The Three Column People Listing

Description:

This layout view displays the faculty members in a single columned table. Use this view to display a limited amount of information for a faculty listing containing a relatively small number of faculty members.
  • Chadi Abdallah

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Deputy Director for Research, and Director of Neuroimaging, Clinical Neuroscience Division, VA National Center for PTSD

    Dr. Chadi G. Abdallah has expertise in antidepressants clinical trials, translational clinical neuroscience, multimodal neuroimaging, and the development of rapid acting antidepressant for the treatment of depression, PTSD and other stress-related psychiatric disorders. He employs broad range of pharmacological challenges, neuroimaging modalities, and network neuroscience approaches to study the neurobiology of depression and other psychiatric disorders and the mechanisms underlying treatment response and resistance. His research program focuses on understanding the mechanisms underlying trauma, depression, and chronic stress, with emphasis on the role of synaptic connectivity and neuroenergetics.

  • Jorge Aguilar-Zanatta

    Dr. Jorge Aguilar-Zanatta came to Yale as a Psychosomatic Medicine Fellow after completing an Adult Psychiatry Residency at Creedmoor Psychiatric Center in Queens, New York. He obtained his medical degree from Ross University School of Medicine and Universidad Autonoma de Guadalajara, Mexico. He joined Yale-New Haven Hospital's Psychological Medicine Department as a Consult Psychiatrist for the Behavioral Intervention Team and Consult Psychiatry Service. In addition, Dr. Aguilar-Zanatta served as an HIV Psychiatry Attending at the Nathan Smith Clinic. Dr. Aguilar-Zanatta also provided General Psychiatric services at Yale's Primary Care Clinic. He Co-Led the response team and de-escalation sub-committee and provided consultation to the Prevention and Management of the Disruptive Patient Initiative. His interests include Psychosomatic Medicine, Addiction Medicine, HIV Psychiatry, and Trauma Surgery Psychiatry. At Yale, he instructs fellows, residents, nurse practitioners and medical students. He is currently the Director of Consultation Psychiatry at Danbury Hospital.

  • Kyung-Heup Ahn

    Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Affective Disorders, Psychotic; Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders
    Clinical Interests
    Anxiety; Depression; Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder; Schizophrenia; Panic Disorder; Substance-Related Disorders
  • Associate Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience; Director, Minority Recruitment, Psychiatry Department; Director, Postdoctoral Affairs, Psychiatry Department

    Research Interests
    Acetylcholine; Electrophysiology; Glutamates; Interneurons; Memory; Neurobiology; Nicotine; Psychiatry; Puberty; Signal Transduction; Prefrontal Cortex; Kisspeptins
  • Hamada Hamid Altalib

    Associate Professor of Neurology and of Psychiatry

    Clinical Interests
    Adult

    Dr. Altalib is the Director of the Veteran Administration (VA) Epilepsy Center of Excellence in West Haven, CT, where he oversees and provides direct care for Veterans with epilepsy throughout the greater New England region. He helped established a VA Neurobehavioral clinic, which provides clinical care for Veterans who suffer from emotional distress and/or behavioral problems associated with neurological conditions (such as traumatic brain injury, stroke, and epilepsy). At Yale University he also provides care for people with neurological injury that impact emotional processing. For instance, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, movement disorders (and their treatments) can affect brain circuits and chemistry and lead to mood, anxiety, and even psychotic disorders. Furthermore, neuropsychiatric conditions such functional movement disorder and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures are managed in his clinic.

    Dr. Altalib is also the Director of the Yale Epilepsy Outcomes Research Program, in which he oversees clinical trials and cohort studies related to epilepsy interventions. In addition to seizure control outcomes, his research explores psychiatric co-morbidity of neurologic disease. He is currently the primary investigator of a studies examining the neurologic substrates of depression in people with epilepsy; the burden of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in the Veteran population; and measuring coordination of health care using social network analysis methods.

  • Gustavo Angarita-Africano

    Associate Research Scientist; Inpatient Chief of the Clinical Neuroscience Research Unit (CNRU), Psychiatry; Medical Director, Forensic Drug Diversion Clinic (ForDD)

    Clinical Interests
    Psychiatry; Substance-Related Disorders

    Experiencing the impact of the cocaine epidemic in my native Colombia led me to pursue a career dedicated to the improved understanding and treatment of cocaine addiction. Since completing Clinical Training and becoming U.S Board Certified in Adult Psychiatry and Addictions Psychiatry in 2012, I have developed academic interest in the regulation of cocaine self-administration in humans, the validation of Remote Wireless Sensor Network (RWSN) technology for detecting cocaine use, and the role of cocaine-induced deficits in sleep in the putative therapeutic effects of the atypical stimulant, modafinil. Currently; my main career interests lie in the development of neurobiologically informed medication treatments for cocaine dependence, such as the ones based on homeostatic changes on the glutamatergic pathways. As an Assistant Chief of the Clinical Neuroscience Research Unit (CNRU) of the Connecticut Mental Health Center (CMHC), I provide care for the patients who are admitted on our floor in order to participate in research studies or in order to receive treatment for the psychiatric conditions afflicting them. This setting fosters collaboration with other clinicians, researchers, as well as teaching of Medical Students and Psychiatry Residents

  • Aniyizhai Annamalai

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Adult Refugee clinic; Director, Wellness Center, Connecticut Mental Health Center

    Research Interests
    Refugees; Diseases; Psychiatry and Psychology; Health Care

    My training was in a dual Internal Medicine/Psychiatry residency program. My clinical interests are in the care of patients with both medical and mental health problems. I am interested in building health care systems that integrate primary care and mental health services. Two populations I work with are refugees and people with serious mental illness. My belief is that students and residents in any discipline should be well trained in both medical and behavioral aspects of illness enabling them to have a holistic approach to patient care.

  • Alan Anticevic

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Division of Neurocognition, Neurocomputation, and Neurogenetics (N3), Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Affect; Mental Disorders; Cognition; Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted; Emotions; Memory, Short-Term; Schizophrenia; Computational Biology; Substance-Related Disorders; Neuroimaging
    Clinical Interests
    Adult

    Dr. Anticevic trained in Clinical Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience at Washington University in St. Louis where he trained with Drs. Deanna Barch and David Van Essen. Following graduate training, Dr. Anticevic completed his internship in Clinical Neuropsychology at Yale University. After internship, he joined the Yale University Department of Psychiatry as research faculty while concurrently serving as the Administrative Director for the Center for the Translational Neuroscience of Alcoholism. Subsequently, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology at the Yale University School of Medicine, where he directs a clinical neuroimaging laboratory focused on severe mental illness. Dr. Anticevic is a recipient of the NARSAD Young Investigator Award, the International Congress of Schizophrenia Research Young Investigator Award, the NIH Director's Early Independence Award, the NARSAD Independent Investigator Award and the Klerman Prize for Exceptional Clinical Research. He currently serves as the Director of the Division of Neurocognition, Neurocomputation, and Neurogenetics (N3) at Yale School of Medicine.

    His group's research focus is centered on computational and cognitive neuroscience of mental illness. Specifically, Dr. Anticevic's group is interested in characterizing neural mechanisms involved in higher order cognitive operations, such as working memory, as well as their interaction with neural systems involved in affective processes, with the aim of understanding how these computations may go awry in the context of severe mental illness . Methodologically, his group uses the combination of task-based, resting-state, pharmacological multi-modal neuroimaging, as well as computational modeling approaches to map neural alterations that lead to poor mental health outcomes. The overarching goal of the group is to develop neurobiologically principled and computationally grounded mapping between neural and behavioral levels of analyses in people to inform personalized and rational treatment design for mental health symptoms.

  • Bachaar Arnaout

    Assistant Professor

    Bachaar Arnaout, MD, is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine, and serves as Director of the Detoxification and Addiction Stabilization Service and Medical Director of the Psychosocial Residential Rehabilitation Treatment Program at VA Connecticut Healthcare System. After graduating from the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Poland, Dr. Arnaout trained in psychiatry at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York, where he also completed the Intensive Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Program at the William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis & Psychology. He then trained in addiction psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine, where he subsequently joined as clinical faculty in 2008 and as full-time faculty in 2016. Dr. Arnaout holds board certification in psychiatry, addiction psychiatry, addiction medicine, hospice and palliative medicine, and brain injury medicine. Dr. Arnaout’s academic interests include the psychotherapy and psychopharmacology of addiction and co-occurring disorders, and medical education. He has co-edited two books on addiction psychotherapy that draw on the theoretical framework of motivational interviewing: Handbook of Motivation and Change: A Practical Guide for Clinicians (2010) and Motivational Interviewing in Clinical Practice (2017). Dr. Arnaout was a 2017-2018 Yale Public Voices Fellow with The OpEd Project. He serves as editor-in-chief of the Carlat Addiction Treatment Report.






  • Amy Arnsten

    Albert E. Kent Professor of Neuroscience and Professor of Psychology; Member, Kavli Institute of Neuroscience at Yale University

    Research Interests
    Aging; Alzheimer Disease; Behavioral Sciences; Psychology, Child; Mental Health; Neurobiology; Neurosciences; Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic; Prefrontal Cortex; Cognitive Science

    Dr. Arnsten was raised in Maplewood, N.J. where she attended Columbia High School. She received her B.A. in Neuroscience from Brown University in 1976, and her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from UCSD in 1981. She did post-doctoral research with Dr. Susan Iversen at Cambridge University in the UK, and with Dr. Patricia Goldman-Rakic at Yale. Dr. Arnsten's research examines the neural basis of higher cognition. Her work has revealed that the newly evolved cortical circuits that underlie higher cognition are uniquely regulated at the molecular level, conferring vulnerability in mental illness and age-related cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease. Arnsten's research has led to new treatments for cognitive disorders in humans, including the successful translation of guanfacine (IntunivTM) for the treatment of ADHD and related prefrontal cortical disorders.

  • Seth Axelrod

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Director of Dialectical Behavior Therapy Services, Yale-New Haven Psychiatric Hospital Intensive Outpatient Program; Director of Yale Instruction/Investigation/Intervention in Emotional Lability and Dysregulation (YIELD)

    Research Interests
    Behavior Therapy; Borderline Personality Disorder; Burnout, Professional; Psychiatry; Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic; Substance Abuse Detection; Mindfulness
    Clinical Interests
    Behavior Therapy; Borderline Personality Disorder; Impulsive Behavior; Suicide; Self-Injurious Behavior; Behavior, Addictive

    I am very interested in training clinicians in personality disorders and dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). I am particularly interested in helping therapists observe personal limits to improve treatment alliance, therapy effectiveness, and therapist satisfaction, and to reduce therapist burnout. In addition to my work at Yale, I am a trainer/consultant with Behavioral Tech, LLC, an organization developed by Dr. Marsha Linehan to disseminate DBT and other empirically supported therapies. Each spring I co-chair a conference on Borderline Personality Disorder in partnership with the National Education Alliance for BPD and co-provided by the Yale School of Medicine, Yale-New Haven Psychiatric Hospital, and the Yale Stress Center.

  • Samuel Ball

    Professor of Psychiatry; Assistant Chair for Education and Career Development

    Research Interests
    Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms; Mental Disorders; Homeless Persons; Personality; Personality Disorders; Psychiatry; Psychotherapy; Substance Abuse Detection; Treatment Outcome; Psychiatry and Psychology
    Clinical Interests
    Alcohol Drinking; Mental Health; Psychiatry; Substance-Related Disorders

    I was born, raised, and continue to live in southern Connecticut. I received my bachelor's degree in Psychology and English from Colgate University in 1984 and then went to graduate school for Clinical Psychology at the University of Delaware where I received my master's in 1988 and doctorate in 1990. After completing my internship at Yale Medical School, I joined the faculty in the Department of Psychiatry as a Clinical Instructor and am now a Professor. In addition to my research, teaching, and faculty development responsibilities at Yale, I have held various clinical administrative leadership positions in The APT Foundation, one of the largest providers of substance abuse treatment in the state.

  • Andres Barkil-Oteo

    Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry

    Dr. Andres Barkil-Oteo is a Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine, and currently a psychiatrist consultant with Doctors Without Borders (MSF). Previously at Yale he was the Medical Director of Acute Care Services at Connecticut Mental Health Center in New Haven CT where he was involved in coordination and provision of mental health services to a large Iraqi refugee population in New Haven. Dr. Barkil-Oteo’s work focuses on using technology to increase capacity of non-specialists to deliver effective and high-quality mental health care in low-income settings. He is the co-founder of the Syrian Tele-mental Health Network, and the editor of an upcoming textbook from Oxford University Press on using telemental health in low-income settings.

  • Declan Barry

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Director of Pain Treatment Services, APT Foundation; Director of Research, APT Foundation

    Research Interests
    Culture; Opioid-Related Disorders; Psychotherapy; Substance-Related Disorders; Chronic Pain; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Dr. Barry is a clinical psychologist and Associate Professor in the Psychiatry Department and Child Study Center at Yale School of Medicine.  His  research is aimed at: 

    1. Developing and evaluating treatments for co-occurring opioid use disorder and chronic pain  and 
    2. Examining the role of sociocultural factors in the occurrence and treatment of pain and addiction. 

    Dr. Barry is the Associate Editor of the Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. He is also the  the Director of Pain Treatment Services at the APT Foundation, a multidisciplinary clinical research unit that focuses on the study of co-occurring chronic pain and opioid use disorder.

  • Assistant Professor of Psychology and of Psychiatry

    Dr. Arielle Baskin-Sommers is a licensed clinical psychologist. She received her Sc.B. from Brown University (2007), a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2013), and completed her pre-doctoral internship and fellowship at McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School. Substantively, her research is concentrated on understanding individual differences in cognitive and affective processes as they relate to vulnerability for disinhibitory psychopathology. Methodologically, she is interested in integrating a wide range of techniques and technologies to explore this issue. Overall, her professional career goals are based on a desire to develop both innovative theory and research in service of increasing the efficacy of clinical intervention.

  • Richard Belitsky

    Harold W. Jockers Associate Professor of Medical Education and Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Deputy Dean for Education

    Dr. Richard Belitsky, Harold W. Jockers Associate Professor of Medical Education and Associate Professor of Psychiatry, is noted for his work in medical education at both the undergraduate (medical student) and graduate (resident) levels.

    Named the School of Medicine’s deputy dean for education in 2006, Dr. Belitsky is concerned with curriculum development, particularly with respect to the methods and challenges involved in teaching medical students in the areas of patient-centered medical interviewing, the biopsychosocial model, social history and counseling patients for behavior change. He is also interested in the development of professional identity in medical education. In addition, he is interested in the delivery of mental health services in prisons and jails, with particular attention to suicide in correctional facilities.

    Belitsky holds a B.A. from the University of Florida, Gainesville, and an M.D. from the University of Florida School of Medicine. He came to Yale in 1979 as a resident in psychiatry and continued on as a fellow in forensic psychiatry and chief resident/instructor in the Department of Psychiatry. He joined the faculty as an assistant professor in 1983, when he also became unit chief of the Inpatient Services Division of the Connecticut Mental Health Center. He served as the director of the division 1988-1989. He was the medical director of the Yale Psychiatric Institute 1991-1997.

    At the School of Medicine, Belitsky has served as the residency program director in the Department of Psychiatry 1996-2006. He became the deputy chair for education in 2001, serving in that role until he was promoted to deputy dean for education. He has earned numerous professional honors at Yale, including the Stephen Fleck M.D. Faculty Award as Exemplary Physician and Teacher, the Charles W. Bohmfalk Teaching Prize and the Francis Gilman Blake Award (for the member of the faculty at the School of Medicine designated by the senior class as the most outstanding teacher of the medical sciences) in both 1998 and 2000.

  • Morris Bell

    Professor Emeritus and Senior Research Scientist in Psychiatry; VA RR&D Senior Research Career Scientist

    Research Interests
    Neuropsychology; Psychiatry; Schizophrenia; Veterans

    Dr. Morris Bell is Professor Emeritus and Senior Research Scientist in the Department of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine and Senior Research Career Scientist for the Dept. of Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service. Trained as a clinical and neuropsychologist, Dr. Bell’s career as clinician and researcher has been devoted to exploring interventions to restore cognitive and work function for people with severe and persistent mental disorders.  His work spans four decades and has had wide national and international influence.

    Dr. Bell’s research on work rehabilitation has revealed that cognitive impairment is a rate-limiting factor in improving work function. As a result, he has been at the forefront of developing cognitive remediation interventions. He has found that cognitive remediation can improve vocational outcomes in work therapy and supported employment. He is also a co-investigator on a study that combines cognitive enhancing medications with cognitive training for people with schizophrenia. His development and study of cognitive interventions has extended to other disorders including substance abuse, "chemo-brain", mild to moderate TBI and ADHD.

    Dr. Bell developed a Virtual Reality Job Interview Training program with funding from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) that has been designated by SAMSHA as an evidence-based practice for job interview training.  It is now commercially available and widely used in vocational rehabilitation programs for adolescents with special needs including Autism Spectrum Disorder and for adults with disabling psychiatric illnesses.  He was recently awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop methods for robot-assisted vocational training. 


    Dr. Bell has been an important contributor to studies of social cognition and is the co-developer of the Bell Lysaker Emotion Recognition Test (BLERT), which was recently recommended by NIMH for clinical trials involving social cognition. He has also developed the Social Attribution Test- Multiple Choice (SAT-MC) as a measure of theory of mind and the American version of the Hinting Task, a measure of Theory of Mind. He is currently a co-investigator on an NIMH funded study of the “Social Brain” that includes these instruments in a comparison of Adults with Schizophrenia, Autism and Healthy Controls.   Other measures developed by Dr. Bell include the Bell Object Relations Reality Testing Inventory (BORRTI) and the Bell Relationship Inventory for Adolescents (BRIA), both published by Western Psychological Services,  Her also co-developed the Work Behavior Inventory and the Vocational Cognitive Rating Scale for use in psychiatric rehabilitation.   

    Dr. Bell is currently developing a measure of embodied cognition that uses physical tasks to assess cognition in motion. Funded by NSF, this instrument will use motion capture technology to automatically score children as they perform balance, gait, attention, response inhibition, working memory and set-shifting tasks. These scores may more closely relate to daily functioning than current static neuropsychological assessment and more clearly represent cognitive development in children.

    Dr. Bell’s research activities are supported by grants from National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute of Drug Abuse, National Science Foundation, Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs. He also serves as chairman of his Institutional Review Board and consults to industry and other research groups internationally on interventions that may lead to functional improvement in schizophrenia and other disabling psychiatric illnesses. Dr. Bell was recently selected by the World Health Organization to serve on their schizophrenia expert panel for the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF).

    Dr. Bell directs the VA/Yale Learning Based Recovery Center. He also directs the Veterans Integration to Academic Leadership (VITAL) program which reaches out to Veterans on college campuses, providing psycho-education and mental health services, liaison to other Veteran Healthcare Administration services, and consultation and education for faculty about Veteran students.

    Dr. Bell serves as Chair of the VA Connecticut Healthcare System IRB. The American Psychological Association has recognized Dr. Bell with a national award for Distinguished Contributions to Science in Public Service.

  • Chyrell Bellamy

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Chyrell D. Bellamy, PhD, MSW is an Associate Professor of Yale School of Medicine’s Department of Psychiatry, Program for Recovery and Community Health (PRCH) and serves as the Director of Peer Services/ Research. Dr Bellamy is also the Acting Director of the Office of Recovery Community Affairs, appointed by the Commissioner of the Department of Mental Health and Addictions Services. She has experience as a frontline service provider, community educator and organizer, and as a community and academic researcher.

    Dr Bellamy’s expertise includes developing and conducting community-based interventions and research initiatives; and, involving and partnering with community, specifically with people living with mental illness, addictions, trauma, and HIV. Her research examines sociocultural experiences and pathways to recovery in prevention and treatment.

    Dr Bellamy and colleagues recently completed research funded by PCORI: “Increasing Healthcare Choices and Improving Health Outcomes among Persons with Serious Mental Illness”. She currently has a NIH NIMH R34 award: “Peer Wellness Enhancement for Patients with Serious Mental Illness and High Medical Costs”. She is also Co-PI with Dr Ayana Jordan of Yale Psychiatry, on the Imani Breakthrough: A Faith-based Response to the Opioid Crisis, a DMHAS funded State Opioids Response grant awarded by SAMHSA.

    In her capacity as Director of Peer Services and Research she provides instruction on peer curricula development and training based on her research and practice experience with peer employees since 1993 (beginning with women living with HIV); training of peers to conduct research; research and evaluation on the effectiveness of peer support; and leadership training for people with lived experiences, via the LET(s)LEAD: Lived Experience Transformation Leadership Academy.

    Dr Bellamy received her PhD in the Joint program in Social Work and Social Psychology from the University of Michigan and her MSW and BA from Rutgers University. She did a Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the Center for Mental Health and Criminal Justice Research at Rutgers University. 

