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  • Brain connectivity increases as children with Tourette Syndrome suppress their tics

    The neurodevelopmental disorder Tourette Syndrome is most synonymous with verbal or physical outbursts. Doctors usually refer to these occurrences as “tics,” and most Tourette patients are able to suppress or stop themselves from acting out their tics for a certain period of time before the urge becomes too great. Now, a new study is uncovering the neurological machinations occurring while a Tourette patient suppresses their tics.

    Source: Study Finds
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  • Yale Experts Think They've Found A Way To Manage Tantrums — Once And For All

    Tantrums and meltdowns are a normal part of growing up. Estimates suggest that up to 90% of toddlers have them, and researchers also have a pretty clear grip on why, like right down to the nitty-gritty neuroscience of it all. Essentially, the amygdala (the part of the brain that helps process emotions) detects a threat, and the hypothalamus (the part of the brain that controls involuntary reactions like heart rate and body temperature) just kind of ... snaps.

    Source: HUFFPOST
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  • Behavioral disorders in kids with autism linked to reduced brain connectivity

    More than a quarter of children with autism spectrum disorder are also diagnosed with disruptive behavior disorders. For the first time, Yale researchers have identified a possible biological cause: a key mechanism that regulates emotion functions differently in the brains of the children who exhibit disruptive behavior.

    Source: Yale
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  • Study finds method for controlling tics in Tourette’s syndrome patients

    A new Yale study successfully trained a group of adolescents with Tourette’s syndrome to control their tics using functional magnetic resonance imaging. This marks the first time that fMRI— a technique which enables participants to look at their own brain function in real time — has been tested on patients with Tourette’s syndrome.

    Source: Yale
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  • Yale study uses real-time fMRI to treat Tourette Syndrome

    Characterized by repetitive movements or vocalizations known as tics, Tourette Syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that plagues many adolescents. A study conducted by Yale researchers has trained adolescents with Tourette Syndrome to control their tics through an imaging technique that allows patients to monitor the function of their own brain in real time.

    Source: Yale
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