Distinguished Women

Women faculty and alumnae of YSM have made important contributions to science, clinical medicine, mentoring, and teaching. Since our goal is to be inclusive and to create a record of all women who have had an impact, we invite you to recognize faculty and alumae, current and past, alive or deceased, whom you feel exemplify excellence in science or clinical care and/or are role models, leaders, or mentors, as well as those who work or have worked on issues that affect women.

To recognize or honor a woman, you may provide professional information pertaining to her career, or you may simply want to offer personal thoughts or remembrances about how a mentor, colleague, advisor or friend affected your life or career.

Click here to recognize a colleague, mentor, or woman whom you admire.

  • Caroline J. (Kendall) Schmidt

    Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry; Clinical Psychologist, Psychology Section

    Years active at Yale: 2005-present

    Dr. Caroline Schmidt is being recognized for her clinical research in tinnitus and audiologic disorders. A graduate of Gallaudet College, Dr. Schmidt successfully completed an NIH T-32 residency where she examined mental health disparities among veterans with auditory disabilities. Of particular excellence, she received a Career Development Award in 2009. This award ultimately led to the development of Progressive Tinnitus Management — the gold standard of care for the management of tinnitus. She continues to support research in tinnitus nationally and currently is examining best practices of mental health integration within audiology clinics across the country. She is a member and active participant of Diversabilities at Yale (DAY) Affinity Group. Finally, Dr. Schmidt's contributions to providing and promoting culturally sensitive mental health services for deaf persons and to veterans is exemplary of the impact of psychological science at its highest service to the community.

  • Alumna

    Years active at Yale: YSPH Class of 1969

    Expertise and Public Health Practitioner, Leadership

    Susan Addiss is being recognized for her expertise and leadership as a public health practitioner. She had an exemplary career in public health practice at the local, state, and national level. She was Commissioner of Health for the State of Connecticut from 1991 to 1995, heading up the Department of Public Health and Addiction Services (now the Department of Public Health). Prior to this she was director of the Quinnipiac Valley Health District from 1985 to 1991, served as chief of the Bureau of Health Planning and Resource Allocation at the Connecticut Department of Health Services from 1976 to 1985, and held various positions with local public health departments in the state. She is a member and past president of the American Public Health Association and the Connecticut Public Health Association, a founding member and current director of the Connecticut-based Environment and Human Health, Inc., a vice-chair of the Connecticut Health Foundation, and a past member of the Pew Environmental Health Commission.

  • Pooja Agrawal

    Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine; Director, Global Health Education; Section of Global Health & International Emergency Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 2012-present

    Dr. Agrawal is being recognized as a nationally and internationally recognized scholar and leader in global health and academic emergency medicine. With extensive, first-hand experience providing technical assistance and evaluations to international NGOs engaged in humanitarian relief, Dr. Agrawal has worked around the globe from Japan to Cameroon. She is a tireless advocate for improving health outcomes among the world’s most vulnerable populations, with a particular focus on refugees. She has partnered with major NGOs to assess health outcomes upon resettlement for pediatric refugees and helped design tools for refugee resettlement agencies to rapidly identify the health needs of new populations. Dr. Agrawal epitomizes the catchphrase, “Think globally-act locally.” As a board member of the Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services (IRIS) of New Haven, she has developed a community-based research program designed to improve the linkage between refugees in the New Haven community and health and social services. Beyond her scholarly work, Dr. Agrawal is a formidable educator and clinician in the Department of Emergency Medicine. She has mentored dozens of residents participating in the Yale/Stanford/Johnson & Johnson Global Health Scholars program, and has served as a faculty advisor to numerous residents and medical students. Dr. Agrawal is also an ardent advocate for women, serving as a member of the American College of Emergency Physicians’ Women in Global Health Initiative, and she was recently elected president of the Academy for Women in Academic Emergency Medicine, where she has served as chair of the Global Health Committee and as Treasurer. In 2018 she received the AWAEM Momentum Award in recognition of her extraordinary services in moving the mission and values of AWAEM forward. Awardees have enhanced the recruitment, promotion, retention, and advancement of women in academic emergency medicine through individual support as well as organizational influence. At YSM, Dr. Agrawal is faculty coordinator of the Emergency Medicine Global Health Day Symposium and a faculty member at the Yale Center for Asylum Medicine.

  • Nita Ahuja

    William H. Carmalt Professor of Surgery; Chair, Department of Surgery

    Years active at Yale: 2018-present

    Dr. Ahuja is being recognized for her leadership and her excellence in clinical care and research. Dr. Ahuja is a passionate advocate for mentorship of trainees, staff, and faculty and has a reputation as a collaborative leader. Her surgical specialization is in gastrointestinal cancers, including gastric, rectal, and pancreatic cancers. She has developed an international reputation for management of peritoneal cancer metastases with cytoreduction and heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy, which attracts patients from around the world. She is widely recognized as a leader in translational epigenetics, conducting investigator-initiated clinical trials in colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer, and other solid tumors. In addition, she has developed biomarkers for early detection of colorectal and pancreatic cancers. 

    Dr. Ahuja is a national and international surgical leader and surgeon scientist who serves on multiple editorial boards and in national leadership positions including as a member of the American Surgical Association, the elected national representative to the Commission on Cancer from the Fellowship for the American College of Surgeons, and on the Association of American Medical Colleges Council of Faculty and Academic Societies Administrative Board. She has published over 200 papers and book chapters contributing to both the surgical and basic science fields. Her many awards and honors include the William J. Reinhoff, Jr. Scholar Award, the American Surgical Association Fellowship, the Society of Surgical Oncology Clinical Investigator Award, and the Abell Foundation Award: Johns Hopkins Alliance for Science and Technology Development.

  • Serap Aksoy

    Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

    Years active at Yale: 2002-present

    Serap Aksoy, PhD, is being recognized for her excellence in research into the biology of host-pathogen interactions, specifically involving tsetse flies, which transmit African trypanosomes and harbor multiple symbiotic microbes. Dr. Aksoy has multiple collaborative research programs with institutions in Uganda and Kenya, and her lab is developing novel methods to reduce tsetse fly populations or their ability to transmit disease. In Uganda, she studies Sleeping Sickness disease. In Kenya, she has been involved in an international training program to expand research capacity in tsetse-transmitted diseases. 

    During her time at Yale, Dr. Aksoy has headed the Division of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases. She also serves as editor in chief of the journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, where she works to build research and publication capacity for global neglected tropical diseases. She has chaired both the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases’ Vector Biology Study Section and the World Health Organization’s Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases, Molecular Entomology BL5.

  • Virginia Alexander

    Alumna

    Years active at Yale: YSPH Class of 1941

    Dr. Alexander is being recognized as a pioneering woman physician and public health practitioner. Born in Philadelphia in 1899, she was only 4 years old when her mother died, and at age 13, her father lost his once flourishing livery stable. She eventually won a scholarship to the University of Pennsylvania and to pay for her living expenses, she worked as a maid, a clerk, and a waitress. Dr. Alexander ranked second highest among medical aptitude test examinees after her entry into the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania. African American physicians were discriminated against in many medical institutions, and no Philadelphia hospital would accept her for practical training. She moved to Kansas City for her internship and within a few years, she was back in Philadelphia, running her own community health clinic and serving on the faculty of the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania. The Aspiranto Health Home was founded in her own home to serve Philadelphia's poor.

