Affiliates

  • Fuad Abujarad

    Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine

    Dr. Abujarad research is interdisciplinary and focuses on the design, development, and use of Health Information Technology (HIT) tools in the domain of public health, clinical, as well as health services research.

     He is currently studying the use of automated screening, motivational interviewing, virtual coaching, and mHealth to enhance identifying elder mistreatment at the point-of-care. Another project is examining the effect of enhancing e-referral to deliver a comprehensive, multi-sector-connected-service model via a community-driven coordinated-case-management approach to improve older adults’ capacity for self-care. A third project is using HIT to build and strengthen the personal care aides (PCAs) workforce to meet the overwhelming demand for high-quality, lower-cost supports and services for older adults at home through an implementation of a new more efficient and cost-effective way. Also, he is studying the use of HIT to prevent abuse, neglect, and exploitation of older adults in long-term care settings.

     Dr. Abujarad is also studying the use of HIT to improve the Informed Consent process. He is the PI on the “Patient-Centered Virtual Multimedia Interactive Informed Consent (VIC)” an R21 funded by AHRQ. In this study, he developed and evaluated a reusable infrastructure that will enable the informed consent process to be performed on handheld devices (e.g. iPads) utilizing interactive multimedia libraries (e.g. graphics, video clips, animations, presentations, etc.) designed to enhance patient comprehension and quality of care.

    As a computer scientist, his research focused on software solutions for healthcare service challenges. His background in computer science enables him to refine the design, as well as implementation and deployment of health systems, that is easy-to-use, user-friendly, and feasible. 

  • Marc Auerbach

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Emergency Medicine) and of Emergency Medicine; Co-chair INSPIRE (International Network for Simulation Based Pediatric Innovation Research and Education); Director, Pediatric Simulation, Yale Center for Medical Simulation; Medical Director, CT Emergency Medical Services for Children, State Partnership Grant; Associate Director of Pediatric Simulation, Department of Pediatrics; Associate Pediatric Trauma Medical Director; PEMnetwork.org Faculty Advisor/Moderator/Blogger; Co-chair International Pediatric Simulation Society, Webinar series

    Marc Auerbach is the Director of Pediatric Simulation and Associate Medical Director of Trauma at Yale New Haven Children’s Hospital. Marc is the Co-chair of INSPIRE (International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation Research and Education), the largest simulation based research network in the world, with multiple ongoing projects and over 1.5 million dollars in grant funding.

    Marc completed a K30 Masters of Science in Clinical Investigation with a focus in translational medicine at New York University and post-graduate course work on simulation at Harvard’s Center for Medical Simulation.

    He has substantial leadership experiences in trauma and simulation research as a board member of the International Pediatric Simulation Society, co-chair of the Pediatric Academic Society’s Special Interest Group on Simulation-Based Research and as a leader on the Pediatric Trauma Society’s Guideline Committee.

    He has served as the principal investigator on multiple funded trauma and simulation research projects to ensure the optimal care for ill and injured children. This includes a grant-funded project using simulation training for disaster preparedness, a regional trauma simulation program, a local office based preparedness program. Most recently he has served as the PI of the ImPACTS study, a national effort to describe, measure and improve the quality of care provided to critically ill and injured pediatric patients in emergency departments using simulation. Marc is currently PI on an AHRQ grant that aims to redesign the process of transitioning injured children from community hospitals to trauma centers. Additionally he is collaborating on an AHRQ grant to develop a screen-based simulation for pediatric disaster triage training.

  • Lori Bastian

    Professor of Internal Medicine (General Medicine); Section Chief of General Internal Medicine VA Connecticut Healthcare System; Director, Pain Research, Informatics, Multimorbidities, and Education (PRIME) Center

    I began my 27 year research career at Duke University and the Durham VA in 1991 and moved to VA Connecticut and University of Connecticut in 2012. In January 2016, I was appointed Section Chief of Chief of General Internal Medicine at VA Connecticut in West Haven. In this role, I oversee the academic development and clinical productivity of the hospitalists, primary care, and research faculty based at VA Connecticut. In February 2016, I was appointed the Director and Principal Investigator of the Pain Research, Informatics, Multimorbidities, and Education (PRIME) Center of Excellence at VA Connecticut. This is a 5-year center grant with over 3 million in infrastructure support for multidisciplinary research focusing on improving pain in Veterans. In 2018, The PRIME Center received a 5-year renewal to 2023.

  • Cynthia Brandt

    Professor of Emergency Medicine and of Anesthesiology

    Dr. Brandt completed a general Preventive Medicine residency at Madigan Army Medical Center in 1989 and a post-doctoral fellowship sponsored by the National Library of Medicine at Yale School of Medicine in 1997. She is board certified in Preventive Medicine and Clinical Informatics. Her research is interdisciplinary and focuses on issues related to the design, development and use of informatics tools in the domain of clinical research, as well as health services research.

  • Sarwat Chaudhry

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medicine); Co-Director, National Clinician Scholars Program; Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect, Dean’s Faculty Advisory Council

    Sarwat Chaudhry, MD is a board-certified internist who completed her clinical training at the University of Chicago. She came to Yale for the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, and now holds a faculty position as Associate Professor of Medicine in the Section of General Medicine. Her work focuses on improving the care and outcomes of hospitalized patients, with a focus on older patients hospitalized for cardiovascular disease. Dr. Chaudhry serves as Director of the Academic Hospitalist Program at Yale. She recently founded the Center for Healthcare Innovation, Redesign, and Learning at Yale. This Center, funded by AHRQ, is studying and improving care transitions into, within, and out of the hospital setting. In March 2019 she was appointed Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect of the Dean’s Faculty Advisory Council.  

