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  • Anethesiology

    Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology

    Dr. Philip Effraim is Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology at Yale New Haven Hospital.  He received both his medical degree and his Doctor of Philosophy degree from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in 2011.  Following his residency at the Yale School of Medicine, Dr. Effraim continued his training at Yale as a fellow in Regional Anesthesia.  In 2017, Dr. Effraim officially joined the Yale University School of Medicine faculty as Assistant Professor.  His research interests are focused on investigating mechanisms of pain and novel pain treatments.  

  • Cancer Center

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Hematology)

    Cecelia Calhoun, MD, MSPH, MBA, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine (Hematology) in the Clinician-Scientist Track and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/ Oncology). Dr. Calhoun cares for adolescents and young adults with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) as part of the Smilow Cancer Hospital Pediatric and Adult Hematology Programs and Director of the Adolescent-Young Adult Sickle Cell Program.

    Her research focuses on the relationship between health literacy, self-management, and cognition in adolescent and young adult patients with SCD. In addition, she’s interested in conducting health services research to inform interventions and improve transitions of care for adolescents and young adults with SCD to adult care. 

    Dr. Calhoun received her medical degree from Wayne State University in Detroit and completed her clinical fellowship at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, where she also received her MSPH. She recently received her MBA from the Yale University School of Management. In 2019, Dr. Calhoun received the Pozen-Commonwealth Fund Fellowship in Minority Health Leadership at Yale University, which is intended to give healthcare practitioners the leadership skills and the deep understanding of teams, markets, and organizations necessary to tackle major inequities in the U.S. healthcare system.

  • Cancer Center

    Instructor of Medicine (Medical Oncology); ABIM Physician-Scientist Research Pathway Resident

    Dr. Tran is an Instructor of Medicine (Medical Oncology) and cares for patients with melanoma and renal cell cancers at Smilow Cancer Hospital in New Haven and in Smilow Guilford. She completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Yale-New Haven Hospital and participated in the ABIM Physician-Scientist Research Pathway. She received her MD and PhD degrees from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. 

    This year, Dr. Tran received funding through the YCC K12 Calabresi Immuno-Oncology Training Program (IOTP) to support her work looking at anti-PD-1 and anti-VEGFR in brain metastases. In 2019 she received a five-year grant through the Yale Cancer Center-Advanced Training Program for Physician-scientists (YCC-ATPP) for her work Models of Melanoma Brain Metastasis-Associated Vasogenic Edema and Development of Novel Anti-Edema Therapies.  Dr. Tran is actively involved in lab-based, translational research and in clinical trials related to melanoma and brain metastasis.

  • Cancer Center

    Assistant Professor

    Dr. Wilson graduated from Duke University and received his PhD at Yale University and MD at Harvard Medical School.  He completed an internship and residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital and a fellowship in medical oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital.  He completed a research fellowship at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT.  His research focuses on the identification and characterization of genetic vulnerabilities in cancer as well as genetic determinants of sensitivity and resistance to targeted therapies.

  • Cellular and Molecular Physiology

    Assistant Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology

    Hongying (Hoy) Shen is an assistant professor at Cellular & Molecular Physiology at Yale School of Medicine and Systems Biology Institute at Yale West Campus from Jan 2020. Dr. Shen is interested to use multidisciplinary approaches ranging from biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, molecular evolution, and metabolomics to study cellular metabolism underlying human health and diseases, which would ultimately offer new directions for diagnostics and therapeutics. Specifically, we will focus on the “deorphanization” of hundreds of enzymes and transporters of unknown functions that are encoded in the human genome and are important to cellular and organismal physiology. 

    Dr. Shen received her B.S. in chemistry from Nanjing University in China in 2006 and her Ph.D. in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry (MB&B) at Yale University in 2013, where she studied membrane curvature formation and lipid metabolism in endocytic trafficking in the laboratory of Dr. Pietro De Camilli at the cell biology department. She then completed her postdoctoral training with Dr. Vamsi Mootha at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School to develop integrated metabolomics and CRISPR screen approaches to study mitochondrial metabolism.


  • Child Study Center

    Assistant Professor

    Dr. Youngsun T. Cho is an Assistant Professor in the Child Study Center and Department of Psychiatry at Yale University. She is a child, adolescent and adult psychiatrist. She holds an MD/PhD degree from the University of Rochester, and completed dissertation work on amygdala neuroanatomy and reward processing using fMRI. She completed psychiatry residency in the Neuroscience Research Training Program (NRTP) at Yale, and a child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship at the Yale Child Study Center.

    Her current research focuses on the development of cognitive and motivational brain circuits in adolescents with depression and adolescents with schizophrenia using fMRI, and pharmacologic neuroimaging to identify mechanisms of potential treatments. Her work is funded by the NIMH, and the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation.

  • Child Study Center

    Associate Research Scientist


    Karim Ibrahim is an Associate Research Scientist at the Yale Child Study Center. His translational neuroscience research focuses on brain networks associated with emotion regulation impairments in childhood-onset psychiatric disorders. Dr. Karim Ibrahim’s research is interdisciplinary and integrates multimodal imaging methods including functional and structural MRI, machine learning, and network neuroscience/connectomics approaches to identify biomarkers relevant to child psychopathology. His recent interests lie in using and developing tools predictive modeling/machine learning approaches that leverage large-scale neuroimaging datasets, including data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, for identifying robust brain-based biomarkers. Among other things in this area, his research also investigates dynamics of the human functional connectome and large-scale networks, how brain connectivity is altered in mental health disorders (such as a disruptive behavior disorders, anxiety disorders, and autism spectrum disorder) and the neural response to treatment in youths. As a licensed clinical child psychologist, he also has extensive experience in developmental psychopathology, including assessments and cognitive-behavioral interventions for autism spectrum disorder, mood, anxiety, and disruptive behavior. Karim completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Yale Child Study Center T32 research program in Translational Developmental Neuroscience and through an award from the Yale Center for Clinical Investigation multidisciplinary research training program.