    In 1941, Dr. Alexander earned her MPH at Yale and accepted a position at Howard University, where she was appointed physician- in-charge of women students. She also ran a private health practice and worked for the U.S. Department of Health. When World War II broke out, physicians from across the country were dispatched to military bases to care for the injured, leaving many groups at home desperate for medical care. Dr. Alexander volunteered for the government and was sent to the coal fields of Alabama to treat miners living in extreme poverty. She died at the age of 49 from lupus.

  • Heather Allore

    Professor; Director, Yale Program on Aging Biostatistics Core; Director, Data Management and Statistics Core, Yale Alzheimer's Disease Research Center; Co-director of the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core of the Yale Transdisciplinary Collaborative Center for Precision Medicine focused on Health Disparities; Adjunct Professor, Harldsplass Deaconess Hospital, University of Bergen, Norway

    Years active at Yale: 2000-present

    Dr. Allore is being recognized for her outstanding contributions to clinical science and leadership. She is director of the biostatistics core of the Yale Program on Aging and has pioneered advanced methodological applications for overcoming issues inherent in aging research. She is credited for founding the field of "gerontological biostatistics."

  • Louise Bates Ames

    Former YSM faculty

    Years active at Yale: 1933-1950 

    Dr. Ames is being recognized for her significant role in research on and popularization of norms of child development. Dr. Ames became the best known of several women MDs and PhDs who collaborated with Arnold Gesell, MD, director of the Clinic of Child Development at Yale from 1911 to 1948. The women members of the clinic included Catherine Strunk Amatruda, MD (1903-1949), Frances Ilg, MD (1902-1981), and Helen Thompson, PhD. Dr. Gesell and his team studied detailed stages of normal development of children by analyzing frames of film taken of children placed inside an experimental dome, which enabled the children to be viewed from outside. The collaborators did almost all the analysis of frames upon which the norms of development were based, and co-authored many of Dr. Gesell’s books. Dr. Ames came to Yale as a PhD student in 1933. Her thesis was on the sequence of prone progression in the human infant. She collaborated on such works as The First Five Years of Life (1940) and Infant and Child in the Culture of Today (1943), and also published research articles on her own. She, like Dr. Gesell, took a biological approach to child development (as opposed to behaviorism or psychoanalysis) and believed that stages of motor and cognitive development were predictable. She was particularly interested in tests for “developmental diagnosis” and age-related responses to Rorschach tests. In 1948, Drs. Ames, Ilg, and Janet Learned Rodell, founded the private Gesell Institute for Human Development in New Haven. She and Ilg, in addition to ongoing research, published books on child development for a general audience. They also wrote a syndicated newspaper column, called “Child Development,” and later, “Parents Ask,” from 1951 to 1996. Dr. Ames lectured widely and hosted a weekly TV talk show in the 1950s and 1960s.

  • Karen Anderson

    Professor of Pharmacology and of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry; Co-Director Therapeutics/Chemotherapy Program

    Years active at Yale: 1992- present

    Dr. Anderson is being recognized for her leadership in mechanistic enzymology and structure-based drug design. Her work focuses on understanding how enzymes, playing critical roles in such diseases as cancer and infectious diseases, including AIDS, work at a molecular level. She uses that information to develop new drug therapies. Her recent work on new antiviral therapies to treat HIV infections in a long-term collaborative effort with Dr. William Jorgensen in Yale’s Department of Chemistry has led to the discovery of a promising preclinical candidate that is now under further development. Dr. Anderson has trained more than 40 graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who are now involved in biomedical research. 

    She is a co-director of Developmental Therapeutics in the Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, and co-track director of Biochemistry, Quantitative Biology, and Structural Biology in the Yale Combined Program in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences. Dr. Anderson has received numerous awards, including Monsanto Research Achievement awards, the Dean’s Young Faculty Award, the Hull Cancer Research Award, YCC Breast Cancer Initiative Award, Gates Foundation Grand Challenge Award, and Department of Defense Lung Cancer Concept Award. She has published more than 200 research papers and was elected to the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering.

  • Nancy Angoff

    Professor; Associate Dean for Student Affairs

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1990, MPH Class of 1991; 1998-present

    Dr. Angoff is being recognized for her leadership in student affairs and the creation of educational programs which emphasize professionalism. Her leadership and programs have changed the ethos of our school and enriched the environment in which our students learn.

    She has been a tireless advocate for students, having created the Peer Advocate program which provides first-year students with upper-class student advocates and the Academic Advisor Program, which provides each student with an advisor who mentors and guides the student’s academic progress. She herself is an incredible mentor. Several of our more well-known students attribute their success to the advice and mentorship of Dean Angoff. Of equal importance to our school, Dr. Angoff has developed important elements of our educational curriculum which help form the professional identity of our students. They include: “The First Day of School” project, in which students are immersed in the importance of cultural humility, and “Power Day,” in which students and interdisciplinary faculty reflect on the meaning of power in medicine. Most recently, Dr. Angoff has become the Director of the Master Course which begins medical school exploring professional behavior through hospital emersion, reflective writing, and other exercises. Her mentorship of students, development of the Students Advisor Program and creation of curricula that emphasize the meaning of being a doctor have been significant and important contributions to our medical school.

  • Lydia Aoun-Barakat

    Associate Professor Term; Medical Director Nathan Smith Clinic; Program Director, HIV Primary Care Training Track

    Years active at Yale: 2000-present

    Dr. Aoun-Barakat is being recognized for her deep and unyielding commitment for the past 20 years to bringing high quality, compassionate, and comprehensive care to people living with HIV. As medical director of the Yale New Haven Hospital Nathan Smith Clinic since 2010, she is a constant inspiration for her trainees and colleagues alike as she fosters team-bases care with excellence. She also created the robust HIV track within the primary care residency program in 2011 to promote development of future leaders in this area.

  • Martine Armstrong

    Senior Research Scientist Emeritus of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

    Years active at Yale: 1968-1997

    Dr. Armstrong is being recognized for her studies of retroviruses and her service as an administrator overseeing the university’s animal care committee. She also served on the Yale Biological Safety Advisory Committee and was acting vice-chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health from 1993 to 1995. 

    Dr. Armstrong’s early career focused on the study of retroviruses in mouse models. In the early 1980s, with the appearance of AIDS, a retrovirus, she turned to the study of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Before retroviral therapy it was a common cause of death in AIDS patients. Dr. Armstrong studied the in vitro cultivation of Pneumocystis carinii, an opportunistic protozoon pathogen, and the delineation of the pathogen’s interaction with host lung tissue. Her research led to about 40 papers and reviews. 

    In 2015, she was inducted into the Winslow Centennial Honor Roll for Excellence and Service, which was established to honor 100 alumni and/or faculty who made outstanding contributions to public health during the Yale School of Public Health’s first 100 years.