  • Geoffrey Chupp

    Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary); Director, Yale Center for Asthma and Airways Disease (YCAAD); Director, Pulmonary Function Laboratory, Yale-New Haven Hospital

    After graduating from Tufts University and the George Washington School of Medicine, Dr. Geoffrey Chupp completed a residency in Internal Medicine at the Tufts University School of Medicine and a Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Fellowship at Boston University School of Medicine. In 1997 Dr. Chupp came to Yale in 1997 and developed the Yale Center for Asthma and Airways Disease. This multifaceted program is a multidisciplinary clinical program that focuses on the care of patients with severe as and other complicated airways diseases, a center for translational research in airways disease, and a center where patients can participate in cutting edge industry sponsored research trials. The success of YCAAD has recently been realized with the publications on novel observations on chitinases in patients with asthma recruited from this multidisciplinary center.

  • Paul D Cleary

    Anna M. R. Lauder Professor of Public Health (Health Policy) and Professor of Sociology and in the Institute for Social and Policy Studies; Director, Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS (CIRA)

    Paul D. Cleary, Ph.D. is the Anna M.R. Lauder Professor of Public Health in the Department of Health Policy and Management. He served as Dean of the Yale School of Public Health from 2006 to 2017. He holds secondary positions as Professor of Sociology and in the Institute for Social and Institute for Social and Policy Studies. He directs the Yale Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS (CIRA), which provides infrastructure support to over 50 research and training grants and over 180 affiliated scientists and community members.

    Dr. Cleary received his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin. His earliest work focused on studies of health behavior. He conducted theoretical and empirical research on smoking as well as patients’ perceptions and responses to physical symptoms and factors affecting use of medical care. He also studied the recognition and management of conditions such as mental illness, alcohol abuse and functional impairment in primary care settings.

    For more than 20 years, Dr. Cleary has been actively involved in research focused on persons infected with HIV. Since early in his career, he has investigated the ways in which infection affects people’s lives and the factors affecting the quality of medical care for infected persons. He led a key component of the HIV Costs and Services Utilization Study (HSCUS), in which his team investigated the physician and clinic characteristics that predict the quality of care that patients receive. He also conducted a major national evaluation of a quality improvement program in HIV clinics funded by the Ryan White Care Act.

    He has studied how organizational characteristics affect the costs and quality of care for persons with AIDS; evaluated a national continuous quality improvement initiative in clinics providing care to HIV infected individuals; and studied the long-term impact of patient-centered hospital care. He is Principal Investigator of one of the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) projects funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to develop information gathering surveys for consumers regarding their health plans and services. He also is Principal Investigator and Director of the Yale Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS (CIRA). He has published more than 300 journal articles describing his research.

    Dr. Cleary has been a member of the Academy of Medicine (AOM) since 1994 and served as Chair of two AOM Committees: the Committee on the Ryan White CARE Act: Data for Resource Allocation, Planning and Evaluation in 2002-2003, and the Committee on HIV Screening and Access to Care from 2010 to 2011. He has also been a member of the Connecticut Academy for Science and Engineering since 2007. In 1996, he was selected as a distinguished fellow of the Association for Health Services Research, and in 2002, received the Distinguished Investigator Award from the Academy for Health Services Research and Health Policy. In 2010, Dr. Cleary was awarded the Picker Award for Excellence in the Advancement of Patient-Centered Care by the Picker Institute.  In 2018, he received the L:eo G. Reeder Award for Distinguished Contributions to Medical Sociology.

    From 2005 to 2016 Dr. Cleary chaired the National Advisory Committee for The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator Awards in Health Policy Research Program. He has served as editor of The Milbank Quarterly, associate editor of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, consulting editor of the Journal of Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry, and an editorial board member of The Handbook of Social Studies in Health and Medicine and the Advanced Handbook of Methods in Evidence Based Health Care.

  • Jeptha Curtis

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiology); Medical Director, Performance Improvement, Heart & Vascular Center; Senior Scientific Advisor, NCDR; Director, Registry Data Analytic Center, Center for Outcomes Research & Evaluation (CORE)

    Jeptha P. Curtis, MD, is an Associate Professor in the Section of Cardiovascular Medicine at Yale University School of Medicine. He received his medical degree from the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons before training in internal medicine at the Duke University Medical Center and completing his fellowships in clinical and interventional cardiology at Yale. Dr. Curtis directs the American College of Cardiology Analytic Center at CORE. He has also led the development of registry-based outcome measures for CMS examining 30-day mortality following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and ICD and currently oversees the maintenance of the registry measures, contributes to the development of new measures, and assists in the development of approaches to cardiovascular surveillance. Currently, he is conducting a mixed methods research study of hospitals that perform PCI (TOP PCI). The study will begin with a qualitative component in which top performing hospitals will be visited to identify candidate strategies, and will then move to a quantitative survey of PCI hospitals to determine which strategies are most closely associated with better patient outcomes. Through critically examining the practice of interventional cardiology, Dr. Curtis hopes to improve the quality of care delivered to patients with coronary artery disease and those undergoing PCI.

  • Mayur M. Desai

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); Associate Dean for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, YSPH; Director, Advanced Professional MPH Program; Core Faculty, National Clinician Scholars Program

    Mayur M. Desai, PhD, MPH, is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health, where he directs the one-year Advanced Professional MPH Program and teaches courses on epidemiologic research methods and data analysis. Professor Desai received both his MPH in health policy and his PhD in epidemiology from Yale University. He then served for two years as an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) Officer at CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics, before returning to New Haven to join the Yale faculty. As a core faculty member in Yale’s National Clinician Scholars Program, he is responsible for coordinating the “Clinical and Health Services Research Methods” course and teaching the quantitative methods portion of the curriculum. Professor Desai’s research interests focus on:

    1. improving the quality and outcomes of medical care in complex and vulnerable populations, including persons with mental disorders, veterans, immigrants, and the elderly; and
    2. workforce issues in public health and medicine.

    At the Yale-New Haven Hospital Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE), Professor Desai is collaborating with a multidisciplinary team of investigators, under contract with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, to develop statistical models that are used to measure and publicly report hospital clinical outcomes using Medicare administrative data.