  • Hilary Blumberg

    John and Hope Furth Professor of Psychiatric Neuroscience and Professor of Psychiatry, and in the Child Study Center and of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging; Director, Mood Disorders Research Program

    Research Interests
    Adolescent Psychiatry; Bipolar Disorder; Depression; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Psychiatry; Suicide; Mood Disorders; Diffusion Tensor Imaging; Neuropsychiatry

    Dr. Hilary Patricia Blumberg is the John and Hope Furth Professor of Psychiatric Neuroscience, Professor of Psychiatry, Radiology and Biomedical Imaging and in the Child Center, and Director of the Mood Disorders Research Program, at the Yale School of Medicine. She graduated summa cum laude in neuroscience from Harvard University and completed her medical degree, psychiatry training and specialty training in brain scanning research at Cornell University Medical College. Dr. Blumberg’s research is devoted to understanding the brain circuitry differences that underlie mood disorders across the lifespan, with a focus on bipolar disorder. She directs the Mood Disorders Research Program at Yale that brings together a multi-disciplinary group of scientists to study the genetic, developmental and environmental factors that cause mood disorders to develop new methods for early detection, more effective interventions, and prevention of the disorders and their associated high risk for suicide. This research includes the use of new state-of-the-art brain scanning methods. The program is also known for training young scientists to be new leaders in the field. Dr. Blumberg has served as principal investigator on awards from the National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Department of Veterans Affairs, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, International Bipolar Disorder Foundation, For the Love of Travis Foundation, MQ Foundation, Stanley Medical Research Institute and Women’s Health Research at Yale. She has received numerous awards including the 2017 Brain and Behavior Foundation Colvin Prize for Research Achievement in Mood Disorders and the 2018 American Psychiatric Association Blanche F. Ittleson Award for outstanding and published research in child and adolescent psychiatry. She is a fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and member of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology and Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  • Kathleen Carroll

    Albert E. Kent Professor of Psychiatry; Director of Psychosocial Research, Division of Addictions; Principal Investigator, Psychotherapy Development Center for Drug Abuse

    Research Interests
    Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms; Mental Disorders; Neurosciences; Psychiatry; Psychotherapy; Evidence-Based Medicine; Cognitive Science; Substance-Related Disorders; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Dr. Kathleen M. Carroll graduated summa cum laude from Duke University, received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology in 1988 from the University of Minnesota, and completed her pre-doctoral training at the Yale University School of Medicine’s Division of Substance Abuse, where she was promoted to Professor in 2002. She is Principal Investigator of the Center for Psychotherapy Development at Yale, NIDA’s only Center devoted to behavioral therapies research, and since 1999 she has been Principal Investigator of the New England Node of the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s Clinical Trials Network. Dr. Carroll is the author of over 300 peer-reviewed publications as well as numerous chapters and books.   Her research has focused on the development and evaluation of behavioral treatments and combinations of behavioral therapies and pharmacotherapies to improve treatment outcomes for individuals with opioid use disorders.  

  • Lara Chepenik

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Biological Psychiatry; Mood Disorders

    Dr. Chepenik is a psychiatrist in the Crisis Intervention Unit, a specialty unit of the Emergency Department for patients with psychiatric disorders. Active research interests include topics in administrative psychiatry: their design, administration and analysis of performance metrics. Previous work focused on cognitive neuroscience approaches to Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder including use of neuroimaging techniques to map areas of affective and cognitive dysregulation associated with these disorders.

  • Catherine Chiles

    Dr. Catherine Chiles is an Associate Professor/Clinical Educator at the Yale School of Medicine, and is a board-certified psychiatrist with added qualifications in Psychosomatic Medicine. She is Director of the Psychiatry Consultation-Liaison Service at the West Haven VA, a position she has held since 1995. She trains Yale medical students, residents and fellows in the art of psychiatric practice at the interface with other medical and surgical services. She is active in the education missions of the VA and the Yale School of Medicine where she serves on psychiatry curriculum review and YSM admission committees. Dr. Chiles has won national awards for education, including the Leah Lowenstein Award for Humane and Egalitarian Education twice. She has won the Yale Psychiatry Residents Association Teaching Award 4 times.

    Dr. Chiles is a Senior National Examiner of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, and is a Fellow of The American College of Psychiatrists and the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine, and Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association.

  • Research Associate

    Kari Cifarelli, MPH, is the Project Coordinator for the New Haven MOMS Partnership. Kari has worked in the clinical research field for the past 10 years focusing on women’s Mental Health. Kari currently works on supporting the research mission of the MOMS Partnership, and to provide the utmost of quality service to study staff and participants.

  • Christian M. Connell

    Associate Professor Adjunct; Co-Director, Division of Prevention and Community Research, Department of Psychiatry; Director, Child Development and Epidemiological Research, The Consultation Center

    Research Interests
    Adolescent Behavior; Child Abuse; Child Development; Child Psychiatry; Child Welfare; Evaluation Studies

    Christian M. Connell, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Co-director of the Division of Prevention and Community Research at Yale School of Medicine. He received his Ph.D. in clinical-community psychology from the University of South Carolina and completed predoctoral and postdoctoral training at The Consultation Center at Yale University, Department of Psychiatry. His research interests address contextual risk and protective processes that influence behavioral and other outcomes for child and adolescent populations exposed to trauma and adversity, with a particular focus on children and families involved with the child welfare and children's behavioral health systems. In addition to evaluation research examining influences on child safety, permanency, and wellbeing in these contexts, Dr. Connell conducts research and evaluation on community-based and family-focused interventions to improve family functioning and child wellbeing following incidents of child maltreatment or foster care placement. His research is supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, the Administration for Children and Families, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and by state and local sources. Dr. Connell has training and expertise in the use of advanced multivariate quantitative data analytic methods to examine risk and protective processes associated with behavioral outcomes for children and adolescents. He teaches a postdoctoral seminar on Data Analytic and Research Methods for Prevention and Community-based Research within the Division of Prevention and Community Research Postdoctoral Training Program in Substance Abuse Prevention.

  • Elizabeth Connors

    Assistant Professor

    Research Interests
    Community Mental Health Services; Education, Professional, Retraining; Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care); Psychology, Social; Schools; Health Care Quality, Access, and Evaluation

    Dr. Connors received her Ph.D. in Clinical Child and Community Psychology from the University of Maryland Baltimore County and is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry (Psychology) and in the Child Study Center, Yale School of Medicine. Her program of research focuses on improving the quality of mental health promotion, prevention and intervention services in critical access points for children, adolescents and their families such as schools and primary care settings. Dr. Connors is currently conducting research funded by the National Institute of Mental Health to select and test implementation strategies to increase the use of measurement-based care among school mental health clinicians based on participatory research methods and principles of implementation science. Dr. Connors is also an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine where she collaborates with the National Center for School Mental Health to advance research, practice, policy and training about comprehensive school mental health system quality and sustainability nationwide.

  • Joan Cook

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Geriatrics; Health Plan Implementation; Mental Health; Multiple Trauma; Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic; Information Dissemination

    Dr. Joan Cook is an Associate Professor in the Yale School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry. She has over 100 publications in the areas of traumatic stress, geriatric mental health and implementation science fields. Dr. Cook has worked clinically with a range of trauma survivors, including combat veterans and former prisoners of war, men and women who have been physically and sexually assaulted in childhood and adulthood, and survivors of the 2001 World Trade Center bombing. She has served as the principal investigator on four grants from the National Institute of Mental Health, as well as grants from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. She was a member of the American Psychological Association (APA) Guideline Development Panel for PTSD and the 2016 President of APA’s Division of Trauma Psychology.

  • Emily Cooney

    Assistant Professor

    Emily Cooney, PhD, is a clinical psychologist who has worked in the US, the UK, and New Zealand with children and adults in a range of inpatient and outpatient settings, with a particular focus on Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT). She is co-director of the DBT and DBT for Substance Use Disorder teams for Yale-New Haven Psychiatric Hospital’s Adult Intensive Outpatient Program.  Emily served as a research therapist on two trials of DBT under Dr Marsha Linehan at the University of Washington, and was the principal investigator on two DBT feasibility trials in New Zealand.  One compared DBT with treatment as usual for self-harming adolescents, and the other was a field trial of DBT skills training for men with anger-related problems.  She provides training in DBT via Behavioral Tech, the organization mandated by the treatment developer to support dissemination and implementation of DBT, and also provides DBT adherence coding for the Linehan Board of Certification.  Her research interests include treatment outcome evaluation, adaptations of dialectical behavior therapy, family processes in treatment, and factors affecting therapist burnout and resilience. 

  • Ned Cooney

    Associate Professor Adjunct, Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Alcoholism; Psychiatry; Smoking; Substance Abuse Detection; Clinical Trial
    Clinical Interests
    Alcoholism; Tobacco Use Disorder

    Ned L. Cooney, Ph.D., has been engaged in addiction research supported by NIH over the past 30 years. His studies have included clinical trials of behavioral interventions for addictive disorders and studies of the process of relapse after addiction treatment. His methodological expertise includes controlled clinical trials, laboratory studies of stress and cue reactivity, and real-time data capture methodology. His current research focus is on alcohol and tobacco interactions in the treatment of alcohol dependent smokers.
    Dr. Cooney is also director of the mental health and substance abuse programs at the Newington Campus of VA Connecticut Healthcare System. He provides patient care services and supervised clinical training in the substance abuse outpatient clinic and the primary mental health care clinic.

  • Philip Corlett

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Dr. Philip Robert Corlett trained in Experimental Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychiatry with Professors Trevor Robbins and Paul Fletcher at the University of Cambridge. He won a Wellcome Trust Prize Studentship and completed his PhD on the brain bases of delusion formation in the Brain Mapping Unit, Department of Psychiatry. After a short postdoc, he was awarded the University of Cambridge Parke- Davis Exchange Fellowship in Biomedical Sciences which brought him to the Yale University Department of Psychiatry to explore the maintenance of delusions with Professors Jane Taylor and John Krystal. He was named a Rising Star and Future Opinion Leader by Pharmaceutical Marketing Magazine and joined the Yale faculty in 2011 where he will continue to explore the cognitive and biological mechanisms of delusional beliefs as well as predictive learning, habit formation and addiction.

  • Kelly Cosgrove

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry, of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Alcoholism; Brain; Opioid-Related Disorders; Neurobiology; Nicotine; Radiology; Positron-Emission Tomography; Neuroimaging; alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor; Diseases; Chemicals and Drugs; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Dr. Cosgrove uses positron emission tomography (PET) to gain insights into the brains of people after they’ve stopped using alcohol and tobacco. Trained as a clinical psychologist who worked with individuals suffering from drug addiction, Dr. Cosgrove transitioned to conducting research in order to find more effective ways of helping patients recover from addiction and avoid relapse. Her laboratory develops and uses creative PET imaging paradigms to track changes in critical neurochemicals during the recovery from addiction.

  • Cindy Crusto

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Assistant Chair for Diversity, Department of Psychiatry; Director, Program Evaluation and Child Trauma Research at The Consultation Center

    Research Interests
    Family; Mental Health; Minority Groups; Social Conditions; Social Problems; Violence; Global Health; Domestic Violence; Cultural Diversity; Substance-Related Disorders; Risk Reduction Behavior; Psychiatry and Psychology; Anthropology, Education, Sociology and Social Phenomena

    Cindy A. Crusto, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry (Psychology Section), Yale University School of Medicine, is the Director of Program and Service System Evaluation at The Consultation Center. Dr. Crusto has more than 20 years of experience in developing, implementing, and evaluating preventive interventions in schools and community agencies. She also has extensive experience providing training and technical assistance to schools and to community-based organizations on the evaluation of prevention programs. She is interested in culturally relevant interventions for children from racial/ethnic minority and low-income backgrounds and in school-based behavioral health services. Dr. Crusto's research examines the impact of family violence on children and the ecological influences on child and family well-being, and includes rigorous evaluations of community-based initiatives involving substance use and violence prevention, and the promotion of school readiness.

    Dr. Crusto earned a B.A. in psychology from Vassar College, an M.A. in clinical-community psychology from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and a Ph.D. in clinical-community psychology from the University of South Carolina. She completed pre-doctoral and postdoctoral fellowships in clinical-community psychology at Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry.

  • Alecia Dager

    Assistant Professor

    Research Interests
    Adolescent Psychiatry; Alcohol Drinking; Alcoholism; Brain; Marijuana Abuse; Cognition; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Marijuana Smoking; Psychiatry; Adolescent Development; Neuroimaging; Functional Neuroimaging; Marijuana Use

    Dr. Dager completed her Ph.D. in experimental psychology at the University of California San Diego, focusing on the influence of heavy marijuana use on brain functioning during adolescent neurodevelopment. She joined the faculty at Yale in 2008, serving as the Administrative Director of the Center for the Translational Neuroscience of Alcoholism. She subsequently moved to the Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center, where she leads multimodal magnetic resonance imaging studies to characterize the neural precursors and consequences of substance involvement during adolescence and young adulthood.

  • Larry Davidson

    Professor of Psychiatry; Senior Policy Advisor, Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services; Director, Yale Program for Recovery and Community Health

    Research Interests
    Mental Disorders; Mental Processes; Psychological Phenomena; Psychological Theory; Substance-Related Disorders; Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders; Psychiatry and Psychology

    My research and consultation/training work focuses on processes of recovery from and in serious mental illnesses and addictions and the development and evaluation of innovative policies and programs to promote the recovery and community inclusion of individuals with these conditions. We utilize mixed qualitative and quantitative methods, and typically conduct our research in a participatory and inclusive fashion that involves people in recovery and other stakeholders in all aspects and phases of the research process.

  • Marie-Paule de Valdivia

    Assistant Clinical Professor of Social Work, Department of Psychiatry, Psychiatry; Founder, Director, DBT Therapist, Psychology Section

    Clinical Interests
    Borderline Personality Disorder; Family Therapy; Expressed Emotion; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Marie-Paule de Valdivia worked in marketing for two decades before experiencing mental health challenges within her family. After learning about borderline personality disorder, she joined the board of National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder, where over the last decade she helped grow the Family Connections (TM) program from serving a couple hundred families yearly to supporting over 3,000 families in over 20 countries.

    An avid advocate for family support, she taught Family Connections, a peer led class, as a volunteer for three years before embarking on an MSW program. As part of this course of studies, she trained in the Dialectical Behavior Therapy-Substance Use Disorder section of the Adult Intensive Outpatient Program of Yale-New Haven Psychiatric Hospital, under Seth Axelrod, Ph.D., program director, and Emily Cooney, Ph.D. After graduation, she worked with adolescents in residential placement and their families and embarked in formal intensive DBT training. She then rejoined Yale-New Haven Psychiatric Hospital, working first with adults, then with adolescents and their families, and finally co-directing the adult DBT and DBT SUD programs at an intensive outpatient level of care.

    Looking to reduce stigma, Marie-Paule speaks frequently about the need for family support and continues to volunteer her time teaching the Family Connections program. From a professional perspective, she has been invited to address the importance of family involvement in DBT treatment both nationally and internationally. She has co-directed the Annual Yale-NEA.BPD conference since 2017.

    An intensively trained DBT therapist, Marie-Paule is the founder and director of Families On The Line, a private group practice aimed at working with patients and coaching their family members in DBT based family skills.

  • Suzanne Decker

    Assistant Professor

    Research Interests
    Mental Disorders; Emotions; Psychotherapy; Suicide

    Dr. Decker is a licensed clinical psychologist at VA Connecticut Healthcare System and New England Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center (MIRECC) and Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine. She specializes in skills-based, behavioral, and cognitive-behavioral treatment approaches, including Dialectical Behavior Therapy and its adaptations. She works with Veterans with substance use disorder and co-occurring mental health disorder. Her research interests include behavioral treatment adaptation and implementation, including the use of Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Groups; suicidal ideation, substance use, and co-occurring mental health disorders; and the roles of emotions and emotion dysregulation in substance use, suicidal ideation, and mental health problems. Dr. Decker is the Director of Training (Psychology) for the Advanced Fellowship in Mental Illness Research and Treatment located at VA Connecticut Healthcare System and affiliated with VISN 1 MIRECC and National Center for PTSD.

  • Jason DeViva

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Jason DeViva is a clinical psychologist who currently works with the VA Connecticut Health Care System as part of the posttraumatic stress disorder and anxiety disorders treatment program. He is the military sexual trauma coordinator for VA Connecticut and the VA military sexual trauma point of contact for the New England region. He is a regional trainer and national consultant for the VA's disseminations of cognitive processing therapy for PTSD and cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia. He has worked in the VA system for the past 13 years, treating veterans of all eras with posttraumatic stress disorder and anxiety disorders. He has published numerous papers on sleep in individuals with PTSD and on factors related to engagement with and completion of evidence-based psychotherapy for PTSD. He is co-author of an award-winning book for family and loved ones of individuals with posttraumatic stress.

  • Esperanza Diaz

    Professor of Psychiatry; Medical Director Hispanic Clinic and Latino Behavioral Health System; Associate Director Psychiatry Residency Program

    Research Interests
    Affective Disorders, Psychotic; Depressive Disorder; Hispanic Americans; Psychiatry; Schizophrenia; Teaching; Global Health; Cultural Diversity; Mood Disorders; Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders
    Clinical Interests
    Psychiatry and Psychology

    Esperanza Díaz M.D. provides teaching and supervision for Yale medical students, psychiatry residents, and trainees from other disciplines such as psychology, nursing and social work. Dr. Diaz received her M.D. degree from the Javeriana University in Bogotá, Colombia. She finished Psychiatry residency at Yale University School of Medicine. She is a board Certified Psychiatrist and Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. She is a psychoanalyst. Her research concentrates on adherence to medications, development of culturally sensitive mental health services to Hispanics with persistent mental disorders, development of teaching methods of cultural sensitive care. She has received research awards from the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD) and from National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Dr. Diaz’s professional interests are focused on improving mental health services to Hispanics and education focusing on interviewing, cultural sensitive services and mental health disparities. She is a member of the American Society of Hispanic Psychiatry. She is a leadership member of the APA Hispanic Caucus. She is the recipient of the 2012 inaugural American Psychiatric Association Assembly Member in Training Mentor Award, and the Irma Bland Award for Excellence in Teaching Residents. She served on the SAMHSA Advisory Committee for Women Services. She serves on NIMH and NIH scientific reviews. She is reviewer for numerous scientific journals.

  • Charles Dike

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Associate Program Director, Law and Psychiatry Fellowship Program; Medical Director, Commissioner's Office, Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services

    Charles C Dike completed medical school at Obafemi Awolowo University (Formerly University of Ife), Ile-Ife, Nigeria, and psychiatric residency at All Birmingham Hospitals Psychiatric Training Scheme (associated with the University of Birmingham), Birmingham, England. After additional psychiatric residency training at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Dr. Dike completed a fellowship training in Law and Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medical.

    Dr. Dike obtained a Diploma in Clinical Psychiatry (DCP) from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ireland, and was awarded a membership of the Royal College of Psychiatrists of England in 1998. He obtained a Masters in Public Health (MPH) from the University of Illinois at Chicago in 2004.

    A past president of Connecticut Psychiatric Society, Dr. Dike is a Distinguished Fellow of American Psychiatric Association (DFAPA), Fellow of the Royal College of Psychiatrists of England (FRCPsych), and Fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives (FACHE). He is Vice Chair of the Ethics Committee of the APA, Vice President of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (AAPL), past Editor of the Newsletter of AAPL, and former Chair of the Ethics Committee of AAPL.

    Dr. Dike is also Medical Director, Office of the Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services.

  • George Dragoi

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Behavior, Animal; Cognition; Electrophysiology; Hippocampus; Learning; Neuronal Plasticity; Spatial Behavior; Spatial Memory; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Dr. George Dragoi is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience in the Department of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, CT. He holds M.D. degree from the Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Iasi, Romania and Ph.D. degree in Behavioral and Neural Science from Rutgers University where he worked in the laboratory of Dr. Gyorgy Buzsaki. He completed his postdoctoral studies at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the laboratory of Dr. Susumu Tonegawa. Dr. Dragoi studies the neurophysiological basis of the organization of hippocampal neurons into cellular assemblies and their dynamic grouping during novel spatial exploration and in response to long-term synaptic plasticity. Recently, he revealed the existence of preconfigured cellular assemblies that pre-play in time the spatial sequences occurring during a future novel spatial experience in naive animals. Dr. Dragoi’ current research focuses on the role of neuronal activity and prior experience in cellular assembly organization and animal learning with implications for our better understanding of neuropsychiatric diseases.

  • Deepak Dsouza

    Professor of Psychiatry; Director Schizophrenia Neuropharmacology Research Group at Yale (SNRGY); Director, Neurobiological Studies Unit, VACHS; Director, VA-CMHC Schizophrenia Research Clinic

    Research Interests
    Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms; Mental Disorders; Behavioral Disciplines and Activities; Psychological Phenomena; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Deepak Cyril D’Souza, MD is a staff psychiatrist at VA Connecticut Healthcare System (VACHS) and Professor of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine. He is an active clinician, teacher and researcher, who has spent almost 25 years within VACHS.

    As an active clinician and clinical administrator, he directs the Neuropsychiatry Program at VACHS, the clinical service that cares for veterans with psychotic, mood and personality disorders.

    He is actively involved in teaching residents, fellows and other trainees, and directs the VA Schizophrenia Research Fellowship program. He also mentors a number of junior faculty.

    He directs the Schizophrenia Neuropharmacology Research Group at Yale (SNRGY) and the Neurobiological Studies Unit. His research focus has been on the pathophysiology and treatment of psychotic disorders, and cannabis dependence using a combination of psychopharmacological, brain imaging and electrophysiological approaches. His research has been funded by the National Institute of Drug Abuse, the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, VA R&D and several foundations. He is recognized as a leading expert in the relationship between cannabinoids and psychosis.

  • Ronald Duman

    Elizabeth Mears and House Jameson Professor of Psychiatry and Professor of Neuroscience; Director, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities

    Research Interests
    Antidepressive Agents; Depression; Molecular Biology; Neurobiology; Psychiatry; Stress, Psychological; Signal Transduction; Gene Expression

    Dr. Duman received his doctorate degree from the University

    of Texas in Houston and conducted postgraduate work at Yale University before

    joining the faculty there. He has written and/or co-authored over 300 original

    papers, reviews and book chapters, and has presented over 250 invited lectures.