  • Linda Arnold

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Emergency Medicine) and of Emergency Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 1999-present

    Dr. Arnold is being recognized as a leader in global child health education and training, and collaborative multi-sector partnerships to improve global maternal and child health (MCH). She is internationally recognized for her contributions to global health capacity building, professional leadership development, and scale up of proven interventions through existing MCH platforms to reduce child mortality through professional societies and initiatives, such as Rwanda’s Human Resources for Health Program, and the Survive and Thrive Global Development Alliance.

    At Yale, Dr. Arnold is a long-standing member of the Down’s International Fellowship Committee, helped create the Yale Pediatric Global Health Track, and actively mentors students, trainees, and junior faculty interested in global health. On a national level, she served as chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on International Child Health (SOICH). Under her leadership, SOICH established an annual scientific abstract program for global health scholarship and travel grants for physicians from low- and middle-income countries to present their work at professional meetings, as well as prioritized global health advocacy training and policy work. Dr. Arnold has moderated congressional receptions focused on global MCH funding; participated in multiple high-level MCH events at the United Nations, NIH, and on Capitol Hill; and is frequently invited to speak both nationally and internationally about the importance of global capacity building and effective multi-sector bidirectional partnerships.

    Dr. Arnold is immediate past chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on International Child Health, a member of the American Board of Pediatrics Global Health Task Force, and the North American representative to the International Pediatric Association, where she is co-chair of the Ethics Committee.

  • Amy Arnsten

    Albert E. Kent Professor of Neuroscience and Professor of Psychology; Member, Kavli Institute of Neuroscience at Yale University

    Years active at Yale: 1987-present

    Dr. Arnsten is being recognized for excellence in research and teaching. She is an international expert on the molecular regulation of the newly evolved brain circuits that subserve higher cognition, which are the target of such disorders as schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s Disease. Much of her work focuses on the prefrontal cortex, a newly evolved brain region that creates our "mental sketchpad," and subserves abstract reasoning, high order decision-making, working memory, and thoughtful regulation of attention, behavior, and emotion (including inhibition of inappropriate thoughts, actions and feelings). Her research has shown that exposure to uncontrollable stress or advancing age weakens network connections by opening ion channels near synapses, leading to loss of neuronal firing and cognitive impairment. Her work has successfully translated to new treatments for cognitive disorders in humans, including guanfacine (IntunivTM) for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorders and related prefrontal cortical disorders, and prazosin for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. Dr. Arnsten has held MERIT and Pioneer Awards from the National Institutes of Health, and was awarded the 2015 Goldman-Rakic Prize for Outstanding Research in Cognitive Neuroscience. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine.

    In addition to her research, Dr. Arnsten is a prize-winning teacher who has taught Yale medical students, graduate students, and undergraduates, as well as medical residents and fellows. She teaches about the neurobiology of mental illness with the hope that it will help reduce stigma. Her research on stress has also led to new programs aimed at de-escalating potentially violent situations by restoring higher brain functions during threatening conditions.

  • Ani Aydin

    Assistant Professor

    Years active at Yale: 2012-present

    Dr. Aydin is being recognized for her accomplishments in the field of emergency medicine education and trauma/surgical critical care. She practices as an attending in the emergency department and the Surgical Intensive Care Unit. She serves as the liaison to the Department of Surgery, as an emergency department Quality Improvement committee member, and as an emergency medicine reviewer for the American College of Surgeons Trauma Center Verification Program. She is the founder and chairperson of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Critical Care Medicine Interest Group, and the secretary/newsletter editor of the American College of Emergency Physicians Critical Care Medicine Section. Dr. Aydin is currently working with other emergency medicine faculty to develop a critical care curriculum for YSM, and she is working on a national scale to develop a mechanical ventilator course for
    emergency medicine.

  • Michele Barry

    Former YSM faculty

    Department: Internal Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 1977-2009

    Dr. Barry is being recognized because of her expertise in international health and leadership in creating change for women at the School of Medicine. While on the faculty she rose to the rank of professor of medicine before she was recruited to Stanford University as senior associate dean for global health and director of the Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health. She is a past president of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene and was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2002.

    While at Yale, Dr. Barry was a tireless advocate for women’s rights. She wrote the first policy to be used for maternity leave in the Department Medicine. In 2000,she and Dr. Shirley McCarthy co-authored “Recommendations for Addressing Inequity Issues at Yale Medical School,” more commonly called the Bill of Rights for Women. Dr. Barry was also passionate about her work in international health. She started the first International Health Clinic at Yale, along with Dr. Frank Bia, and they obtained funding from Johnson & Johnson to launch the first international residency training program at Yale. Our loss was Stanford’s gain.

  • Linda Bartoshuk

    Former YSM faculty

    Department: Department of Psychology, Department of Surgery’s Section of Otolaryngology

    Years active at Yale: 1970-2005

    Dr. Bartoshuk is being recognized for her research in the studies of genetic variations in taste perception and how taste perception affects overall health. She is one of the world’s foremost authorities on the sense of taste. Now at the University of Florida, Dr. Bartoshuk is best known for her discovery, in the early 1990s, that one in four people is a “supertaster” for whom sweet is more cloying and bitter, more astringent. She was the first to discover that burning mouth syndrome, mostly experienced by postmenopausal women, is not a psychosomatic condition, but caused by damage to the taste buds at the front of the tongue. She was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1995, and in 2003 she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

    Dr. Bartoshuk began her career in astronomy as an undergraduate at Carleton College in Minnesota, but left that field when her professors told her it was not friendly to women and that landing a position at an observatory would be nearly impossible for her. She changed majors when she learned that the psychology department would accept her math and science credits.

  • Susan Baserga

    Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, of Genetics and of Therapeutic Radiology

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1988; 1993-present

    Dr. Baserga is being recognized because of her excellence in basic science research, in teaching and mentoring, and for her contributions to the history and progress of women at the school. A graduate of Yale College and YSM, Dr. Baserga has served in many leadership roles in the MD/PhD program as well as in her own department, including director of medical studies in the Department of Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry,and program director in the Predoctoral Program in Cellular and Molecular. 

    She has received many awards for her science and teaching including the “Bohmfalk Scholar in Medical Research,” and the Charles W. Bohmfalk Prize for basic science teaching. She was elected to the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering in 2012. Dr. Baserga has also been an advocate for women and the issues that affect them. In the 1980s and 1990s, she worked with the Committee for the Status of Women in Medicine, helping to create policy that increased day care options, pressed the dean to hire more women, and published yearly transparency documents for faculty salaries. The first sexual harassment guidelines at Yale University were written at that time by Dr. Baserga and this committee. Dr. Baserga’s science, teaching, and women’s advocacy constitute important contributions to our school.