  • Gail D'Onofrio

    Professor of Emergency Medicine; Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine

    Dr. D’Onofrio is Professor and the Inaugural Chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine (2009) and Physician-in Chief of Emergency Services at Yale-New Haven Hospital EDs with an annual census of approximately 180,000 patients. She is boarded in emergency and addiction medicine.  Dr. D’Onofrio has extensive experience as a leader, researcher, mentor and educator, and is internationally known for her work in alcohol and other substance use disorders (SUDs) as well as for her research on gender variations in women with ischemic heart disease.   Her work (JAMA, 2015) demonstrating that ED-initiated buprenorphine increases engagement in addiction treatment for individuals with OUD, has changed clinical practice, receiving multiple science awards, including awards from the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation and the Clinical Research Forum.  Dr. D’Onofrio has a long track record of mentoring physician scientists in independent research careers. She is the PI of a NIDA K12 establishing the Yale Drug Use, Addiction and HIV Research Scholars (Yale-DAHRS) program, a Mentored Career Development Program with focused training in prevention and treatment of drug use, addiction, and HIV in general medical settings with scholars in Medicine, Emergency Medicine (EM), Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Pulmonary Critical Care; and she has mentored numerous EM faculty.  She has received multiple awards including Excellence in Mentoring award from the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA 2008), Advancing Women in Emergency Medicine award from the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM 2016) and the Academy for Women in Academic Emergency Medicine (AWAEM) Outstanding Department Award for the advancement of women (SAEM 2018). Dr. D’Onofrio is a founding Board member of the Board of Addiction Medicine recently recognized by ABMS as a Specialty, Sub-specialty.  An advocate for individuals with SUD, she is one of the architects of Connecticut Governor’s Strategic Plan to Reduce Opioid Deaths, working with multiple agencies regionally and nationally to change policies and introduce interventions to combat the opioid crisis.

  • James Dziura

    Professor of Emergency Medicine; Deputy Director, Yale Center for Analytical Sciences; Deputy Director, Yale Data Coordinating Center

    Jim is a Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at YMS. As a biostatistician at Yale since 2002 he has co-authored over 160 peer-reviewed articles with a diverse group of Yale investigators. Dr. Dziura also serves as the Deputy Director of both the Yale Center for Analytical Sciences (YCAS) and the Yale Data Coordinating Center (YDCC) in the Yale School of Public Health. He has been active in training young investigators, both individually (as a mentor and statistical resource for K-awardees, post-doctoral fellows, residents and Master’s students) and in the classroom (where he has developed a graduate-level course and several workshops on biostatistics in clinical research). His primary research interests are in the coordination of multicenter clinical trials. Over the past ten years he has overseen data coordinating and biostatistical efforts for several trials. Notably, he served as the PI of the data coordinating center for the RUPP Autism Network study of Guanfacine for the treatment of hyperactivity. He is the Director of the Data Coordinating Center for the Autism Biomarkers Consortium for Clinical Trials (ABC-CT), a multicenter longitudinal study developing reproducible experimental biomarkers (e.g. from EEG, eye tracking) for use as stratification factors and outcomes in clinical trials.He is a senior biostatistician (and unblinded statistician for the DSMB) for the Data Coordinating Center of a large pragmatic cluster-randomized trial for the prevention of serious fall injuries (STRIDE) in 6,000 older persons from 86 health care practices.

  • Leigh Evans

    Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine; Executive Director, Yale Center for Medical Simulation; Director, Resident Research

    Leigh Evans, MD is an Associate Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine and the Executive Director of YCMS.

    She graduated from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and completed an Emergency Medicine residency at Yale, serving as chief resident in her final year.

    She is the recipient of the Outstanding Teaching Award in Emergency Medicine in 2003 and 2005. Dr. Evans is the recipient of the Yale School of Medicine Bohmfalk Teaching Prize in 2008 and the Alvan R. Feinstein Award in 2015.

    Dr. Evans is the director of the Medical Simulation fellowship in Emergency Medicine. Her research interests are in the transfer of simulation skills to the clinical setting and the use of simulation for medical student and resident clinical assessment. She was the Principal Investigator for an AHRQ grant “Simulation Training for Ultrasound Guided Central Venous Catheter Insertion” and she is currently the PI for a Department of Defense grant assessing live tissue vs simulation training using system dynamics modeling.

  • Lynn E Fiellin

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medicine) and in the Child Study Center; Instructor, Investigative Medicine Program; Director, Yale Center for Health & Learning Games, Internal Medicine; Director, play2PREVENT Lab at Yale, Internal Medicine; Chief, Fitkin Firm, Yale-New Haven Hospital, Internal Medicine; Director, ForAGirl Program, Yale School of Medicine, Internal Medicine

    Dr. Lynn Fiellin is recognized for excellence and leadership in clinical research and as a leader and innovator at YSM as founder/director of both the play2PREVENT (p2P) Lab at the Yale Center for Health & Learning Games and the ForAGirl summer program. She has also distinguished herself with her hospital leadership role as Fitkin Firm Chief at Yale New Haven Hospital as well as in a national role as a Founding Member of TIME'S UP Healthcare, a national organization focused on ensuring safe and equitable work places for women in healthcare. She has excelled as an educator, mentor, and role model in these programs.

    Dr. Fiellin has created programs that specifically target impact on youth and young adults, on a local/community and national/international level. In the p2P Lab she established a premiere videogames research program of collaborating researchers, game developers, and community partners who develop and evaluate video game interventions targeting HIV prevention and smoking prevention in adolescents. She has received National Institutes of Health, foundation, and industry funding to build this lab. Dr. Fiellin's program has garnered considerable interest from students and trainees. Because of this interest and given her focus on supporting and promoting the personal and professional growth of girls and women, she created For A Girl, a summer program housed in her lab. There is a well-documented failure to attract girls and young women to the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Dr. Fiellin established ForAGirl as a novel, multifaceted program that focuses on promoting girls' engagement in STEM, medicine, and research. In addition to these innovative programs, she has focused on mentoring women trainees and faculty as a critical aspect of her work.

