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Amanda Calhoun, MD/MPH

Clinical Fellow; Solnit Integrated Program, Yale Child Study Center

Contact Information

Amanda Calhoun, MD/MPH

Research Summary

Dr. Calhoun’s research focuses on minority populations, particularly indigenous and African/African diaspora children and adolescents, in an effort to increase representation and knowledge of minority populations in the current evidence research base, which largely focuses on the majority population. Her research targets the unique issues minority children face which affect their mental health outcomes, such as colorism, racism, and identity threat.

Dr. Calhoun’s global mental health initiatives focus on underserved minority populations in lower and middle-income countries. She currently serves as PI on research initiatives in the indigenous Mayan population in Guatemala and in Lagos, Nigeria.

Extensive Research Description

Dr. Calhoun is a Psychiatry resident in the Albert J. Solnit Adult/Child Integrated Program. As a pre-medical student, Dr. Calhoun engaged in global clinical mental health interventions and psychiatric research projects around the world, including Haiti, New Zealand, Guatemala, Nigeria, and Honduras.

Prior to medical school, her projects included coordinating a clinical intervention teaching infant massage techniques as a means of decreasing maternal depression and increasing mother-infant bonding in Cap Haïtien, Haiti and editing a medical school textbook surrounding Maori mental health at University of Auckland in Auckland, New Zealand.

During medical school, Dr. Calhoun served as PI on an AACAP and APA-funded research project assessing the mental health infrastructure in Sololá, Guatemala for depressed children and adolescents. Additionally, Dr. Calhoun served as PI of a research project in Lagos, Nigeria which assessed youth-generated solutions of ways to decrease stigma around HIV self-testing among Nigerian youth. She was awarded the Community Health Scholarship from Saint Louis University due to her commitment to underserved minority research.

As a resident, Dr. Calhoun has continued her global work in Guatemala and Nigeria as the PI of two projects, a needs assessment of the gaps in child/adolescent psychiatric care in Nigeria as well as in Guatemala. She is also currently working on quantitative research studies based in Brazil and Mozambique, with future projects planned in Barbados. Domestically, Dr. Calhoun’s current projects include implicit bias testing outcomes in psychiatry, microaggressions among Black women in academic medicine, effects of racism on mental and physical health, and the criminalization of minority youth with psychiatric disorders.

Research Interests

Psychiatry and Psychology

Public Health Interests

Global Health; Implementation Science

Research Images

Selected Publications

  • Rapid phenotyping of autism spectrum disorders: inclusion of direct observation in feasible paradigms for clinical assessmentConstantino, J., Zhang, Y., Abbacchi, A., Calhoun, A., Scofield, F., Grafeman, S.J. Rapid phenotyping of autism spectrum disorders: inclusion of direct observation in feasible paradigms for clinical assessment. Neuropsychiatry, 2(3), 203-212. doi:10.2217/npy.12.28.
  • Water and SanitationCalhoun A. Water and Sanitation. In Atlas of Pediatrics in the Tropics and Resource-Limited Settings, 2nd edition, eds. J.M. Spector and T.E. Gibson, American Academy of Pediatrics, Elk Grove Village, IL, pp. 25-30.
  • Neglected Tropical DiseasesCalhoun A. Neglected Tropical Diseases. In Atlas of Pediatrics in the Tropics and Resource-Limited Settings, 2nd edition, eds. J.M. Spector and T.E. Gibson, American Academy of Pediatrics, Elk Grove Village, IL, pp. 7-8.
  • Young, Angry, and in Need of a Liver TransplantCalhoun A., and Newman B. Young, angry, and in need of a liver transplant. Current Psychiatry An adverse effect to valproic acid in an otherwise healthy 21-year old. Current Psychiatry. 18(5): 45-51.
  • “I feel like I know them”: the positive effect of celebrity self-disclosure of mental illness. Academic Psychiatry.Calhoun A. and Gold J. “I feel like I know them”: the positive effect of celebrity self-disclosure of mental illness. Academic Psychiatry. Accepted for publication.