  • Lori Bastian

    Professor of Internal Medicine (General Medicine); Section Chief of General Internal Medicine VA Connecticut Healthcare System; Director, Pain Research, Informatics, Multimorbidities, and Education (PRIME) Center

    Years active at Yale: 2016-present

    Dr. Bastian is being recognized for her excellence in clinical science and leadership. She is a health services researcher whose research focuses on developing health behavior interventions. Since joining the faculty in 2016, she has served as section chief for General Internal Medicine and director of Pain Research, Informatics, Multimorbidities, and Education (PRIME) at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System. She has a long-standing interest in health behaviors among women veterans. She began her research career in women's health in 1991 at Duke University, where she served as the medical director of a comprehensive women's clinic and also served as PI of NIH and VA grants focusing on interventions to change health behaviors,such as smoking cessation and weight loss. She has served as deputy editor of the Journal of General Internal Medicine since 2006. Her scholarly accomplishment is demonstrated by more than 150 publications in peer-reviewed journals. In her leadership role as director of the PRIME Center, she oversees a health services research program with 30 core faculty and she mentors both fellows and junior faculty.

  • Leona Baumgartner

    Alumna

    Years active at Yale: PhD Class of 1932; MD Class of 1934

    Dr. Baumgartner is being recognized for her role as a pioneering woman in public health. She was an early recruit to the Yale Plan of Medical Education. Induced to undergo two years of general medical training and an internship rather than remain immersed in basic immunology, she found a place for her expanded interests as a national leader in public health. Values promulgated by C-E.A. Winslow and Ira Hickok of the Yale School of Public Health became the bedrock of her career. She eventually became Commissioner of Health for New York City, where she spearheaded the creation of the Health Research Council (meant to be a National Institutes of Health for NYC), developed programs for drastically reducing the infant mortality rate, improved sanitation, and linked clinical medicine to public health in new and effective ways. Under her direct leadership, NYC enrolled in the Salk vaccine trial of 1954, which led to the near elimination of polio in the city over the course of three years. Dubbed by Life Magazine as “Doctor to 8,000,000 People,” she went on from the Health Department to become an assistant secretary of state, the highest ranking woman in the Johnson administration. She ended her distinguished career as Visiting Professor of Social Medicine at Harvard.

  • Kirsten Bechtel

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Emergency Medicine) and of Emergency Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 1999-present

    Dr. Bechtel is being recognized for her dedication to the well-being of children and adolescents. She is medical director of the Pediatric Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) Program; chairperson of the Yale Traffic Safety Subcommittee; co-chairperson of the state of Connecticut Child Fatality Review Panel; and co-principal investigator of the Injury Free Coalition for Kids at Yale New Haven Children's Hospital. She received her medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Rutgers Medical School; completed her pediatric residency at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, and completed her fellowship training at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. She has been on the faculty at Yale School of Medicine since 1999.

    Dr. Bechtel’s academic career has focused on the social welfare and medical well-being of children and injury prevention. Her clinical research has focused on the evaluation of children with head trauma; the prevention of abusive head trauma; recognition of child abuse and neglect by emergency medical service providers; the evaluation of children and adolescents after sexual assault; the evaluation of children and adolescents who are involved in domestic minor sex trafficking; the prevention of traffic injury; and the prevention of post-traumatic stress symptoms in children with traumatic injury.

    She was honored by Yale University and the City of New Haven with the Seton Elm Ivy Award in 2015 for her work to prevent traffic injury.

  • Lisa F. Berkman

    Former YSM faculty

    Department: School of Public Health 

    Years active at Yale: 1979-1995

    Dr. Berkman is being recognized because of her research in epidemiology and inequities of health care delivery due to social and race inequities. During her 16 years on the Yale faculty, Dr. Berkman headed the Division of Chronic Disease Epidemiology and the Division of Health Policy at the School of Public Health. Now at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, she is an internationally recognized social epidemiologist who studies social and policy influences on health outcomes. She seeks to understand inequalities related to socioeconomic status, different ethnic and racial groups, and social networks, support and isolation.

    At Harvard, she is director of the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, director of the PhD Program in Population Health Sciences and the Thomas D. Cabot Professor of Public Policy, Epidemiology, and Global Health and Population.

  • Gretchen Berland

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medicine)

    Years active at Yale: 2002-present

    Dr. Berland is being recognized for a unique and distinguished career path that has combined the practice of medicine with media. As an example, she has combined her long-standing interest and experience in the use of the documentary film format as a means to explore the experiences of patients. One film, “Rolling,” which documents the experiences of persons using wheelchairs, aired on PBS. This project was part of the reason she was recognized as a MacArthur Fellow, the first at Yale School of Medicine.

    At Yale, Dr. Berland has excelled at mentoring medical students who have an interest in this area, helping them produce short documentaries. She teaches two highly regarded courses at Yale College, each devoted to the exploration of how media can impact health. Her extraordinary mentorship across the university has enabled students to pursue novel scholarly projects, which has led to an expansion of what the university views as scholarly work. Currently an associate professor in the Department of Internal Medicine in the Section of General Internal Medicine, she is a practicing general internist. She has lectured nationally and internationally and has received achievement awards from her college, medical school, and residency-training program, many of which recognize her ability and courage to use novel approaches to scholarship.

  • Nancy Berliner

    Former YSM faculty

    Department: Internal Medicine

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1979; 1986-2008

    Nancy Berliner, MD is being recognized for her excellence in basic and clinical research.  Currently she is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and senior attending physician at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Dr.Berliner was in the Hematology Section, Dept.Medicine at YSM where she rose to the rank of Professor of Medicine and Genetics.She was a consummate clinician and teacher while doing basic research centering on the genetic defects in neutrophils that cause myelodysplasia and leukemia. 

    She is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, the American Clinical and Climatological Society, and the Interurban Clinical Club, and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American College of Physicians. She was President of the American Society of Hematology in 2009 and was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2011.

    Dr.Berliner is the embodiment of a “triple threat” –great researcher; clinician and teacher. In addition to her outstanding reputation in academic medicine, she has always an outspoken advocate for women’s issues and gender equity.

  • Margaret Bia

    Professor Emeritus of Medicine (Nephrology); Senior Transplant nephrologist

    Years active at Yale: 1978-present

    Dr. Bia is being recognized for her excellence in medical education, her leadership in transplantation, and her advocacy for women’s issues. A self-taught transplant specialist, she became the Yale School of Medicine’s first director of transplant nephrology in 1984, a post she held until 2001. She was recognized with the “Pioneer in Transplant” award from the National Kidney Foundation in 2004. She was the first woman invited to join the Nephrology Board of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM), where she served from 1996 to 2002. Dr. Bia served another 11 years on the ABIM’s Self-Assessment Nephrology Committee. 

    In medical student education, she directed the renal module from 1985 to 1998, becoming director of all the modules (the pathophysiology course) from 1998 to 2002. She created the Clinical Skills Program in 2001 and ran the program until 2014.

    Dr. Bia has won numerous teaching awards including: The Bohmfalk teaching prize for clinical sciences; the Francis Blake teaching award (twice); the dean’s award for exceptional contributions to the school; the Leah Lowenstein teaching award (twice); the AAMC Humanism in Medicine Award; and the House-Staff Teaching Award. Most recently, she was honored with a named teaching prize, the “Dr. Peggy Bia Award for Outstanding Clinical Teaching,” given to residents by the third-year class for outstanding teaching on the internal medicine clerkship. 