  • Child Study Center

    Assistant Professor

    Dr. Wan-Ling Tseng is an Assistant Professor at the Yale Child Study Center. She received her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from the Institute of Child Development at the University of Minnesota and completed her postdoctoral fellowship in the Section on Mood Dysregulation and Neuroscience at the National Institute of Mental Health. Her research focuses on understanding the brain mechanisms mediating abnormal psychological processes associated with irritability and aggression in children and adolescents and how these behaviors and symptoms change over time. Dr. Tseng's current work, funded by her NIH Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00), uses machine learning, a data-driven computational approach, to investigate the neural mechanisms of childhood irritability. Her goal is to understand individual differences in how children process frustrating events, how frustration affects the neural mechanisms underlying attention and other cognitive function, and how these processes are associated with irritability symptoms. She studies irritability using multiple levels of analysis (e.g., brain, behavior, social/experiential factors, environment) in order to gain a comprehensive understanding of the etiology and development of irritability. In addition to her recent K99/R00 Award, Dr. Tseng’s work has been recognized by other prestigious awards and organizations including the Society of Biological Psychiatry Travel Award (2015), Career Development Institute for Bipolar Disorder (2015), NIH Fellows Award for Research Excellence (2015), and the NIMH OFT Trainee Travel Award (2016).

  • Dermatology

    Assistant Professor in Dermatology and Dermatopathology

    William Damsky, M.D., Ph.D. is a physician-scientist who uses basic and translational approaches to understand mechanisms of skin disease. In clinical practice, he specializes in medical dermatology and dermatopathology with a specific focus in cutaneous granulomatous disorders (sarcoidosis and granuloma annulare). Dr. Damsky is an attending physician at Yale-New Haven Hospital, Yale Health Center, the VA Veteran's Hospital, and Cornell Scott Hill Health Center. Dr. Damsky provides care for both adult and pediatric patients.

    Dr. Damsky provides care for patients with all dermatologic conditions and he has special interest in:

    • sarcoidosis
    • granuloma annulare
    • psoriasis
    • atopic dermatitis (eczema)
    • acne and hidradenitis suppurativa
    • other cutaneous granulomatous disorders such as necrobiosis lipodica
    • other inflammatory skin disorders such as lichen planus
    • skin cancer

    Dr. Damsky uses a wide variety of treatment modalities including retinoids including isotretinoin, phototherapy, systemic immunomodulatory agents, "biologic" agents to treat psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and other disorders, and Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors.

    In his research, Dr. Damsky is using various pre-clinical and translational approaches to study inflammatory skin diseases as well as melanoma. Dr. Damsky is leading a clinical trial in sarcoidosis and granuloma annulare. Dr. Damsky has published over 50 peer-reviewed articles. His research is supported by the Dermatology Foundation, the Skin Cancer Foundation, and Pfizer. He was received the Young Investigator Award from the American Academy of Dermatology in 2020 for his research in sarcoidosis. 

    Dr. Damsky completed his undergraduate, M.D., and Ph.D. degrees the University of Vermont. He completed an internship in Internal Medicine and residency in Dermatology at Yale. Dr. Damsky also completed an N.I.H. funded Research Fellowship in Investigative Dermatology and served as Chief Resident during this time.

  • Dermatology

    Assistant Professor of Dermatology

    Undergraduate School: Amherst College

    Undergraduate Major: Chemistry and Neuroscience

    Medical School: Yale University School of Medicine    

    Research Fellowship: Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine

    Internship: Yale-New Haven Hospital Internal Medicine 

    Alicia Little, MD, PhD, is a dermatologist with expertise in women’s skin health and autoimmunity. 

    She specializes in skin disease of pregnancy and vulvar skin diseases; autoimmune skin diseases including cutaneous lupus, dermatomyositis, morphea, lichen sclerosus, and lichen planus; and inflammatory skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis (eczema), and rosacea. She also handles general dermatology, acne, and skin cancer screening.

    “I enjoy meeting new patients and developing lasting relationships with them,” Dr. Little says. “I love looking at my schedule and recognizing patients who I have helped with uncomfortable rashes, acne, or skin cancers, and continuing to support them over the years with any new or chronic skin conditions.”

    Dermatology, she says, allows her to see patients of all ages and to use her background in immunology since many skin diseases and rashes are caused by an overactive immune system. 

    “As dermatologists, we have the wonderful privilege of seeing our patients get better quite literally, since their symptoms are often also visible to us on the skin,” she says.

    When not caring for her patients, Dr. Little, who is an assistant professor of dermatology at Yale School of Medicine, conducts research on the immune cells responsible for autoimmune skin disease. “By studying what is going wrong to cause the body to attack itself, I hope that we can identify targets for future treatments to improve patients’ lives,” she says.