    Dr. Duman is also on the editorial board of several prestigious journals and

    serves as a consultant for a number of biotech and pharmaceutical companies.

    Dr. Duman has received several awards for his work, including the Anna-Monika Prize, Nola Maddox Falcone Prize, Janssen Prize, NIMH MERIT Award, and a NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Award

    Studies from Dr. Duman’s laboratory have contributed to characterization of the molecular and cellular actions of stress, depression, and antidepressant treatments, providing the basis for a neurotrophic and synaptic hypothesis of depression. He has also studied the role of the innate immune system in the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. These findings represent major advances in our understanding of the effects of antidepressants and provide a framework for the development of novel therapeutic agents.

  • Ellen Edens

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Associate Fellowship Director, Addiction Psychiatry

    Dr. Edens is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine. In 2002, Dr. Edens received her MD from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and subsequently completed residency training in psychiatry at Washington University in St. Louis. In 2009, she completed advanced training in Addiction Psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine followed by a VA-funded addiction psychiatry clinical/research fellowship. She joined the faculty in 2011.

    Dr. Edens is also the Associate Director of the Addiction Psychiatry Residency at Yale, an ACGME-accredited program, where she oversees the program’s didactic curriculum and clinical supervision and serves as co-director of the VA Interprofessional Advanced Fellowship in Addiction Treatment.

    Her clinical and research interests dovetail in the areas of co-occurring addiction and chronic pain and expansion of access to evidence-based treatments for addiction, particularly opioid and alcohol use disorders. She is the clinical co-director of the VA Opioid Reassessment Clinic, a clinic designed to assess the safety, efficacy, and misuse of opioids by Veterans treated with prescription opioids for chronic pain.  Additionally, she is actively working on developing and disseminating interprofessional educational material on the topic of addiction screening, diagnosis, and initiation of treatment.

  • Laurie Edwards

    Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Psychiatry and Psychology
    Clinical Interests
    Chemicals and Drugs; Psychiatry and Psychology; Phenomena and Processes; Anthropology, Education, Sociology and Social Phenomena; Health Care

    As both a licensed clinical psychologist and a yoga teacher, I use a variety of approaches to offer support through struggles with anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, addiction, depression, perfectionism, workaholism, burnout, stage of life issues, and stress related chronic health problems.  For more information, please visit:

    https://www.lauriemedwardspsyd.com/

  • John Encandela

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Associate Director for Curriculum and Educator Assessment, Teaching & Learning Center (SOM)

    My contributions to education and research have focused on the organization and delivery of: (1) health-related services for vulnerable populations, and, (2) physician/health-professional training. After having done work in national and international evaluation of HIV/AIDS-related programs and mental health service research, a more recent component of my career has involved the application of my skills in medical education. In this area, most of my work has focused on working with medical education faculty in assessing trainees and training programs.

    At the Yale School of Medicine, I focus on evaluation of the medical education curriculum and its component parts; training faculty, house staff, and students in giving and receiving feedback as part of teaching and learning; improving systems for assessing educators towards enhancement of teaching and faculty success; and consulting to faculty and trainees in evaluation approaches that contribute to scholarly work. I am also involved in incorporating LGBTQI-health related topics into the medical school curriculum and serve on the Dean's Council for LGBTQI Affairs. For select graduate medical education programs including my home department of Psychiatry, I work towards gathering and analyzing qualitative data that contribute to internal review of training programs.

  • Irina Esterlis

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Molecular Imaging Program, NCPTSD, VA; Director, Mood, Anxiety, and Cognitive Sciences Division

    Research Interests
    Psychiatry; Radiology; Tobacco; Mood Disorders; Molecular Imaging; Chemicals and Drugs
    Clinical Interests
    Adult
  • Dwain Fehon

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Chief Psychologist, Psychiatric Services, Yale New Haven Hospital; Director, Behavioral Medicine Service

    Research Interests
    Alcoholism; Anxiety; Behavioral Medicine; Depression; Quality of Life; Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic; Resilience, Psychological; Diseases
    Clinical Interests
    Palliative Care

    Dr. Fehon is an Associate Professor within the Department of Psychiatry and a member of the Medical Staff at Yale New Haven Hospital. As Chief Psychologist for Psychiatric Services, Dr. Fehon oversees and coordinates the predoctoral psychology training program within Yale New Haven Hospital and Yale New Haven Psychiatric Hospital. Since completing his internship and postdoctoral training at Yale in 1993, Dr. Fehon has devoted his career to psychology training and the development of hospital-based programs for adolescents, families, and adults. He is the founding director of the Behavioral Medicine Service, a clinical service that provides integrated psychological services to chronically ill adults within the Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital, Tobacco Treatment Service, Yale New Haven Hospital Transplantation Center, Yale Sleep Center and Yale Spine Center. As a member of the Yale Cancer Center's palliative care services, Dr. Fehon provides integrated psychological care to aid coping, resilience and quality of life with patients living with advanced cancer.

    Dr. Fehon’s current academic interests relate to understanding psychological, behavioral, and neuropsychiatric comorbidities among patients facing serious, chronic, and life threatening illnesses. He is interested in the utilization of qualitative and qualitative research methods to understand the phenomenological aspects of living with serious illness, and he is interested the development of novel psychotherapies to reduce the risk of adverse stress-related symptoms such as drug and alcohol abuse, depression, anxiety and PTSD in vulnerable medically ill patient populations.

  • Thomas Fernandez

    Assistant Professor in the Child Study Center and of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Anxiety Disorders; Child Psychiatry; Genetics; Genetics, Behavioral; Tourette Syndrome; Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder; Psychiatry; Tic Disorders; Stereotypic Movement Disorder
    Clinical Interests
    Anxiety Disorders; Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity; Mental Disorders; Child Psychiatry; Genetics; Tourette Syndrome; Mental Health; Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder; Tic Disorders; Stereotypic Movement Disorder; Mood Disorders; Substance-Related Disorders

    Dr. Fernandez is a child psychiatrist and psychiatric geneticist who has an active clinical practice and research laboratory. Tom is a graduate of Princeton University and Yale School of Medicine, with additional research training at the National Institute of Mental Health in Bethesda, Maryland. He completed residency training in child, adolescent, and adult psychiatry in the Solnit Integrated Residency Program at Yale. As a faculty member in Yale Child Study Center and the Department of Psychiatry, Tom's research efforts include the following investigations into developmental neuropsychiatric disorders: (1) discovering genetic mutations in Tourette syndrome, motor stereotypies, obsessive-compulsive disorder, ADHD, and anxiety disorders using next generation DNA sequencing (whole genome and exome), and using these discoveries to identify treatment targets; (2) discovering epigenetic marker variation in these disorders; and (3) clinical trials of new behavioral and medication treatments. Tom has received research funding from the NIMH (K08, R01), Brain & Behavior Research Foundation (NARSAD), Simons Foundation, and Allison Family Foundation. Additionally, Tom works clinically as an attending in the Tourette/OCD/ADHD Clinic at Yale Child Study Center.

  • Sarah Fineberg

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry

    Dr. Fineberg holds an MD PhD from the University of Iowa, where she studied the molecular mechanisms that control early fate decisions for neural stem cells in mouse brain.  She initially became interested in science as an undergraduate student at Oberlin College in physiology classes, where mechanism came alive in narratives about the evolutionary and individual history of the organism. She came to Yale in 2010 to pursue clinical and research training in psychiatry.  Her current research engages  both stories and brain-based mechanisms of mental illness, asking questions about how patient social experiences relate to neural circuits and learning mechanisms.

    Dr. Fineberg has been awarded young investigator grants from the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation and the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention to pursue studies about social learning in Borderline Personality Disorder.

     

  • Elizabeth Flanagan

    Research Scientist

    Research Interests
    Mental Health Services; Personality Disorders; Public Policy; Social Isolation; Social Justice; Community Networks; Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders; Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders

    Reed College, BA, 1992
    Auburn University, MS, 1999, Clinical Psychology
    Auburn University, PhD, 2003, Clinical Psychology
    APA approved internship 2002-2003 Wisconsin Psychiatric Institute and Clinics
    F32 Post-doctoral Fellowship 2003-2006, Yale University

  • Ariadna Forray

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Psychiatry Director, Adult Sickle Cell Program; Co-Director, Center for Wellbeing of Women and Mothers

    Research Interests
    Behavior Therapy; Tobacco Use Disorder; Cognitive Therapy; Depression, Postpartum; Substance-Related Disorders; Postpartum Period; Motivational Interviewing
  • Dawn W Foster

    Lecturer in Psychiatry; Assistant Professor, Social & Behavioral Sciences, Yale School of Public Health

    A central theme of my research is the focus on social psychological principles related to etiology, prevention, and treatment of substance use among adolescents and young adults. My research objective is to better understand individual and contextual factors associated with risks for substance use so as to inform intervention and prevention efforts.

  • Helen Fox

    Dr Helen Fox began her doctoral career examining the cognitive neuropsychological profiles of ecstasy club drug users while at the University of East London under the supervision of Drs Andy Parrott and John Turner. She then came to Yale as a post doctoral fellow, where she worked with Dr Rajita Sinha establishing cognitive, neuroendocrine and biophysiological mechanisms underpinning drug craving and drug use in cocaine dependent and alcohol dependent individuals. She obtained a K-01 career development award in May 2010 to study the effects of alpha2 agonist, guanfacine HCl on cognitive processes and relapse in cocaine abusers, and an R01 award assessing the role of peripheral immune system cytokines in alcohol dependent individuals with and without depressive symptomatology. She is also conducting dexamethasone suppression/CRH stimulation challenge procedures on the same population of alcoholics, via an R03 award, to better delineate the discreet and converging stress system mechanisms associated with elevated craving. Following her faculty appointment, Dr Fox continues her work at the Yale Stress Center investigating pharmacotherapy interventions for cognition and immune system changes in addiction. She also continues her collaboration with the University of East London, examining stress and immune system markers in club drug users consuming novel psychoactive substances, including synthetic marijuana and synthetic cathinone derivatives.

  • Lisa Fucito

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Tobacco Treatment Service Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven

    Research Interests
    Alcoholism; Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders; Psychotherapy; Sleep; Sleep Wake Disorders; Tobacco; Smoking Cessation; Risk Reduction Behavior
    Clinical Interests
    Psychiatry; Sleep Wake Disorders; Smoking; Substance-Related Disorders

    I am an expert in the assessment and treatment of tobacco use and heavy alcohol use. I have experience conducting laboratory-based, clinical trials, mixed methods, and implementation and dissemination research. My research has identified important predictors of tobacco and alcohol use and treatment response. I am also developing and testing novel tobacco and alcohol interventions that are integrated with primary/specialty healthcare, promote multiple health behavior change, and incorporate technology with funding from NIH grants. I have held leadership roles for the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco and the Research Society on Alcoholism. I have presented at numerous national and international conferences and am widely cited for my research. In addition to my research activities, I direct the Tobacco Treatment Service at Smilow Cancer Hospital and teach/mentor medical students, residents, and fellows.

  • Brian Fuehrlein

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Psychiatric Emergency Room, VA Connecticut Healthcare System

    Dr. Fuehrlein graduated from the M.D. Ph.D. program at the University of Florida in 2008, adult psychiatry residency program the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in 2012 and addiction psychiatry fellowship from Yale University in 2013.  Dr. Fuehrlein then joined the faculty at the University of Florida where he was an Assistant Professor. He served as the director of an MS2 course on pain and addiction, the assistant MS3 psychiatry clerkship director, was on the medical school admissions committee and on the M.D. Ph.D. program executive committee. Dr. Fuehrlein then joined the Yale faculty as an Assistant Professor in 2014. He is currently the director of the psychiatric emergency room at the VA Connecticut. Dr. Fuehrlein has a strong interest in medical student and resident education, particularly surrounding addiction psychiatry.  He currently serves on the medical school admissions committee, residency recruitment committee and is the VA site representative for medical student education.  He serves nationally on the ABPN MOC test writing committee and the education committee for the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.  In 2017 he was awarded the Irma Bland award for excellency in psychiatry resident education through the APA.  In 2018 he was awarded the Clerkship Faculty Teaching Award for Outstanding Medical Student Educator and Role Model.  In 2016-2017 he was nominated for and completed the Yale Medical Education Fellowship and in 2018 was selected as an Education Scholar through the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry.

  • Kathleen Garrison

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Neurosciences; Smoking; Smoking Cessation; Stroke; Binge Drinking

    Kathleen Garrison is an Assistant Professor in Psychiatry. She received her BS in Neuroscience from the University of California, Los Angeles, a MSc in Neuroscience from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, a PhD in Neuroscience from the University of Southern California, and completed her postdoctoral training at Yale. Her background is in cognitive and clinical brain imaging. Her research is focused on substance abuse treatment including mindfulness-based therapies. Her work uses brain imaging methods to better understand and potentially change the cognitive processes related to addictions. Her work also tests smartphone app-based treatments for addictions.

  • Joel Gelernter

    Foundations Fund Professor of Psychiatry and Professor of Genetics and of Neuroscience; Director, Division of Human Genetics (Psychiatry)

    Research Interests
    Affective Disorders, Psychotic; Alcoholism; Anxiety Disorders; China; Genetics; Genetics, Population; Israel; Polymorphism, Genetic; Psychiatry; Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic; Thailand; Global Health; Substance-Related Disorders
  • David Glahn

    Professor Adjunct of Psychiatry; Professor of Psychology

    Research Interests
    Aging; Bipolar Disorder; Child Development; Depressive Disorder, Major; Genetics; Genetics, Behavioral; Neuropsychology; Schizophrenia; Neuroimaging; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Dr. David Glahn joined Yale’s Department of Psychiatry and the Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center in 2008. He received his doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Pennsylvania in 2000 and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of California at Los Angeles. From 2002 to 2008, Glahn was faculty at the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, where he created a psychiatric genetics and imaging research program.

    The primary aim of Glahn’s laboratory is to discover genes that predispose affective and psychotic disorders like major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. To achieve this aim, he develops and applies neuroanatomic, functional neuroimaging, and neurocognitive endophenotypes in large-scale family-based studies. Glahn co-direct the Neurocognition, Neurocomputation and Neurogenetics (n3) Division of the Department of Psychiatry at Yale University Medical School, and the Affective Disorders and Psychosis (ADAPTING) laboratory at the Olin Neuropsychiatric Research Center. In this capacity, he supervises an 11-strong research team comprised of junior faculty, postdoctoral fellows and research assistants. Glahn collaborates with investigators locally at Yale/Olin, nationally and internationally in connection to neuroimaging, neurocognition and genomic research.

  • Linda Godleski

    Professor of Psychiatry

    Dr. Linda Godleski, MD, was a Berkeleyite, Yale Class of ’78, in the Kingman Brewster days when Yale first accepted female undergraduates. Following graduation, her career led her to interesting and exotic places, but Yale ultimately lured her back. Thinking she could leave the Northeast for warmer, more gentile environments, she completed medical school and psychiatry residency at the University of Virginia. She remained on as faculty at UVA and as Director of the University of Virginia's Psychiatric Research Unit at Staunton's Western State Hospital. Leaving academia, she began a solo private practice in psychiatry in Florida, but returned to her work with chronic mental illness when offered a position as Associate Professor at the University of Hawaii. While in Hawaii, she enjoyed opportunities as visiting faculty throughout Micronesia, in Palau and Pohnpei.

    Virtually nothing could lure her away from this idyllic setting….except being offered a position at Yale as Associate Professor of Psychiatry, and more importantly, a Berkeley fellow appointment! Though family reasons forced her to leave again shortly afterwards, she ultimately returned to her Yale appointment and now works at the VA Connecticut Healthcare Center as the Associate Chief of Staff for Education for the Yale academic affiliation there. Dr. Godleski is also the VHA National Lead for Telemental Health, and promotes implementation of technological opportunities to deliver mental health care to remote areas. She has published widely, and presented at many national and international conferences, including expert testimony before Congress. She welcomes the opportunity to talk with any students about life at Yale, psychiatry, or career choices
  • Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Co-Director, Medical Student Clerkship, Biopsychosocial Approach to Health-Psychiatry, Psychiatry

    Matthew Goldenberg, M.D., M.Sc., is a psychiatrist who has been on the faculty at Yale and the staff of Yale-New Haven Hospital since 2013. He serves as an attending psychiatrist in the YNHH emergency department's Crisis Intervention Unit. He is active in medical student education at Yale, serving as a member of the steering committee for the inegrated Primary Care and Psychiatry Clerkship and a regular lecturer, seminar leader and tutor to medical and physician associate students.

    Prior to arriving at Yale, he was a faculty member at Uniformed Services University (USUHS) and Dartmouth Medical School, and served as the director of the medical student psychiatry clerkship directors at both institutions. He also directed the psychiatric emergency and consultation/liaison services at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. He also earned a MSc in Global Mental Health from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine/King's College London in 2013.

    A native of Birmingham, Alabama, Dr. Goldenberg graduated from Yale College in 1999 with a degree in history and received the Potter and Clement prizes for his senior thesis, Touchdown, Brown: Race, Football and the Desegregation of Birmingham Schools, 1954-1980. He received his medical degree from Yale in 2003 and then completed residency training in general psychiatry at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill where he also served as chief resident.

    Dr. Goldenberg’s professional interests include medical student and resident education, emergency psychiatry, physician political behavior/advocacy, race in medicine, health promotion, as well as international and refugee mental health. He received a certificate in Global Mental Health from the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma in 2009. He is a member of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) and the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry (ADMSEP).

    He is the author of A is for Artisanal: An Alphabet Book for the Hip, Modern Baby, published in 2013.

  • Derrick Gordon

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Research, Policy and Program on Male Development, The Consultation Center

    Research Interests
    Men; Parents; Primary Prevention; Prisoners; Students; Vulnerable Populations; Secondary Prevention
    Clinical Interests
    Family Relations; Mental Health; Men's Health

    Derrick Gordon, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry (Psychology Section) at Yale University School of Medicine, is the Director of the Program on Male Development in the Division of Prevention and Community Research of the Department of Psychiatry, and is a Core scientist in the Community Research Core of the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS (CIRA). Dr. Gordon has considerable experience in intervention and prevention development having served as an investigator on several federal, NIH, and state funded projects and studies focused on those factors that either support or undermine men transitioning from prison back to the community; the engagement of low-income, non-custodial fathers; the identification and service of adolescent fathers committed to child protection services; and men mandated to batterer intervention groups in the community. He is currently a co-investigator and a minority supplement recipient on an NIH funded project that examines the STI risk of heterosexual young men to their pregnant female partners. As part of his supplement, Dr. Gordon is interested in understanding how the young men use preventive health care services and the factors that either facilitate or inhibit their access. Dr. Gordon’s work with men has and continues to focus on increasing the health of men and their positive involvement in family and community life. In his mentorship role, pre- and post doctoral fellows get to explore with Dr. Gordon how issues like adolescent fatherhood, low income fatherhood status, transitioning from prison to the community, and men’s access and use of health care services impact their efforts to be healthy community members. Overall Dr. Gordon in his research seeks to identify those factors that enhance the access and use of preventive and indicated health care services by men on the “fringes.”

  • Carlos Grilo

    Professor of Psychiatry and of Psychology; Director, Program for Obesity Weight and Eating Research (POWER)

    Dr. Grilo is an internationally-recognized expert on eating disorders, obesity, and manifestations of disordered eating. His secondary clinical-research interests include psychopathology, personality disorders, addictions, and the sociocultural contexts of functioning. Dr. Grilo’s current work focuses on performing controlled treatment studies testing behavioral, cognitive-behavioral, guided-self-help scalable treatments, and pharmacotherapy interventions for eating/weight disorders in diverse patient groups/settings, including bariatric surgery. Dr. Grilo’s current RCTs include adaptive “SMART” stepped-care designs. His current collaborative work is interdisciplinary, integrating laboratory and neurobiological methods, extending across diverse settings and patient groups, and includes epidemiological and longitudinal outcome studies, with an increasing emphasis on health disparities and stigma.

    Dr. Grilo has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for 25 years and has served as Principal Investigator on 17 NIH grants. Dr. Grilo received two K24 Mid-Career Investigator Awards in Eating/Weight Disorders from the NIH/NIDDK, which reflect his longstanding commitment to training and mentoring and in collaborative clinical-research activities.  Dr. Grilo’s involvement with the psychology training program dates back to 1993-2000, when he coordinated the pre-doctoral internship and postdoctoral training programs at the Yale Psychiatric Institute while serving as Director of Psychology.

    Dr. Grilo currently serves on the editorial boards of 10 professional journals, including the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology and the American Psychologist. Dr. Grilo has published over 440 peer-reviewed journal articles (“h” index of 77 with over 21,000 citations), 25 chapters, and two books on eating and weight disorders.

    In his capacity as Director of POWER, Dr. Grilo provides leadership of this entirely grant-funded clinical-research and training program focused on eating/weight disorders. POWER provides research training to students/trainees (undergraduate, graduate, pre-doctoral, post-doctoral, and junior faculty levels) with interests in academic careers; the primary focus is on post-doctoral training.

