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Leah Ferrucci, PhD, MPH

Assistant Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases)

Contact Information

Leah Ferrucci, PhD, MPH

Office Location

Mailing Address

  • Chronic Disease Epidemiology

    60 College Street, PO Box 208034

    New Haven, CT 06520

    United States

Research Summary

Dr. Ferrucci’s primary research interests are in elucidating modifiable causes of cancer and developing a better understanding of how cancer impacts the individual across various life domains. She focuses mainly on evaluating diet/nutrition and ultraviolet radiation related exposures in relation to cancer. Her research also encompasses the needs and experiences of cancer survivors, including health information needs and quality of life, utilizing a unique national longitudinal study of cancer survivors. Dr. Ferrucci is working to translate some of her etiologic and descriptive findings into behavioral and structural interventions for individuals and communities to reduce cancer risk and impact survivorship. Dr. Ferrucci has conducted both quantitative and qualitative research to develop a behavioral prevention intervention to prevent indoor tanning in young people. In addition to her work on skin cancer prevention, Dr. Ferrucci is also studying sun exposure, sun protection behaviors, and indoor tanning among skin cancer survivors after their diagnosis to better understand these risk behaviors after a cancer diagnosis. Her work in nutrition and diet currently includes an evaluation of diet quality and food insecurity in female cancer survivors and an evaluation of the gut microbiome and metabolomics in breast cancer survivors enrolled in a weigh-loss trial. She is also studying diet quality as assessed by skin carotenoids in relation to chemotherapy-related side effects in breast cancer patients.

Extensive Research Description

Understanding ultraviolet radiation exposure in skin cancer survivors

Understanding and preventing indoor tanning among young adults and adolescents

Diet quality and food insecurity in female cancers survivors

Microbiome and metabolomics in relation to weight loss in breast cancers survivors

Dietary meat intake and colorectal neoplasia

Needs of long-term cancer survivors

Diet quality and chemotherapy related side effects

Coauthors

Research Interests

Breast Neoplasms; Chronic Disease; Diet; Epidemiology; Public Health; Skin Neoplasms; Tanning; Colorectal Neoplasms; Survivors; Metabolomics