  • Dermatology

    Assistant Professor; Dermatology Director, Adult Primary Care Center

    I am a physician-scientist in dermatology, which involves both taking care of patients and advancing scientific research. I see patients at the Yale Medicine dermatology office at 322 East Main St in Branford, CT. I take care of a wide range of dermatologic conditions including autoimmune diseases such as lupus and scleroderma (systemic sclerosis), skin cancer, acne, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis/eczema, and blistering skin diseases. In the laboratory my research primarily focuses on the role of the immune system in scleroderma and chronic graft-vs-host disease, two immune-mediated processes that cause tightening of the skin. To setup an appointment, please contact our office at (203) 481-3419. I look forward to seeing you. 

    Ian D. Odell, MD, PhD

  • Dermatology

    Assistant Professor of Dermatology

    I am a physician-scientist who has trained in immunology, molecular biology, genetics and clinical dermatology. My overall career goal as a physician-scientist are to integrate fundamental immunology with clinical dermatology. In particular, I am interested in the role of costimulatory and inhibitory immune receptors in cancer immunity, autoimmunity pathogenesis and immunotherapy. My interest in this field was driven by my experience in the Medical Scientist Training Program at Washington University in St. Louis, where I worked in the laboratory of Dr. Robert Schreiber to decipher key molecular regulators of cancer immunoediting. As a consequence, the expertise gained in skin immunology and the emerging immunotherapies to treat melanoma inspired me to become a dermatologist. During my dermatology residency, I joined the laboratory of Dr. Lieping Chen at Yale School of Medicine, who pioneered targeting the PD-1 axis for cancer immunotherapy and has discovered multiple novel immune checkpoint molecules including programmed death receptor-1 homolog (PD-1H) (also known as VISTA). My current research interests include: 1) identification of novel immune checkpoints such as PD-1H/VISTA and others in cutaneous malignancies (e.g., melanoma and keratinocyte carcinomas) and 2) elucidating the inhibitory immune landscape of chronic inflammatory disorders such as psoriasis and cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

  • Emergency Medicine

    Assistant Professor

    Edouard Coupet Jr, MD, MS, is a NIDA-sponsored Yale Drug Use, Addiction, and HIV Scholar (DARHS) and Assistant Professor in Emergency Medicine. Dr. Coupet graduated from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He completed medical school at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine and his residency training at the Jacobi/Montefiore Emergency Medicine program. Following his residency, he completed a Center for Emergency Care Policy & Research fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Coupet’s primary research interests are in the intersection between substance use & community violence and disparities in access to addiction treatment.

  • Emergency Medicine

    Assistant Professor; Director of Simulation Research; Associate Fellowship Director, Medical Simulation

    Ambrose Wong, MD, MSEd, MHS, is a physician-scientist in the Department of Emergency Medicine, with a focus on teamwork, patient safety, behavioral health, and healthcare disparities. He is the Research Director and Associate Fellowship Director at the Yale Center for Medical Simulation. He also has expertise in qualitative and mixed-methods techniques for health services research.

    He received his Bachelor of Science from the University of British Columbia in Microbiology & Immunology in Vancouver, Canada and attended Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri. Ambrose obtained his Emergency Medicine residency training at NYU & Bellevue Hospitals Center in New York City, serving as chief resident physician in his final year. He subsequently completed a medical simulation fellowship at NYU School of Medicine & New York Simulation Center for the Health Sciences. He received a Master of Science in Health Professions Education at Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions.

    Dr. Wong applies healthcare simulation technology to address workplace violence and improve behavioral care in the emergency setting. He has authored eighteen peer-reviewed publications on behavioral emergency care and received an NIH NCATS KL2 & YCCI Scholar Award to implement an agitation code team response intervention. He is the current recipient of an NIMH K23 career development award to investigate the use of health IT in preventing episodes of agitation for behavioral patients in the emergency department.

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Nephrology)

    Dr. Besse received her bachelors degree in Biomedical Engineering from Brown University in 2003, pre-doctoral training in genetics at the Joslin Diabetes Center at the Harvard Medical School, her M.D. from the University of Connecticut School of Medicine in 2009, and clinical training in Internal Medicine/Nephrology at the Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Besse joined Yale School of Medicine faculty in the Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Nephrology in 2018. Her research training in Nephrology has been under the mentorship of Dr. Stefan Somlo, C.N.H Long Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) and Professor of Genetics. 

    Dr. Besse's field of research interest is genetic kidney diseases, with initial focus on polycystic kidney disease. She uses genetic approaches to identify novel disease genes for dominantly inherited polycystic kidney and liver diseases: a phenotypic spectrum from autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) to isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD), and both in vitro and animal models to further disease gene mechanism investigation. Her identification and investigation of multiple genes has contributed understanding to how the central PKD protein, Polycystin-1, matures through the endoplasmic reticulum. She has contributed approaches for gene validation to the field. Dr. Besse has an active research program recruiting patients with genetically unresolved polycystic kidney and/or liver disease or other inherited kidney diseases for projects involving gene/pathway discovery and variant analysis in genetic kidney diseases. The goal of her lab is to have the identification of novel disease genes serve as an entry point for molecular biology investigation that contributes to a better understanding of disease mechanism and the identification of successful targets for treatments. 

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine (Geriatrics)

    Dr. Cohen attended medical school at the University of Pennsylvania after receiving a doctorate in English literature at Oxford, where he studied as a Marshall Scholar. Following residency training in internal medicine and a fellowship in geriatrics, he joined the Yale faculty in 2015.

