Curriculum

First Year

The focus of the first year is to provide the fund of knowledge and basic skills needed to practice Emergency Medicine, including management of critically ill patients. This is obtained through blocks of emergency medicine rotations at both Yale-New Haven Hospital (YNHH) and Bridgeport Hospital (BH), as well as intensive care experience at YNHH. The first block of intern year is an orientation consisting of seminars, workshops, lectures, and simulations, and a light schedule in the Emergency Department. Additional time is provided in obstetrics, orthopedics, simulation, anesthesiology and ultrasound.

Year 1

EM Orientation 4 weeks
Yale Emergency Medicine 14 weeks
Emergency Medicine Services 2 weeks
Emergency Medicine Pediatrics and Urgent Care* 4 weeks
Bridgeport Emergency Medicine* 12 weeks
Pediatric Emergency Medicine 2 weeks
Cardiac ICU 2 weeks
Medical ICU 4 weeks
Orthopedics/Procedure* 2 weeks
Obstetrics* 2 weeks
Simulation/Anesthesia /Ultrasound 4 weeks
Vacation (taken during Bridgeport blocks)
4 weeks

* denotes rotation at Bridgeport Hospital

Second Year

In the second year, emphasis is placed on critical care emergency medicine, trauma management, and pediatric emergency medicine. Pediatric experience is obtained through two rotations in the YNHH pediatric emergency department. During second year, critical care training is continued in the surgical intensive care unit, the coronary care unit, and the critical care areas of the YNHH Emergency Department. The second year resident assumes a supervisory role in the coronary care unit, guiding the care provided by first year residents. Second-year residents direct trauma resuscitations of modified (second tier) trauma responses. Two weeks of toxicology training is provided at the New York City Poison Control Center. This center offers a wealth of exposure to a wide range of toxicologic emergencies and high yield lectures on common and uncommon toxicologic pathology. During this year, our residents also have an essential role in teaching medical students in the Yale Center for Medical Simulation.

Year 2

Yale Emergency Medicine 18 weeks
Bridgeport Emergency Medicine* 12 weeks
Pediatric Emergency Medicine 8 weeks
Cardiac ICU 2 weeks
Surgical ICU 4 weeks
Toxicology (NYC Poison Control) 2 weeks
Trauma/General Surgery 4 weeks
Simulation 2 weeks
Vacation (taken during Bridgeport blocks) 4 weeks

*denotes rotation at Bridgeport Hospital

Third Year

The third year resident begins to assume the role of supervisor and teacher in the emergency department while continuing their education in critical care, trauma, and general emergency medicine. Emphasis is placed on directing junior level residents in the emergency department and medical intensive care unit. Third year residents lead trauma resuscitations while at Yale and Bridgeport hospitals and primarily manages all emergency department trauma intubations. The third-year resident gains extensive experience in critical care during this academic year. Exposure to pediatric emergency medicine is integrated throughout the year. Core experience in emergency psychiatry is obtained in the acute crisis intervention unit. This unit specifically serves patients with acute, emergent psychiatric needs. So that each resident may pursue research or other areas of interest, eight weeks of elective study time is allotted during this year.

Year 3

Yale Emergency Medicine (Adult and Pediatric) 24 weeks
Bridgeport Emergency Medicine* 12 weeks
Medical ICU 4 weeks
Emergency Psychiatry 2 weeks
Electives/Research 8 weeks
Simulation 2 weeks
Vacation (taken during Bridgeport blocks) 4 weeks

* denotes rotation at Bridgeport Hospital

Fourth Year

The final year is spent primarily learning the role of emergency department supervisor and teacher, as well as learning to lead the trauma team caring for critically ill trauma patients. During blocks of adult emergency medicine, the resident functions as a supervisor in the emergency department and is expected to oversee the care of all the patients in their section of the ED. The senior resident receives case presentations from junior residents and oversees all interventions, procedures and dispositions. Concurrently, the resident is expected to provide education to the junior residents about the pathology that is seen. Emphasis is placed on the coordination of care, direction of trauma and medical resuscitations, and emergency department management. The fourth-year resident is responsible for directing all full (first tier) trauma responses during the day as well as overseeing junior residents who direct modified trauma responses during the day and night. Pediatric emergency department shifts are integrated throughout the year for continued exposure to pediatric emergency medicine. Four weeks of the senior year are spent learning emergency department administration, which includes day-to-day operations, quality improvement, and joint work groups. The administrative block also includes valuable teaching of medical students and other residents in the Yale Center for Medical Simulation. So that each resident may pursue research or other areas of interest, eight to twelve weeks of elective study time is allotted. Eight of these weeks can be spent outside of Yale.

Year 4
Yale Emergency Medicine (Adult and Pediatric) 24-28 weeks
Bridgeport Emergency Medicine* 12 weeks
Administrative Emergency Medicine 4 weeks
Electives/Research 8-12 weeks
Vacation (taken during Bridgeport blocks)
4 weeks

* denotes rotation at Bridgeport Hospital