Public Health Interests

Cancer; Nutrition

Selected Publications

  • Randomized trial of diet and exercise on chemotherapy completion in women with breast cancer: The Lifestyle, Exercise, and Nutrition Early After Diagnosis (LEANer) study.Sanft T, Harrigan M, Cartmel B, Li F, Zupa M, Zupa M, McGowan C, Ferrucci L, Puklin L, Nguyen T, Nguyen T, Tanasijevic A, Tanasijevic A, Neuhouser M, Neuhouser M, Hershman D, Hershman D, Basen-Engquist K, Basen-Engquist K, Jones B, Knobf M, Chagpar A, Silber A, Ligibel J, Ligibel J, Irwin M. Randomized trial of diet and exercise on chemotherapy completion in women with breast cancer: The Lifestyle, Exercise, and Nutrition Early After Diagnosis (LEANer) study. Journal Of Clinical Oncology 2022, 40: 12007-12007. DOI: 10.1200/jco.2022.40.16_suppl.12007.
  • Abstract PS8-09: Dietary supplement use in a healthy eating and exercise lifestyle intervention in breast cancer survivors: The lifestyle exercise and nutrition (LEAN) studyNguyen T, Nguyen T, Harrigan M, Mcgowan C, Hood A, Hood A, Li F, Cartmel B, Ferrucci L, Irwin M, Sanft T. Abstract PS8-09: Dietary supplement use in a healthy eating and exercise lifestyle intervention in breast cancer survivors: The lifestyle exercise and nutrition (LEAN) study Cancer Research 2021, 81: ps8-09-ps8-09. DOI: 10.1158/1538-7445.sabcs20-ps8-09.
  • EnergeticsFerrucci L, Irwin M. Energetics 2020, 303-320. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-42011-6_15.
  • A randomized trial of a healthy lifestyle intervention versus usual care on chemotherapy and endocrine therapy adherence rate in women with breast cancer: The Lifestyle Exercise and Nutrition Early After Diagnosis (LEANER) Study.Sanft T, Harrigan M, Cartmel B, Ferrucci L, Basen-Engquist K, Basen-Engquist K, Hershman D, Hershman D, Ligibel J, Ligibel J, Neuhouser M, Neuhouser M, Chagpar A, Jones B, Knobf M, Silber A, Li F, Irwin M. A randomized trial of a healthy lifestyle intervention versus usual care on chemotherapy and endocrine therapy adherence rate in women with breast cancer: The Lifestyle Exercise and Nutrition Early After Diagnosis (LEANER) Study. Journal Of Clinical Oncology 2019, 37: tps11633-tps11633. DOI: 10.1200/jco.2019.37.15_suppl.tps11633.
  • Abstract 5321: Metabolomics and body mass index among breast cancer survivors in The Lifestyle, Exercise, and Nutrition (LEAN) StudyFerrucci L, Cartmel B, Harrigan M, Sanft T, Playdon M, Jia W, Yu H, Johnson C, Pusztai L, Chagpar A, Irwin M. Abstract 5321: Metabolomics and body mass index among breast cancer survivors in The Lifestyle, Exercise, and Nutrition (LEAN) Study Cancer Research 2017, 77: 5321-5321. DOI: 10.1158/1538-7445.am2017-5321.
  • Attitudes and predictors of sunless tanning in a sample of young adultsAnderson C, Cartmel B, Mayne S, Ferrucci L. Attitudes and predictors of sunless tanning in a sample of young adults Dermatology Online Journal 2016, 22 DOI: 10.5070/d3229032520.
  • Predictors of tanning dependence in white non-hispanic females and malesCartmel B, Mayne S, Bale A, Gelernter J, DeWan A, Leffell D, Pagoto S, Spain P, Ferrucci L. Predictors of tanning dependence in white non-hispanic females and males Dermatology Online Journal 2016, 22 DOI: 10.5070/d3229032556.
  • Compliance with indoor tanning laws for minors among salons and business in the United StatesChoy C, Cartmel B, Clare R, Ferrucci L. Compliance with indoor tanning laws for minors among salons and business in the United States Dermatology Online Journal 2016, 22 DOI: 10.5070/d3229032531.
  • Abstract A50: Impact of indoor tanning and MC1R genotype on basal cell carcinoma risk in young peopleMolinaro A, Ferrucci L, Cartmel B, Loftfield E, Leffell D, Bale A, Mayne S. Abstract A50: Impact of indoor tanning and MC1R genotype on basal cell carcinoma risk in young people Cancer Prevention Research 2015, 8: a50-a50. DOI: 10.1158/1940-6215.prev-14-a50.
  • Do nonmelanoma skin cancer survivors use tanning beds more often than the general public?Wiznia L, Ferrucci L, Mayne S, Chagpar A. Do nonmelanoma skin cancer survivors use tanning beds more often than the general public? Journal Of Clinical Oncology 2013, 31: e20017-e20017. DOI: 10.1200/jco.2013.31.15_suppl.e20017.
  • Abstract 1365: Sun protection practices among melanoma survivors.Puthumana J, Ferrucci L, Mayne S, Lannin D, Chagpar A. Abstract 1365: Sun protection practices among melanoma survivors. Cancer Research 2013, 73: 1365-1365. DOI: 10.1158/1538-7445.am2013-1365.
  • Dietary Iron, Iron Homeostatic Gene Polymorphisms and the Risk of Advanced Colorectal Adenoma and CancerRuder E, Berndt S, Gilsing A, Graubard B, Burdett L, Hayes R, Weissfeld J, Ferrucci L, Sinha R, Cross A. Dietary Iron, Iron Homeostatic Gene Polymorphisms and the Risk of Advanced Colorectal Adenoma and Cancer Journal Of The Academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics 2012, 112: a13. DOI: 10.1016/j.jand.2012.06.045.
  • Abstract 635: Indoor tanning and risk of early-onset basal cell carcinomaFerrucci L, Cartmel B, Molinaro A, Leffell D, Bale A, Mayne S. Abstract 635: Indoor tanning and risk of early-onset basal cell carcinoma Cancer Research 2012, 72: 635-635. DOI: 10.1158/1538-7445.am2012-635.
  • Abstract A83: Host phenotype characteristics and MC1R in relation to early-onset basal cell carcinomaFerrucci L, Cartmel B, Molinaro A, Gordon P, Leffell D, Bale A, Mayne S. Abstract A83: Host phenotype characteristics and MC1R in relation to early-onset basal cell carcinoma Cancer Prevention Research 2011, 4: a83-a83. DOI: 10.1158/1940-6207.prev-11-a83.
  • Tea and coffee and basal cell carcinoma in a case‐control studyFerrucci L, Cartmel B, Molinaro A, Leffell D, Bale A, Mayne S. Tea and coffee and basal cell carcinoma in a case‐control study The FASEB Journal 2011, 25: 978.2-978.2. DOI: 10.1096/fasebj.25.1_supplement.978.2.
  • Red and processed meat intake and risk of colorectal adenoma and carcinoma from a molecular epidemiological point of viewSinha R, Ferrucci L, Cross A. Red and processed meat intake and risk of colorectal adenoma and carcinoma from a molecular epidemiological point of view Toxicology Letters 2010, 196: s5. DOI: 10.1016/j.toxlet.2010.03.039.
  • Abstract B129: Xenobiotic metabolizing genes, meat intake and risk of advanced colorectal adenomaFerrucci L, Cross A, Gunter M, Ahn J, Mayne S, Ma X, Chanock S, Yeager M, Graubard B, Berndt S, Huang W, Hayes R, Sinha R. Abstract B129: Xenobiotic metabolizing genes, meat intake and risk of advanced colorectal adenoma Cancer Prevention Research 2008, 1: b129-b129. DOI: 10.1158/1940-6207.prev-08-b129.

Clinical Trials