  • Internal Medicine

    Instructor

    Dr. Cudahy is an instructor in infectious diseases with a research interest in HIV and tuberculosis co-infection. He currently conducts research in South Africa trying to improve treatment outcomes in people co-infected with tuberculosis and HIV by investigating biomarkers of treatment response and analysis of tuberculosis strain complexity. Dr. Cudahy is board certified in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases.

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor; Assistant Hospital Epidemiologist, Hospital Epidemiology & Infection Prevention

    Rupak Datta, MD, PhD is an Assistant Professor at the Yale School of Medicine and an Assistant Hospital Epidemiologist at the Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare System. He completed his undergraduate training at Tufts University, earned his MPH at the Yale School of Public Health, and received his MD/PhD at the University of California Irvine School of Medicine. His dissertation focused on quantifying the burden and transmission potential of multidrug-resistant organisms across statewide healthcare facilities. Dr. Datta entered the American Board of Internal Medicine physician-scientist research pathway at the Yale School of Medicine and completed his infectious diseases fellowship program in 2020. His current research has focused on infection prevention and antibiotic stewardship in older adults. His areas of interest include hospital epidemiology, antibiotic-resistant organisms, and quality improvement.

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor

    Kamil Faridi is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Section of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine and an Investigator at the Yale Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation. He received his medical degree from the Duke University School of Medicine and went on to complete his residency training in Internal Medicine at The Johns Hopkins Hospital and fellowship in Cardiovascular Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. As a cardiology fellow, he also completed a research fellowship at the BIDMC Smith Center for Outcomes Research in Cardiology and received a Master of Science Degree in Epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He is board certified in internal medicine, cardiovascular medicine, and echocardiography, and is a general cardiologist and echocardiographer at Yale New Haven Hospital. He is a member of the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, and the American Society of Echocardiography.  

    Dr. Faridi’s research interests include comparative effectiveness and outcomes for new cardiovascular therapies, utilization of cardiovascular medications and echocardiography in clinical practice, and effective use of real-world evidence to enhance cardiovascular care. He has recently been awarded the Yale Center for Clinical Investigation (YCCI) Junior Faculty Scholar Award to pursue outcomes research in cardiology.

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor (General Medicine); Deputy Director of Mental Health & Well-Being, General Internal Medicine

    Claudia-Santi F. Fernandes, Ed.D., LPC, MCHES, NCC is a youth mental health expert with experience in public schools, clinical settings, and research institutions. Previously, her work focused on a practitioner-based approach that concentrated on health education, social and emotional learning (SEL), and school climate. She served as a former public school teacher, bilingual school counselor in New York City, and part of the founding leadership team at Bard High School Early College (BHSEC) Newark where she developed and oversaw student-centered policies, programs, and structures. As part of her doctoral studies, she explored facilitators and barriers to the implementation of school wellness policies. She was also a project director at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence where she led the earlier stage of development for the inspirED Online Resource Center. Recognizing the impact and reach of evidence-informed, technology-based interventions to improve mental health and well-being in youth, she completed her postdoctoral studies at the play2PREVENT Lab, Yale Center for Health & Learning Games. Since her transition to a research career, she continues to apply a public health approach to reach more students and to improve youth mental health and well-being outcomes in schools with a specific focus on reducing the risk of suicide.

    Currently, Dr. Fernandes is the Deputy Director of Mental Health & Well-Being at the play2PREVENT Lab, Yale Center for Health & Learning Games and an Assistant Professor in the Section of General Internal Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine. In her role at the play2PREVENT Lab, she was the Project Director of a NIH-/NIDA-funded Helping to End Addiction Long-term (HEAL) project (PI: Lynn Fiellin, M.D.) to address opioid misuse in youth in school-based health centers. The project is in its third year and the goal is to develop an evidence-informed intervention to address opioid misuse, to evaluate the intervention in a large-scale RCT, to implement the intervention in school-based health centers across the nation, and to conduct a cost evaluation. More recently, Dr. Fernandes became a Yale Center for Clinical Investigation (YCCI) Scholar where she was awarded a KL-2 (Mentored Career Development Award) to design and to evaluate a digital intervention to reduce the risk of suicide among youth who misuse opioids. Other research interests focus on the translation of policies into practices and successful transitions from high school to post-secondary education, employment, and healthcare. Dr. Fernandes aims to use evidence-based research to inform federal-, state-, and local-level policies and to provide support to schools in their implementation efforts. Dr. Fernandes also practices as a licensed professional counselor and serves on the Board of Directors for the Connecticut Association of School-Based Health Centers and Society of Public Health Education, CT Chapter. 

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary); Director, Operations Core, Yale Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center

    Dr. Ferrante is a Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine physician at the Yale School of Medicine who conducts clinical research at the interface of critical care medicine and geriatrics. The overarching goal of her research program is to understand and improve the functional outcomes of older ICU patients. Dr. Ferrante is a strong advocate of integrating geriatrics principles into critical care medicine and increasing collaboration between the subspecialties and geriatrics.  To that end, she co-founded/co-chairs the Aging in Critical Care Interest Group of the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and co-chairs the Medical Subspecialties Section of the American Geriatrics Society (AGS).  She is currently funded by a Beeson award from the NIH/NIA and the Yale Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center.  From a clinical perspective, Dr. Ferrante is an attending physician in the medical intensive care unit (MICU) of Yale New Haven Hospital, where she is the physician leader of STEPS-ICU early mobilization program.  