    She has authored more than 100 peer-reviewed publications. For decades Dr. Bia has been active on The Committee on the Status of Women in Medicine (SWIM) and senior faculty committees, which promote issues that affect women. In 2018, she was honored with the Life Time Achievement Award from the National Kidney Foundation, Connecticut branch.

  • Years active at Yale: 2015-present

    Dr. Blakley is being recognized for her excellence in teaching and mentoring. She has been a fantastic supervisor and mentor. Dr. Blakley provides thoughtful and professional supervision within the Clinical Health Psychology program for interns and postdoctoral fellows. Trainees know firsthand that she works hard to offer hopeful and positive messages about caring for veterans. Dr. Blakley models ethical care for veterans and through her example, encourages excellence. In her current role in the Palliative Care Service, she provides compassionate care for veterans and their families. She is always willing to learn new skills and apply those wholeheartedly in her work.

  • Hilary Blumberg

    John and Hope Furth Professor of Psychiatric Neuroscience and Professor of Psychiatry, and in the Child Study Center and of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging; Director, Mood Disorders Research Program

    Years active at Yale: 1998- present

    Dr. Blumberg is being recognized for her accomplishments in research and as an inspiration to women and men to work their hardest while maintaining friendships and family ties. 

    Dr. Blumberg is well known for her pioneering work in youths with bipolar disorder (BD). This has included research evidence of differences in the trajectories of development of the brain circuitry during adolescence that has shaped the view of BD as a disorder of neurodevelopment and of adolescence as an important period. More recent areas of study include some of the first multi-modality research on the brain circuitry of suicide risk in adolescents and young adults, as well as changes in the brain in BD with age later in life, and with her Brain Emotion Circuitry-Targeted Self-Monitoring and Regulation Therapy (BE-SMART) psychobehavioral treatment. Dr. Blumberg’s research brings affected families hope that there may soon be new methods for early detection, targeted treatments, improved prognosis, and prevention of BD progression and suicide.

    Dr. Blumberg, who characterized one of the first demonstrations of brain differences in individuals experiencing manic symptoms of BD, has received the Colvin Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Mood Disorders Research.

  • Linda Bockenstedt

    Harold W. Jockers Professor of Medicine, Deputy Dean for Faculty Affairs

    Years active at Yale: 1989 - present

    Dr. Bockenstedt is being recognized for excellence in clinical medicine and for promoting diversity and equality at YSM. 

    Dr. Bockenstedt received her undergraduate degree in chemistry and physics from Harvard College and her medical degree from the Ohio State University School of Medicine. After her residency in medicine at Yale, she completed clinical and research fellowships in rheumatology at the University of California, San Francisco. She returned to Yale as a faculty member in 1989, became assistant professor in 1991, and served as director of the Section of Rheumatology Training Program in Investigative Rheumatology from 1995-2004, leading it through its last ACGME accreditation in 2004. Dr. Bockenstedt leads a research program focused on the immunopathogenesis of tick-borne diseases with rheumatologic relevance, especially Lyme disease. She has mentored postdoctoral and medical trainees and gained international recognition for her studies of the host response to spirochetal infections. Her current research employs a systems biology approach to understand the diverse clinical manifestations of Lyme disease, and uses molecular profiling to identify host factors that underlie the divergent outcomes from this infection. For her teaching and clinical excellence, she was awarded the Howard M. Spiro Young Faculty Teaching Award and has continually been on the Best Doctors list since 2002. She is also a recipient of the Sir William Osler Young Investigator Award. She presently serves as co-chair, representing the American College of Rheumatology, of the Trisocieties’ (American College of Rheumatology, Infectious Diseases Society of America and American Academy of Neurology) effort to updates guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease. 

    Dr. Bockenstedt is a Fellow member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and an elected member of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering. In 2006, she was named director for professional development and equity at YSM. In 2014, she was appointed associate dean for faculty development and diversity and chaired the YSM Ad Hoc Task Force on Gender Equity. In 2017, she became deputy dean for faculty affairs, where she is working to improve climate and support for the advancement of all faculty.

  • Jessica Bod

    Assistant Professor

    Years active at Yale: 2012-present

    Dr. Bod is being recognized for her outstanding contributions to medical student education and promoting diversity at YSM. She helped to develop a combined emergency medicine/ultrasound sub-internship track for advanced rotators, and she helped to develop and implement a program to increase the recruitment of underrepresented minority students in emergency medicine. She is also a member of the Dean’s Advisory Council for LGBTQ Affairs.

  • Phyllis  Bodel

    Former faculty

    Department: Internal Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 1961-1978

    Dr. Bodel is being recognized as a gifted scientist, a beloved mentor to students, and an international leader in the study of fever. She came to Yale in 1961 as a research assistant and later joined the faculty, where she conducted research on the experience of women in medicine, challenging the notion that women were less likely than men to persevere and succeed in their medical careers. Writing in the journal Clinical Medicine in 1972, she and co-author Elizabeth Short, MD '68, laid much of the conventional wisdom to rest. (Their work is described in the book Medicine at Yale: The First 200 Years, published in 2011.)

    The data they collected led to an increase in the number of women admitted to YSM and better opportunities for women on the faculty. Dr. Bodel become the first director of the school’s Office for Women in Medicine—the first such office at an American medical school—and helped guide the medical school into a new era. Tenure rules were changed, allowing women more time to achieve tenure as they began families. Measures were put in place to correct gender disparities and to provide social and professional support. One example of this was increasing access to childcare.

    The Phyllis Bodel Childcare Center has had a tremendous impact on the careers of faculty, students, and staff at the medical school by providing a safe and stimulating environment for their young children right on campus.

  • Sandy Bogucki

    Professor

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1984; 1989-present

    Dr. Bogucki is being recognized for her research and program development in Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and disaster planning and response. She graduated from YSM in 1984 and joined Yale’s Department of Emergency Medicine in 1989. She holds several positions of leadership in the fire service and emergency medical services communities. She's a principal member of the National Fire Protection Association Technical Committee of Fire Department Health and Safety, and has conducted on-site investigations of fire fighter line-of-duty deaths for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 

    Dr. Bogucki is also on the editorial board of Pre-hospital Emergency Care and was an associate editor of Academic Emergency Medicine. She is a past chairman of the board of directors of the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians, and was a senior medical advisor to the assistant secretary for Preparedness and Response in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services from 2004-2008, participating in the federal medical response to major disasters.

  • Jean Bolognia

    Professor of Dermatology; Vice Chair, Clinical Affairs

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1980; 1980-present

    Jean Bolognia has served as President of the Medical Dermatology Society, the Women’s Dermatologic Society and the American Dermatological Association, in addition to serving as Vice-President of the Society of Investigative Dermatology, the American Board of Dermatology, and the International Society of Dermatology. She has also been elected to serve on the Board of Directors of the American Academy of Dermatology and the International League of Dermatological Societies. In the latter organization, she currently serves as Secretary-General. Jean is the senior editor of the textbook Dermatology, which is now in its fourth edition, and Dermatology Essentials. She is also the co-founder of the Clinical Scholars program of the SID and author of over 200 articles and book chapters.