  • Howard Forman

    Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, in the Institute for Social and Policy Studies, of Economics, of Management and of Public Health (Health Policy); Director of MD/MBA Program at Yale; Director, MBA for Executives (Healthcare Focus Area); SOM; Director, Health Care Management Program; YSPH; Faculty Director of Finance; Department of Radiology; YSM

    Howie Forman is a Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Public Health (Health Policy), Management, and Economics at Yale University. He came to Yale as a practicing diagnostic radiologist and remains an active clinician in the YNHH Emergency Room, where he also functions as the operational chief for Radiology. Since 1998, he has taught undergraduate and graduate courses on healthcare policy, economics, finance, and leadership. He is the faculty director and founder of Yale’s MD/MBA program and the Healthcare focus area of the Executive MBA program. Since 2011, he has been the director of the Health Care Management (HCM) Program at the YSPH. He is actively involved in patient care and issues related to financial administration, healthcare compliance, and quality improvement. He has worked in the US Senate, as a health policy fellow, on Medicare legislation.

  • Margaret Grey

    Annie Goodrich Professor of Nursing; Deputy Director, Yale Center for Clinical Investigation; Professor of Pediatrics (secondary)

    Margaret Grey, DrPH, RN, FAAN is the Annie W. Goodrich Professor at the Yale School of Nursing. She also holds appointments in the Department of Pediatrics and as Deputy Director for community and collaboration at the Yale Center for Clinical Investigation. She served as Dean of the School of Nursing from 2005-2015. A pediatric nurse practitioner, Dr. Grey's research has focused on improving the lives of youth with type 1 diabetes and preventing type 2 diabetes using innovative web-based programs developed using patient-engaged approaches. She has been principal investigator for grants totaling over $45 million.

    The author of over 380 journal articles, chapters, and abstracts, she has received numerous regional and national honors for her research. She was elected to the Institute of Medicine (now the National Academy of Medicine) in 2005, and she was named the Outstanding Nurse Scientist by the American Academy of Nursing in
    2008. She was named the Rubin Award recipient by the American Diabetes Association for outstanding contributions to behavioral medicine. She has served on multiple NIH and AHRQ review panels, and she was the
    chairperson of the Nursing Science Review Committee for the National Institute
    of Nursing Research from 1995-1997. 

  • Cary Gross

    Professor of Medicine (General Medicine) and of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); Director, National Clinician Scholars Program at Yale

    Dr. Cary Gross is a Professor of Medicine, and Director of the National Clinician Scholars Program at Yale. Dr. Gross completed his residency in Internal Medicine at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center and served as chief medical resident at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center the following year.His research addresses comparative effectiveness, quality, and population health, with a focus on cancer prevention and treatment. He is a founding Director of Yale’s Cancer Outcomes Public Policy and Effectiveness Research Center (COPPER). His research has been supported by the National Cancer Institute, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the American Cancer Society, among others. As a former Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar, Dr. Gross has advanced training in biostatistics, epidemiology, research ethics, and outcomes research.

  • Jeanne Hendrickson

    Professor of Laboratory Medicine; Medical Director, Apheresis Service, Laboratory Medicine; Associate Director, Transfusion Medicine Service

    Dr. Hendrickson is a pediatric hematologist and transfusion medicine specialist. Her clinical interests include factors influencing alloimmunization (particularly red blood cell alloimmunization), as well as strategies to minimize the formation and dangers of such antibodies. Her translational research interests include investigating the induction and consequences of red blood cell alloantibodies in transfusion and pregnancy situations, in murine models and in the clinical setting.

  • Allen Hsiao

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Emergency Medicine) and of Emergency Medicine; Chief Medical Information Officer, Yale School of Medicine & Yale New Haven Health

  • Harlan Krumholz

    Harold H. Hines, Jr. Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) and Professor in the Institute for Social and Policy Studies, of Investigative Medicine and of Public Health (Health Policy); Director, Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Yale-New Haven Hospital; Co-Director, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program, Yale University

    Harlan Krumholz is a cardiologist and health care researcher at Yale University and Yale-New Haven Hospital. He received a BS from Yale, an MD from Harvard Medical School, and a Masters in Health Policy and Management from the Harvard University School of Public Health. He is the Harold H. Hines, Jr. Professor of Medicine and Director of the Yale Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE), one of the nation’s first and most productive research units dedicated to producing innovations to improve patient outcomes and promote better population health. He is also a Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program, which prepares talented physicians to become future health care leaders.

    Dr. Krumholz has been honored by membership in the Institute of Medicine, the Association of American Physicians, and the American Society for Clinical Investigation. He was named a Distinguished Scientist of the American Heart Association. He was elected to the Board of Trustees of the American College of Cardiology and the Board of Directors of the American Board of Internal Medicine, and was appointed by the U.S. government to the Board of Governors of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. He is a 2014 recipient of the Friendship Award from the People’s Republic of China in recognition of his collaborative efforts to develop a national cardiovascular research network.

    Dr. Krumholz is the editor of Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, and editor of CardioExchange, a social media site of the publisher of the New England Journal of Medicine. He has published more than 800 articles and is the author of two books, one on smoking cessation and another on reducing the risk of heart disease. He has a regular blog on Forbes.com and has contributed to the New York Times Wellness blog, the New York Times op-ed page, and National Public Radio Shots blog.

  • Meir Kryger

    Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary) and Clinical Professor of Nursing

    Meir Kryger, MD, FRCPC, joined the Yale School of Medicine and the VA Connecticut Health System, November 2011. Previously he was Professor of Medicine, University of Manitoba where he established the first clinical laboratory studying patients with sleep breathing problems in Canada. Dr. Kryger has published more than 200 research articles and book chapters. He is the chief editor of the most widely used textbook in sleep medicine, The Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine, currently in its 5th edition and is the author of A Woman's Guide to Sleep Disorders, the Atlas of Clinical Sleep Medicine, and Kryger’s Sleep Medicine Review. Dr. Kryger was the first to diagnose and report obstructive sleep apnea in North America. His research was the first to show the feasibility of using noninvasive techniques to ventilate post-polio patients in their homes. His laboratory elucidated the interaction between heart failure and sleep respiration publishing the first systematic study of oxygen in this condition. He has been president of both the Canadian Sleep Society and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. He is on the Board of Directors of the National Sleep Foundation in Washington, D.C., and served as Board. He received the William C. Dement Award for Academic Achievement in sleep medicine. In 2011 he received a Distinguished Scientist Award from the Canadian Sleep Society at the meeting of the World Association of Sleep Medicine

    Kryger graduated from the McGill University Medical School, interned at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago and completed internal medicine training at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal. His pulmonary fellowship was at the University of Colorado, followed by two years of research training. He is boarded in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine and Sleep Medicine and is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada.

