Short Courses & Certifications

In addition to earning an MSc in Tropical Medicine and International Health, fellows will have an opportunity to take part in several Short Courses and Certification programs offered domestically and abroad. Fellows are required to successfully pass the Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Examination and are encouraged to take the WHO Program on Disease Control in Humanitarian Emergencies and the Health Emergencies in Large Populations course. The following listing includes a brief overview and links to the three expected courses. Additional short courses which are not covered as part of fellowship training can be taken at the fellows discretion.

  • Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (DTM&H): The Diploma in Tropical Medicine & Hygiene is recognized by the Royal College of Physicians and is one of the few internationally recognized certification exams for Tropical Medicine. The Accreditation Committee of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene has approved the curriculum of the DTM&H course as suitable for doctors training in clinical tropical medicine and travelers' health in the USA. Completion of an accredited course and examination is a required part of this training. Additional information can be obtained at: http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/prospectus/short/stmh.html. The diploma is included as part of the MSc in Tropical Medicine and International Health and is required for completion of the fellowship.
  • Health Emergencies in Large Populations (HELP): The H.E.L.P. course was created in 1986 by the International Committee of the Red Cross to upgrade professionalism in humanitarian assistance programs conducted in emergency situations. The course is organized in partnership with academic institutions, WHO (World Health Organization), PAHO (Pan-American Health Organization), WMA (World Medical Association), and National Red Cross Societies. The purpose of the HELP modules is to provide the public health tools necessary for making appropriate decisions in emergency situations involving large populations. The course lay the foundation for common approaches to public health among humanitarian organizations, thus contributing to better program coordination in emergency operations. The course is offered in several locations annually and can be taken during the first or second year of fellowship training. Further information can be obtained at: http://www.icrc.org/Web/Eng/siteeng0.nsf/html/help_course.
  • WHO Program on Disease Control in Humanitarian Emergencies (DCE): The WHO Disease Control in Humanitarian Emergencies Program (DCE) aims to reduce the excess morbidity and mortality caused by communicable diseases in humanitarian emergencies. The course aims:
    • To review the epidemiology of infectious diseases in humanitarian emergencies (conflict and natural disasters);
    • To explore the challenges of implementing infectious disease programs in emergencies;
    • To explore concepts in infectious disease risk assessment in emergencies;
    • To review in depth the concepts in design and implementation of early warning/surveillance systems in emergencies;
    • To review principles of outbreak investigation and outbreak management, including laboratory, media and communication, social mobilization, and infection control;
    • To explore strategies in the prevention and control of key infectious diseases in emergencies.
    The course is given annually in London as a joint WHO-LSHTM 5 day program in the spring and can be taken in either the first or second year of training. Further information can be obtained at: http://www.who.int/diseasecontrol_emergencies/en/