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Announcements

Global Mental Health Research Fellowship
Columbia University T32 Fellowship Research Training in Global Mental Health: Interventions That Make a Difference

Description

More than 75% of those with mental disorders in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs) do not receive care despite substantial disability. Where treatment is provided, it frequently is below minimum standards and often lacks respect for human rights. The Lancet Global Mental Health (GMH) Series concluded that "funding should be given to research that develops and assesses interventions that can be delivered by people who are not mental health professionals, and that assesses how health systems can scale up such interventions across all routine-care settings."

The Columbia University Research Fellowship in GMH provides training to the next generation of GMH scientists with a two-fold focus. (1) The first is deployment-focused interventions research, whereby fellows learn to develop interventions ready to be deployed in resource poor areas. Adaptation of evidence-based interventions, with community collaboration, that directly address prevention, recognition, assessment, and treatment, will be followed by field-testing. (2) The second focus is intervention dissemination, implementation and services research, through which fellows examine how mental health prevention, assessment and treatment interventions can be translated for utilization in specific LMIC settings and study outcomes.

The fellowship is a two to three-year post-doctoral training program. Key program components Include: (1) mentorship; (2) didactic courses in research design, statistics, special topics, grant writing; (3) specialized training in GMH; (4) participation in research, including design, execution and analysis of studies and submission of scientific papers, reviews and proposals; (5) hands-on research experience in task-shifting and other access enhancing strategies through design and implementation of their own pilot projects; (6) instruction in the responsible conduct of research; (7) presentation at scientific meetings and (8) interchange with Columbia faculty, our Global partners, and distinguished researchers in the field.

This program provides a rich learning environment and fellows are steeped in a milieu focused on scientific endeavor to promote mental health locally and world-wide. Because underserved populations are sadly abundant in the US, this training program also teaches young investigators the necessary skills to implement research protocols that can lead to the closing of the mental health care delivery gap in this country as well as internationally.

  • Milton Wainberg, MD (Principal Investigator)
  • Melissa Arbuckle, MD, PhD (Principal Investigator)
  • Jean-Marie Bradford, MD (Training Director)

Eligibility

Trainees must have received their doctorate (or medical) degree at the time of appointment, demonstrate a commitment to a career GMH research, and have a record of academic excellence.

The major qualification of prospective fellows is that they evidence the desire and potential to become independent researchers in GMH Research. The following factors are considered in the interviewing process: quality and productivity of the applicant's work to date (prior training, publications, recommendations); articulation of a specific area of interest in GMH; feasibility of conducting research of interest within the Columbia GMH Research Fellowship; and commitment to a research career.

To be appointed to the program applicants must be U.S. citizens, non-citizen nationals of the United States, or must have been lawfully admitted for permanent residence. Individuals on temporary or student visas are not eligible. Candidates who are members of a minority or under-represented group are strongly encouraged to apply. We are an equal opportunity employer.

Application Process

Interested applicants can begin the application process by contacting the Training Director (Jean-Marie Bradford, MD at ja658@cumc.columbia.edu). Applications are accepted on a rolling basis until the available spots have been filled. The final application packet must be received by no later than January 1st.

Title: Project Director
Hiring Manager: Paul Bolton, Principal Investigator
Location of Position: Kiev (Kyiv), Ukraine
Projected Start Date: August-October
Duration of Position: 18-24 months

Description

The Applied Mental Health Research (AMHR) group at Johns Hopkins University in collaboration with the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy (NaUKMA) is developing, implementing, and researching community based mental health services in Ukraine. The project began in 2015 have has trialed and introduced a community-based psychotherapy in 3 cities in Ukraine. In the next 2 years we will introduce a complement psychosocial intervention. Our research will include a randomized controlled trial of these services to assess the impact and appropriate implementation of this psychosocial intervention to address major mental health issues affecting persons affecting by the current conflict in Ukraine, with particular focus on military veterans and their families. The project is being conducted in multiple cities across Ukraine. Design, and preliminary research (qualitative research, instrument development and testing, intervention training) have been completed and the trial proper will begin in September/October 2019. Other activities include working with government and other stakeholders to coordinate implementation and expansion of these services across the country; and coordinating capacity building in terms of assisting a US-based and Ukraine-based collaborative clinical team in the training of providers, supervisors, and local trainers.

More information on the AMHR group at JHU can be found here.

The project is sponsored by USAID as one of a series globally to assess the impact and feasibility of community-based interventions for survivors of structural violence.

We are hiring one full-time position that will serve as the Project Director for the study. The position will be based 100% on-site in Kyiv, with regular travel to other sites. The Director will be responsible for the day-to-day operations of all study activities. The Director will report directly to the U.S.-based Principal Investigator and Clinical Director and work closely with the Ukrainian director and team. This position is to replace the current program director who cannot remain in Ukraine for the duration of the study.