  • Swapnil Gupta

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Psychopharmacology; Psychoses, Substance-Induced; Schizophrenia

    I received most of my foundational training in medicine and psychiatry in Pondicherry and Chandigarh in India. and completed a second residency and a psychopharmacology fellowship at SUNY Downstate and Yale. My interest in deprescribing comes from a critical clinical need for such an intervention in psychiatry, my experience of having worked in settings with limited access to medications and my strong inclination toward rational and parsimonious use of medications. I teach clinical interviewing and psychopharmacology to medical students and psychiatry residents. I also work as outpatient attending psychiatrist at the Connecticut Mental Health Center.

  • Ilan Harpaz-Rotem

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Afghanistan; Iraq; Mental Health Services; Psychiatry; Psychotherapy; Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic; Veterans

    Dr. Harpaz-Rotem is an Associate Professor at Yale Department of Psychiatry. He is a clinical psychologist who, for many years, has conducted research and provided treatment to individuals exposed to trauma. Dr. Harpaz-Rotem serves as an investigator at the National Center for PTSD, and he also directs the evaluation of VA PTSD treatment programs at the Department of Veterans Affairs, Northeast Program Evaluation Center, and the VA Central Office. Research into how to modify traumatic memories and their associated emotions is one of the core questions that guide his work.

  • Keith Hawkins

    Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Neuropsychological Assessment Service, Connecticut Mental Health Center, Psychiatry

    Prior to coming to the US for advanced training Professor Hawkins worked as a sailing journalist, college counselor, and psychology tutor and lecturer in colleges and universities in New Zealand and Australia.  He is the Director of the Neuropsychological and Psychological Assessment Service of the Connecticut Mental Health Center, where he has trained an estimated 70 pre and postdoctoral fellows, several now full professors.  Dr. Hawkins has additionally supervised T32 postdoctoral fellows and mentored faculty with NIH career development awards.  During his career Dr. Hawkins has consulted to the Yale New Haven Hospital (YNHH) Adler Geriatric Clinic, and to the Memory Disorders Clinic of the Institute of Living/Hartford Hospital, on early dementia detection and differential diagnosis, and has held numerous training and consulting contracts with external hospitals.  He assesses practitioners for the YNHH Late Career Program, with over 190 evaluations to date, and consults to YNHH medical leadership and credentialing officials on cognitive competence.

    Dr.  Hawkins has held editorial board appointments for several neuropsychological, neuropsychiatric, and neurology journals, and consulted weekly to the Olin Neuropsychiatric Research Center (ONRC) in Hartford (ongoing), and the Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders (IND) for approximately a decade.  He is an author on 85 papers (index = 34, total citations 5,000+).  Among other scholarly engagements, Dr. Hawkins has studied cognitive aging in 350 older African Americans, many within their own homes, community centers, and churches. He has collaborated with Dr. Chris van Dyck in a study of executive functioning in the elderly, and within the P50 AD Research Center at Yale.  During his consultation to IND he participated in amyloid imaging and immunotherapy trials, and oversaw the neuropsychological components of several Parkinson’s Disease studies.  He has been Yale subcontract Principal Investigator for the Hartford Healthcare Corporation funded study, “Midlife vascular risk factors and the development of cognitive impairment, cerebrovascular disease and preclinical dementia”, and has designed and overseen the neuropsychological component of numerous large-scale studies.  This includes selecting tests, finalizing the neuropsychological manual, and conducting training for the 22 site international study of early stage Parkinson’s disease (the $60 million Parkinson Progression Markers Initiative, PPMI).  At the ONRC he has collaborated with Drs. Godfrey Pearlson and Michael Stevens in studies of psychosis, the neural underpinnings of developing executive capacities in adolescence, the effects of alcohol on the late adolescent brain, and, currently, the effects of marijuana on driving.  Earlier he was a collaborator with Drs. Scott Woods and Thomas McGlashan of Yale, and faculty across USA and Canada, in studies of the schizophrenia prodrome, including the first ever double-blind treatment trial.  He collaborated with the late Dr. Ralph Hoffman and Dr. William Sledge in studies of the linguistic characteristics of disordered speech, and, with Dr. Hoffman, the efficacy of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a treatment for refractory hallucinations.  Other recent activities include collaborations with Dr. Hochang Lee in studies of cardiac surgery patients.  Throughout his career Dr. Hawkins has researched the psychometric properties and inference validity of neuropsychological tests, including analyses of the clinical utility of the radical six-factor revision of the widely used Wechsler intellectual and memory batteries.  In concert with the eminent neuropsychologists who implemented this new direction in intelligence and memory testing, Dr. Hawkins presented at national and international conferences on clinical interpretation.

  • George Heninger

    Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry; Senior Research Scientist/Scho

    After a career in neuropsychopharmacology, I am now using an internet site to educate medical students on the biological basis of behavior and its applications to medicine. This will give students an up to date modern view of brain mechanisms and treatment interventions that are relevant to clinical practice.

  • Eric D.A. Hermes

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Mental Health; Psychiatry; Internet; Veterans Health

    Dr. Hermes is focused on improving the access to and quality of mental health services. His research, pedagogy, and clinical work is at the nexus of cutting-edge technology-driven care, the integration of mental health services in primary care, and quality improvement for psychopharmacologic prescribing. Dr. Hermes received his medical degree from the University of South Florida College of Medicine in 2000, and was an active-duty flight surgeon in the U.S. Air Force for seven years.  He went on to complete a residency in psychiatry at Yale University and research fellowships supported by the National Institute of Mental Health and the Veterans Health Administration (VA). Dr. Hermes’ research is currently focused on the developing and testing strategies for implementing digital therapeutic interventions (e.g. behavioral intervention technology, internet-based interventions, mhealth) in healthcare systems as a way to increase access and improve the quality of mental health services. His past work has focused on assessing how providers use pharmacologic agents, such as second-generation antipsychotics and sedative-hypnotics in real-world clinical practice, especially in contexts where use may be complicated by side-effects, such as obesity, or driven by clinical problems such as insomnia. In Dr. Hermes’ educational and clinical work, he trains psychiatry residents using telepsychiatry in integrated mental health in primary care settings. His work is supported by a VA Health Services Research and Development Career Development Award and the VA Connecticut Healthcare System. He is affiliated with the VA VISN 1 Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC); Pain Research, Informatics, Multi-morbidities, and Education (PRIME) Center, and the VA Northeast Program Evaluation Center (NEPEC). 

  • Assistant Professor; Medical Director, APT Foundation; Chief Psychiatrist, Yale Stress Center; Addiction Psychiatry Fellowship Coordinator, APT Foundation

    Gretchen Hermes completed her MD/PhD on pre-clinical stress-diathesis models of social neglect at the University of Chicago with Martha K. McClintock, a pioneer in the field of social neuroscience. These models of psychopathology (schizophrenia, depression) laid the foundation for her current research on molecular mechanisms that protect against the pathophysiological changes underlying abnormal brain development. This work in collaboration with the Section of Comparative Medicine and the Yale Depression Research Program focuses on the role of mitochondrial proteins in facilitating synaptic plasticity and neurotransmission, representing a potential paradigm shift toward a role for energy and biogenesis in mental illness.

    Dr. Hermes is also an attending psychiatrist at the APT Foundation, a cornerstone treatment facility for Opioid Use Disorder in New Haven where she provides targeted pharmacotherapy for the full spectrum of co-morbid DSM disorders. In addition, Dr. Hermes is on the faculty of the Yale Addiction Fellowship where she teaches and supervises fellows in the Addiction Psychiatry Residency Program.

    Dr. Hermes is a co-investigator at the Yale Stress Center, an interdisciplinary behavioral health facility, dedicated to applying evidence-informed practice to reduce the risk of stress-related physical and mental illnesses. The Stress Center conducts research on the science of stress, linking brain mechanisms of stress to disease, and on related interventions.

  • Rani Hoff

    Professor of Psychiatry; Associate Director, National Clinician Scholar Program; Director, Northeast Program Evaluation Center; Director, Evaluation Division, National Center for PTSD

    Research Interests
    Homeless Persons; Disruptive, Impulse Control, and Conduct Disorders; Prisoners; Veterans; Women; Mood Disorders; Substance-Related Disorders; Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders; Vulnerable Populations

    Rani Hoff, received both her MPH in chronic disease epidemiology, and her PhD in mental health services research and psychiatric epidemiology, from Yale University. Dr. Hoff serves as Director of the Northeast Program Evaluation Center (NEPEC), which performs national program evaluation of mental health services within the Office of Mental Health Operations in VA Central Office; the Director of the Evaluation Division of the National Center for PTSD; the head of the Women and Trauma Core of Women's Health at Yale; and Associate Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program at Yale.

    Dr. Hoff’s research utilizes principles of psychiatric epidemiology and services research to examine risk factors and correlates of psychiatric disorders, with particular attention paid to co-occurring disorders and vulnerable populations. This research has included studies on pathological gambling, schizophrenia, substance abuse/dependence, the risk of suicide in psychiatric patients, trauma and comorbidity, criminal justice mental health, and the mental health problems experienced by the homeless and by returning Veterans from the Middle East. At the national level, Dr. Hoff regularly advises senior management within the VA Office of Mental Health Operations, the Office of Mental Health services, and other areas of VA Central Office regarding VA performance with respect to mental health services, and the appropriate metrics to evaluate those services nationally. She has also served on several advisory committees to the VA on the mental health needs of female veterans, with particular attention to military sexual trauma. She is currently the Principal Investigator of the Survey of the Experiences of Returning Veterans (SERV) a large VA-funded study of the gender differences in coping behaviors of Veterans returning from military service.

  • Michael Hoge

    Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Yale Behavioral Health; Director, Yale Group on Workforce Development

    Research Interests
    Health Services Administration; Health Care Quality, Access, and Evaluation; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Michael A. Hoge, Ph.D., is a Professor of Psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine. He also serves as the Director of Yale Behavioral Health, which provides a broad array of mental health and addiction services to adolescents and adults. Dr. Hoge is a founding member of The Annapolis Coalition on the Behavioral Health Workforce, which initiated a national, inter-professional effort to improve the recruitment, retention and training of individuals who provide prevention and treatment services for persons with mental illnesses and substance use disorders. Michael serves as the Senior Science and Policy Advisor for the Coalition and was the senior editor of the national Action Plan on Behavioral Health Workforce Development, which was commissioned by the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. He has consulted on behavioral health workforce issues to the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health, the Institute of Medicine, and many states and organizations. Currently he directs the Yale Group on Workforce Development, which includes the Yale Program on Supervision.

  • Avram Holmes

    Assistant Professor of Psychology and of Psychiatry

    Dr. Holmes earned a Bachelors degree in psychology from Pennsylvania State University (1998), a PhD in Clinical Psychology from Harvard University (2009), and received his clinical training at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University (2008-2009). Prior to joining the faculty at Yale, Dr. Holmes completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Harvard University Center for Brain Science (2009-2012) and served as an Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School (2012-2014).

  • Marcia Hunt

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Mental Disorders; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Marcia G. Hunt, Ph.D. earned her doctorate in clinical community psychology from Bowling Green State University in 2005 with an emphasis in in qualitative and mixed-methods research as well as program development, implementation and system-level evaluation. She is an Associate Director of the VA Northeast Program Evaluation Center (NEPEC), responsible for the national program evaluation of the Mental Health Intensive Case Management (MHICM) programs and the Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Center (PRRC) programs. Dr. Hunt's research interests focus on evaluating recovery-related changes for people with serious mental illness and the relationship between valued social roles and life functioning. Dr. Hunt, a licensed psychologist, is also actively involved in clinical training for psychology and psychiatry.

  • Joanne Iennaco

    Associate Professor of Nursing; Psychiatric-Mental Health Specialty

    Joanne DeSanto Iennaco is an Associate Professor of Nursing and Psychiatry at Yale University, and Specialty Coordinator of the Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Program at Yale School of Nursing. Professor Iennaco holds a PhD in Chronic Disease Epidemiology from Yale University's School of Public Health. Her research focuses on the effects of aggression exposure on workers in inpatient psychiatric and hospital settings. Dr. Iennaco is also a Clinical Interventionist leading CBT for Insomnia groups for Dr. Nancy Redeker's Heart Sleep Study, a randomized controlled trial. In addition, she has worked with Yale's Occupational and Environmental Medicine research team studying the effect of psychosocial aspects of the workplace on health. Her research interests include occupational mental health, aggression, anxiety, depression, suicide, violence and the interface between physical and mental health.

    Dr. Iennaco is a Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner with dual certification as both a Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner and an Adult Psychiatric Mental Health Clinical Nurse Specialist. She was recently awarded the 2016 Nightingale Award for Excellence in Nursing. She was also honored with a Faculty Service-learning Award in 1998 from the Maine Campus Compact and with the St. Joseph's College Outstanding Faculty Award in 1999.Joanne is a member of the Society for Epidemiologic Research, the American Public Health Association, the American Psychiatric Nurses Association, the Society for Occupational Health Psychology, and Sigma Theta Tau International. She works clinically at the Connecticut Mental Health Center in New Haven, CT, and has prior experiences in many settings including FQHC Behavioral Health services, Adult Inpatient Psychiatry, Psychiatric Admissions and Emergency Department, Day Treatment, and as a Community Health Nurse.

    YCCI Scholar 2010

    Project: 07/01/10 - 06/30/12

    Effects of Aggression Exposure in Psychiatric Settings on Employee Health and Work Outcomes

  • Theddeus Iheanacho

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Medical Director, Errera Community Care Center, VA Connecticut Health Care System

    Research Interests
    Behavior, Addictive; Psychiatry and Psychology; Health Care
    Clinical Interests
    Mental Disorders; Homeless Persons; Behavior, Addictive

    My background is general psychiatry specifically addressing the needs of homeless adults with severe mental illness and co-morbid substance use disorders and other chronic disorders.

  • Peter Jatlow

    Professor Emeritus of and Senior Research Scientist in Laboratory Medicine and in Psychiatry

    Dr Jatlow has been a member of the full time Yale faculty since 1968. He served as Chair of the Department of Laboratory Medicine from 1984-2006, and is currently Professor of Laboratory Medicine with a joint Appointment in the Department of Psychiatry. His clinical interests are focused on clinical chemistry and, in particular, toxicology. His research activities have been concerned with the clinical pharmacology of drugs of abuse, especially cocaine, nicotine and most recently alcohol.
  • Reena Kapoor

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Associate Program Director, Forensic Psychiatry Fellowship

    Dr. Kapoor is Associate Professor of Psychiatry in the Law & Psychiatry Division, where her clinical work and scholarship focus on the intersection between serious mental illness and the criminal justice system. She has expertise in correctional psychiatry, community treatment of persons with criminal justice involvement, and management of problematic sexual behaviors. In addition, she serves as Associate Program Director for the Yale forensic psychiatry fellowship, teaching and supervising fellows in the country's largest training program for forensic psychiatrists. Dr. Kapoor has lectured widely on forensic psychiatry and holds leadership positions in several professional organizations. She is President of the Connecticut Psychiatric Society, serves as Connecticut's representative to the American Psychiatric Association Assembly, co-founded the Community Forensics committee of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (AAPL), and is President-Elect of the International Association for Forensic Psyhotherapy. Prior to joining the Law & Psychiatry faculty, Dr. Kapoor completed her residency training in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and a forensic psychiatry fellowship at Yale. She is a 2003 graduate Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine.

  • Joy Kaufman

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Director of Program and Service System Evaluation at The Consultation Center; Director of Evaluation Research, Division of Prevention and Community Research; Deputy Director, The Consultation Center, Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Health Promotion; Program Evaluation; Qualitative Research; Community-Based Participatory Research; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Joy S. Kaufman, PhD is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry (Psychology Section), Yale School of Medicine and Director of Program and Service System Evaluation and Evaluation Research at the Yale Consultation Center. Trained as a Clinical and Community Psychologist, Dr. Kaufman conducts large-scale, multi-level evaluations of health service delivery systems, provides consultation to governmental and community organizations regarding these evaluations, and carries out related research. These evaluations take place in under-resourced communities; involve close partnerships with state and municipal governments, community organizations, and other public stakeholders; and generate data that informs program and policy development. A unique feature of her work is the training of public stakeholders to evaluate the services they receive or to utilize data so that they can provide rigorous and systematic feedback to improve services and participate in decision-making about their community. Dr. Kaufman's research interests include the identification of contextual factors that impact outcomes for individuals with emotional and behavioral difficulties.

  • Robert Kerns

    Professor of Psychiatry, of Neurology and of Psychology

    Research Interests
    Ethics; Health Services Accessibility; Health Services Research; Professional-Patient Relations; Quality of Health Care; Healthcare Disparities; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Dr. Robert D. Kerns is Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Psychology at Yale University.  He is one of three directors of the Yale-based NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory Coordinating Center.  He recently retired from VA Connecticut Healthcare System (VACHS) and service to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) following a nearly 38 year career during which time he served as VACHS Chief of Psychology (1987-2008) and founding Director of the Pain Research, Informatics, Multimorbidities and Education (PRIME) Center of Innovation (2008-2016), and as VA National Program Director for Pain Management (2006-2013). He received his bachelor’s degree in Psychology from West Virginia University in 1974 and his doctorate in Bioclinical Psychology from Southern Illinois University in 1980. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, and he has held leadership positions in these and other professional and scientific societies.

    He is the recipient of numerous awards including the 2006 Leadership Award from the Association of VA Psychologist Leaders, the 2006 David M. Worthen Award for Academic Excellence and the 2006 Mark Wolcott Award for Clinical Leadership from the VHA, and the 2010 John and Emma Bonic Public Service Award from the American Pain Society. He serves on the editorial board of several scientific journals, including the Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Clinical Journal of Pain, Health Psychology, Pain Medicine, and Psychological Services. He was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Advancing Pain Research, Care and Education and National Pain Management Strategy Oversight Panel that developed a National Pain Strategy for transforming pain care in America. He also served as co-chair of the Federal Interagency Workgroup that produced a National Action Plan for Prevention of Opioid-related Adverse Drug Events.

    Dr. Kerns’ primary area of scholarly and academic interest is in the fields of behavioral medicine and health psychology, with a more specific interest and expertise in the area of pain and pain management. He has published over 250 peer-reviewed articles, chapters, and books, and he frequently delivers invited addresses at professional and scientific meetings. His research has been funded through the VA, the National Institutes of health and through other federal and private sources for over 35 years. His current research focuses on use of large datasets from VA to study pain and pain care among veterans, especially age, gender, and race/ethnicity differences and disparities; developing informatics solutions for extracting information from unstructured electronic health record notes, mechanisms and processes of change during psychological interventions for chronic pain; use of innovative technologies to promote access and fidelity of non-pharmacological pain interventions; and formative evaluation and implementation of organizational improvement initiatives in pain care.

  • Brian D. Kiluk

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Technology-Based Interventions

    Research Interests
    Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms; Cognition; Drug Utilization; Cocaine-Related Disorders; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Brian D. Kiluk, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine is a licensed clinical psychologist conducting research in the field of substance use disorder treatment. He received his Ph.D. in 2009 from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, completed postdoctoral training at Yale through a National Institute on Drug Abuse T32 Fellowship, and ultimately joined the faculty ranks in the Department of Psychiatry in 2012.  Dr. Kiluk's area of research includes an emphasis on three major topics: (1) the evaluation and enhancement of a web-based version of cognitive behavioral therapy for alcohol and drug use disorders (CBT4CBT); (2) exploration of the mechanisms of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for substance use disorders, and (3) the identification of clinically meaningful outcome indicators of clinical trials for illicit drug use disorders.  He serves as Principal Investigator on research grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, and his work has been featured at national scientific meetings.  As an expert in CBT for substance use disorders, Dr. Kiluk also consults with treatment facilities across the U.S. to provide workshop training in manual-guided CBT, as well as ongoing fidelity monitoring and coaching.   

  • Anne Klee

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry

    Anne Klee, Ph.D., CPRP, completed her graduate work at the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York and her undergraduate work at Columbia University, New York, New York.  After completing predoctoral and postdoctoral fellowships at the Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, she accepted a position at VA Connecticut Healthcare System, where she has worked for the past fifteen years in various roles.  Professionally she is devoted to developing quality, recovery-oriented programs for individuals with serious mental illness, training and supporting the work of peer specialists, and training the next generation of clinicians in the field of psychosocial rehabilitation and engaging them in careers in public mental health.  She serves in national and state capacities.  She is an Associate Editor for Psychological Services, a Representative on the Council of the American Psychological Association (APA), a past president of Psychologists in Public Service (Division 18) of APA, the current president of the Connecticut Psychological Association, and a member of the Connecticut State Innovation Model Practice Transformation Taskforce.   

  • Hedy Kober

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and of Psychology; Adjunct Associate Professor of Law; Director, Clinical and Affective Neuroscience Lab

    Research Interests
    Cognition; Emotions; Thinking; Smoking Cessation; Meditation; Substance-Related Disorders; Mindfulness
  • Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin

    Professor of Psychiatry; Chair, Human Investigations Committee II & IV, Human Research Protections Program

    Research Interests
    Adolescent Psychiatry; Alcohol Drinking; Behavioral Medicine; Marijuana Smoking; Nicotine; Psychotherapy; Tobacco; Chemicals and Drugs; Psychiatry and Psychology; Health Care

    Dr. Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin is a Professor of Psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine. Her research is focused on developing a bio-behavioral understanding of substance use behaviors in adult and adolescent substance users, with the goal of developing optimal prevention and cessation interventions. In the area of adolescent tobacco use, she has conducted qualitative research including focus groups and surveys to understand patterns and perceptions of use of tobacco products, clinical trials to develop and test the use of novel behavioral and pharmacological cessation and prevention interventions, and experimental evaluations of behavioral and neural predictors of use and cessation behaviors. Because of her expertise in youth tobacco use behaviors, she has contributed to the Surgeon General’s report on “Preventing Tobacco Use among Young People” and also serves as a member of the FDA’s Tobacco Product Scientific Advisory Committee. Dr. Krishnan-Sarin is the Co-PI on the Yale Tobacco Centers Of Regulatory Science which is using a multidisciplinary approach to understand the role of flavors in tobacco and nicotine addiction.