  • H. Kim Bottomly

    Former faculty

    Department: Pathology, Immunobiology (Primary); Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology (Secondary)

    Years active at Yale: 1980-2007

    Dr. Bottomly is being recognized for her work as a renowned immunobiologist responsible for fundamental discoveries in her field. She served as deputy provost at Yale and, from 2007 to 2016, was the 13th president of Wellesley College. She has published more than 170 refereed articles in science journals and holds six patents. She is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Inventors, and the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering. She was awarded an honorary doctorate from Japan Women’s University and was selected as one of the University of Washington’s ‘Wondrous 100’ (top 100 graduates of the past century). 

    In addition to recognition for strong leadership in excellence in all aspects of academia, Dr. Bottomly has a long-standing keen interest in science education and women in science. She chaired the board of directors of the Consortium on Financing Higher Education and was a member of the advisory council of the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health. She is a member of the leadership council of the Yale School of Engineering and Applied Science and the Olin College of Engineering President’s Council. She currently serves as a trustee for the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship Foundation.

  • Former faculty

    Years active at Yale: PhD Class of 1996; 1992-2017 

    Dr. Bradley is being recognized for her teaching, mentoring, and leadership roles. She was Brady-Johnson Professor of Grand Strategy and founder and faculty director of the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute at Yale. In 2017, she became president of Vassar College.

    Dr. Bradley is regarded as being at the forefront of healthcare system strengthening, both domestically and internationally. She is co-author of the The American Healthcare Paradox: Why Spending More Is Getting Us Less, a book that started an international dialogue on the impact of social determinants on the health of a population. She led the Health Management Program at the Yale School of Public Health, Health Policy and Administration and coordinated health management teaching efforts in joint programs for business and medical students at Yale University. A leader of global health initiatives at Yale, she spearheaded education and research programs in China, the United Kingdom, Ethiopia, Ghana, Liberia, Rwanda, and South Africa. Her work in these countries contributed to significant changes to advance the overall health and well-being of their populations. In the U.S., she contributed to the improvement of quality of care within hospital settings, the understanding of the relationship between state-level social service spending and health outcomes, and improving the transition from acute to palliative care.

  • Cynthia Brandt

    Professor of Emergency Medicine and of Anesthesiology

    Years active at Yale: 1995-present

    Dr. Brandt is being recognized for her work building informatics infrastructure for clinical research and performing research focused on such issues as the management of clinical vocabularies used in clinical research databases and the implementation of computerized clinical practice guidelines. She is also part of an interdisciplinary team that received funding to develop the Pain Management Collaboratory Coordinating Center, which will provide national leadership and serve as a national resource in conducting high-impact pragmatic clinical trials on non-drug approaches to manage pain and other comorbid conditions in veteran and military health care systems.

  • Former faculty

    Years active at Yale: 1996-2007

    Dr. Bravata is being recognized for her achievements in research and mentorship. Dr. Bravata’s research has focused on the measurement and evaluation of quality of care, seeking to identify gaps in care that serve as targets for future implementation projects. Currently professor of medicine at the University of Indiana, she has published over 100 peer-reviewed research papers in leading journals. In 2006, Dr. Bravata became the clinical coordinator of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Stroke Quality Enhancement Research Initiative, where she worked with collaborators in the U.S.and Canada to develop and advance a national VA stroke research health services, implementation science, and health policy portfolio. Dr. Bravata was the first to benchmark the quality of stroke care for patients in VA hospitals in a study that identified opportunities to improve VA stroke care. This project led to the issuance of the national VA Acute Ischemic Stroke Directive and to system-wide changes in the organization of VA stroke services. As a result of this system reorganization, stroke care quality has improved consistently and substantially for veterans.Her work in stroke care quality led to an interest in evaluating new approaches to improve outcomes for patients with vascular disease. For example, she has conducted several prospective, randomized controlled clinical trials to evaluate a strategy of diagnosing and treating sleep apnea among patients with a cerebrovascular event. These studies demonstrated that this strategy results in clinically meaningful improvements in neurological functioning and a reduced risk of recurrent vascular events for patients with stroke and transient ischemic attack. 

    Dr. Bravata has also served as a research mentor for many students, fellows, and junior faculty members across a diverse spectrum of clinical specialties.

  • Former faculty

    Department: Department of Human Genetics

    Years active at Yale: 1974-1984

    Dr. Breakefieldis being recognized for her international leadership in the field of the genetics and gene therapy of brain tumors. She has been at the forefront of research on gene therapy for brain tumors, including such novel killing mechanisms as prodrug-activating enzymes delivered by oncolytic virus vectors and neuroprecursor cells as homing vehicles for delivery of therapeutic proteins. She has also led efforts in new methods of in vivo molecular imaging of gene delivery and tumor regression, and modulation of microRNAs in tumors and associated endothelial cells to kill tumor stem cells and block angiogenesis. She and her colleagues are now characterizing the role of exosomes produced by tumor cells in the manipulation of normal tissue to promote tumor expansion and as serum biomarkers to monitor tumor status.

    She is now at Harvard, where she is a professor of neurology and a geneticist in the neurology and radiology services at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Breakefield is a member of Scientific Advisory Board at Exosome Diagnostics, Inc. She has served on the National Institutes of Health Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee and is a member of an NIH study section that reviews translational research.

  • Former faculty

    Department: Internal Medicine

    Years active at Yale: Late 1980's-2001

    Dr. Brett-Smith is being recognized because of her excellence in clinical work, specifically in HIV/AIDS. After completion of her residency and infectious disease fellowship at Yale, Dr. Brett-Smith specialized in the care of HIV patients and became a passionate advocate for these patients. She was the first medical director of the HIV clinic at the Hospital of St.Raphael, called the Haelen Center Infectious Disease. She worked tirelessly to care for patients with AIDS early in the epidemic when many others were avoiding these patients. In addition to her devotion to clinical care, Dr. Brett-Smith was also an outspoken advocate for all issues relating to women and women’s rights.

  • Ursula C Brewster

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Nephrology); Firm Chief, Peters Medical Firm; Training Program Director, Nephrology Fellowship

    Years active at Yale: 1998-present

    Dr. Brewster is being recognized for several reasons. The first is her teaching and mentoring. She is a tremendous teacher of the resident physicians, always going above and beyond to teach on rounds, at the bedside, and in formal teaching sessions. Her teaching inspires passion within the residents and her energy and enthusiasm is palpable. She is a mentor to residents in multiple ways. Her patients absolutely adore her and she epitomizes the doctor-patient relationship. Watching her interact with patients inspires residents to be better clinicians. She is also a terrific example of a strong woman in medicine. She is not afraid to speak up and ensure that her patients get only the best care. Residents who watch Dr. Brewster stand up for her patients learn to do this themselves. Her teaching, modeling of the doctor-patient relationship, and passion for medicine are inspiring.