    Research Interests: Functional outcomes after a critical illness among older adults

    Mentors: Thomas Gill, M.D. (Geriatrics) and Margaret Pisani, M.D., M.P.H. (Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine)

    Current Grant Funding:

    1. Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging (NIH/NIA K76) 2017-2022
    2. Pilot award, Yale Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center (P30 AG021342) 2020-2021
    3. COVID-19 in Older Adults: A Longitudinal Assessment (P30 AG021342-18S1, mPI of study) 2020-2021

    Completed Grant Funding:

    1. GEMSSTAR (Grants for Early Medical/Surgical Subspecialists' Transition to Aging Research) awardee 2015-2017
    2. Pepper Center Career Development Award 2015-2017
    3. T. Franklin Williams Scholar (ATS/AAIM-ASP Career Development Award in Geriatrics) 2015-2017
    4. Parker B. Francis Research Opportunity Award (converted from a Parker B. Francis Fellowship Award after concurrent receipt of K) 2017-2018

    Awards (selected):

    1. Outstanding Junior Investigator of the Year Award, American Geriatrics Society (AGS), 2021
    2. Inaugural Arti Hurria Memorial Award for Emerging Investigators in Internal Medicine, American Geriatrics Society (AGS), 2019
    3. Intensive Care Global Rising Star Award, Australia and New Zealand Intensive Care Society (ANZICS), 2018
    4. Outstanding Recent Graduate Award, Stony Brook School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, 2018
    5. Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) Star Research Award, 2017
    6. AGS/Merck New Investigator Award, 2016
    7. Iva Dostanic Physician-Scientist Award, Yale School of Medicine, 2016

    Internal Medicine residency: Columbia University Medical Center 2007-2010

    Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Fellowship: Yale University 2011-2015

    Geriatrics Research Fellowship: Yale University 2013-2015

  • Internal Medicine

    Instructor

    Dr. Leigh Goedeke is an Instructor in the Department of Medicine (Endocrinology) at Yale University School of Medicine. With extensive experience in multiple metabolic disease indications, Dr. Goedeke specializes in the interplay between hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. During her graduate studies, under the mentorship of Dr. Carlos Fernandez-Hernando, Dr. Goedeke identified and characterized novel genes and miRNAs involved in lipid metabolism using functional genomic screens. As part of her postdoctoral training in the laboratory of Dr. Gerald Shulman, Dr. Goedeke used stable isotope tracer methods to understand how alterations in metabolic fluxes contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and is currently investigating the therapeutic potential of liver-targeted mitochondrial uncoupling agents to reverse metabolic syndrome. 

    Dr. Goedeke holds a Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences from New York University School of Medicine and a B.S. in Biology from Gettysburg College. She has authored over 30 publications, and holds a patent in specialized anti-microRNA oligonucleotides as therapeutic tools for treating dyslipidemias and cardiovascular diseases.


  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases)

    Dr. Vikas Gupta is a physician-scientist interested in using basic science to understand the fundamental nature of disease and to translate these discoveries to patients. He received his MD and PhD from the Duke University School of Medicine where he studied organ regeneration in zebrafish. He completed an Internal Medicine Residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital and went to Weill Cornell Medical College for a Gastroenterology and Hepatology Fellowship. As a fellow, he used genetic mouse models to study lineage relationships between different liver mesenchymal cells and became interested in diseases of the biliary tree. The research goal of his lab is to comprehend the fundamental changes that lead to fibrosing and inflammatory disorders of the biliary tree. 

    Dr. Gupta is a practicing hepatologist who sees and treats patients with any liver disorder.

     

  • Internal Medicine

    Research Scientist; Director, play4REAL Lab at Yale, Internal Medicine

    Kimberly Hieftje, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at Yale Pediatrics and Director of the play4REAL XR Lab, which focuses on the development and evaluation of videogame interventions using extended reality (virtual reality, augmented reality, etc) for health prevention and promotion, behavior change, and education in adolescents and young adults. She is currently involved in the development and testing of several health behavior change XR and game-based interventions and has published frequently on developing, evaluating, and implementing serious games. She has worked on games that have focused on topics including vaping/e-c-cigarette prevention, tobacco use prevention, risk reduction in adolescents, HIV/STI prevention, HIV/STI testing, empowering girls around healthy decision making, bystander intervention, LGBTQ bullying, school climate, and alcohol harm reduction.

    Dr. Hieftje was a K12 Scholar in the Yale Implementation Science program (YSIS), where she focused on understanding the factors associated with successful implementation of videogame interventions in schools.

    Dr. Hieftje is also the editor-in-chief at the Games for Health Journal.

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (General Medicine)

    Benjamin A. Howell, MD, MPH, MHS grew up in Phoenix, Arizona and earned his undergraduate degree from Columbia University. He received his medical degree from the University of California, San Francisco along with a Masters of Public Health from the UC Berkeley School of Public Health. He completed residency and chief residency in the Internal Medicine-Primary Care residency at Yale-New Haven Hospital. Following residency, he completed a health services research post-doctoral fellowship in the Yale School of Medicine's National Clinician Scholars Program. Dr. Howell is interested in improving the health outcomes of individuals, families, and communities impacted by mass incarceration, increasing access to harm reduction strategies for addiction, and developing innovative models of primary care delivery.