  • John Krystal

    Robert L. McNeil, Jr. Professor of Translational Research and Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience; Chair, Department of Psychiatry; Chief of Psychiatry, Yale-New Haven Hospital; Director: NIAAA Center for the Translational Neuroscience of Alcoholism; Director, Clinical Neuroscience Division, VA National Center for PTSD

    Research Interests
    Alcoholism; Drug Therapy; Genetics; Neurobiology; Psychiatry; Schizophrenia; Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic; Veterans; Neuroimaging

    Dr. Krystal is a leading expert in the areas of alcoholism, post-traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia, and depression. His work links psychopharmacology, neuroimaging, molecular genetics, and computational neuroscience to study the neurobiology and treatment of these disorders. He is best known for leading the discovery of the rapid antidepressant effects of ketamine in depressed patients.

    He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Medicine. He also serves in a variety of advisory and review capacities for NIAAA, NIMH, Wellcome Trust, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, the Broad Institute, and the Karolinska Institutet.

    Dr. Krystal previously served on the National Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Advisory Council (NIAAA), the Department of Defense Psychological Health Advisory Committee, and the NIMH Board of Scientific Counselors (chair, 2005-2007). He has led the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (president, 2012), and International College of Neuropsychophamacology (president, 2016-2018).

    Currently, he is co-chair of the Neuroscience Forum (NeuroForum) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, a member of the NIMH National Mental Health Advisory Council, and he edits the journal, Biological Psychiatry (impact factor: 11.982).

  • Alex Kwan

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Decision Making; Depressive Disorder; Electrophysiology; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Schizophrenia; Prefrontal Cortex; Executive Function

    Dr. Kwan received a B.A.Sc. in Engineering Physics from Simon Fraser University and a Ph.D. in Applied Physics from Cornell University. At Cornell, he developed nonlinear optical microscopy methods in the laboratory of Watt Webb. In 2009, he went to the University of California, Berkeley to work in the laboratory of Yang Dan, where he studied cortical GABAergic interneurons. He joined the Yale School of Medicine faculty in 2013.

    Research in the Kwan lab focuses on the mouse prefrontal cortex. We are interested in how cortical circuits enable flexible decision-making, and how dendritic dysfunctions underlie neuropsychiatric disorders. Our expertise lies in developing and applying optical methods to record and control neural activity in behaving mice.

  • Robert F. Leeman
    Research Interests
    Opioid-Related Disorders; Cocaine-Related Disorders; Alcohol-Related Disorders; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Robert F. Leeman, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine and a Research Scientist with the VA VISN1 MIRECC. His primary research interest is in relationships between various difficulties with self-control and addictive behaviors, particularly alcohol and cocaine/opioid co-use. He has particular interests in impaired control over alcohol use, disinhibition/impulsivity and cognitive biases. Much of Dr. Leeman's research concerns young adult addictive behaviors and he has made use of human laboratory, survey and clinical trial methods.

    Dr. Leeman joined the faculty at Yale in 2007 after having completed a NIDA post-doctoral fellowship, also in the Yale Psychiatry Department. He joined the VA MIRECC as a Research Scientist in 2012. Dr. Leeman received a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania in 2005 and a B.A. in Psychology and Screen Studies from Clark University in 1998.

    Dr. Leeman was awarded a K01 from NIAAA in 2010, a grant from the ABMRF/the Foundation for Alcohol Research in 2012 and was a recipient of a clinical research loan repayment award from NIAAA from 2006-2012. He held an F31 individual, predoctoral National Research Recognition Award from NIAAA from 2003-2005 and was a 2006 recipient of an Enoch Gordis Research Recognition Award from the Research Society on Alcoholism, in addition to several other travel and young investigator awards.

  • Chiang-Shan Ray Li

    Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Alcohols; Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms; Mental Disorders; Biological Therapy; Central Nervous System; Nervous System; Nervous System Diseases; Psychological Phenomena; Therapeutics; Behavior Control; Research Subjects; Drug Users; Chemicals and Drugs; Psychiatry and Psychology

    I am a Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience at Yale University School of Medicine. I graduated from National Taiwan University College of Medicine and California Institute of Technology and has been a faculty member at Yale since 2003. My earlier work employed non-human primate models to understand the neural bases of cognition. Current research in my laboratory continues to focus on systems neuroscience. By combining psychophysics, computational modeling and brain imaging we explore the circuit mechanisms of a multitude of cognitive constructs, including self control, affect regulation, and reward-related processes. The primary goals are to understand systems neural bases of these cognitive processes and how these neural processes contribute to the etiology of psychiatric and neurological illnesses, with a specific emphasis on addiction.

  • R. Ross MacLean

    Assistant Professor; Clinical Psychologist, VA CT Healthcare System

    Research Interests
    Alcohol Drinking; Buprenorphine; Mental Health; Methadone; Opioid-Related Disorders; Pain; Substance-Related Disorders; Drug-Seeking Behavior; Tobacco Use
    Clinical Interests
    Adult
  • Robert Malison

    Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Clinical Neuroscience Research Unit; Director, Neuroscience Research Training Program

    Research Interests
    Central Nervous System Stimulants; Biological Psychiatry; Genetics, Behavioral; Methylphenidate; Motivation; Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy; Psychopharmacology; Psychoses, Substance-Induced; Cocaine-Related Disorders; Functional Neuroimaging

    Dr. Malison completed his undergraduate degree at Williams College, before obtaining his M.D. degree at Yale University School of Medicine. He remained at Yale for psychiatry residency training as part of the Clinical Neuroscience Research Training Program in Psychiatry. After a one-year addiction fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania, he returned to Yale to join faculty and is currently a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Malison has devoted 20 years to patient-oriented research into the neurobiology, neuropharmacology, and genetics of stimulant, including both cocaine and methamphetamine, addiction. His research has applied numerous clinical-translational approaches, including stimulant administration (cocaine, methylphenidate, and amphetamine), medications development (e.g., modafinil), drug-drug interaction (e.g., disulfiram-cocaine), human genetic, brain activation (e.g., fMRI), and neurochemical brain imaging (e.g., SPECT/PET) methods. His group has applied these techniques to studies of the regulation of stimulant self-administration behavior, drug-induced neuroplasticity, and individual (including genetic) differences in vulnerability to stimulant effects. He is Director of the Clinical Neuroscience Research Unit at the Connecticut Mental Health Center and Program Director / Principal Investigator of three NIH-funded research training programs, including the Clinical Neuroscience Research Training Program in Psychiatry.

  • Steve Martino

    Professor of Psychiatry; Chief of Psychology, VA CT Healthcare System

    Research Interests
    Curriculum; Psychotherapy; Motivational Interviewing; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Dr. Martino specializes in the treatment of addictive disorders and of patients diagnosed with co-occurring psychiatric problems, with specific interests in motivational interviewing, cognitive behavioral therapy, group work, use of brief interventions in medical settings, and clinical supervision. His current research focuses on strategies for disseminating and implementing empirically supported treatments in community treatment programs and medical settings. Dr. Martino is the Chief of Psychology at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System.

  • Robin Masheb

    Senior Research Scientist in Psychiatry; Director, Veterans Initiative for Eating and Weight (The VIEW at VA CT)

    Research Interests
    Feeding and Eating Disorders; Body Image; Eating; Obesity; Pain; Psychiatry; Veterans; Health Behavior; Cognitive Therapy; Evidence-Based Medicine; Bariatric Surgery; Overweight; Binge-Eating Disorder

    Dr. Masheb is a Senior Research Scientist and clinical psychologist at the Yale School of Medicine (YSM). Her scholarly work has focused on advancing the fields of obesity, eating disorders, and pain for underserved populations. The recipient of multiple grants from the National Institutes of Health and VA, Dr. Masheb is expert in the conduct of trials to develop and implement evidence-based treatments. She is founder and Director of the Veterans Initiative for Eating and Weight (The View), the first and only national program dedicated to addressing the broad spectrum of eating and weight problems in the Veteran population through research and expert consultation to national VA policy and operations offices. She is a fellow of both the American Psychological Association’s Division of Health Psychology and the Society of Behavioral Medicine, is on the Editorial Board of Eating Behaviors, has over 140 peer-reviewed publications, and has reviewed for 25 unique scientific journals. Dr. Masheb has been an active educator at the individual level training YSM medical students, graduate students, interns and postdoctoral fellows; at the University level teaching in the classroom, and participating on multiple internship and postdoctoral training committees; and at the national level, serving as Director of Education for the VA PRIME Center of Innovation (COIN) located at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System. 

  • Graeme Mason

    Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging and of Psychiatry; Director Metabolic Modeling and Director Psychiatric MRS; Director, Neuroimaging Sciences Training Program; Chair, Magnetic Resonance Research Center Protocol Review Committee

    Research Interests
    Alcoholic Intoxication; Alcoholism; Amino Acids; Carbohydrates; Central Nervous System Diseases; Fatty Acids; Mathematical Computing; Substance Withdrawal Syndrome; Tobacco Use Disorder; Mood Disorders; Cocaine-Related Disorders; Alcohol-Induced Disorders, Nervous System; Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action; Physiological Effects of Drugs; Neuroimaging

    Dr. Grame F. Mason develops experimental models and methods for studies of brain metabolism using 1H and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Mass Spectrometry in conjunction with 13C isotopic labeling in vivo, in cell preparations, and other systems. His work began during his graduate studies at Yale where he used a rat model for the experimental determination of brain glucose transport kinetics, energetics, and neurotransmitter metabolism. Dr. Mason received further training at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, where he guided the group's 13C-labeling studies of the human brain in vivo in the 4.1T whole-body MR system. Dr. Mason currently studies metabolism and neurotransmission in the brain in vivo, including effects of psychiatric disorders and substances such as alcohol and nicotine; Dr. Mason examines healthy subjects and patients to investigate relationships among GABA, glutamate, and glutamine concentrations and their rates of synthesis and release in the brain, in particular with regard to effects of acute and chronic use of alcohol.

  • Carolyn M. Mazure

    Norma Weinberg Spungen and Joan Lebson Bildner Professor in Women's Health Research and Professor of Psychiatry and of Psychology; Director, Women's Health Research at Yale

    Research Interests
    Depressive Disorder; Psychiatry; Sex Differentiation; Stress, Psychological; Women's Health; Behavior, Addictive; Tobacco Use Cessation

    Carolyn Mazure is the Norma Weinberg Spungen and Joan Lebson Bildner Professor in Women's Health Research and Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology at the Yale School of Medicine. She created and directs Yale's interdisciplinary research center on health and gender — Women's Health Research at Yale.

    After three years at the National Institutes of Health and fellowship training at Yale, Dr. Mazure was invited to join the Yale faculty — becoming an active clinician, a researcher funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and Director of Psychiatry's Adult Inpatient Program at Yale New Haven Hospital.

    Her contributions in women's health began with her own internationally recognized research in depression. Focusing on the gender differences in this disorder, she was the first to demonstrate how stress is a more potent pathway to depression in women than men and use these findings to inform treatment interventions.

    Understanding the value of uncovering gender differences in depression, combined with recognizing that such data are sorely lacking in other fields, she created Women's Health Research at Yale. Since its inception in 1998, the center has been recognized as a national model for launching research on the influence of sex and gender on human health, translating findings into practice, and providing mentored training.

    Dr. Mazure is a member of the Advisory Committee for the NIH Office for Research on Women's Health. She has provided testimony to the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives on the importance of women's health research, served on the planning committee for the First White House Conference on Mental Health and as a fellow for the U.S. Congress' Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.

    She also a consultant to the Yale Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science and a member of the Advisory Board of the Yale Center for Biomedical Innovation and Technology (CBIT), an interdisciplinary initiative to foster greater innovation in medical technology.

    She has been an invited speaker at diverse venues, such as NASA and the Smithsonian Institution, and has been a featured expert on ABC's "Prime Time Live" and in the BBC documentary "The Science of Stress." Her books include "Does Stress Cause Psychiatric Illness?" and "Understanding Depression in Women: Applying Empirical Research to Practice and Policy."

    Dr. Mazure served as Associate Dean for Faculty at Yale Medical School, and was awarded the Stephen Fleck Clinician and Teacher Award and the Sidney J. Blatt Award for excellence in clinical care, teaching and research - both from Yale. Among her other honors, Dr. Mazure is the recipient of the Marion Spencer Fay Award from the Institute for Women's Health and Leadership, the American Psychological Association Distinguished Leadership Award from the Committee on Women in Psychology, the Elizabeth Blackwell Award from the National Organization for Women, and a U.S. Public Health Fellowship.

     

  • Sherry McKee

    Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Yale Behavioral Pharmacology Laboratory; Clinical Director, Forensic Drug Diversion Clinic; Director, Yale Program for Sex Differences in Alcohol Use Disorder, Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Criminal Psychology; Tobacco Use Disorder; Substance-Related Disorders; Alcohol-Related Disorders; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Dr. Sherry McKee is a Professor of Psychiatry at the Yale Medical School, Director of the Yale Behavioral Pharmacology Laboratory, and Clinical Director of the Forensic Drug Diversion Clinic. Dr. McKee directs a translational program of research focused on treatment development for addictive disorders, with an emphasis on women and more recently criminal justice populations. Her work spans clinical trials, behavioral pharmacology, survey research, and epidemiological research to uncover mechanisms underlying poor outcomes and to translate these finding into improved interventions. Dr. McKee has directed large NIH-funded efforts (P50-ORWH/NIDA; P01-ORWH/NIAAA) focused on developing effective medications for addictive behaviors which are responsive to sex-differences. For these efforts, she has directed interdisciplinary teams conducting translational cross-species research focused on expediting the development of gender-sensitive therapeutics, mentoring junior faculty, and providing a national resource on women and addiction. Dr. McKee also leads a federally funded partnership between Yale University, the of Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, and the State of Connecticut Department of Correction, to develop and implement an integrated system of addiction care for offender re-entry.

  • Thomas McMahon

    Professor of Psychiatry and The Child Study Center; Program Director, West Haven Mental Health Clinic, Connecticut Mental Health Center; Director of Clinical Research, Connecticut Mental Health Center

    Research Interests
    Child Abuse; Father-Child Relations; Fathers; Parent-Child Relations; Parents; Domestic Violence; Substance-Related Disorders; Reproductive Behavior
    Clinical Interests
    Adolescent Psychiatry; Child Abuse; Child Development; Child Psychiatry; Parent-Child Relations; Child of Impaired Parents; Parenting; Adolescent Development

    Thomas J. McMahon, Ph.D. is a Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Child Study. He is also the Program Director for the West Haven Mental Health Clinic at the Connecticut Mental Health Center. As a clinician, educator, and researcher, he is broadly interested in developmental perspectives on psychopathology and developmentally informed approaches to clinical intervention offered in community settings.

    As a clinician, he is interested in the psychological assessment and treatment of children, adolescents, and young adults with a history of child abuse or neglect, particularly in the context of parental addiction. As an educator, he coordinates training in clinical child, adolescent, and young adult psychology; and he is actively involved in cross-training on addiction, family process, and child development within the child welfare, child guidance, and addiction treatment systems. As a researcher, he is interested in the impact of drug addiction on family process; and he is involved in the development of family-oriented intervention for men and women affected by drug addiction.

    Dr. McMahon has been the recipient of several grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to explore parenting as a treatment issue for men struggling with drug addiction; and he has been invited to participate in national and international initiatives designed to attenuate the impact of alcohol and drug addiction on family process and child development.

  • Adam Mecca

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; Associate Director, Alzheimer's Disease Research Unit; Faculty, Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC)

    Adam Mecca, M.D., Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and the Associate Director of the Yale Alzheimer’s Disease Research Unit. He received his B.S. in Chemistry, Microbiology and Cell Science from the University of Florida in 2005 before matriculating to the UF M.D.-Ph.D. program from which he graduated in 2012. Dr. Mecca worked at the UF College of Medicine Equal Access Clinic for 10 years during undergraduate and graduate training. During that time, he helped advance the mission of the clinic and co-founded an international organization, Society of Student Run Free Clinics. After graduation, Dr. Mecca completed a residency in Psychiatry and a fellowship in Geriatric Psychiatry at Yale University. Dr. Mecca practices at the Yale Adler Geriatric Assessment center and is a faculty member in the Yale Department of Psychiatry. In his role as Associate Director of the Yale Alzheimer’s Disease Research Unit, Dr. Mecca works with a team to conduct clinical research testing potential therapies for Alzheimer’s disease. Another focus of his research is developing novel neuroimaging methods to investigate the neurobiology of Alzheimer’s disease. Recently, Dr. Mecca and his collaborators have used a novel positron emission tomography imaging technique to measure decreases in the number of connections between nerve cells in people with Alzheimer’s disease. They have also shown age and Alzheimer’s disease related declines in a specific synaptic receptor that is important for memory formation. The goal of this work is to develop a clearer understanding of Alzheimer’s disease to develop treatments.

     

  • Sarah Meshberg-Cohen

    Assistant Professor

    Sarah Meshberg-Cohen, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist with a background in behavioral medicine, and specializes in the treatment of substance use disorders, chronic depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, and dual diagnosis. Dr. Meshberg-Cohen’s clinical work utilizes evidence-based treatments, including cognitive behavioral therapy, motivational enhancement, cognitive processing therapy, and interpersonal therapy including cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy (CBASP). Her research focuses on improving EBTs for substance use disorders and co-occurring psychiatric disorders. Dr. Meshberg-Cohen serves as the Program Manager of the VACHS Outpatient Addiction Recovery Service and her clinical work and research treating individuals with co-occurring addictions and trauma has led to increased interest in improving treatment engagement and adherence for returning service members, resulting in research examining the role of PTSD C&P claims on Veterans’ overall treatment engagement, quality of life, and mental health outcomes.

  • John D Murray

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, of Neuroscience and of Physics

    Research Interests
    Cognition; Computer Simulation; Decision Making; Interneurons; Memory, Short-Term; Schizophrenia; Prefrontal Cortex; Computational Biology; Functional Neuroimaging

    Dr. John D. Murray is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Murray trained in Physics and Mathematics at Yale University. For his PhD in Physics, he worked with Dr. Xiao-Jing Wang in the field of Computational Neuroscience. Following his graduate training, he was a Postdoctoral Associate at New York University in the Center for Neural Science. He joined the faculty at Yale in 2015, where he directs a computational neuroscience lab with interests in leveraging computational modeling to understand psychiatric disorders in a framework for Computational Psychiatry.

  • Angus Nairn

    Charles B. G. Murphy Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Dopamine; Huntington Disease; Parkinson Disease; Protein Kinases; Psychiatry; Schizophrenia; Signal Transduction

    Angus Nairn did his undergraduate training in biochemistry at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland and his PhD in muscle biochemistry in the laboratory of Professor Sam Perry at Birmingham University, England. He then carried out postdoctoral research in molecular neuroscience with Professor Paul Greengard at Yale, and moved with Professor Greengard to Rockefeller University in 1983 as a faculty member. He moved back to Yale University in 2001, where he is currently the Charles B.G. Murphy Professor of Psychiatry. He also holds a joint appointment in the Department of Pharmacology and is co-director of the Yale/National Institute of Drug Abuse Neuroproteomics Center at the Yale School of Medicine.

  • Michael Norko

    Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Forensic Psychiatry; Mental Health; Psychiatry; Religion; Violence; Risk Assessment; Spirituality; Harm Reduction

    Dr. Michael Norko received his bachelor’s degree from Johns Hopkins University (1979), his MD from SUNY – Upstate Medical Center (1983) and trained in psychiatry at St. Vincent’s Hospital and Medical Center in New York (1983-97), during which he also completed a certificate program in mental health administration at the New School for Social Research (1987). He completed a fellowship in forensic psychiatry at Yale University in 1988 and has since then been a member of the faculty of the Law and Psychiatry Division at Yale/ Connecticut Mental Health Center, including 7 years as Deputy Training Director. Dr. Norko is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, and Past President of the Connecticut Psychiatric Society. Dr. Norko has worked at the Whiting Forensic Institute (CT’s maximum security psychiatric hospital) for a total of 17 years; first as a unit chief and attending psychiatrist and later as Associate Director for Hospital Operations, Medical Director and Director/CEO. He has chaired the Committee on Institutional and Correctional Forensic Psychiatry of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (AAPL), was Editor of the AAPL Newsletter from 1996 to 2003, the Vice President of AAPL in 2005-2006 and President of AAPL in 2016-17. He has published and presented nationally and internationally on a variety of topics related to psychiatry and law, including his special interest in the use of the concepts of dangerousness and risk in psychiatric practice. He is currently Director of Forensic Services for the CT Dept of Mental Health & Addiction Services, and Deputy Editor of the Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law. Dr. Norko earned a Master of Arts in Religion degree at the Yale Divinity School (2010), and teaches an elective course in the Department of Psychiatry on religion, spirituality, worldview and psychiatry. He chairs the Psychiatry and Religion Committee of the Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry (GAP).

