which helped to stimulate the funding of two NIDDK RCTs in obese youth; The TODAY and RISE studies. In recognition of the importance of this work, in 2008 Dr. Caprio was awarded the prestigious “Distinguished Clinical Scientist Award (DCSA)” from the American Diabetes Association. Her research spans both clinical and basic research in metabolism, genetics, and imaging and is the recipient of the “Distinguished Leader in Insulin Resistance” 2015 Award from the International Committee for Insulin Resistance (ICIR). Over the past decade, our group has assembled two large multiethnic cohorts of children/adolescents cohorts: The Pathogenesis of Youth Onset Diabetes (PYOD) study (NCT01967849), (R01HD040787, R01DK111038), and The Yale Pediatric NAFLD/NASH Cohort  (NCT01966627), which served as the vehicle for a series of studies aimed at investigating the roles of insulin resistance, beta-cell dysfunction and NAFLD in the earliest stage of T2D: Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT).

  • Research Scientist in Epidemiology (Environmental Health Sciences)

    Ying Chen has a broad background in environmental genetics and molecular toxicology, with specific training and expertise in redox biology, oxidative stress related disease and transgenic animal models of glutathione (GSH) deficiency. Her research in the past over ten years has focused on understanding the mechanistic roles of GSH redox homeostasis in human disease conditions related to environmental (including dietary) exposures. Other ongoing research projects in the Vasiliou lab include studies of: (i) the mechanistic roles of ALDH1B1 in alcohol-associated colon cancer, and (ii) the functional roles of ALDH1A1/3A1 in corneal pathophysiology.<_o3a_p>

  • Ebenezer K. Hunt Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging and Professor of Biomedical Engineering; Director of Undergraduate Studies in Biomedical Engineering; Vice Chair, Bioimaging Sciences in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology

    James Duncan, the Ebenezer K. Hunt Professor of Biomedical Engineering, has focused his research and teaching in the areas of biomedical image processing and analysis.

    Duncan, who holds joint appointments in diagnostic radiology and electrical engineering, is the associate chair and director of undergraduate studies in the Department of Biomedical Engineering as well as the vice-chair for bioimaging sciences research in diagnostic radiology. He is particularly interested in the use of model-based mathematical strategies for the analysis of biomedical images. He helped pioneer the use of geometrical models for segmenting deformable (typically anatomical) objects of approximately known shape and for tracking certain forms of non-rigid object motion, and later soft tissue deformation, most notably that of the heart.

    Duncan and his research team performed seminal work starting in 1987 on the use of parameterized global shape models to incorporate a notion of known prior object shape into the segmentation process using a Bayesian reasoning strategy, helping lead the way towards the use of strategies for automatically finding certain known anatomical structure from any of a variety of medical (e.g. computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound) and biological (e.g. confocal microscopy) images.

    The strategies he developed have resulted in major advances in bioimaging. He and his research collaborators have applied these strategies to locate the cortical gray matter layer and a variety of co-localized subcortical gray matter structures in the brain as well as to locate the structure near the prostate gland. More recently, Duncan’s team has begun to show that these same techniques will be useful for estimating gray matter-constrained activations from functional MRI data and could help guide the recovery of quantitative biochemical information from MR spectroscopy.

    Beginning in the late 1980s, Duncan also pioneered using shape features on the inner and outer surfaces of the heart wall as material tags for tracking left ventricular motion. This technique was successfully applied to other non-rigid tracking problems in cell biology and became the basis for a variety of efforts internationally. Duncan and his research team used this strategy for more sophisticated analysis in echocardiography. The team’s approach is now recognized in the medical-image-analysis community as among the first to incorporate true physical models into image analysis strategies and has helped develop a more general area of physical/biomechanical model-based re covery of both structural and functional information from biomedical images. Duncan’s laboratory has also developed initial forms of these techniques to estimate brain shift during epilepsy neurosurgery and guide fractionated prostate radiotherapy, among other uses. His work has resulted in three U.S. patents.

    Duncan is the principal investigator of major research funded by the National Institutes of Health. Before coming to Yale in 1983, he worked for Hughes Aircraft Company. He holds a B.S.E.E. from Lafayette College, an M.S. from the University of California at Los Angeles and a Ph.D. from the University of Southern California.

