YSPH Names Teacher, Mentor of the Year

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The ability to bring data analysis to life is a valuable asset in a teacher – a fact not lost on YSPH’s Class of 2009 when they chose Mayur Desai M.P.H. ’94, Ph.D. ’97, assistant professor in the division of Chronic Disease Epidemiology and director of the Advanced Professional M.P.H. Program as Teacher of the Year.

Desai received the award for his dedication and excellence in teaching the Principles of Epidemiology II and Data Management and Analysis courses, said Dean Paul Cleary.

“Mayur is consistently praised for his passionate commitment and mastery in teaching the practice of public health research; his genuine, nurturing mentorship; and his ability to make SAS [software] entertaining,” said Cleary.

Desai will speak at the YSPH Commencement ceremony on May 25th, and his name will be inscribed on the Distinguished Teaching Award plaque, which hangs outside of Winslow Auditorium at 60 College Street.

“I’m deeply honored to have been selected for this award by the graduating class,” said Desai. “Teaching research methods and data analysis can be dry and difficult, but not here at YSPH. It’s such a pleasure to be in class with our highly talented and motivated students. I look forward to following their careers and will take great pride in their world–changing accomplishments.”

Desai’s colleague Trace Kershaw, assistant professor in the division of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, has been selected to receive YSPH’s inaugural 2009 Distinguished Student Mentor award, a new honor established to recognizing excellence in student mentoring among faculty. The award affirms the recipient as a leader in shaping the next generation of public health professionals, serving as a role model for students while encouraging them to grow and achieve their full potential.

Kershaw was nominated by graduating students and selected by a student/faculty sub–committee of the Education Committee. He will also be awarded at Commencement and recognized on a plaque outside of Winslow Auditorium.

“Trace is recognized for surpassing expectations in numerous ways to foster excellence and growth in the students he works with beyond classroom learning,” said Dean Cleary. “He supports professional skill development in public speaking, software applications, and career counseling through advice, resume reviews and job interview preparation.” Cleary also noted that Trace is known for his accessibility not only in the office, but also during recesses and social events.


This Article was submitted by Denise Laraine Meyer, on Monday, August 06, 2012.