The position is suitable for individuals with a PhD in public health or related field, with experience in program management, an interest in global mental health, and a desire for additional global health field experience. Persons will a masters degree will also be considered, based on their experience in low and middle income countries.

Please send a cover letter and CV to the principal investigator, Paul Bolton, at pbolton1@jhu.edu

Call for Papers for 41st Annual Meeting. Abstract Submission Deadline: September 20, 2019
Click here for Abstract Submission Form

Collaboration: Partnership, Translation, Integration

Cultural Psychiatrists and Psychologists and Global Mental Health practitioners are increasingly working in collaborative spaces. Some of these collaborations feel familiar, such as with scholars in other disciplines. Other collaborations might feel new or unfamiliar, such as with lay counselors, peer specialists, religious leaders and healers, as well as with policy-makers and institutional administrators. The 2020 Annual Meeting aims to grapple with the challenges of such complex collaborations and to highlight examples of success.

Collaboration can mean many things. An obvious meaning is partnership: to what extent do our academic, educational, and community-based collaborations reflect true partnerships? What are the challenges that arise in collaborating across levels of expertise, such as expertise in psychiatry, local expertise, or expertise in lived experience? Should partnerships be sought for every aspect and kind of mental health-related research, or are they more applicable to some than others? How are power differentials managed in partnerships between researchers from high-income countries and those from low-and-middle-income countries? What are successful models for navigating such partnerships?

Additionally, we aim to translate our work not only to other experts in the field but to policy-makers, patients, their family members, and the broader public. How do we ensure that our research is applicable, and how do we effectively convince others of this? The translation aspect of this year’s meeting will continue conversations begun in our 2018 and 2019 themes, that asked us to move from Theory to Practice.

Finally, how can we successfully integrate across disciplines and epistemologies in our scholarship and practice? How can we conceptualize categories such as cultural competence and structural competence as complementary and integrative approaches to achieve healthcare equity? How can we integrate across care providers, including not only psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, nurses, and peer specialists, but also religious leaders, traditional healers, or other care providers?

Examples of topics and domains related to the conference theme include the following:

  • Inter-disciplinary collaboration: This is perhaps the most familiar type of collaboration, but it is vulnerable to the vicissitudes of institutions, funding mechanisms, and individual goals. How can we effectively partner across disciplines, and what are the primary challenges? How do we pursue a common language and value system in our work?
  • Partnerships among care providers: How can we integrate across care providers, including not only psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, nurses, and peer specialists, but also religious leaders, traditional healers, or other care providers? What are the challenges that arise in collaborating across levels of expertise, such as expertise in psychiatry, local expertise, or expertise in lived experience?
  • Integrating epistemologies: How can we successfully integrate across disciplines and epistemologies in our scholarship and practice? How can we conceptualize categories such as cultural competence and structural competence as complementary and integrative approaches to achieve healthcare equity?
  • Translating to policy-makers and the general public: How do we ensure that our research is applicable and translatable to policy-makers, patients, family members, and the general public? How do we effectively convince others of its value? What can the growing field of dissemination and implementation science contribute to these goals?
  • Partnerships between Global North and South: How are power differentials managed in partnerships between researchers from high-income countries and those from low-and-middle-income countries? What are successful models for navigating such partnerships?
  • Family: Family has become an increasingly important focus at recent SSPC meetings. How can cultural psychiatrists and psychologists effectively partner with family members as caregivers and decision-makers? How can global mental health increasingly incorporate families into interventions?
  • Reflexivity: In the 2020 conference, we want to emphasize the reflective side of presentations: why haven’t we been collaborative? What change occurs when we do collaborate? Why do we pick certain people to collaborate with? What are the challenges along the way?

Abstract Submission Categories

Abstracts can be submitted for Workshops, Symposia, Individual Papers or Posters, Works in Progress, and Trainee Fellowship Papers. Workshops that allow for participants to gain skills in issues related to Collaboration or cultural psychiatry writ large are strongly encouraged and will be given priority. Submissions based on qualitative, quantitative, or mixed-methods primary data and clinical encounters will be given preference over position pieces. Participants are encouraged to submit abstracts early. SSPC will provide technical assistance for abstract submissions up to 48 hours before the deadline.

Please note: This year, in order to support psychology and social worker attendees to apply for Continuing Education credits, we are requiring each abstract submission to include a CV for each participant. These materials will not be circulated other than being provided to those attendees who wish to apply for CE credit through their local CE office.

Click here for Abstract Submission Form

The deadline for all submission types is September 20, 2019, except for Trainee Fellowship submissions, which have a deadline of November 1, 2019.

Please visit the Society's website for more information.