    Duncan is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. He is president of the International Society for Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention and is a member of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence and the I.E.E.E. Computer Society, among other professional organizations.

  • Professor of Comparative Medicine and of Pathology

    Carlos studied Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Universidad Autonoma of Madrid. From 1999 to 2004, he performed his PhD with Prof. Miguel Angel Lasuncion at Hospital Ramon y Cajal (Madrid). He did his postdoctoral training with Prof. William Sessa at Yale University (2005-2009). Then, Carlos started his laboratory in the Department of Medicine at NYU. He is currently an Associate Professor in the Comparative Medicine Department and a Member of the Vascular Biology & Therapeutics Program

  • Sterling Professor of Immunobiology; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

    Dr. Flavell is Sterling Professor of Immunobiology at Yale University School of Medicine, and an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He received his B.Sc. (Honors) in 1967 and Ph.D. in 1970 in biochemistry from the University of Hull, England, and performed postdoctoral work in Amsterdam (1970-72) with Piet Borst and in Zurich (1972-73) with Charles Weissmann. Before accepting his current position in 1988, Dr. Flavell was first Assistant Professor (equivalent) at the University of Amsterdam (1974-79); then Head of the Laboratory of Gene Structure and Expression at the National Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill, London (1979-82); and subsequently President and Chief Scientific Officer of Biogen Research Corporation, Cambridge, Massachusetts (1982-88). Dr. Flavell is a fellow of the Royal Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences as well as the National Academy of Medicine. Richard Flavell uses transgenic and gene-targeted mice to study Innate and Adaptive immunity, T cell tolerance and activation in immunity and autoimmunity,apoptosis, and regulation of T cell differentiation.

  • Associate Professor

    Training Period: 1997-2004 
    Degree/Year: PhD-1997 
    Source of Funding: HHMI/Virology Postdoc Training Grant 
    1st Position: Asst Prof, OB/GYN, Yale U School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. 
    Current Position: Assoc Prof, OB/GYN, Yale U School of Medicine, New Haven, CT.

  • Associate Professor of Medicine

    Dr. Kibbey obtained his undergraduate degrees in music (B.A.) and an honors degree in biochemistry (B.S.) at Trinity University in San Antonio in 1991. He then obtained his combined M.D. and Ph.D. at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in 2000. His Ph.D. was in Cellular and Molecular Biophysics and involved determining the NMR structure of peptides from the LDL receptor under his mentors Drs. R.G.W. Anderson and L. Gierasch. Subsequently, he went to Yale University in where he was selected for the ABIM short-track in Categorical Internal Medicine. In 2002 he stayed on for his Endocrinology fellowship at Yale and is now board certified in Internal Medicine and Endocrinology. While in his fellowship he worked in the laboratory of Dr. Gerald Shulman on metabolism in the pathophysiology of Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus. Here he identified mitochondrial GTP as a metabolic signal in the mitochondria sensing flux in the pancreatic beta-cell as a crucial component of the signal to secrete insulin. His laboratory also has developed a novel platform using stable isotopes and mass spectrometry named Mass Isotopomer MultiOrdinate Spectral Analysis (MIMOSA) that measures the flow of metabolism inside and between tissues. He is now an Associate Professor in the Departments of Internal Medicine/Endocrinology and Cellular & Molecular Physiology. He continues to see patients at Yale Health and has an independent NIH-supported laboratory doing research on islet and whole body physiology in order to understand/prevent/treat Type-2 diabetes.