  • Rebecca Brienza

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (General Medicine); Director, VACHS Center of Excellence in Primary Care Education

    Years active at Yale: 1999-2004; 2009-present

    Dr Brienza is being recognized for her leadership in the development and implementation of the Center of Excellence (COE) in Primary Care Education at VA ConnecticutHealthcare System. The COE is an innovative model of interprofessional education and team-based collaborative care. Dr Brienza was successful in receiving one of five competitive grants to develop this program in 2011 and since then has been a pioneer and strong advocate for the advancement of inter-professional education. The COE has developed many educational innovations that have been adopted throughout VA primary care as well as across the Yale internal medicine residency program. These have included the MD residents ambulatory immersion block schedule; the IMPROVE clinic, an interprofessional education and care initiative aimed at reducing polypharmacy in the elderly; integration of physical therapy into primary care teams; a robust quality improvement program; a health policy curriculum; numerous regional and national presentations,and the first interprofessional nurse practitioner residency program (now adopted by all COE sites). The COE program has included Yale internal medicine residents and medical students; Yale nurse practitioner students and post-graduate residents; health psychology pharmacy and social work residents;and Yale Physician Associate students. As director of this program, Dr Brienza has served as a mentor, role model,and leader to all trainees.

  • Former faculty

    Department: Pediatric Cardiology

    Years active at Yale: 1950s-early 1990s

    Dr. Brown is being recognized as one of the earliest pediatric cardiologists. She worked with Dr. Ruth Whittemore, and together they set up and ran the first EKG laboratory for children. They traveled throughout Connecticut to set up clinics so that sick children didn’t have to travel to New Haven for care. 

    Dr. Brown was one of the first people to catalog the children of people who had congenital heart disease and to establish that there was a higher risk for offspring who had been born to parents with congenital heart disease. Even before cardiac catheterization, Dr. Brown worked with early pioneering pediatric heart surgeons for children.

    Dr. Brown was also known for her teaching and mentoring of medical students.

  • Martina Brueckner

    Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology)

    Years active at Yale: 1990-present

    Dr. Brueckner is being recognized for excellence in clinical medicine and research. She obtained her BS and MD degrees from the University of Virginia, followed by a pediatric residency at the University of Pittsburgh and a pediatric cardiology fellowship at YSM. Her clinical and research focus is genetics of congenital heart disease (CHD). Her laboratory focuses on the cause(s) of a type of congenital heart disease called heterotaxy. The development of non-random asymmetry along the left-right axis is a unique feature of vertebrate development. Defects in this process in mouse and man result in severe congenital cardiac anomalies. 

    The goal of Dr. Brueckner’s laboratory is to understand the mechanism by which embryonic cilia create and signal left-right positional information, and to investigate whether cilia have essential roles in other developmental processes. In addition to her studies of mouse models of congenital heart disease, Dr. Brueckner is developing a large-scale international collaboration using state of the art genomic technology to identify the genes causing heterotaxy in humans.

  • Sonja Buckley

    Former faculty

    Years active at Yale: 1964-1994

    Dr. Buckley is being recognized for her contributions to science. She was a virologist at Johns Hopkins, then the Rockefeller virus labs before they were moved to Yale to form the Yale Arbovirus Research Unit. With Dr. Wilbur Downs and Dr. Jordi Casals-Ariet at Yale, Dr.Buckley was credited with isolating and cultivating the Lassa virus responsible for outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever in Africa.

  • Barbara Burtness

    Professor of Medicine (Medical Oncology); Disease Aligned Research Team Leader, Head and Neck Cancers Program; Co-Director, Developmental Therapeutics Research Program

    Years active at Yale: 1989 - present

    Dr. Burtness is being recognized for a pioneer clinical study of epidermal growth factor (EGFR) inhibition. As part of that study, she administered the first-in-human dose of cetuximab, an antibody that leads the cell to degrade the EGFR, at Yale in 1995.

    In her role as chair of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Head and Neck Therapeutics Committee, Dr. Burtness led the field in studying (human papillomavirus) HPV-driven head and neck cancer as a distinct disease, and pioneered the study of treatment deintensification. She introduced bevacizumab into treatment of metastatic disease, and established the first cooperative group trial of minimally invasive surgery for HPV-driven disease. She has recently completed the first randomized trial incorporating immune checkpoint inhibition with chemotherapy for metastatic head and neck cancer. Dr. Burtness has mentored many oncologists who are now important leaders in the field of head and neck cancer.She received the Robert L. Krigel Award for Excellence in Teaching and Clinical Oncology from the Fox Chase Cancer Center in 2012, and was named Top Doctor in U.S. News and World Report. 

  • Susan Busch

    Professor of Public Health (Health Policy) and Professor in the Institution for Social and Policy Studies

    Years active at Yale: 2000-present

    Dr. Busch is being recognized for teaching and policy research. She leads impactful research examining the effects of policies and regulations on health care cost and quality. Most of her work focuses on behavioral health; health care economics and organizations; health services research; and health care quality, access, and evaluation.

    As the opioid epidemic deepens, Dr. Busch’s research on opioid addiction becomes more integral to treatment options and effectiveness. Her most recent work identified that people with opioid addiction who seek treatment in emergency departments (ED) for overdoses and other ailments and receive buprenorphine, a medication to reduce drug cravings, incur lower health care costs over the following month than those who get a referral to treatment services or receive a brief intervention with a facilitated referral. The findings are significant because relatively few people with opioid use disorder receive treatment, and even fewer receive the most effective treatments such as buprenorphine. Additionally, patients who started the medication in an ED were almost twice as likely to be enrolled in addiction treatment and used opioids for fewer days, during the 30 days following their ED visits. The findings could have a significant impact in Connecticut, where emergency departments treat a relatively high number of opioid-related cases.

  • Deepa Camenga

    Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 2012-present

    Dr. Camenga is being recognized for her innovative work as a physician-scientist with expertise in adolescent addiction, smoking cessation, and young adult e-cigarette use. She is a recent graduate of the National Institute on Drug Abuse K12 scholar program at Yale. She was recently selected to serve on a national American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Substance Use and Prevention, tasked with protecting and improving the health and well-being of children and adolescents throughout the country. She is one of a very few clinicians in the state that provides medication treatment for adolescents and young adults with opioid use disorder.

  • Anne Camp

    Years active at Yale: 1990-present

    Dr. Camp is being recognized for her career as an endocrinologist dedicated to improving the care of people with diabetes and metabolic disease in underserved communities, specifically at the Fair Haven Community Health Center in New Haven. Over the last decade, as the incidence of diabetes explodes in the population she serves, her focus has broadened to include research in diabetes prevention and improved treatments that address the needs of such communities. 

    Following medical school at Vanderbilt she completed residency in Internal Medicine at Yale, followed by fellowships in preventive cardiology and endocrinology. Under her leadership, the Fair Haven Community Health Center was among the first nationally to focus on health disparities in diabetes incidence and outcomes. She has worked tirelessly to improve diabetes care for the underserved through applied organizational system changes. More recently, her efforts have been directed at developing such systems as translating existing evidence into proven effective programs. These are aimed at reversing abnormalities in glucose regulation in adults with pre-diabetes and obese youth in underserved communities. 