  • Maria O'Connell

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Maria O’Connell, Ph.D. is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Director of Research and Evaluation at the Yale Program for Recovery and Community Health (PRCH). Dr. O’Connell has provided oversight and quality assurance for collaborative research and evaluation projects conducted at PRCH since 2002. She has an extensive background in conducting research on recovery-related topics, including psychiatric advance directives, self-determination and choice, recovery-oriented services, housing and other community based programs, as well as expertise in the development of data management systems, statistical analysis, and program evaluation. Dr. O’Connell currently has an NIMH R01 examining the adoption and diffusion of person-centered and recovery-oriented practices among community mental health centers nationwide.

  • Christy Olezeski

    Assistant Professor

    As a clinical child and adolescent psychologist, my expertise lies in the intersection between trauma, sexuality and gender identity. Currently, I am the Director of the new Yale Pediatric Gender Program, an interdisciplinary team that provides services for transgender and gender non-conforming youth in Connecticut. We are the only interdisciplinary team of this type in the state. The team includes professionals in the fields of psychology, endocrinology, psychiatry, obstetrics, gynecology, medical ethics and law. We also consult with urology, plastics and general medicine. This collaboration has led to many local, regional, national and international speaking engagements, several research projects and multiple academic pieces of work.

    In addition, I am a supervising psychologist at a satellite clinic of the Connecticut Mental Health Center, the West Haven Mental Health Clinic, where I provide supervision and consultation to staff and work individually with children, adolescents and young adults. In this capacity, I coordinate and supervise the psychological testing of patients, teach on trauma-informed treatment models, supervise the clinical work of fellows and see patients for individual treatment. I also provide assessment and clinical consultation services for patients who have engaged in problematic sexual behaviors, or who are exploring their gender identity.

  • Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Division of Psychiatry & Law.; Chief, Psychotherapy Service. Whiting Forensic Hospital, Middletown, CT, Psychotherapy Service

  • Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Deputy Director, Hispanic Services, CMHC; Director, Psychology Training Program, Hispanic Services, CMHC

    His professional focus is on the adaptation of evidence-based interventions within a culturally appropriate framework, with a specific emphasis on motivational interviewing for co-occurring disorders. As such, he is actively involved in the following three areas: 1) evaluation of cultural/linguistic adaptations of evidence based interventions and assessments; 2) multisite training and fidelity monitoring; and 3) workforce development. He has co-authored numerous articles on Latino behavioral health issues and motivational interviewing, and also teaches and lectures extensively on both these topics. In 2007, he co-created the Connecticut Latino Behavioral Health System (CT LBHS). The CT LBHS represents a united effort to enhance, expand, and evaluate a network of treatment services developed from regional partnerships and tailored to meet the specific behavioral health needs of the Latino community. In addition, he currently serves as the Senior Advisor on Public Policy for the National Latinx Psychological Association, and is focused on non-partisan social justice advocacy on behalf of the Latinx community. 

  • Godfrey Pearlson

    Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Genotype; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Neurobiology; Phenotype; Psychiatry; Psychotic Disorders; Substance-Related Disorders; Endophenotypes

    Dr. Pearlson's medical school training was in the University of Newcastle upon Tyne in England . Following this he completed a graduate degree in philosophy at Columbia University in New York and was successively a resident, postdoctoral fellow and faculty member at Johns Hopkins University Department of Psychiatry under Dr. Paul McHugh, where he was ultimately Professor of Psychiatry and founding director of the division of Psychiatry Neuroimaging.

    Dr. Pearlson is currently founding director of the Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center, a 50-person organization consisting of 4 component labs. The Center specializes in the translational neuroscience of major mental illness, including dementias, mood disorders, substance abuse, schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder, PTSD, autism and other conditions spanning childhood to old age.

    The center includes two 3-Tesla research-dedicated MRI scanners and scans over 1200 individuals annually, all of whom are genotyped. It has a fully equipped psychophysiology lab and a bio-bank for specimen storage. The Center also specializes in the importation of virtual reality (VR) paradigms into the functional MRI environment to yield ecologically valid "virtual environments" to study complex behaviors in the scanner such as automobile driving.

    Dr. Pearlson's research uses neuroimaging as a tool to address a broader array of questions regarding the neurobiology of major mental disorders, primarily psychosis and substance abuse. Important "firsts" include showing that structural and functional brain changes associated with schizophrenia can also occur in psychotic bipolar disorder, the relationship of structural and functional abnormalities in the superior temporal gyrus with hallucinations in schizophrenia, using VR to explore complex behaviors in the MRI scanner (or example simulated driving) to assess disruptive effects of abused substances and the first demonstration of human in-vivo cocaine-mediated dopamine release using PET ligands. As part of the BSNIP consortium, his lab contributed towards a reconceptualization of psychotic illness based on biological, rather than clinical syndromic criteria.

    Dr. Pearlson is an former NIMH MERIT awardee and is PI on multiple R01 grants from NIAAA, NIDA and NIMH. He has been awarded a NARSAD Distinguished Investigator award and a Michael visiting professorship from the Weizmann Institute. He has published >600 peer-reviewed research articles, with an H-index of 78. He is also co-founder of the annual BrainDance competition for high school and college students across New England. These competitive awards encourage students to gain knowledge about psychiatric diseases and to develop a more tolerant and realistic perspective towards people with severe psychiatric problems.

    Dr. Pearlson was awarded the 2015 Stanley Dean Award for Schizophrenia Research from the American College of Psychiatrists and in 2015 was inducted into the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars (distinguished alumni).
    Current important intra-departmental collaborations are with Drs. Krystal (CTNA), Gelernter and Potenza.

  • Ismene Petrakis

    Professor of Psychiatry; Chief of Psychiatry, VA Connecticut Healthcare System

    Research Interests
    Alcoholism; Neurobiology; Psychiatry; Psychopharmacology; Veterans; Comorbidity; Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry); Substance-Related Disorders; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Dr. Petrakis is a Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine and the Director of the Mental Health Service Line at VA Connecticut Healthcare System (VACHS) since July 2010. Dr. Petrakis completed residency training at Yale School of Medicine and then a NIDA-funded addiction psychiatry clinical/research fellowship. She joined the faculty in 1992. Prior to July 2010, she was the Director of the Substance Abuse Treatment Program of the VACHS since 1996.

    Dr. Petrakis is also the Director of the Addiction Psychiatry Residency at Yale, an ACGME-accredited program and the PI of both an NIAAA-funded and a NIDA-funded training grant (T32).

    Her research interests are predominately two-fold: (1) finding appropriate treatments for dually diagnosed individuals and (2) understanding the neurobiological mechanisms underlying alcohol dependence. She has received funding from the Department of Defense, NIH-NIAAA, the VA, NARSAD and the Stanley Foundation.

  • Marina Picciotto

    Charles B. G. Murphy Professor of Psychiatry and Professor in the Child Study Center, of Neuroscience and of Pharmacology; Deputy Chair for Basic Science Research, Dept. of Psychiatry; Deputy Director, Kavli Institute for Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Alcohol Drinking; Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms; Mental Disorders; Nervous System Diseases; Neurobiology; Neurosciences; Nicotine; Pharmacology

    Dr. Picciotto joined the Yale faculty in 1995, after completing a postdoctoral fellowship with Jean-Pierre Changeux in the Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience at the Institut Pasteur in Paris. She earned a Ph.D. in Molecular Neurobiology at The Rockefeller University in New York City in 1992, where she worked in the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience under Paul Greengard. She received a B.S. degree in biological sciences from Stanford University, Stanford, California, in 1985.

    Dr. Picciotto is currently Editor-in-Chief of The Journal of Neuroscience. She served on the Scientific Council of the National Institute on Drug Abuse from 2010-2014, was Treasurer of the Society for Neuroscience from 2014-2015, and President of the Society for Research on Nicotine & Tobacco from 2018-2019. She has been a Handling Editor for the Journal of Neuroscience, the Journal of Nicotine and Tobacco Research, the Journal of Neurochemistry and Neuroscience Letters. She is currently Chair of the MNPS NIH Study Section and is a past member of the Neurobiology of Motivated Behavior. In 2000 she was awarded the Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering by President Clinton and in 2007, she was honored with the Jacob P. Waletzky Memorial Award for Innovative Research in Drug Addiction and Alcoholism by the Society for Neuroscience. She was elected to the National Academy of Medicine and the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering in 2012 and as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2014, where she is currently Chair of the Neuroscience Section. 

  • Robert Pietrzak

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Public Health (Social and Behavioral Sciences); Director, Translational Psychiatric Epidemiology Laboratory, Clinical Neurosciences Division, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs National Center for PTSD

    Research Interests
    Anxiety Disorders; Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic; Stress Disorders, Traumatic; Resilience, Psychological

    Robert H. Pietrzak completed a B.A. in Psychology at Clark University, and M.P.H. in Epidemiology and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology with specialization in Clinical Neuropsychology at the University of Connecticut. Dr. Pietrzak is Director of the Translational Psychiatric Epidemiology Laboratory in the Clinical Neurosciences Division of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs National Center for PTSD and Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine and Associate Professor of Public Health (Social and Behavioral Sciences) at Yale School of Public Health. His primary research interests include the epidemiology of traumatic stress and resilience across the lifespan; dimensional models of stress-related psychopathology; and the effect of stress on cognition.

  • Christopher Pittenger

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Assistant Chair for Translational Research, Psychiatry; Director, Yale OCD Research Clinic; Co-Director, Neuroscience Research Training Program

    Research Interests
    Basal Ganglia Diseases; Tourette Syndrome; Learning; Molecular Biology; Neuroanatomy; Neurobiology; Neurophysiology; Neurosciences; Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder; Phobic Disorders; Psychopharmacology; Trichotillomania

    Christopher Pittenger earned his MD and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University, where his graduate work was done with Nobel Prize recipient Eric Kandel. He returned to Yale University - where he had done his undergraduate studies - for residency and research training in psychiatry in 2003. He joined the faculty as an Assistant Professor in 2007 and was promoted to the rank of Associate Professor in 2013.

    During his Ph.D. studies in basic neurobiology, he became fascinated by the brain's ability to go on autopilot -- to perform complex series of actions or thoughts, after sufficient rehearsal, with almost no conscious effort. Then, during his clinical training, he recognized how this process, when disrupted by disease, can lead to the maladaptive and disruptive automaticity seen in many neuropsychiatric disorders. His research, both with patients and in animal models, aims to elucidate the mechanisms of learned automatic behaviors and to better understand the consequences when they go awry, with the ultimate goal of developing new understandings and better treatments for a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions.

    Dr. Pittenger's research and clinical work have been acknowledged by a number of prestigious awards, including grant funding from the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke, NARSAD, the Tourette Syndrome of America, and the Doris Duke Charitable Trust.  He has won a number of honorific awards, including from the National Institute of Mental Health, the Society for Neuroscience, the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, the American Psychiatric Association, and the American College of Psychiatrists. He is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the International OCD Foundation and an active member of the Society for Neuroscience, the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, the Society of Biological Psychiatry, the American Neurological Association, the American Psychiatric Association, and other groups. 

  • Jessica Pollard

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; Clinical Director, STEP

    Research Interests
    Psychotic Disorders; Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders
    Clinical Interests
    Psychology, Adolescent; Psychotic Disorders; Schizophrenia; Schizotypal Personality Disorder; Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders; Transition to Adult Care

    Jessica Pollard, PhD is a licensed psychologist, Clinical Director of the Specialized Treatment Early in Psychosis (STEP) Clinic and Assistant Professor in Psychiatry. Her role in the STEP Clinic is to develop and oversee clinical services, supervise clinical staff and trainees, provide community and professional outreach, and conduct research. Dr. Pollard has an extensive background in early psychosis treatment and research, having completed a two year fellowship at the Yale where she was the first project director for STEP; founding and directing the multidisciplinary Aware Program for those at ultra-high risk for psychosis (UHR) and in the early stages of psychotic illnesses (first episode psychosis) at The Acadia Hospital in Bangor, Maine and then opening the Aware Center for Early Intervention as a private clinic in the Bangor community.

    Dr. Pollard earned her B.A. at the University of Maine at Farmington, double majoring in Psychology and an interdisciplinary major of her own construction involving biology and music. She attended the University of Connecticut Clinical Psychology PhD program, earning her masters and doctoral degrees. Dr. Pollard's thesis and dissertation were both on the relationship between perceived coercion and mental health treatment outcomes. At UCONN, she trained with Linda Frisman, PhD, Director of Research for the State of Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, on policy and services research. She became involved in the American Public Health Association (APHA), serving as Deputy Program Chair for Mental Health and Program Chair for Mental Health. Dr. Pollard is 2009 recipient of the APHA Mental Health Section Award for excellence in the field of public mental health.

  • Allison Ponce

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Psychiatry and Psychology

    Allison Ponce earned her Ph.D. in clinical psychology at the University of Connecticut in 2003, and completed her postdoctoral training in the Yale Department of Psychiatry before joining the faculty in 2005. She is the Director of Education at the Connecticut Mental Health Center. Dr. Ponce has research, administrative, and clinical interests in public mental health, particularly with regard to serious mental illness and homelessness. Another major area of focus is the education and training of psychologists and other mental health professionals. Dr. Ponce supervises psychology fellows and coordinates several seminars focused on administration, leadership, and community-based care. Dr. Ponce is immediate Past-Chair of the Board of Directors of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC) and serves as an internship site visit chair for the American Psychological Association's Commission on Accreditation.

  • Marc Potenza

    Professor of Psychiatry, in the Child Study Center and of Neuroscience; Director, Center of Excellence in Gambling Research; Director, Yale Program for Research on Impulsivity and Impulse Control Disorders; Director, Women and Addictive Disorders, Women's Health Research at Yale

    Research Interests
    Child Psychiatry; Gambling; Disruptive, Impulse Control, and Conduct Disorders; Neurobiology; Psychiatry; Psychotherapy; Substance-Related Disorders; Psychiatry and Psychology
    Clinical Interests
    Alcohol Drinking; Mental Health; Obesity; Women's Health; Substance-Related Disorders; Men's Health

    Dr. Potenza is a board-certified psychiatrist
    with sub-specialty training and certification in addiction psychiatry. He has trained at Yale University receiving
    a combined BS/MS with Honors in Molecular Biochemistry and Biophysics and a PhD
    in Cell Biology, the latter concurrent with the MD through the Medical
    Scientist Training Program. He
    completed internship, psychiatric residency and addiction psychiatry fellowship
    training at Yale. Currently, he is
    a Professor of Psychiatry, Child Study and Neurobiology at the Yale University
    School of Medicine where he is Director of the Problem Gambling Clinic, the
    Center of Excellence in Gambling Research, and the Women and Addictive
    Disorders Core of Women's Health Research at Yale, and Senior Scientist at the Connecticut Council on Problem Gambling. He is on the editorial boards of fifteen
    journals (including editor-in-chief of Current Addiction Reports) and has received multiple national and international awards for
    excellence in research and clinical care.
    He has consulted to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services
    Administration, National Registry of Effective Programs, National Institutes of
    Health, American Psychiatric Association and World Health Organization on
    matters of addiction.

  • Seth Powsner

    Professor of Psychiatry and of Emergency Medicine; Director, Crisis Intervention Unit

    Research Interests
    Computer Graphics; Medical Informatics; User-Computer Interface

    Dr. Powsner teaches Emergency Medicine and Psychiatry residents, and advanced medical students. He has been on faculty over 30 years and has been Medical Director of the Crisis Intervention Unit within Yale-New Haven Hospital's Emergency Department since 2000. Prior to joining the faculty at Yale, Dr. Powsner was on the clinical faculty at the University of Chicago. He had a private practice in downtown Chicago.

  • Research Scientist

    Research Interests
    Alcoholism; Personality; Personality Disorders; Pharmacology; Psychiatry; Stress, Physiological; Comorbidity; Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
    Dr. Ralevski is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine and the Project Director for the Substance Abuse Treatment Program. Dr. Ralevski completed her Post Doctoral Fellowship at Harvard Medical School. She joined the faculty at Yale University in 2001. Her research interest include the search for appropriate treatment for individuals with dual diagnosis of alcoholism and other psychiatric conditions including depression, post traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia and borderline personality disorder. Her other research examines factors, such as stress, that may lead to the development and maintenance of alcoholism and other mental disorders.
  • Clinician; Psychologist

    Dr. Xoli Redmond came to Yale School of Medicine as a predoctoral fellow and continued his postdoctoral training through the Department of Psychiatry at the Substance Abuse Treatment Unit of CMHC. Dr. Redmond specializes in mindfulness-based and cognitive therapeutic approaches specifically focusing on domains such as acceptance, compassion, truth, and awakening. He is a trained meditation instructor with significant experience in insight-based and non-dual meditative practices. He is currently a Clinician focused on the development and implementation of beneficial treatments.

  • Sandra Resnick

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Deputy Director, VA Northeast Program Evaluation Center; Editor, Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal

    Research Interests
    Health Services Research; Mental Health Services; Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders
  • Robert Rohrbaugh

    Professor of Psychiatry; Deputy Chair for Education and Career Development, Department of Psychiatry; Residency Program Director, Department of Psychiatry; Director, Office of International Medical Student Education, Yale School of Medicine

    Research Interests
    Internship and Residency; Medicine; Mental Health Services; Global Health; Ethical Analysis; Psychiatry and Psychology; Health Care

    A graduate of Franklin and Marshall College, Yale School of Medicine and the Yale Psychiatry residency and geriatric psychiatry fellowship programs, Dr. Rohrbaugh has been a member of the Yale Department of Psychiatry faculty since 1988. Early in his career, Dr. Rohrbaugh's clinical, educational and research interests were at the interface of geropsychiatry and medicine. He has been Chief of the Psychiatry Consult service at VA-Connecticut and developed the geropsychiatry service and the psychiatry primary care clinic at VA-Connecticut. He was the Clinical Director for VA-Connecticut Mental Health Service Line before leaving the VA to become the department's residency program director.

    Throughout his career Dr. Rohrbaugh has been active in medical student and residency education. He has been especially interested in teaching beginning clinicians how to listen to a patient's narrative, identify pertinent data, and use that data to develop a bio-psycho-social formulation and treatment plan. Dr. Rohrbaugh served as the Clerkship Director and Director of Medical Studies for medical student education and as Associate Program Director before assuming the Program Director role in 2008. In 2009, Dr. Rohrbaugh was named Deputy Chair for Education and Career Development, extending his role in education to faculty in the department.

    Most recently, Dr. Rohrbaugh has worked to educate Yale medical students and residents in global health and has worked with colleagues at Xiangya School of Medicine in Changsha, Hunan Province, PRC to develop a competency based model for post-graduate (residency) education. This model has heavily influenced the Chinese national model for residency training. He was named the Founding Director of the Yale School of Medicine's Office of International Medical Student Education in 2008. In 2015, having noted the irony that global health education is largely discussed by educators in high income countries, Dr. Rohrbaugh co-founded the Bellagio Global Health Education Initiative with an explicit goal of bringing global health education leaders from high, middle and low income countries together to developed global health curricula that could be implemented world-wide.

  • Marc Rosen

    Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Mental Disorders; Psychopharmacology; Psychotherapy; Substance-Related Disorders; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Dr. Rosen has been at Yale since beginning his psychiatry residency in 1987. He is a staff psychiatrist at VA Connecticut and conducts research on behavior change. His current research directions involve: (1) therapeutic money management for people with comorbid psychiatric and substance abuse disorders, (2) adherence to antiretroviral medication by people with substance use disorders, and (3) counseling for veterans presenting for Comp and Pension evaluations. His group's research materials are available at http://www.behaviorchange.yale.edu/

  • Robert Rosenheck

    Professor of Psychiatry and of Health Policy

    Research Interests
    Criminology; Humanities; Quality of Life; Public Sector; Substance-Related Disorders; Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders; Federal Government; Psychiatry and Psychology; Health Care

    Dr. Robert Rosenheck is Professor of Psychiatry, Public Health and at the Child Study Center at Yale Medical School where he is also Director of the Division of Mental Health Services and Outcomes Research in the Department of Psychiatry. He is an internationally known mental health service researcher who is leader in cost-effectiveness studies of behavioral health interventions and in monitoring quality of care and other aspects of the performance of large health care system. He was responsible for the cost-effectiveness components of the recent NIMH-funded Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease trials as well as five multi-site VA Cooperative Studies. As founding Director of the Department of Veterans Affairs Northeast Program Evaluation Center he spent 22 years evaluating, disseminating, and monitoring innovative mental health programs across the VA system including: (i) several hundred specialized programs for homeless veterans; (ii) a national network of 100 Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) teams for veterans who suffer from severe and persistent mental illnesses; (iii) a variety of specialized programs for veterans suffering from war-related PTSD and iv. a national network of work restoration programs. Beginning in 1994 he published the annual Mental Health Report Card for the Department of Veterans Affairs (see http://NEPEC.med.VA.gov) He was a prime architect of national VA collaborative programs with both the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Social Security Administration. He also directed both the client-level evaluation of the ACCESS program for homeless mentally ill Americans, for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration of the Department of Health and Human Services and the joint HUD-HHS-VA Collaborative Initiative on Chronic Homelessness. He has published more than 800 scientific papers on topics such as performance evaluation of large mental health systems, mental health quality of care, the causes of homelessness, the organization and financing of mental health services, and the cost-effectiveness of psychosocial and psychopharmacological treatments of serious mental illness, homelessness, and PTSD among war veterans. He has conducted global mental health services research in China, Brazil, Nigeria, and Ghana. He has received awards for his work from the American Psychiatric Association and the American Public Health Association, among others

  • Michael Rowe

    Professor; Co-Director, Program for Recovery and Community Health; Principal Investigator, Citizens Community Collaborative, Yale Department of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Humanities; Psychiatry and Psychology; Anthropology, Education, Sociology and Social Phenomena; Health Care

    Much of my research and writing over the past 20 years concerns “citizenship” as an applied theoretical framework for the social inclusion and participation of people with mental illnesses. Citizenship, in my and my colleagues’ work is defined as a person's strong connection to the 5 Rs of rights, responsibilities, roles, resources, and relationships that society offers its recognized members, along with a sense of belonging that is validated by others. This research is organized under the Citizens Community Collaborative (CCC) at the Program for Recovery and Community Health (PRCH) of the Department of Psychiatry and Connecticut Mental Health Center. Study/intervention components with DMHAS funding include the Citizens Project, a 6-month intervention for people with mental illness and previous incarcerations; community-connection work including Project Connect and F.A.C.E.; financial health and empowerment supports; measurement, clinical tools, and manual development; and a statewide learning collaborative to take citizenship to scale in Connecticut. Among other funders are NIMH and the Melville Charitable Trust.