  • Assistant Professor Adjunct, Radiology & Biomedical Imaging

    Dr. Lin received the B.S. degree from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the Ph.D. degree from Duke University, all in biomedical engineering. He is currently the Director for Clinical Research in North America for Visage Imaging and is stationed at Yale-New Haven Hospital where he oversees, coordinates, drives and directs research collaborations with high profile academic hospitals in North America to develop new solutions for diagnostic image analysis and guidance that improve clinical and operational outcomes while reducing cost of care. This includes activities in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) in the Radiology enterprise diagnostic imaging solutions space. Dr. Lin identifies opportunities for academic-industry research partnerships, and acts as the liaison between Visage Imaging researchers and clinical collaborators to translate ideas to prototype for clinical validation, with the goal of technology transfer to product. Dr. Lin also is directly involved in research to develop better ways to treat patients with liver cancer using transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) and in this context, he is also the chief engineer and operations manager of the Yale Interventional Oncology Research Lab. Dr. Lin is the Principle Investigator (PI) on two NIH R01 grants to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and response assessment after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for patients with liver cancer. Dr. Lin is the inventor of 3D quantification TACE therapy response tool (qEASL) and in collaboration with clinical partners, validated, and showed clinical relevance (ability to predict patient survival) that led to transfer to commercial product (FDA 510(k) approved December 2016 - Multi-Modality Tumor Tracking (MMTT) application). Prior to Visage Imaging, Dr. Lin was the Philips research site manager and senior researcher stationed onsite at Yale where he managed the research portfolio and partnership Philips has with Yale.

  • Professor of Radiology & Biomedical Imaging and Medical Oncology; Vice Chair for Clinical Research, Radiology & Biomedical Imaging; Section Chief, Interventional Radiology

    Dr. David C. Madoff is Professor of Radiology & Biomedical Imaging and Medical Oncology at Yale School of Medicine. His current administrative roles are Vice Chair for Clinical Research and Section Chief of Interventional Radiology. Dr. Madoff earned his B.A. from Emory University and his M.D. from the University of Pittsburgh. He completed both his internship in Internal Medicine and residency in Radiology at SUNY at Stony Brook and his fellowship training in Vascular and Interventional Radiology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Madoff achieved Board Certification in Diagnostic Radiology from the American Board of Radiology in 2000 and attained his Certificate of Added Qualifications in Vascular and Interventional Radiology in 2002. He was a faculty member in the Section of Interventional Radiology at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas for a decade before joining New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center in 2011. While at Weill Cornell, Dr. Madoff served as Division Chief of Interventional Radiology from 2011 to 2015 and Vice Chair for Academic Affairs from 2015 to 2019. He moved to Yale in July, 2019.

    Dr. Madoff has a strong background in clinical care and has treated many patients with complex oncological problems. His clinical interests are wide-ranging, and have included visceral vascular, hepatobiliary and genitourinary interventions, various embolotherapy and percutaneous biopsy techniques and many specialized therapies within the realm of Interventional Oncology. In particular, Dr. Madoff is world-renowned for his work on preoperative portal vein embolization, a technique used to improve the safety of major hepatic resection. This technique is based on the liver's ability to regenerate and has been used in patients with primary and metastatic hepatobiliary cancer to increase the size of the anticipated liver remnant before surgery. Without this procedure, many patients with potentially resectable disease would not be eligible for curative resection.

    Dr. Madoff is a leader in academic Interventional Radiology and has been an invited speaker at numerous national and international meetings. He authored or co-authored over 150 peer-reviewed scientific articles, has written more than 30 book chapters and served as co-editor of four textbooks including Venous Embolization of the Liver: Radiologic and Surgical Practice (2011), Clinical Interventional Oncology (2014) and Interventional Radiology: Fundamentals of Clinical Practice (2019). Dr. Madoff served as Deputy Editor-in-Chief for the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology from 2007 to 2010 and Deputy Editor for Radiology from 2012 to 2017. Dr. Madoff currently serves as founding co-Editor-in-Chief for Digestive Disease Interventions and on the editorial boards of additional publications that include Techniques in Vascular and Interventional RadiologySeminars in Interventional Radiology, European Radiology Experimental, Cancer Biology & Medicine, Chinese Clinical Oncology and Current Oncology Reports. Dr. Madoff is active in many of the major radiological societies including the Radiological Society of North America, the American Roentgen Ray Society, the Society of Interventional Radiology and the Association of University Radiologists and serves on the Board of Trustees of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). Based on his important contributions to the field, Dr. Madoff was elected Fellow of the Society of Interventional Radiology in 2007, the American College of Radiology in 2015 and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology Society of Europe in 2018.