  • Rachel Lampert

    Professor of Internal Medicine (Cardiology)

    Rachel Lampert, MD, is a cardiologist with Yale Medicine who specializes in electrophysiology. She treats patients with arrhythmias, syncope, palpitations, and other related conditions. Many of them are athletes who are thinking of getting back into the game or patients with a terminal diagnosis who are hoping to maintain a good quality of life.

    When it comes to treating these complex issues, Dr. Lampert believes strongly in collaborating with patients to develop a plan that works for each of them, a model of patient-physician interaction called shared decision-making. “I will explain the options to my patients, and they will tell me about their goals and preferences,” she says. “The patient is a very active participant during this whole process.”

    Dr. Lampert’s dedication to her patients extends into her research—many of her research questions have been inspired by patient questions. For example, many have asked which of the lifestyle restrictions for patients with medical devices are actually necessary. Dr. Lampert has collected data and has since published several papers on this topic. Some have focused on athletes, including a study of athletes competing with ICDs, others on the terminally ill, looking at practices and patient experiences and wishes regarding deactivation of an ICD as they reach the end of their lives.  Also, she has brought Yale into a study on MRI for patients with devices, which found that contrary to previous recommendations, patients with pacemakers may be able to safely undergo an MRI scan. “I’m committed to giving patients who have devices their lives back,” she says.

    In addition to seeing patients and conducting research, Dr. Lampert teaches at the Yale School of Medicine as a professor of internal medicine, cardiology, and serves as an active member of the Heart Rhythm Society, American College of Cardiology, and the Leadership Council for Sports and Exercise. 

  • Melissa Langhan

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Emergency Medicine) and of Emergency Medicine; Director of Operations, Pediatric Emergency Medicine; Fellowship Director, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Pediatric Emergency Medicine; Director of Education, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Pediatric Emergency Medicine

    Dr. Melissa Langhan is an associate professor in pediatric emergency medicine at Yale University with a focus in clinical, patient-oriented research. Melissa completed her medical education at the State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn where she graduated summa cum laude in 2000. From here she completed residency and chief residency in pediatrics at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, and her pediatric emergency medicine fellowship at Yale University in New Haven, CT.

    Her early clinical research focused on the use of bedside technology, including capnography, portable spirometry and bedside ultrasonography to improve the accuracy of patient care in the emergency department. She then began honing in on capnography, assessing its use to monitor ventilation in patients with acute asthma exacerbations, altered mental status, procedural sedation and endotracheal intubation, as well as assessing the utilization of capnography in different patient care areas. Melissa’s focus is now on translational research, and improving the dissemination and implementation of research into practice. She has explored the barriers and facilitators to the implementation of technology into acute care settings. Dr. Langhan has now incorporated this data into the development of a pilot study to improve use of these capnography in the emergency department for critically ill patients. Her overarching goal is to reduce adverse events and improve quality of care among this vulnerable population.

    Melissa also serves as the fellowship director for pediatric emergency medicine and is engaged in both local and multicenter collaborative research in medical education. She serves on the Subspecialty Pediatric Investigative Network and the Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowship Directors Committee.

  • Steve Martino

    Professor of Psychiatry; Chief of Psychology, VA CT Healthcare System

    Dr. Martino specializes in the treatment of addictive disorders and of patients diagnosed with co-occurring psychiatric problems, with specific interests in motivational interviewing, cognitive behavioral therapy, group work, use of brief interventions in medical settings, and clinical supervision. His current research focuses on strategies for disseminating and implementing empirically supported treatments in community treatment programs and medical settings. Dr. Martino is the Chief of Psychology at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System.

  • Robert McNamara

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiology)

    University of Notre Dame, Bachelors of Science in Chemical Engineering

    Washington University School of Medicine, Medical Doctorate

    Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Internal Medicine Residency and Clinical Cardiology Fellowship

    Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, Masters of Health Science in Clinical Epidemiology

    Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Advanced Echocardiography

    Indian Health Service, Navajo Reservation, Chinle Arizona

  • Christopher L Moore

    Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine; Chief, Section of Emergency Ultrasound; Director, Emergency Ultrasound Fellowship

    Dr. Moore has established and directed the Emergency Ultrasound Section over the last thirteen years. He is fellowship trained in emergency ultrasound and founded and directed the Yale Emergency Ultrasound Fellowship over the last twelve years. His research interest are in diagnostic testing in the emergency department setting, particularly imaging tests such as ultrasound and computed tomography. He is currently funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to disseminate the appropriate use of reduced-dose CT scan protocols in renal colic (kidney stone).

    In addition to his research, Dr. Moore runs the emergency ultrasound rotation, a required rotation for emergency medicine residents which is also popular as an elective both with Yale residents from other services, medical students and trainees from other institutions. He teaches ultrasound as part of the first year Yale School of Medicine Anatomy Course and is involved in the point-of-care ultrasound education pilot for the Yale School of Medicine, now in its third year. He has established and directed the New England Point-of-care Ultrasound Course, one of the largest courses in the country, which is has also been given in the Caribbean the last four years. He is past-chair of the Emergency and Critical Care Ultrasound Section at the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) where he is a senior member and a former member of the AIUM Board of Governors.

    Dr. Moore is a 2007 recipient of the ACEP Teacher of the Year Award and received the Ultrasound Achievement Award from the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine in 2009. He has lectured internationally in Europe, China, South America, and New Zealand. On a clinical level Dr. Moore has worked within Yale New Haven Hospital to establish clinical ultrasound privileges and has overseen the training of attending physicians in the Department of Emergency Medicine.