    Related to this work is my past and continuing writing and research on homelessness and mental health outreach, and peer-informed interventions for people with mental illness. I also write and have conducted research in the areas of narrative medicine, patient-doctor relationships, high-technology medicine, and medical errors. I am also conducting research on interventions to support “motive control” for people with strong revenge feelings against those who have wronged them.

    I am Co-Director of PRCH and of the International Recovery and Citizenship Collaborative (IRCC)and the Collaborative for Motive Control Studies, Principal Investigator of the CCC, and Editor of The Perch, an arts, music, and literary journal.  

  • David Russell

    Director, Clinical Research, Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders; Assistant Clinical Professor

    Research Interests
    Alzheimer Disease; Huntington Disease; Movement Disorders; Parkinson Disease; Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Dr. Russell is a neurologist specializing in movement disorders, dementias, and other neurodegenerative disorders. He is working full-time within a clinical research institute, devoted entirely to clinical research on diseases with major unmet needs. As a former director of the Yale Movement Disorders Consultation he clinic, he continues to work closely with other area neurologists and researchers to try to help improve the future for people with these diseases. Referrals to the Institute for Negenerative Disorders for potential research participation can be made most efficiently through the patient's treating neurologist or other physician.

  • Gerard Sanacora

    George D. and Esther S. Gross Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Yale Depression Research Program; Co-Director, Yale New Haven Hospital Interventional Psychiatry Service

    Research Interests
    Amino Acids; Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms; Mental Disorders; Nervous System Diseases; Drugs, Investigational
    Clinical Interests
    Adult; Depression

    Dr. Sanacora completed an NIH sponsored Medical Scientist Training Program at the State University New York at Stony Brook, earning his Ph.D. in Physiology and Biophysics in 1992 and his M.D. degree in 1994. He then moved to Yale University where he completed his internship at Yale-New Haven Hospital, the Clinical Neuroscientist Training Program Residency in the Department of Psychiatry, and an NIH funded Neuroimaging Scientist Training Program Fellowship. He is currently an Associate Professor and the Director of the Yale Depression Research Program. Dr. Sanacora’s work is concentrated largely on elucidating the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with mood and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Much of his recent research has focused on identifying the contributions of the amino acid neurotransmitter systems (GABA and Glutamate) to the neurobiology of mood disorders and the mechanism of antidepressant action. Specifically, his basic science laboratory employs rodent models to explore the effects of chronic stress on cellular and molecular biology, and examines the molecular, cellular and behavioral effects of novel treatment strategies targeting these affected systems. His clinical laboratory employs novel magnetic resonance spectroscopy methodologies and pharmacological challenge paradigms to identify abnormalities in the function of the amino acid neurotransmitter systems in individuals suffering from mood and anxiety disorders. In addition, he is involved in several early phase clinical trials designed to test the clinical efficacy of newly developed therapeutic agents.

  • Richard Schottenfeld

    Senior Research Scientist

    Research Interests
    Alcoholism; Behavioral Medicine; Buprenorphine; Methadone; Opioid-Related Disorders; Substance-Related Disorders; Chronic Pain

    Dr Schottenfeld is an experienced clinician, teacher and
    clinical researcher who has focused on improving the efficacy, accessibility
    and availability of addictions treatment in the United
    States and internationally (in Malaysia,
    Iran and China.) In clinical trials and clinical epidemiologic
    studies, he has developed new programs that integrate addictions treatment and
    general medical services and has evaluated the pharmacological and behavioral
    components of different treatments for opioid dependence and other addictive
    disorders. In his clinical, administrative and teaching roles, he oversaw
    development of a multi-component drug abuse treatment program providing
    innovative ambulatory and residential treatment for addictive disorders and was
    the founding Director of the Addiction Psychiatry Residency Training Program
    and the drug abuse clinical research post-doctoral training program at Yale.

  • Dongju Seo

    Assistant Professor

    Dr. Seo received a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus in 2008. She is interested in conducting interdisciplinary research to understand the etiology of stress-related clinical disorders and facilitate the development of effective treatment strategies for stress-related diseases.

  • Hyojung Seo

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience

    Research Interests
    Behavior, Animal; Learning; Memory; Neurophysiology; Psychiatry; Schizophrenia; Prefrontal Cortex

    Dr. Hyojung Seo received her bachelor and master's degree in Psychology from Seoul National University in the Republic of Korea. She then completed her Ph.D. in behavioral neuroscience with her thesis research on the neurophysiology of the oculomotor system. Dr. Seo continued her research in decision neuroscience as a post-doctoral fellow and associate research scientist at Yale University and joined the Department of Psychiatry at Yale University as an assistant professor in 2016.

  • Michael Sernyak

    Professor of Psychiatry; Deputy Chair for Clinical Affairs and Program Development, Department of Psychiatry; CEO, Connecticut Mental Health Center

    Research Interests
    Bipolar Disorder; Health Services Administration; Health Care Quality, Access, and Evaluation; Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders

    Dr. Michael Sernyak graduated from Amherst College with a BA in Physics and Astronomy in 1983. He attended Jefferson Medical College and took his residency in psychiatry at Yale in 1987, with an internship at Greenwich Hospital. Following completion of his residency, he served as unit chief of the Psychosis Studies Unit at the Connecticut Mental Health Center for 5 years. In 1996 he joined the staff at the VA Connecticut Health Care System and in 2001 was appointed the Chief of the Psychiatry Service. In 2009 he was appointed CEO of the Connecticut Mental Health Center--a collaboration between the department and the CT Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services. Dr. Sernyak is an internationally recognized health services researcher who specializes in the treatment issues of the severely mentally ill. His most recent areas of focus have been the development of metabolic abnormalities such as diabetes and the delivery of medical care in patients with schizophrenia.

  • Michelle Alejandra Silva

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Connecticut Latino Behavioral Health System, Psychiatry

    Michelle Silva is a licensed clinical psychologist and Director of the Connecticut Latino Behavioral Health System, an academic-community partnership designed to expand access to behavioral health services for the monolingual Spanish speaking community of greater New Haven. Dr. Silva’s work bridges practice, education, and clinical research, and she engages in multidisciplinary collaborations designed to promote health equity among vulnerable and underserved communities. Based at the Connecticut Mental Health Center, Dr. Silva provides clinical services to individuals affected by immigration-related trauma at the Hispanic Clinic, and treats children, adolescents, and families at the West Haven Mental Health Clinic. She serves as a supervising psychologist for fellows in the Department's Doctoral Internship in Clinical and Community Psychology, and faculty advisor to health professional students in the Behavioral Health Department of the Yale HAVEN Free Clinic.  

  • Rajita Sinha

    Foundations Fund Professor of Psychiatry and Professor in the Child Study Center and of Neuroscience; Director, Yale Interdisciplinary Stress Center; Chief, Psychology Section in Psychiatry; Co-director of Education, Yale Center for Clinical Investigation

    Research Interests
    Child Psychiatry; Chronic Disease; Neurobiology; Neurosciences; Psychiatry; Relaxation; Stress, Psychological; Substance-Related Disorders

    Rajita Sinha, Ph.D. is the Foundations Fund Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Yale University and also Professor of Neurobiology and Child Study. She is Chief of the Psychology section in Psychiatry and Co-Director of Education at the Yale Center for Clinical Investigation, home of the NIH supported Yale Clinical Translational Science Award. She is the Founding Director of the Yale Stress Center, a university-wide center that focuses on understanding the stress mechanisms affecting health behaviors, mood and emotion regulation and chronic disease risk. She is internationally known for her pioneering research on the mechanisms underlying chronic stress and adversity to negative health consequences and those underlying resilient coping that promote health and disease prevention. Her research has made discoveries in identifying childhood trauma, chronic stress and addiction related brain and peripheral changes in stress pathways that affect behavioral choices and decision making and loss of control to increase addiction and chronic disease risk. She is also developing and testing new pharmacological and behavioral strategies to reverse the toxic effects of stress and addictive behaviors such as excessive alcohol use, overeating of high fat and high sugar foods and other behavioral addictions. These objectives are being accomplished through a series of NIH funded research projects and she has published widely on these topics. She has served on many NIH special emphasis panels, review committees and workshops, presented at numerous national and international conferences, and her work is widely cited.

  • Patrick Skosnik

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Association Learning; Auditory Perception; Marijuana Abuse; Conditioning, Eyelid; Electroencephalography; Marijuana Smoking; Memory, Short-Term; Psychoses, Substance-Induced; Verbal Learning; Designer Drugs; Drugs, Investigational; Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders; Executive Function; Memory, Long-Term; Drug-Seeking Behavior; Neuroimaging; Memory, Episodic; Controlled Substances; Medical Marijuana; Mindfulness; Chemicals and Drugs

    Dr. Skosnik trained in Neuroscience at Northwestern University where he was mentored by Dr. Sohee Park. His doctoral work involved the formulation of a novel hypothesis stating that schizophrenia pathology is caused in part by a dysregulation of the brain’s endogenous cannabinoid system. Subsequently, Dr. Skosnik completed postdoctoral study at the Indiana University Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences where he was involved in electrophysiology research under the tutelage of Dr. Brian O’Donnell and Dr. William Hetrick. After his postdoctoral study, he joined the Yale University Department of Psychiatry as research faculty where he worked with Dr. Deepak C. D’Souza examining the electrophysiological correlates of cannabinoids in humans. In 2018, Dr. Skosnik was appointed as an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine, and now directs the Psychophysiology Laboratory within the VA-CMHC-Yale Schizophrenia Research Clinic (Directed by Dr. Deepak C. D’Souza and Dr. Mohini Ranganathan). He has been the recipient of two NARSAD Young Investigator Awards, was invited to participate in the NIH Early Career Reviewer (ECR) Program, was the 2016 Yale Nominee for the Charles A. Dana Foundation Neuroimaging Grant (awarded), has received The Brain and Behavior Foundation (Formerly NARSAD) Independent Investigator Award. and his work has been featured on the covers of Biological Psychiatry, Neuropsychopharmacology, and Clinical Neurophysiology.

  • William Sledge

    George D. and Esther S. Gross Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Humanities; Psychiatry and Psychology; Anthropology, Education, Sociology and Social Phenomena; Health Care
    Clinical Interests
    Depression

    Dr. Sledge has served in a variety of roles within Psychiatry as well as Yale University. Within Psychiatry, he was Clinical Director of the Connecticut Mental Health Center until he moved in 1996 to the Medical Directorship of Psychiatry at Yale New Haven Hospital. From 1995 to 2005, he was also Master of Calhoun College and participated in a variety of administrative roles in Yale College including Chair of the Council of Masters. He is a psychoanalyst as well as a health services investigator and innovator of clinical services.

  • Dana Small

    Professor of Psychiatry and Professor of Psychology; Director, Modern Diet and Physiology Research Center

    Research Interests
    Dopamine; Motivation; Neurophysiology; Obesity; Psychophysics; Stress, Psychological; Neuroimaging; Psychiatry and Psychology

    I am a psychologist and neuroscientist with graduate degrees in Neuroscience and Clinical Psychology from McGill University.  My research focuses on understanding how sensory, metabolic and neural signals are integrated to determine food choices and on how the dysregulation of these systems contribute to the development of obesity, diabetes and cognitive impairment. My group primarily uses neuroimaging, neuropsychological and metabolic methodologies in humans; however, we also have collaborations with a number of basic research labs at Yale and abroad where we use a revere translational approach to pursue mechanistic questions in rodent models that arise from findings in humans.  My laboratory generally consists of 1-2 phd students; 3-4 post-docs; a research associate professor and a handful of international interns and Yale undergraduates. I have trained 5 PhD students, 12 post-doctoral fellows and over 40 undergraduates and medical students. The  lab has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health since 2003.

    In addition to my activities at Yale, I am also involved in a number of initiatives related to advancing knowledge and treatment of diabetes and obesity. I am co-leading a National Institutes of Health workgroup developing a neuropsychological battery for use in obesity and diabetes trials and chairing the annual meeting for the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior. I am executive editor at Appetite and Biological Psychiatry and a member of the National Academy of Sciences Board on Behavior, Cognitive and Sensory Sciences. 

  • Megan Smith

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and in the Child Study Center; Director, Mental health Outreach for MotherS (MOMS) Partnership; Director, Yale Child Study Center Parent and Family Development Program

    Research Interests
    Child Psychiatry; Chronic Disease; Mental Health; Stress, Psychological; Urban Health; Women's Health; Substance-Related Disorders; Healthcare Disparities; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Megan V. Smith, MPH, DrPH is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and in the Child Study Center in the Yale School of Medicine and in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences in the Yale School of Public Health. Smith is the Founder and Director of the nationally acclaimed Mental health Outreach for MotherS (MOMS) Partnership, a community-academic partnership to improve maternal mental health among low-income women through a community-driven, place-based approach. Smith is currently working to transform systems of mental health care for low-income women with a particular focus on reducing mental health inequities related to race, ethnicity and poverty. Smith has numerous publications related to poverty, mental health and gender, and serves as Principal Investigator on studies ranging from the epidemiology of depressive and anxiety disorders in the perinatal period to the utilization of mobile health technology to reduce depression in mothers.

  • Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Psychiatry and Psychology

    David L. Snow, Ph.D. is Professor Emeritus and Senior Research Scientist in Psychiatry and Epidemiology & Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. Snow is a clinical/community psychologist who has extensive experience in the design and evaluation of preventive interventions in community settings, particularly in the workplace and school systems, and in research aimed at identifying key risk and protective factors predictive of substance use/abuse, psychological symptoms, intimate partner violence, and other behavioral outcomes. His workplace intervention, Coping with Work and Family Stress, has been rigorously evaluated through grants from NIDA and NIAAA, and has been designated as a science-based program by the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP) and as a SAMHSA Model Program. Along with ongoing efficacy and effectiveness trials, the program is being disseminated on a national and international basis. Dr. Snow also is collaborating with faculty at Columbia University and staff of the National Health Promotion Association on the dissemination of science-based workplace interventions to militatry personnel and their families, is testing the effectiveness of his Coping with Work and Family Stress intervention with a population of minority women at risk for HIV/AIDS and substance abuse in partnership with an organization in the Washington, DC area, and is collaborating with the Boston College Center on Aging & Work as a member of a research team investigating the effects of Time and Placement Management (TPM) policies on employee health, well being, and productivity in a large U.S. corporation. In addition, Dr. Snow has special interests in the protective and stress-mediating effects of coping and social support, methodological and ethical issues in prevention research, and technical assistance and organizational consultation.

  • Steven Southwick

    Glenn H. Greenberg Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Epidemiology; Neurobiology; Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic; Resilience, Psychological; Psychiatry and Psychology

    Dr. Southwick received an MD from George Washington Medical School, 1980. He completed his psychiatry residency at Yale University School of Medicine. He is the Glenn H. Greenberg Professor of Psychiatry, PTSD and Resilience at Yale University Medical School and Yale Child Study Center, Medical Director of the Clinical Neuroscience Diversion of the Veterans Affairs National Center for PTSD, and Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine. His interests include the psychology and neurobiology of psychological trauma, PTSD, and resilience to stress. He has worked with a wide range of trauma survivors including combat veterans, civilian children and adults with PTSD, and very high functioning stress resilient former prisoners of war and active duty Special Forces soldiers and Navy Seals.

  • Vinod Srihari

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Associate Program Director, Psychiatry Residency Training; Director, STEP Program

    Research Interests
    Curriculum; Mental Health Services; Psychotic Disorders; Biomarkers; Health Care Quality, Access, and Evaluation; Evidence-Based Medicine; Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders

    Dr. Srihari's clinical and research interests are focused on the evaluation and treatment of individuals with psychotic disorders. He directs a clinic that provides a specialized model of care to individuals who are early in the course of a psychotic disorder. The clinic for Specialized Treatment Early in Psychosis (STEP, www.step.yale.edu) is based at the Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven. In 2015, the program initiated a population health campaign to reduce the duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) in 10 surrounding towns. The campaign, titled MindMap (www.mindmapct.org), uses social & mass media, outreach and detailing of a variety of professionals (educators, police, consumer/youth organizations, clinicians) to shorten pathways to care for youth and families confronting the recent onset of a psychotic illness.

  • Meaghan Stacy

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Clinical Interests
    Bipolar Disorder; Schizophrenia; Mood Disorders

    Meaghan Stacy, Ph.D. is a regional and national expert in consultation and systems change. Her research, training, clinical, consultation, and administrative efforts focus on the development and improvement of healthcare systems. She provides education regarding the implementation and evaluation of recovery-oriented and patient-centered mental healthcare to support the recovery of individuals with serious mental illnesses (SMI). Beyond mental health systems, she enhances healthcare organizations by providing consultation regarding systems transformation, interdisciplinary team functioning, and organizational health throughout the eight VA medical centers in New England. Through data-driven consultation and action planning, she drives performance improvement and systems change, which overlaps with her academic efforts focused on improving healthcare provision and systems.  

     

  • Jeanne Steiner

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Medical Director, Connecticut Mental Health Center; Director, Yale Fellowship in Public Psychiatry; Co-Director, Yale Division of Public Psychiatry

    Dr. Steiner serves as the Medical Director of the CT Mental Health Center, where she oversees programs in quality improvement, clinical risk management, and medical staff affairs. She is involved in initiatives to improve the health of individuals with serious mental illness who are served by the center and throughout the public system in CT. She is the Director for the Yale Fellowship in Public Psychiatry, which provides advanced training to psychiatrists who have an interest in pursuing careers in psychiatric administration within the public sector. She is the Co-editor of the Yale Textbook in Public Psychiatry, and the Co-Director of the Yale Division of Public Psychiatry.

  • Matthew Steinfeld

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; Associate Director of Clinical Training, Substance Abuse Treatment Unit of the Connecticut Mental Health Center

    Dr. Matthew Steinfeld received his doctorate in clinical psychology from The New School for Social Research, and completed pre and postdoctoral fellowships in the Department of Psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine. He has been a Fellow of the American Psychoanalytic Association and a Psychoanalytic Fellow at Columbia University’s Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research. Dr. Steinfeld’s scholarly, clinical, and research interests center on: clinical theory and technique in psychodynamic psychotherapy, the psychological and sociological correlates of substance use disorders, and the acoustic dimensions of psychotherapy. A classically trained musician, he has also conducted research on the psychodynamics of music making. He serves as an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and the Associate Director of Clinical Training at the Connecticut Mental Health Center’s Substance Abuse Treatment Unit.

  • Michael Stevens

    Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Clinical Neuroscience and Development Laboratory at Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center; Director, Child & Adolescent Research, The Institute of Living

    Research Interests
    Adolescent Behavior; Anxiety Disorders; Brain Mapping; Child Behavior Disorders; Child Development; Child Development Disorders, Pervasive; Depressive Disorder, Major; Electroencephalography; Impulsive Behavior; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Neural Pathways; Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders; Substance-Related Disorders; Adolescent Development

    Dr. Stevens has been continually funded by the National Institutes of Health since shortly after he received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Connecticut in 1999.  His NRSA-funded postdoctoral work at the University of Connecticut Health Center focused on neuropsychological and neurobiological study of adolescent risk factors for addictions.  After joining the UCHC faculty as an assistant professor and starting adolescent-related clinical and research programs, Dr. Stevens left in 2002 to help develop the just-founded Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center.  Here, Dr. Stevens received a K23 Career Development award from the NIMH to provide him opportunity to gain expertise in fMRI and EEG methods.  He received his academic appointment in the Yale Department of Psychiatry in 2003, was promoted to Adjunct Associate Professor in 2009, and Full Professor in 2017.  During this time, he has been the Principal Investigator or a co-investigator on dozens of R01-level NIH grants that use neuroimaging, EEG, neurocognitive, and genetic methods to better understand a variety of different neuropsychiatric disorders.  These include ADHD and other disruptive behavior disorders of childhood, Major Depressive Disorder and Bipolar Illness, Autism, psychosis, TBI, and recently both alcohol-related addiction as well as the effects of cannabis on the brain.  Much of this research work focuses on the developmental period starting at puberty until early adulthood, and incorporates both concepts and methodology that examines distributed neural networks in the brain.  Most recently, Dr. Stevens has become keenly interested in using neuroimaging tools to accelerate development of novel, non-pharmacological clinical interventions such as cognitive training, rTMS and tDCS

  • Michael Strambler

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Child Wellbeing and Education Research

    Research Interests
    Achievement; Behavioral Medicine; Child Psychiatry; Culture; Psychiatry; Urban Health

    I received my Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from University of California at Berkeley and conducted my predoctoral fellowship at the Institute for Juvenile Research at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Upon completing this fellowship, I was a Postdoctoral Fellow at Rush Neurobehavioral Center with funding from the William T. Grant Foundation. I completed my postdoctoral training at The Consultation Center at Yale within the Division of Prevention and Community Research at Yale School of Medicine with support from the Ford Foundation. I began my faculty career as an Associate Research Scientist at the Yale and have been an Assistant Professor since 2014.