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor

    Dr. Khera is an Assistant Professor in the Section of Cardiovascular Medicine. He is a general cardiologist at the Yale New Haven Hospital, data science, health policy and outcomes researcher at the Yale School of Medicine, and an investigator at Yale’s Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation. Dr. Khera is a graduate of the All-India Institute of Medical Sciences where he was a National Young Investigator Scholarship awardee. During his internal medicine residency training at the University of Iowa and his cardiology fellowship training at UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dr. Khera received the American College of Cardiology’s Young Investigator Award and the Francois Abboud Young Investigator Award, in addition to being inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society for his academic accomplishments. Dr. Khera also received the Jeremiah Stamler Distinguished Young Investigator Research Award for 2021.

               Dr. Khera’s research focuses on evaluating the quality of care and patient outcomes across hospitals in the United States and identifying targets for interventions aimed at improving the outcomes of patients. His work has specifically addressed the vast variation in adherence to evidence-based therapy, uptake of novel care practices and treatments, and rigorous evaluation of national health policies and their effects on hospital practices and patient outcomes. Dr. Khera’s work leverages national registries and large databases, and increasingly focuses on the use of the electronic health record and advanced data science tools to evaluate both the quality of care patients receive and their outcomes. The work he has led has been published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), BMJ, Circulation, JAMA Internal Medicine, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, and JAMA Cardiology, among others. Further details about his ongoing research are available at www.cards-lab.org.

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary)

    Dr. Knauert received her MD and PhD degrees from the Yale School of Medicine. She completed an internal medicine residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and pulmonary, critical care, and sleep fellowships at Yale University School of Medicine. She joined the PCCSM faculty in 2013. She has been a Pepper and YCCI Scholar. She is currently supported by a NHLBI K23 Award and the Doris Duke Fund to Retain Clinician Scientists. She has research interests focused on acute sleep deprivation in the ICU, atypical ICU sleep, and ICU circadian disruption. 

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor

    Dr. Maudry Laurent-Rolle received her B.S. from Long Island University, Brooklyn Campus in Biology in 2001. She then obtained her MD and PhD from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Her dissertation research was funded by an NIH pre-doctoral fellowship, which allowed her to examine the molecular mechanisms by which flaviviruses inhibit host innate immune responses.  She completed residency training in Internal Medicine at Albert Einstein/Montefiore Medical Center in 2016 then joined the Infectious Diseases Fellowship program here at Yale University. Her research focus is on vaccine design and development of antivirals. She is originally from the beautiful Caribbean island of Dominica, known for its many rivers, tropical rainforests, and natural hot springs.

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor

    Dr. Lu was trained in epidemiology and global health, with a particular focus on cardiovascular diseases. She obtained both of her ScD and MSc Degrees in Global Health and Population at the Harvard School of Public Health. She works in the intersection of cardiovascular disease prevention, health equity, and digital health, using implementation science methods to resolve real-world issues. Her long-term goal is to improve care, outcomes, and equity of cardiovascular diseases by designing and implementing technology-based interventions. As a K12 Yale Scholar in Implementation Science, she is currently working on a project to leverage the electronic health records from the Yale New Haven Health System to identify patients with persistent hypertension and design decision supports to improve their care. Over the past few years, she has been working on a number of groundbreaking collaborating projects between Yale University and the Chinese National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases in Beijing. These include the Millions Persons Project that assembles remarkable population health and biomedical resources from 5 million people across China. She has also worked with the NCD Risk Factor Collaboration (NCD-RisC) on global analyses of the impact of risk factors on global burden of cardiovascular diseases. She has authored over 70 peer-reviewed publications, including first author articles in leading journals such as The Lancet and Circulation, and her work has been cited more than an 40,000 times. 

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor

    Residency: Yale New Haven Hospital, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

    Research: Dr. Miner is an internist who completed subspecialty training in geriatric medicine, sleep medicine, as well as a postdoctoral research fellowship in clinical epidemiology and aging-related research. She is interested in symptom management in older adults, and whether a model that takes into account a broad array of impairments is more predictive of symptoms than the traditional disease model, where symptoms are thought to arise from specific diseases. Dr. Miner’s prior work focused on the symptom of dyspnea. Her current research examines insomnia symptoms, describing how these symptoms change over time as well as important factors in different domains that increase risk for insomnia in older adults.

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor

    Dr. Mnatsakanyan obtained her PhD from Yerevan State University and performed her postdoctoral work at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. As a postdoctoral fellow, she studied the catalytic mechanism of the ATP synthase and characterized the important structural unit, beta DELSEED loop region of the ATP synthase that couples ATP synthesis with subunit rotation. Dr. Mnatsakanyan's current research focuses on understanding the molecular mechanism and regulation of the enigmatic cell death channel located in the mitochondrial ATP synthase and its role in mitochondrial permeability transition (mPTP). The goals in the lab are threefold: 1) Identify and structurally characterize the molecular components of mPTP by using cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography. 2) Functionally characterize the ATP synthase leak channel and its regulation by using electrophysiology techniques, patch-clamp and planar lipid bilayer recordings. 3) Generate CRISPR/Cas9-edited mice with the low probability of ATP synthase leak channel/mPTP opening and introduce these mutations in transgenic Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice to study if they will protect the mice from the onset of AD-like features. We hypothesize that this mouse will be protected from degenerative diseases of heart and brain. These studies may lead to the structure-based drug design of specific therapeutic compounds for the treatment of mPTP-related neurodegenerative disorders, aging and cancer.

