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INFORMATION FOR

Critical Care Rotations (York and Saint Raphael Campus)

Introduction

The goal of medical training in the intensive care units is to educate residents in the diagnosis, evaluation and management of patients with a wide range of critical illnesses, most commonly sepsis, chronic disease related multi-organ failure, hemodynamic instability, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and respiratory failure. The resident is expected to become knowledgeable about the indications, contraindications, risks and benefits of common ICU level procedures. Residents have the opportunity to be trained in a variety of procedures such as arterial puncture and arterial blood gas interpretation, arterial line and central venous line placement, thoracentesis, paracentesis, lumbar puncture and naso-gastric tube placement. Residents will rotate through the Cardiac Care Unit at York Street Campus and the Medical Intensive Care Unit at Saint Raphael Campus.

Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (York Street Campus)

The Cardiac Intensive Care Unit team is comprised of Cardiology attendings, cardiology fellows, PGY II and PGY III residents, interns and midlevel providers. Trainees learn to provide care for acutely ill patients with heart disease under careful supervision of the cardiology and heart failure services. Residents learn the indications for cardiac catheterization, PTCA, thrombolysis, cardiac bypass surgery, intra-aortic balloon pump placement, left ventricular assist devices, etc.. Clinical care is complimented with daily case discussions and a core cardiology curriculum.

Medical Intensive Care Unit (Chapel Street Campus)

The Medical Intensive Care Unit team is comprised of Pulmonary/Critical Care attendings and fellows, PGY II and PGY III residents, interns and midlevel providers. Residents learn to provide care to critically ill patients with a wide range of conditions and become proficient in hemodynamic monitoring and ventilator management. Inherent in the care of critically ill patients is the management of psychiatric, social and family concerns which are heightened in these intensive care settings and are addressed by residents as part of a multidisciplinary team. In addition to becoming proficient in critical care, residents in the ICU, are often given graduated responsibility in leading conversations around goals of care with patients and their families. Clinical care is complimented with daily case discussions and a core intensive care unit curriculum.