  • Rafael Perez-Escamilla

    Professor of Public Health (Social and Behavioral Sciences); Director, Office of Public Health Practice; Director, Global Health Concentration

    Rafael Pérez-Escamilla, Ph.D., is Professor of Epidemiology & Public Health, Director of the Office of Public Health Practice, and Director of the Global Health Concentration at the Yale School of Public Health. His global public health nutrition and food security research program has led to improvements in breastfeeding programs, iron deficiency anemia among infants, household food security measurement and outcomes, and maternal, infant and young child community nutrition education/counselling programs. His health disparities research involves assessing the impact of community health workers at improving behavioral and metabolic outcomes among Latinos with type 2 diabetes. He has published over 200 research articles, 2 books, and numerous journal supplements, book chapters, and technical reports. He is a member of the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM) Food and Nutrition Board. He has been a senior advisor to maternal-child community nutrition programs as well as household food security measurement projects funded by WHO, PAHO, UNICEF, FAO, UNESCO, UNDP, CDC, USDA, USAID, The World Bank, the Gates Foundation, and the Governments of Mexico, Brazil, and Colombia. He obtained his BS in Chemical Engineering from the Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City and his MS in Food Science and his PhD in Nutrition from the University of California at Davis.

  • Margaret Pisani

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary); Co-Director Sleep in the ICU Task Force

    Dr. Pisani is a board certified physician who specializes in pulmonary and critical care medicine. As a clinician-investigator with expertise in pulmonary, critical care, sleep medicine and chronic disease epidemiology, Dr. Pisani’s research focuses on improving the care and outcomes of critically ill patients.  She has a special interest in geriatric pulmonary and critical care medicine an outcomes in older patients. She holds an MPH in chronic disease epidemiology and brings this training and her research focus to her role as mentor for fellows and junior faculty doing clinical and translational work in pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine. In addition, she has extensive experience in conducting longitudinal clinical research studies both in the critical care setting and the outpatient setting. Her current research focuses on sleep in critically ill patients and its impact on delirium and other patient centered outcomes.

  • Carrie A Redlich

    Professor of Medicine (Occupational Medicine); Director, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program

    Dr. Redlich, a graduate of Williams College and Yale University School of Medicine, is trained in internal medicine, pulmonary medicine, and occupational and environmental medicine. Her clinical practice and research interests focus on occupational and environmental lung diseases, in particular work-related asthma, and health effects and prevention of exposure to isocyanates, chemicals widely used to produce polyurethane foams and coatings and other products.

  • Brita Roy

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (General Medicine); Director of Population Health (Yale Medicine), N/A

    Brita Roy, MD, MPH, MHS is Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine and Director of Population Health for Yale Medicine.

    Dr. Roy is a clinician-investigator, researching ways to use assets-based approaches to mitigating disparities in health outcomes by identifying and promoting positive psychosocial factors at the individual and community levels. She is investigating mechanisms by which positive psychology can prevent disease among individuals and groups, which led to the development of an actionable framework to measure and support the health and well-being of entire communities. She also serves as a measurement lead for the 100 Million Healthier Lives initiative, led by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. In addition, Dr. Roy also enjoys teaching health professions students and internal medicine residents in the classroom and while taking care of a diverse array of patients in the hospital.

    Dr. Roy pursued Bachelors and Master’s degrees in Biomedical Engineering at Vanderbilt University and Wayne State University, respectively. She then went on to the University of Michigan to pursue a combined MD/MPH in Health Behavior and Health Education. Dr. Roy subsequently completed residency training in internal medicine and served as Chief Medical Resident at the University of Alabama at Birmingham prior to completing the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program at Yale University.

  • Basmah Safdar

    Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine; Co-Chair, Chest Pain Center

    Dr. Safdar serves as the Director of the Yale New Haven Hospital Chest Pain Center. She is a nationally recognized scholar in sex and gender-specific research with a focus on cardiovascular health in emergency care. Her current research focuses on microvascular disease in a multi-system model. Dr. Safdar has been the recipient of federal and industry funding to conduct investigations on the physiology of unexplained chest pain and how it relates to patient sex. She leads the Yale CMD (coronary microvascular dysfunction) Registry that intersects with a multi-disciplinary clinical program addressing the systemic nature of microvascular dysfunction. Dr. Safdar has won several research awards including Yale EM Research of the year award in 2004, Connecticut Chapter of Emergency Physicians (CCEP) award in 2004 and the National Best Clinical Science Research Award (Resident) by Society of Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) in 2005. Dr. Safdar speaks regularly at regional and national forums and has given several media presentations raising awareness about gender-specific forms of heart disease. In 2014, she successfully co-chaired the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference on “Sex and Gender Specific Research – Investigate, Understand and Translate how Gender Affects Patient Outcomes”. This national conference brought leaders in academic Emergency Medicine and other specialties to put forth a blue print to create a research agenda for the specialty for the next decade. Lastly, Dr. Safdar is passionate about advancing women in medicine. She recently served as President of Academy for Women in Academic Emergency Medicine (AWAEM) and used this platform to collate faculty development resources for mid-career women faculty in emergency medicine. She has mentored several undergraduates, medical students, residents and faculty.  She currently serves as Fellow at Yale Branford College.

  • Eugene Shapiro

    Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) and of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases); Vice Chair for Research, Department of Pediatrics; Deputy Director, Investigative Medicine PhD Program; Co-Director of Education, Yale Center for CLinical Investigation

    Dr. Shapiro received a B.A. with a major in English Literature from Yale College in 1970 and an M.D. from the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, in 1976.  He completed a residency in pediatrics at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh in 1979 and a two-year fellowship in pediatric infectious diseases at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh in 1981.  He completed another two-year fellowship in clinical epidemiology (Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program) at Yale in 1983. 

    He has been on the faculty at Yale since 1983, where he sees patients, teaches, and conducts research.  He is currently Professor of Pediatrics, of Epidemiology and of Investigative Medicine and is Vice Chair for Research of Yale’s Department of Pediatrics.  He is also Deputy Director of Yale’s PhD Program in Investigative Medicine and is Co-Director of Education and Director of Child Health Research for Yale’s Center for Clinical Investigation. 

