Marc Auerbach MD, MSci

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Emergency Medicine); Co-chair INSPIRE (International Network for Simulation Based Pediatric Innovation Research and Education); Co-chair of the Pediatric Academic Society’s Special Interest Group on Simulation-Based Research Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Emergency Medicine); Associate Director of Pediatric Simulation; Associate Pediatric Trauma Medical Director; PEMnetwork.org Faculty Advisor/Moderator/Blogger; Co-chair International Pediatric Simulation Society, Webinar series

Research Interests

Simulation; Pediatric Emergency Medicine; Experiential learning; Competency assessment; Patient outcomes; Pain management; Sedation; Ultrasound

Current Projects

POISE IV/LP Practice makes permanent training program.
This project aims to demonstrate improved success rates with lumbar puncture and intravenous access procedures by comparing providers who were trained with practice until perfect hands-on skills training to standard skills training.

Research Summary

There is a gap in evidence supporting the translation of simulation training in the laboratory into improved patient outcomes at the bedside. Simulation-based education is rapidly replacing the see one, do one, teach one paradigm in medicine. Learners now develop mastery in the simulated environment prior to patient contact. After the learner proves their competency on a simulator she will be allowed to provide that component of care at the bedside to the patient. The academic simulation community must close the gap in evidence by evaluating the effect of simulation education interventions on patient outcomes. A great deal of time, money, and resources are going into the development of simulation training programs worldwide. The current simulation literature largely focuses on attitudes, confidence, and skills in the simulated environment. Few programs are evaluating the direct effects of simulation training on patient outcomes. Patient morbidity and mortality are the gold standard for measuring the success of any medical intervention. POISE, Patient Outcomes In Simulation Education, is a collaborative research network that hopes to bridge gaps correlating effective medical education to patient outcomes. Merriam Webster defines POISE as “to put into readiness.” Health care providers are expected to possess certain competencies after completing their training, yet it is difficult to guarantee that all trainees receive adequate experience with skills that occur infrequently. Innovative medical education techniques are frequently used to fill gaps in patient care experiences. However, not much is known about whether specific methods or technologies translate into clinical efficacy.

Extensive Research Description

There is a gap in evidence supporting the translation of simulation training in the laboratory into improved patient outcomes at the bedside. Simulation-based education is rapidly replacing the see one, do one, teach one paradigm in medicine. Learners now develop mastery in the simulated environment prior to patient contact. After the learner proves their competency on a simulator she will be allowed to provide that component of care at the bedside to the patient. The academic simulation community must close the gap in evidence by evaluating the effect of simulation education interventions on patient outcomes. A great deal of time, money, and resources are going into the development of simulation training programs worldwide. The current simulation literature largely focuses on attitudes, confidence, and skills in the simulated environment. Few programs are evaluating the direct effects of simulation training on patient outcomes. Patient morbidity and mortality are the gold standard for measuring the success of any medical intervention.


POISE, Patient Outcomes In Simulation Education, is a collaborative research network that hopes to bridge gaps correlating effective medical education to patient outcomes.


Miriam Webster defines POISE as “to put into readiness.” Health care providers are expected to possess certain competencies after completing their training, yet it is difficult to guarantee that all trainees receive adequate experience with skills that occur infrequently. Innovative medical education techniques are frequently used to fill gaps in patient care experiences. However, not much is known about whether specific methods or technologies translate into clinical efficacy. POISE network provide an infrastructure for designing,implementing, and studying novel educational interventions across participating institutions. This network will continue to grow in size and lead to the development of simulation interventions that lead to improvements in patient outcomes.


Selected Publications

  • Auerbach MA, Kessler D, Cheng A. Simulation Based Research in Pediatric Emergency Medicine. Pediatric Emergency Care. In press 2013
  • Auerbach MA,Chang T, Krantz A, Pratt A, Gerard J, Quinones C, Pusic M, Kessler D. Are pediatric interns prepared to perform infant lumbar punctures? A multi-institutional descriptive study. Pediatric Emergency Care. In press 2013
  • Kamdar G, Kessler D, Tilt L, Khanna K, Chang T, Balmer D, Auerbach MA. Qualitative evaluation of Just-in-time Simulation-based Learning: The learners' perspective. Simulation in Health Care. In press 2013
  • Siew LT, Auerbach M, Baum CR, Pavlovic L, Leventhal JM. Respiratory failure caused by a suspicious white powder: as case report of intentional methadone poisoning in an infant. Pediatric Emerg Care. 2012 Sep;28(9):918-20.
  • Auerbach MA, Chang T, Krantz A, Ching K, Pusic M, Kessler D, Infant Lumbar Puncture: POISE Pediatric Procedure Video. MedEdPORTAL #8339, 2011 http://services.aamc.org/30/mededportal/servlet/s/segment/mededportal/?subid=8339
  • Auerbach MA, Kessler D, Foltin JC. Repetitive Pediatric Simulation Resuscitation Training. Pediatric Emergency Care. 2011, 27(1): 29-31
  • 5. Kessler D, Auerbach MA, Tunik M, Pusic M, Foltin JC. A Randomized Trial of Simulation-Based Deliberate Practice For Infant Lumbar Puncture Skills. Simul Healthc. 2011 Aug; 6(4):197-203
  • Langhan ML, Auerbach MA, Smith AN, Chen L. Improving detection by pediatric residents of endotracheal tube dislodgement with capnography: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of Pediatrics. 2012 Jun; 160 (6): 1009-14
  • Corwin DJ, Kessler DO, Auerbach MA, Liang A, Kristinsson G. An intervention to improve pain management in the pediatric emergency department. Pediatric Emergency Care. 2012 Jun; 28(6): 524-8
  • Cicero MX, Auerbach MA, Zigmont J, Riera R, Ching K, Baum CR. Simulation Training with Structured Debriefing Improves Residents’ Pediatric Disaster Triage Performance. Prehospital Disaster Medicine. 2012 Jun 27 (3):239-44

Read more...

Edit Profile