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Yale-led study finds surprise link between metabolism and immunity

In the search for obesity treatments, scientists recently zeroed in on a gene known as Nucleobindin-2 (Nucb2), which was believed to play a role in satiety. However, in a new study published in Cell Reports, Yale researchers uncovered an unexpected function for the gene in reducing inflammation.

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  • Two brain neuroscience: understanding our social selves

    Humans are innately sociable mammals. However, almost all of our understanding of the neural basis of social interaction has been carried out with individual participants, limiting our knowledge of how our brains react to other humans. Joy Hirsch, Professor of Neuroscience at the Yale School of Medicine and University College London, has embarked on a truly pioneering research programme using new neuroimaging technology to study the human brain as it interacts with others.

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  • Battling belly fat: Specialized immune cells impair metabolism in aging

    In a new study, Yale researchers have described how nervous systems and immune systems talk to each other to control metabolism and inflammation. Their finding furthers scientists’ understanding of why older adults fail to burn stored belly fat, which raises the risk of chronic disease. The study also points to potential therapeutic approaches to target the problem, the researchers said.

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  • Blavatnik Fund awards grants for innovation

    Several faculty members won research grants from the Blavatnik Fund for Innovation at Yale at the fourth annual Yale Innovation Summit on May 10. The summit, presented by the Office of Cooperative Research (OCR) and Yale Entrepreneurial Institute, provides a window into an expanding entrepreneurial ecosystem at Yale.

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  • Could a ketogenic diet alleviate gout?

    More than 8 million individuals in the United States have gout, a disease that can cause intense recurrent episodes of debilitating pain, inflammation, and fever. The cause of gout is the accumulation of urate crystals in joints, which continuously reactivate the immune system, leading to activation of the most common type of immune cell in the blood, neutrophils. These periods of immune reactivation are known as flares, and are driven by a protein complex called the NLRP3 inflammasome.

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  • Can a cancer drug treat a rare cardiac disease?

    A study by a Yale scientis suggests that dasatinib and similar drugs at low doses could be effective treatment for cardiovascular defects related to Noonan syndrome (NS), a genetic disorder that results in severe heart defects, and should be considered for clinical trials.

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  • Yale Researchers Study Life-Extending Hormone

    Beginning in 2007, Vishwa Deep Dixit, professor of comparative medicine and immunobiology at Yale School of Medicine, and a team of researchers at his lab began studying the hormone and its effects on mice genetically engineered to produce more of it.

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