    Dr. Shapiro is board certified in both Pediatrics (1980, unlimited) and Pediatric Infectious Diseases (1994, 2000, 2008).  He served a 6-year term (2 years as Chair) as a member of the Infectious Diseases sub-board of the American Board of Pediatrics.  This is the group that writes the questions for the certifying examination. Dr. Shapiro has more than 250 publications (more than 150 in peer-reviewed journals), most of which are studies related to vaccines. He has been the principal investigator of many clinical studies, a number of which have been funded by highly competitive R01 grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  He has also received funding from private foundations and from industry, including from Connaught, from Pasteur Merieux and from Merck Laboratories.

     Dr. Shapiro has been a consultant to the World Health Organization (for both the Department of Vaccines and Biologicals and for the Acute Respiratory Infections Control Programme) and was Chair of the Advisory Group for the Epidemiology Branch of the National Institute of Health and Human Development. He also served as a Special Advisor to the Food and Drug Administration’s Vaccine Advisory Committee.  He has been either Chair or a member of the Data Safety and Monitoring Boards for numerous clinical trials, including clinical trials of the efficacy of vaccines, many of which were (or are currently) funded by the National Institutes of Health. He has served as a member of a permanent NIH study section for a 4-year term and has been an ad hoc reviewer for the NIH many times.  He has also served as a reviewer for grant proposals and/or awards for the Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development, the Department of Health of the United Kingdom, the University of Amsterdam, the Czech Health Research Council and the Karolinska Institute.

    In 2014, Dr. Shapiro received the Stanley A. Plotkin Lectureship in Vaccinology Award for career achievement for research in vaccinology.  In 2017, he received the Pediatric Diseases Society Distinguished Physician Award for “an extensive and distinguished career in pediatric infectious diseases.”

  • Mark Silvestri

    Assistant Clinical Professor, Division of Gynecologic Specialties, Yale School of Medicine Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences; Medical Director of Quality and Operations, Cornell Scott-Hill Health Center

  • Jody L. Sindelar

    Professor of Public Health (Health Policy), Professor of Economics, and Professor in the Institution for Social and Policy Studies; Research Associate, NBER

    Dr. Jody Sindelar is a professor of public health, health economist and public policy expert at the Yale School of Public Health (YSPH) and the Department of Health Policy and Management within YSPH, as well as with the Yale Economics Department. In addition, she is a research associate at the National Bureau Economic Research (NBER), research fellow at the IZA Institute of Labor Economics, faculty fellow at the Institution for Social and Policy Studies (ISPS) at Yale. She has been a  Bing visiting faculty at Rand Corporation in Santa Monica, CA and Washington, DC, and has been the President-elect, President, Past President & founding member of the American Society of Health Economists (ASHEcon).

    Dr. Sindelar is an expert on the economics of substance abuse, including addictive substances of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs, as well as the economics of obesity. Her studies include lost productivity, cost-effectiveness of treatments, social costs, and policy. She has published over 115 papers and studies on the impacts of substance abuse on productivity, educational attainment, gender differences, and related policy issues in economics, policy, addiction, health and medical journals. She has served on numerous editorial, review, advisory and other boards and committees, and has presented her research at seminars and conferences both nationally and internationally. Sge has also been a visiting professor at several universities and institutes including Mexico City (CIDE) and Shanghai Jiatong University Medical School (January 2016-2019).

    Dr. Sindelar has four decades of research experience in health economics, health and work, aging, and retirement, and she has mentored junior faculty in these fields. She has also been a principal investigator or collaborator on numerous past research projects funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality (AHRQ), Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), Connecticut Department of Social Services, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), Veteran’s Administration (VA), and Yale Center for Clinical Investigation (YCCI) among others.

  • Erica Spatz

    Associate Professor Term

    Dr. Erica S. Spatz, MD, MHS is a general cardiologist and a clinical investigator at the Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE). Her clinical and research interests include the development of individualized approaches to preventing and managing cardiovascular disease, along with tools to help patients become more active in their healthcare decisions.

  • Donna Spiegelman

    Susan Dwight Bliss Professor of Biostatistics; Director, Center for Methods in Implementation and Prevention Science (CMIPS); Director, Interdisciplinary Research Methods Core, Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS; Assistant Cancer Center Director, Global Oncology, Yale Cancer Center

    Donna Spiegelman was appointed the Susan Dwight Bliss Professor of Biostatistics at the Yale School of Public Health in 2018. As one of the few people in the world with a joint doctorate in biostatistics and epidemiology, she can freely speak the languages of both disciplines and switch between these two professional cultures, playing the role of interlocutor for either. Her research is motivated by problems which arise in epidemiology and require biostatistical solutions. In particular, but by no means exclusively, she has focused on methods for study design and data analysis which reduce bias in estimation and inference due to measurement error or misclassification in the exposure variable. She has extensive experience in troubleshooting and solving methodological issues that arise in longitudinal investigations, in clinical trials, and in large scale public health effectiveness evaluations. 

    Dr. Spiegelman, formerly at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, had a dynamic role as a professor, mentor, and an expert statistician. She was the recipient of the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award and  recently the recipient of the CAWF (Committee on the Advancement of Women Faculty) Mentoring Award.

  • Lynn Tanoue

    Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary); Clinical Chief, Section of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine; Director, Yale Lung Screening and Nodule Program; Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs, Department of Internal Medicine

    Lynn Tanoue, MD, MBA is Professor in the Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, and Vice-Chair for Clinical Affairs in the Department of Internal Medicine. Dr. Tanoue received her undergraduate degree from Harvard and medical degree from Yale, and completed training in internal medicine and pulmonary/critical care medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital. Her clinical interests focus on thoracic oncology and lung cancer screening. She is Clinic Chief in the Section of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine and Director of the Yale Lung Screening and Nodule Program. She established the Yale New Haven Hospital Tuberculosis Outreach Program, which over the past fifteen years has performed tuberculosis screening in thousands of English-as-a-Second-Language students enrolled at the New Haven Center for Adult Education. Dr. Tanoue serves on numerous national committees, including the American College of Chest Physicians lung cancer guidelines writing committee and Thoracic Oncology Network steering committee, the American Thoracic Society Thoracic Oncology Assembly Executive Committee, and the Pulmonary Board and Examination Committee of the American Board of Internal Medicine.