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor; Director of Research, Equity Research and Innovation Center (ERIC)

    Dr. Oladele is Assistant Professor in the Section of General Internal Medicine, core faculty at the Equity Research and Innovation Center, and Center for Neuroepidemiology and Clinical Neurological Research at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Oladele's research focuses on social determinants of cardiovascular health disparities, with specific focus on the role of nutrition, healthcare quality, food, and built environments. She has expertise in the development of dietary assessment methodologies for African descent populations. Her research aims to generate evidence to support health policies and interventions to improve cardiovascular outcomes among racial/ethnic and immigrant populations domestically and globally. Dr. Oladele’s current work examines the role of food insecurity and ultra-processed food on disparities in hypertension incidence and control.

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor

    Dr. Rachel Perry is an Assistant Professor in Medicine/Endocrinology and Cellular & Molecular Physiology at the Yale University School of Medicine. Rachel's background is in the use of hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps and stable isotope infusions to assess insulin sensitivity, having earned her B.S. in Biomedical Engineering, Ph.D. (with Distinction) in Cellular & Molecular Physiology, and performed her postdoctoral training in Medicine/Endocrinology, all in the laboratory of Dr. Gerald Shulman. Rachel's CV includes first-author papers in Nature, Cell (2), Science, JCI, PNAS, Nature Medicine (2), PNAS, Nature Communications (3), JBC, Cell Metabolism (2), and AJP-Endocrinology. 

    The Perry laboratory focuses on applying stable isotope tracer methods to understand obesity- and insulin-associated alterations in metabolic flux pathways. Dr. Perry and her colleagues have recently identified hyperinsulinemia-induced increases in tumor glucose uptake and oxidation as a critical driver of colon cancer in two mouse models of the disease, and mitochondrial uncoupling as a potential therapeutic strategy against the disease (Wang et al. Cell Reports 2018, Nasiri et al. Cancer & Metabolism 2019), and went on to show that responsiveness to insulin is a metabolic signature of obesity-associated tumor types in vitro (Rabin-Court et al. PLoS One 2019). 

    Current projects in the Perry lab include:

    1. What is the molecular mechanism by which obesity and hyperinsulinemia promote tumor growth? How does insulin alter rates of glycolytic, oxidative, and anaplerotic metabolism? Can we invent better tracer methods than currently exist, allowing us to reliably measure rates of these pathways in vivo?

    2. What is the impact of exercise, a classic insulin-sensitizing intervention, on obesity-associated tumor growth - and what is the mechanism?

    3. Are alterations in tumor immunometabolism permissive for tumor progression? How does cancer therapy alter substrate preference in immune cells? Can we exploit systemic metabolic changes to enhance anti-cancer immunity?

    4. How do tumor metabolism and immunometabolism differ - in rate and regulation - in metastases as compared to primary tumor?

    5. What drives the changes in glucose metabolism commonly observed in inflammation that occurs following various stimuli? (Close collaboration with Dr. Andrew Wang's lab.) 

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor

    Dr. Richman is a general internist and health services researcher. Her research interests explore how health policy and preventive services intersect and how we can use specific policies to promote both better health and value in healthcare. She has a specific interest in cancer screening and her current work focuses on evaluating new breast cancer screening technologies as well as use and implementation of lung cancer screening.  

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (General Medicine) and Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); Director of Population Health, Yale Medicine

    Brita Roy, MD, MPH, MHS is Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine (General Medicine) and Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health (Chronic Diseases), and Director of Population Health for Yale Medicine.

    Dr. Roy is a clinician-investigator, researching ways to use assets-based approaches to mitigating disparities in health outcomes by identifying and promoting positive psychosocial factors at the individual and community levels. She is investigating mechanisms by which positive psychology can prevent disease among individuals and groups, which led to the development of an actionable framework to measure and support the health and well-being of entire communities. She also serves as a measurement lead for the 100 Million Healthier Lives initiative, led by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. In addition, Dr. Roy also enjoys teaching health professions students and internal medicine residents in the classroom and while taking care of a diverse array of patients in the hospital.

    Dr. Roy pursued Bachelors and Master’s degrees in Biomedical Engineering at Vanderbilt University and Wayne State University, respectively. She then went on to the University of Michigan to pursue a combined MD/MPH in Health Behavior and Health Education. Dr. Roy subsequently completed residency training in internal medicine and served as Chief Medical Resident at the University of Alabama at Birmingham prior to completing the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program at Yale University.

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor

    Dr. Ryu is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Section of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine at Yale. He received his BS at Emory University, MPH at Dartmouth College, and MD at New York Medical College. After completing his internal medicine residency, including a year as chief resident at SUNY Upstate Medical University, he came to Yale for his Pulmonary Critical Care Fellowship. During his time as a clinical fellow, he joined the laboratory of Dr. Erica Herzog, and under her mentorship he conducted translational research in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) and Sarcoidosis. His research involves the study of extracellular mitochondrial DNA as biomarker for survival in IPF and clinical phenotypes in Sarcoidosis. Related to this, he is exploring the pathogenic mechanisms by which mitochondrial DNA contributes to disease pathology in interstitial lung disease. 

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor

    Dr. Shin completed Allergy and Clinical Immunology fellowship training (2017-2020) at Yale and joined the Yale Section of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology as a faculty in 2020.  As an Allergy and Immunology specialist, she cares for patients with wide range of allergic and immunologic diseases. Dr. Shin also joined Dr. Insoo Kang's laboratory in 2018 and has been studying the immune system of patients with immune deficiency and/or immune dysregulation using in-depth immune profiling techniques. Dr. Shin’s overall research goal is understanding how immune alterations occur and affect the pathogenesis of such disorders in relation to their genetic defects, clinical presentations and comorbidities.