    Currently, I direct Child Well-Being and Education Research at The Consultation Center at Yale where I am also a Senior Evaluation Consultant for YaleEval. My work has two main themes. One theme focuses on the role of social environments in the academic, psychological, social, and behavioral well-being of children and youth. A second theme examines whether and how school-based programs and practices improve the academic performance and health of children and emphasizes practical approaches for how to use data to inform practices and policies. Much of my work occurs in the context of partnerships between researchers and practitioners. One such project I direct is the Partnership for Early Education Research (PEER; http://peer.yale.edu), a research-practice partnership between three Connecticut communities. 

  • John Strauss

    Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry

    John Strauss majored in psychology at Swarthmore College and then took a year out from Yale Medical School to study with Jean Piaget and prepare for his Yale thesis using Piaget’s tests with schizophrenic patients. Subsequently he conducted numerous studies on the diagnosis and prognosis of schizophrenia with Will Carpenter and John Bartko while at the National Institute of Mental Health. They made the earliest scientific study showing that people with schizophrenia could improve. Subsequently, at the University of Rochester and then at Yale John has become increasingly involved in understanding narrative as essential along with traditional scientific methods to comprehend the nature of psychiatric disorders and to develop more effective treatments.

  • Thomas Styron

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Psychology Training, Adult Community Mental Health Services, CMHC; Executive Director, Community Services Network of Greater New Haven

    Dr. Styron earned his BA (English) and MA (Political Science) from Columbia University and his MS and PhD (Clinical Psychology, 1997) from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. From 1982 to 1990, he held a variety of leadership positions with the New York Coalition for the Homeless, the National Coalition for the Homeless, HELP, Inc., and the Association to Benefit Children, which he co-founded. Dr. Styron completed his postgraduate training at Yale University, based at the Connecticut Mental Health Center (CMHC) and Yale's Student Counseling Service. He served as Executive Director of the Obsessive Compulsive Foundation in 1998 and then joined the faculty of the Department of Psychiatry as an Assistant Professor in 1999 and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2005. In addition to senior leadership roles at CMHC, Dr. Styron is Executive Director of the Community Services Network of Greater New Haven, a collaborative of 16 community-based not-for-profit organizations which provide a broad array of integrated community supports for individuals with serious mental illness and for which CMHC is lead agency. Dr. Styron is also Director of Psychology Training for CMHC's Adult Community Mental Health division, a Fellow at Pauli Murray College, a Yale College Student Faculty Advisor and serves on the Admissions Committee for the Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Styron’s research and teaching focuses on best practices in the area of recovery-oriented care for individuals with serious mental illnesses.

  • Nancy Suchman

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Associate Professor Yale Child Study Center (secondary appointment)

    Research Interests
    Child Development; Mother-Child Relations; Neurobiology; Parenting; Substance-Related Disorders; Psychology, Developmental

    Dr. Suchman’s research integrates perspectives from attachment theory, neuroscience of addiction and developmental psychopathology. Funded by the National Institutes of Health since 1995, her research has focused on developing and evaluating attachment-based parenting interventions for mothers with substance use and psychiatric disorders. In 2015, she completed the second randomized clinical efficacy trial testing the efficacy of Mothering from the Inside Out, a mentalization based psychotherapy that aims to promote maternal reflective functioning - the capacity to make sense of and manage emotional distress in difficult parenting situations and to make sense of young children's emotional needs in order to promote secure attachments. Two randomized clinical trials have now demonstrated the efficacy of MIO. In a third ongoing randomized trial, addiction counselors are being trained to deliver MIO with sustained fidelity to determine if treatment efficacy holds in a community-based setting.

  • Tami Sullivan

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Family Violence Research and Programs

    Research Interests
    Psychiatry and Psychology


    Dr. Sullivan's program of research is centered on individual- and system-level factors that affect the wellbeing of victims of intimate partner violence (IPV), with specific attention to daily processes and micro-longitudinal designs. At the individual level, Dr. Sullivan's work aims to advance understanding of the relationships among IPV and its highly prevalent negative outcomes such as posttraumatic stress, substance use, and sexual risk in an effort to develop preventive interventions that promote safety and resilience. At the systems-level, she conducts IPV research and evaluation within the criminal justice and other service systems. She studies the impact of the system’s response on victims’ wellbeing including the ways in which it promotes or impedes victims’ safety, recovery and resilience. She collaborates with community partners locally and nationally to study the impact of criminal justice system interventions, including being a key investigator on the National Domestic Violence Homicide Prevention Demonstration Initiative, a multi-site evaluation of two interventions to reduce IPV and IPV-related homicide across the United States. She disseminates findings broadly to have the greatest impact including to professionals (e.g., to court-based practitioners through the Center for Court Innovation) and the general public (Cosmopolitan magazine). Dr. Sullivan is a licensed psychologist who has extensive clinical experience with victims and offenders of IPV, providing services in a range of settings from community programs, dual diagnosis programs, inpatient settings, and outpatient clinics to domestic violence shelters, transitional living programs, and community programs.

  • Jacob Tebes

    Professor of Psychiatry (Psychology), in the Child Study Center and of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); Director, Division of Prevention and Community Research, Department of Psychiatry; Director, The Consultation Center; Chief Psychologist, Connecticut Mental Health Center; Program Director, NIDA T32 Postdoctoral Research Training Program in Substance Abuse Prevention

    Research Interests
    Primary Prevention; Public Health; Social Change; Social Justice; Program Evaluation; Cultural Diversity; Vulnerable Populations; Resilience, Psychological; Community-Based Participatory Research

    Jacob Kraemer Tebes is Professor of Psychiatry (Psychology) and in the Child Study Center, Yale School of Medicine, and Professor of Epidemiology (Social and Behavioral Sciences), Yale School of Public Health. He is also Director of the Division of Prevention and Community Research in the Department of Psychiatry, Executive Director of The Consultation Center, and Chief Psychologist at the Connecticut Mental Health Center. He received his B.S. in Psychology from Georgetown University and his Ph.D. in Clinical/Community Psychology from the State University of New York at Buffalo. After completing a doctoral fellowship at Yale, he joined the faculty in the Department of Psychiatry. His professional activities include research, service, teaching, and administration, much of it centered on issues related to equity and social justice. His scholarship focuses on the promotion of resilience in at risk populations; the prevention of adolescent substance use; the integration of cultural approaches into practice, research, and policy; philosophy of science and its implications for community research methodology; and interdisciplinary team science. He also consults to public agencies, schools, and community-based organizations on the development, implementation, and evaluation of community-based programs and services, and on the use of evaluation data to inform practice, organizational performance, and policy. Dr. Tebes teaches or has taught postdoctoral and doctoral fellows in community and clinical psychology and in prevention science, on such topics as: prevention research methods, models of prevention, human diversity in clinical/community practice, clinical methods of child intervention, and professional development. He currently serves as the Program Director of a NIDA T32 postdoctoral research training program in substance abuse prevention, and previously served on the leadership team of Yale education/training programs in interdisciplinary team science for faculty and postdoctoral fellows.

  • Janis Tondora

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Dr. Janis Tondora is currently an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine. Based at the Program for Recovery and Community Health, Dr. Tondora functioned for several years as Project Director for an NIMH-funded R-01 study titled Culturally Responsive Person-Centered Care for Psychosis. Her professional interests focus on the design, implementation, and evaluation of services that promote self-determination, recovery, and community inclusion among individuals diagnosed with serious behavioral health disorders. In addition to her role at PRCH, she works closely with the Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) to promote the transfer of academic research into the public-sector behavioral health system. She has coordinated a number of statewide training, technical assistance, and consultation initiatives regarding the provision of recovery-oriented care, person-centered planning, and best-practice employment supports. This activity includes her role as Principal Investigator on a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services grant implementing and evaluating person-centered planning models in State public sector behavioral health systems.

    Dr. Tondora has collaborated with PRCH faculty and DMHAS leadership to develop a series of practice guidelines, program standards, and recovery-specific provider competencies. In recognition of her work, she has been invited to participate as a steering committee member of the SAMHSA National Consensus-Building Initiative on Person-Centered Care, and she has been providing training and consultation to numerous states seeking to develop person-centered planning models and programs. Dr. Tondora has shared her work with the field in numerous publications including a recent book co-authored with several colleagues entitled A Practical Guide to Recovery-Oriented Practice: Tools for Transforming Mental Health Care.

    Prior to her involvement in behavioral health, she worked as a consultant providing services to public and private agencies, school districts, families, and individuals with disabilities. These services were designed to promote the full inclusion of individuals in all aspects of classroom and community life: an objective that remains at the core of her current work in behavioral health.
  • Jack Tsai

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Research Director, National Center on Homelessness Among Veterans; Director, Yale Division of Mental Health Services and Treatment Outcomes Research

    Research Interests
    Housing; Mental Health Services; Social Work, Psychiatric; Health Care Quality, Access, and Evaluation; Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders; Stress Disorders, Traumatic

    Dr. Tsai has dual appointments with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Central Office and Yale University School of Medicine. He serves as Research Director for the National Center on Homelessness Among Veterans and is Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Yale where he is also Director of the Division of Mental Health Services Research. Dr. Tsai has served on the Yale faculty since 2010. He has received federally funded grants and published over 150 peer-reviewed articles on topics related to homelessness, severe mental illness, trauma, and health disparities. He has been a grant reviewer for the VA, PCORI, Social Security Administration, and several foundations. He holds leadership positions in the American Psychological Association and the American Public Health Association, and serves as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless. He teaches and supervises interns, residents, and fellows in the VA, Yale, and surrounding universities. In his spare time, he enjoys scuba diving, climbing, Brazilian jiu jitsu, basketball, and international travel.

  • Anthony Van den Pol

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Brain Neoplasms; DNA Virus Infections; Nervous System Diseases; Parasitic Diseases; Tumor Virus Infections; Encephalitis, Viral; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm; Trauma, Nervous System; Central Nervous System Viral Diseases; Central Nervous System Parasitic Infections

    Dr. Anthony van den Pol is a Professor of Neurosurgery. After completing his graduate education at Yale University, Dr. van den Pol did postdoctoral work at Oxford, Semmelweis, and Stanford Universities in the areas of neuropharmacology, neuroanatomy, and neurophysiology. Dr. van den Pol has two overlapping research interests, related to basic cellular mechanisms and approaches to understanding the normal and diseased brain, and the treatment of brain disorders.

    One focus is on the organization and mechanisms of action of hypothalamic neuropeptides and amino acid transmitters, using a combination of patch clamp electrophysiology, ultrastructural cytochemistry, digital imaging, molecular biology, optogenetics and behavioral analysis. The other interest is in neurovirology, including how viruses alter normal function in the developing and mature brain, and the use of viral vectors to study normal brain or treat the diseased brain, or utilization of replication-competent oncolytic viruses to treat brain cancer. Dr. van den Pol's research is supported by the National Institute of Health.

  • Christopher Van Dyck

    Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Neuroscience; Director, Alzheimer's Disease Research Unit; Director, Yale Alzheimer's Disease Research Center; Director, Division of Aging and Geriatric Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Aging; Alzheimer Disease; Drug Therapy; Genetics; Neurobiology; Neurology; Psychiatry; Positron-Emission Tomography; Neuroimaging
    Clinical Interests
    Alzheimer Disease

    Christopher H. van Dyck, MD, is Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Neuroscience, Director, Division of Aging and Geriatric Psychiatry; Director of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Unit; Director, Yale Alzheimer's Disease Research Center

    His research interests include therapeutic, neuroimaging and genetic studies of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy cognitive aging. Dr. van Dyck is very active in AD therapeutic research. Since 1992 he has participated in 80+ multicenter clinical trials for AD and MCI and has authored several of the trial publications. He serves on the Steering Committees of the NIA Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study (ADCS) and Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Dr. van Dyck’s other significant scholarly contributions include dopamine transporter imaging in healthy aging and the apolipoprotein E e4 Phenotype of AD. In 2005 he received the "Compassion and Cure" Award from the Alzheimer's Association.

  • Tobias Wasser

    Assistant Professor; Associate Director, Public Psychiatry Fellowship

    Dr. Tobias Wasser obtained his undergraduate degree in psychology at Wesleyan University in 2006 and then completed medical school at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine in 2010. He completed all of his psychiatry training at Yale, first the psychiatry residency program in 2014, before completing fellowships in forensic psychiatry in 2015 and then in public psychiatry in 2016. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry in the department and on faculty in both the Public Psychiatry and Law and Psychiatry Divisions. He is also the Associate Program Director of the Yale Fellowship in Public Psychiatry and works clinically as the Chief Medical Officer of the Whiting Forensic Hospital.

  • Professor Emeritus of and Senior Research Scientist in Psychiatry

    NIH Director's Award for high impact, high innovation, paradigm changing medical research, 2012-2016
    Founder and President "A Different Future", an NGO to reclaim the public idea space from extremists regarding the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
    Facilitator for the Council of Religious Institutions of the Holy Land, designed and managing U.S. State Department funded study of how "the other" is portrayed in Israeli and Palestinian school books
    Founder and Chief Scientist, C8 Sciences, created C8 Kids, a brain-based content-independent pedagogy to directly improve thinking abilities in 5-9 year old children. Combines computer presented brain exercises and physical exercises.
  • Ilse Wiechers
    Research Interests
    Drug Utilization; Geriatric Psychiatry; Health Services Research; Mental Health Services; Psychotropic Drugs; Program Evaluation; Pharmacoepidemiology; Community-Based Participatory Research; Quality Improvement
    Clinical Interests
    Anxiety Disorders; Geriatric Psychiatry; Psychiatry; Mood Disorders; Neurocognitive Disorders; Substance-Related Disorders; Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders; Stress Disorders, Traumatic

    Dr. Wiechers works for the Department of Veterans Affairs in the Office of Mental Health and Suicide Prevention. She serves as the National Director for the Psychotropic Drug Safety Initiative, a nation-wide VA psychopharmacology quality improvement program, as well as co-director for VA’s national Care for Patients with Complex Problems program, which aims to support implementation and dissemination of innovative inpatient care practices for patients with co-morbid chronic medical, mental health and substance use disorders, and cognitive impairment. Her research focuses on pharmacoepidemiology evaluating use of psychotropic medications in elderly populations.  Dr. Wiechers specializes in providing clinical care for Veterans with late-life mood, anxiety and trauma-related disorders.  She lectures extensively to audiences of interprofessional healthcare providers at all levels of training and experiences in the subject areas of psychopharmacology, geriatric mental health, health policy and advocacy, and quality improvement. She serves as an Associate Editor for the Harvard Review of Psychiatry and is Chair of the Public Policy Caucus for the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry.

    Dr. Wiechers earned her undergraduate degree in political science at Case Western Reserve University. She then received a Master in Public Policy and medical degree from Duke. She completed her residency training in Psychiatry at MGH/McLean Hospitals and her Geriatric Psychiatry fellowship at Yale. She is an alumna of the VA Advanced Fellowship Program in Mental Illness Research and Treatment, the Yale RWJF/VA Clinical Scholars Program, and the John A. Hartford Foundation's Center of Excellence in Geriatric Medicine and Geriatric Psychiatry Training Program.

  • Kirsten Wilkins

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Co-Director for Psychiatry

    Dr. Wilkins is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine, where she also serves as Psychiatry Clerkship Director. Dr. Wilkins works in outpatient general and geriatric psychiatry at the VA CT Healthcare System in West Haven, CT. Her areas of clinical focus include Mood Disorders, Repetitive Transcranial Stimulation (rTMS), and Cognitive Disorders, including complex neuropsychiatric symptoms of Dementia.

    As a Clinician-Educator, Dr. Wilkins is actively involved in the supervision and education of Yale medical students, PA students, and psychiatry residents and fellows. On a national level, she has long been involved with the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry (AAGP), currently serving as Vice-Chair of the Teaching and Training Committee and Chair of the Scholars Program for trainees. She is a member of the Association for Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry (ADMSEP) and was selected last year as a participant in the ADMSEP Education Scholars Program.

    Dr. Wilkins is board certified in General Psychiatry by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, with subspecialty certification in both Geriatric Psychiatry and Psychosomatic Medicine. She has co-authored several peer-reviewed publications and has presented regionally and nationally in the areas of geriatric psychiatry, psychosomatic medicine, and the education of medical trainees in psychiatry. Current areas of research interest include the integration of basic and clinical science in the Psychiatry Clerkship, medical student mental health, and novel applications of rTMS.

  • Professor of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    Adolescent Psychiatry; Psychiatry; Psychotic Disorders; Prodromal Symptoms

    Dr. Woods assesses young people at risk for psychosis through his PRIME Clinic, which also offers studies aiming to improve treatment for current symptoms and prevent progression.

  • Kimberly Yonkers

    Professor of Psychiatry, of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases) and of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences; Director, Division of Psychological Medicine; Director, Center for Wellbeing of Women and Mothers

    Research Interests
    Anxiety Disorders; Health Care Quality, Access, and Evaluation; Mood Disorders; Substance-Related Disorders; Sexual and Gender Disorders

    I am a Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry, Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences and in the School of Public Health .  My clinical position is Chief for the Yale New Haven Health Division of Psychological Medicine.  This Division provides inpatient and outpatient consultations to providers and patients in the other medical and surgical divisions of Yale New Haven Health.  Our services are provided at both the York Street and St. Raphael campuses. 

    My research hats include and being Director of Research for the Yale New Haven Hospital Division of the Department of Psychiatry and Director of the Center for Women and Mothers, a research unit in the Department of Psychiatry.  My group investigates the clinical course, etiopathology and treatment of psychiatric and substance use disorders as they occur in women. A major component of this work is the occurrence and treatment of illnesses in pregnancy and the postpartum period, and across the menstrual cycle. This area, by its nature, cuts across disciplines and requires psychiatric expertise, as well as knowledge in neuroscience and reproductive biology. Contributions to the literature include evaluations of the impact of psychiatric conditions and treatments on various birth outcomes.  My group published pivotal work in postpartum depression including the fact that 50% of instances of postpartum depression began antenatally and that standard antidepressant treatment is effective for postpartum onset of major depressive episodes.  My work on premenstrual dysphoric disorder, the severe form of premenstrual syndrome, established the efficacy of serotonin reuptake inhibitors as first line treatments.  Moreover, my work showed that treatment with these agents could commence either halfway through the menstrual cycle or at symptom onset. My recent work has explored the impact and treatment of substance use disorders on pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes.  We devised a screening measure for substance use in pregnancy, the Substance Use Risk Profile-Pregnancy, which is an efficient measure to help identify and assist pregnant women with substance misuse. Additional work in this arena includes finding a therapeutic effect on abstinence of progesterone for women who have postpartum cocaine use, and showing the efficacy of a computerized brief interview, based upon motivational principles, in reducing substance misuse in pregnant and non-pregnant women.

    I led the DSM 5  Study Group for Race, Gender and Ethnicity.  This group assessed psychiatric conditions to determine possible bias in race, gender and ethnicity and incorporated relative text about race, gender and ethnicity into the DSM 5 text.  I currently lead the Gender Study Group that is reviewing and conducting text revisions for the DSM 5 Text Revision.

    I am the inaugural Editor in Chief for a new American Psychiatric Association on-line journal, Psychiatric Research and Clinical Practice. This journal seeks to publish clinical and translational research as well as timely reviews in psychiatry.




  • Paula Zimbrean

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Transplant Psychiatry Services at Yale New Haven Hospital; Associate Director, Psychosomatic Medicine Fellowship, Yale New Haven Hospital

    Research Interests
    Mental Health Services

    BOARD CERTIFICATION: Psychiatry, Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry, Addiction Psychiatry



    CLINICAL INTERESTS: Consultation Liaison Psychiatry, Addiction Psychiatry, Transplant Psychiatry, Refugee Mental Health



    RESEARCH INTEREST: intensive psychiatric interventions in general hospital, psychiatric disease and organ transplantation, graduate medical education

  • Howard Zonana

    Professor of Psychiatry and Professor (Adjunct) of Law

    When Howard Zonana, MD, first became interested in forensic psychiatry, there was little connection between law and psychiatry in the City of New Haven, the State of Connecticut, or the Yale campus. In the mid-1970's, Dr. Zonana joined up with Marc Rubenstein and Lansing Crane, who were trying to create a forensic psychiatry program. They created the Yale Law and Psychiatry Division.

    The Division is part of the Yale School of Medicine Psychiatry Department and Connecticut Mental Health Center. It is made up of four sections – forensic services, the New Haven Court Clinic, the Jail Diversion Program and research and scholarship. The staff includes licensed psychiatrists, psychologists, nurses and social workers as well as a training program in Forensic Psychiatry with funding for four fellows chosen annually through a competitive selection process. The work focuses on evaluations for the courts in civil and criminal matters, e.g. competency, criminal responsibility, pre-sentence evaluations, psychic harm.


    Dr. Zonana also chaired the YNHH Bioethics Committee for over 15 years and remains a member of the Committee. He also has an Adjunct Appt at Yale Law School and consults to Clinics there, such as the Immigration, Veterans, and Criminal Clinics where law students under supervision, represent clients. He also works with the American Psychiatric Assn. on the Council of Psychiatry and the Law and Judicial Action Committee.