    Dr. Tanoue is an active clinician, mentor, and educator at Yale, where she has received a number of awards including the Dean’s Mentors Award, the Department of Internal Medicine Faculty Achievement Award for Clinical Care, and the Leffell Prize for Clinical Excellence. She is President-elect of the Yale New Haven Hospital medical staff. Her contributions to Yale School of Medicine include the founding of the Yale Medical Symphony Orchestra, of which she is a member and President of its Board of Directors.

  • Arjun Venkatesh

    Associate Professor Term; Chief, Section of Administration, Emergency Medicine; Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Emergency Medicine; Scientist, Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Internal Medicine; Co-Director, Emergency Department Administration Fellowship, Emergency Medicine

    Dr. Venkatesh is an Associate Professor and Chief of the Section of Administration in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Yale University. He is also Scientist at the Yale Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation. He has been funded by the NIH, AHRQ, and the Emergency Medicine Foundation to study health system outcomes and efficiency, and he is supported by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as co-Principal Investigator of the Emergency Quality Network (E-QUAL) and for the development of the Overall Hospital Quality Star Ratings. He has received over $6 million in grant funding and published over 80 peer-reviewed papers and is senior editor of The Evidence book series. He is national leader within ACEP and SAEM and he serves on expert panels for the National Quality Forum (NQF), Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and CMS. His work is also funded by the National Institute of Drug Abuse and the Addiction Policy Forum to advance the quality and delivery of emergency and acute care for opioid use disorder. 

    Dr. Venkatesh earned his undergraduate degree at Northwestern University. He went on to earn an MBA from Ohio State University before completing medical school at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Most recently he completed Emergency Medicine residency at Brigham and Women’s and Massachusetts General Hospitals and the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program here at Yale University. He is originally from Dayton, OH and resides in New Haven.

  • Emily Wang

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medicine)

    Dr. Emily Wang, MD, MAS, is an Associate Professor in the Yale School of Medicine and directs the Health Justice Lab. The Health Justice Lab is a collaborative, innovative, interdisciplinary team focused on improving the health of individuals and communities who have been affected by mass incarceration. The Lab has received funding from the National Institutes of Health, Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, Bureau of Justice Assistance, and Centers of Medicare & Medicaid Innovation for studies ranging from the epidemiology of incarceration and cardiovascular health to mitigating the community impact of gun violence using a participatory approach and assets based framework. Dr. Wang has cared for thousands of individuals with a history of incarceration and is Co-Founder of the Transitions Clinic Network (TCN), a growing consortium of 25 community health centers nationwide dedicated to caring for individuals recently released from correctional facilities by employing individuals with a history of incarceration as community health workers. Dr. Wang has served on the National Academy of Sciences/Institute of Medicine’s Health and Incarceration Workshop, Means of Violence Workshop, and the Steering Committee on Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs. Her work been published in the Lancet, JAMA, American Journal of Public Health, and Health Affairs, and showcased in national outlets such as the New York Times, NPR, and CNN.  Dr. Wang has a BA from Harvard University, an MD from Duke University, and a MAS from the University of California, San Francisco.

  • Robin Whittemore

    Professor of Nursing

    Robin Whittemore is a Professor at Yale School of Nursing, Director of the PhD program, and the Co-Director of the National Clinician Scholars Program at Yale. Dr. Whittemore’s research focus is on lifestyle change to prevent and treat type 2 diabetes as well as the psychosocial adjustment to chronic illness. Initially her work focused on adults with type 2 diabetes, specifically in translating theory-based interventions with established efficacy into a new setting, such as modifying the Diabetes Prevention Program for delivery by nurse practitioners in primary care and by visiting nurses and community health workers (CHWs) in subsidized housing. She has modified behavioral interventions for adults and adolescents to a technology platform. She has translated an in-person coping skills training program and an obesity prevention program for youth to the internet and has used text messaging to provide a positive psychology intervention for adolescents with type 1 diabetes, Currently, she is developing an internet program for parents of adolescents with type 1 diabetes, and modifying a group-based program for adults of low socioeconomic status with T2D in Mexico that includes a theory-based mHealth component.

    Activities:

    • Teens with type 1 diabetes, (South Central University, Changsha China). Collaboration with Dr. Jia Guo to adapt and evaluate a coping skills training program for tees with type 1 diabetes in China.
    • Gestational diabetes, (South Central University, Changsha China). Collaboration with Dr. Jia Guo to evaluate a lifestyle change program for rural women in China with a history of gestational diabetes
    • Adults with type 2 diabetes, (Iberoamerica University, Mexico City, Mexico). Collaboration with Dr. Rafael Perez Escamilla, Dr. Vilar Compte, and Ana Bertha Perez to evaluate a self-management program plus mHealth for adults with type 2 diabetes in Seguro Popular Clinics.
  • Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary); Vice Chief of Research, Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine; Associate Director, Yale Pulmonary/Critical Care Fellowship Program, Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine; Director, Yale Centers for Sleep Medicine, Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine

    Dr. Yaggi is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine and Director of the Yale Program in Sleep Medicine. He is board certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine. He is a Principal Investigator at the national VA Clinical Epidemiology Research Center. His research interest is the clinical epidemiology of sleep-disordered breathing, with a focus on the diverse health implications of sleep apnea and an emphasis on informing clinical care. Within this larger domain, his work has focused on 3 specific topics: sleep apnea as a risk factor for adverse cardiovascular and metabolic health outcomes; prognostic factors for adverse cardiovascular and metabolic health outcomes in patients with sleep-disordered breathing; and the impact of diagnosing and treating sleep apnea (using home-based strategies) on cardiovascular risk.

Contact Us

Director – Steven L. Bernstein, MD
Steven.bernstein@yale.edu
Office phone: 203-737-3574

Manager – June Weiss, MA, MEd
June.weiss@yale.edu
Office phone: 203-737-3582