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) and of Pathology; Associate Director, Yale MD-PhD Program, Digestive Diseases

    Silvia Vilarinho is a physician-scientist who uses genetics, genomics and human samples to investigate the molecular basis of various liver diseases of unknown etiology. Using these approaches, we have identified a new mendelian form of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension, a novel bile acid disorder due to ACOX2 deficiency and a new cholestatic disorder due to mutations in KIF12. Our research goal is to discover new genes important in liver function both in health and disease and to use cell biology and animal models to determine the specific mechanism(s) linking mutant gene to disease, with potential diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic applications.

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor

    I obtained my AB from Harvard University and my MD, PhD degrees in 2011 from University of Texas Southwestern with additional training done at the University of Paris. As a part of his MD/PhD training in the laboratories of Drs. Edward Wakeland and Chandra Mohan, I identified a key role for the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis in end-organ targeting (in mouse and man), an important insight in the pathogenesis of SLE. I then did my Internal Medicine internship and residency training at Yale and joined the ABIM Short Track Pathway into the Rheumatology fellowship. 

    I joined the laboratory of Dr. Ruslan Medzhitov in July 2014 for my postdoctoral training.  There, based on my clinical experience as a house officer, I shifted my focus to understanding how inflammation and metabolism are coordinated on an organismal level.  My work in Dr. Medzhitov's laboratory led to the discovery that different inflammatory states are coordinated with different metabolic programs, an important insight into the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases.  I joined the faculty as Assistant Professor in Internal Medicine (Rheumatology) in August 2017 and the Immunobiology faculty in July 2019.

    My lab is generally interested in trying to understand how the environment interacts with the host to affect disease trajectories. We utilize a broad range of techniques spanning disciplines spanning physiology, metabolism, inflammation, neurobiology, and immunology coupled with patient samples. 

    On-going interests:

    1. Identifying and dissecting environmental determinants of inflammatory diseases. 

    2. Understanding inflammatory physiology

    3. Understanding placebo and nocebo physiology.

    4. Understanding the "moonlighting" functions of the immune system.

    5. Understanding energy allocation in host defense. (Collaboration with Dr. Rachel Perry)

    6. Understanding the relationship between cell death and inflammation. (Collaboration with Dr. Aaron Ring)


    In the clinic, I see patients with inflammatory conditions, many of the times with no clear diagnosis, as well as patients with rheumatologic diseases.

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor

    My interest in microbes started in college when I did a research project on Trypanosomes, the parasite that causes African sleeping sickness. I was struck with how the membrane of the parasite changed its surface antigens to circumvent the host immune response.  My interest in the host microbe relationship continued during my MD/Ph.D., during which my thesis work focused on Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV), the cause of chicken pox and shingles.  We demonstrated that the VZV virus had co-evolved to become highly dependent on the cellular signaling proteins JNK and ERK, which was beautifully illustrated when we found that the virus had hijacked these cellular proteins and had incorporated them into the virion.  My research interests inspired my choice to pursue Infectious Diseases as a specialty.

    During my Infectious Disease fellowship at Yale, my clinical experiences repeatedly demonstrated that different human hosts respond very diferrently to infection.  The same microbe could produce a mild disease in one person, and an overwhelming sepsis in an another.  I especially noted that both older adults and HIV-infected individuals had particularly different responses.  With each patient I saw, the important role the host response plays in infection was underscored.   Overall, my clinical experiences have solidified the importance of the host-microbe relationship, and have pushed me to further understand the host innate immune response through my research.  

  • Internal Medicine

    Assistant Professor; Director, Advanced Apnea Management Program; Director, Yale Sleep Fellowship Didactic and Research Curriculum, Internal Medicine, PCCSM; Section of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine

    After working as a chemical engineer, I completed my medical school training at University of Connecticut and have found the intersection between disciplines to be an exciting area for patient care and research. I  have trained in internal medicine, neurology, pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine and am now focused on caring for patients with sleep disorders and those who are critically ill. 

    Patient care: My goal is to provide the kind of care that I would want for my own family. I believe in taking the time to hear the patient and being a guide in their journey in health and illness. In the clinic, my focus is on caring for patients with sleep disorders and in particular, individuals with complex sleep disordered breathing. 

    Research: My aim is to improve the lives of people with sleep disordered breathing. My colleagues and I hope to do so by identifying subgroups (phenotypes) of sleep apnea patients with unique physiology, prognoses and treatment responsiveness, as well as through development of novel, effective and tolerable treatments.

    Mentors: Klar Yaggi MD, MPH,  John Concato, MD, MPH, Andrew Wellman, MD, PhD (Harvard)

  • Laboratory Medicine

    Instructor

    Vanessa is a wife and mother of two adorable little boys. She is passionate about science and strengthening the pipeline of underrepresented individuals to successful research careers. Her research interests include hematopoiesis and the bone marrow microenvironment. In her spare time, she enjoys live music, gardening and star gazing.

  • Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

    Postdoctoral Associate

    Gamze Gursoy is a postdoctoral research associate at Gerstein Lab in the Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry department. She received her Ph.D in Bioinformatics from University of Illinois at Chicago in 2016.