    Her current research collaboration through the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases takes place within a multicenter clinical trial to evaluate and compare the long-term metabolic and clinical effects of several classes of drugs in combination with metformin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  • Alumna

    Years active at Yale: YSPH Class of 1998

    Andy Carmone is being recognized for her dedication to and excellence in public health. She has lived and worked in low-income communities for multiple years, despite hardship and sacrifice, both personal and professional. Trained as a nurse midwife and public health professional, she offers a unique perspective on health systems design and evaluation and global health delivery, particularly among rural and remote populations. She has over 20 years of experience in resource-limited settings such as: Cameroon, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Malawi, the Navajo Nation, Papua New Guinea, and New Mexico (U.S.). She has worked intensively to design public health interventions that focus on the decentralization of high-quality HIV, TB, maternal, and child health, as well as conduct research and leverage evidence to inform policy. She was instrumental in developing research to improve clinical outcomes and the quality of care for thousands of women, children, and families across Papua New Guinea and Indonesia.

    Since 2006, Carmone has been engaged in efforts to rebuild health systems in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea, some of the most remote populations in the world. Her work spans technical assistance and guidance to local and international health programs, including guidance on protocols, tools, and technology adoption in areas such as family health, essential medicines, vaccine delivery, HIV, TB, and women's sexual and reproductive health. She has co-authored papers in a variety of peer-reviewed journals including the Journal of AIDS. She serves as clinical director on the Clinton Health Access Initiative's Clinical Sciences Team and is also the co-founder of Indigenous Health Solutions, a non-profit organization focused on integrated delivery of health, development, and conservation programs in Papua New Guinea.

  • Professor Emeritus of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation

    Years active at Yale: 1986-present

    Dr. Gundberg is being recognized for advocating for women. She was active on the Committee for the Status of Women in Medicine (SWIM) for years and was on the Commission on Women Faculty that resulted from the Bill of Rights. She evaluated space allotment to faculty by gender.

  • Kathleen Carroll

    Albert E. Kent Professor of Psychiatry; Director of Psychosocial Research, Division of Addictions; Principal Investigator, Psychotherapy Development Center for Drug Abuse

    Years active at Yale: 1982- present

    Dr. Carroll is being recognized for her 30 years of experience in developing and evaluating effective therapies for substance use disorders.Her research has focused on the development and evaluation of a range of behavioral treatments and combinations of behavioral therapies and pharmacotherapies, with an emphasis on improving the quality and rigor of clinical efficacy research concerning addictions.Dr. Carroll, a clinical psychologist, is the Albert E. Kent Professor of Psychiatry at Yale and the director of psychosocial research in the Division of Substance Abuse. She has co-authored more than 300 articles in peer-reviewed journals.

    She has received numerous awards and honors in her career, including being named a Highly Cited Researcher by the Thomson Institute for Scientific Information in 2008. She received the Norman E. Zinberg Award & Memorial Lecture from Harvard University School of Medicine in 2007. She also received the Distinguished Scientific Contributions to Education and Training Award by the American Psychological Association, as well as the Senior Scientist Award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. She won the Clinical Innovations Award at Yale in 2015.

    She is a member of the Scholar Awards Committee at the Yale School of Medicine, and is on the board of directors of the College of Problems on Drug Dependence.

  • Anees Chagpar

    Professor of Surgery

    Years active at Yale: 2010-present; MBA Class of 2014

    Dr. Chagpar is being recognized for her numerous groundbreaking innovative clinical and translational studies in breast cancer. Born and raised in Canada, she completed her MD with honors in research at the University of Alberta, and her general surgery residency training and MSc at the University of Saskatchewan. She went on to complete the Susan G. Komen Interdisciplinary Breast Fellowship at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, an MPH at Harvard School of Public Health and an MA in bioethics and medical humanities at the University of Louisville. After fellowship, she joined the University of Louisville as assistant professor of surgery, rising rapidly through the ranks to associate professor with tenure and academic advisory dean. She built the first nationally accredited Breast Center in Kentucky at the James Graham Brown Cancer Center prior to being recruited to Yale in September 2010, where she led the effort for Yale to become the first NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center in the Northeast to have a nationally accredited breast center. She is a busy breast surgical oncologist who participates in investigator-initiated and cooperative group clinical trials, as well as translational and clinical research. Her most recent groundbreaking work was published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine. She enjoys teaching and mentoring medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty, and is the Breast Surgery Section editor for UpToDate, a commonly used resource. She is passionate about global health and leadership in academic medicine, having most recently completed an MBA for Executives with a focus on Leadership in Healthcare at Yale’s School of Management.

  • Sarwat Chaudhry

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medicine); Co-Director, National Clinician Scholars Program; Vice-Chair/Chair-Elect, Dean’s Faculty Advisory Council

    Years active at Yale: 2005-present

    Dr. Chaudhry is being recognized for her excellence in outcomes and health services research and mentoring. She is director of the Academic Hospitalist Program in the Section of General Internal Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine, founding director of the Center for Healthcare Innovation, Redesign, and Learning (CHIRAL), co-director of the National Clinician Scholars Program, and director of the Field Core of the Pepper Center at the Program on Aging. Her scholarly work has focused on improving the care and outcomes of older patients in the hospital setting, especially those with cardiovascular disease. In addition to directing large-scale epidemiologic studies, she has led work to understand and improve care transitions in the hospital setting. Her work has been published in leading medical journals and she has excelled as a nationally and internationally recognized thought leader in her field. Dr. Chaudhry is a standing member of the Health Services, Organization and Deliver study section for the National Institutes of Health (NIH). She has mentored numerous medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty, who have garnered awards that include career development awards from the NIH and American Heart Association.

  • Sharon Chekijian

    Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine; Medical Director, PA/NP group; Medical Director, Yale New Haven Hospital PA/NP Residency Program; Faculty Member, Division of Global Health and International Emergency Medicine; Chair, Patient Experience Forum

    Years active at Yale: 2007-present

    Dr. Chekijian is being recognized for her insightful clinical expertise, her extraordinary compassionate worldview and sensitivity for her patients, and her ability to impart these qualities to all caregivers including students, residents, advanced practice providers, faculty, and nurses. She is the director of patient experience in the Department of Emergency Medicine (EM) and is committed to bettering patient and staff communication and engagement. She is
    the founding medical director of the PA residency program in EM, the first postgraduate PA program at Yale School of Medicine. She has been instrumental in the development of a bereavement program in the emergency department, and is known internationally for her emergency care systems development, unintentional injury prevention, and cardiac care in low- and middle-income countries. She is deeply committed to spearheading the development of injury
    prevention programs in Armenia and she has served as a consultant for the World Bank and the U.S. Department of State.

  • Veronica Chiang

    Professor of Neurosurgery; Associate Vice Chair of Academic Affairs; Director, Stereotactic Radiosurgery; Director, Gamma Knife Center, YNHH; Director, Stereotactic Radiosurgery Fellowship

    Years active at Yale: 1994-present

    Dr. Chiang is being recognized for being the first female physician to become a full professor in the Department of Neurosurgery at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Chiang pioneered the use of laser thermocoagulation therapy for brain metastases and now directs the Intra-operative MRI Laser Program for patients with brain tumors and epilepsy at YSM. She is also director of the Yale New Haven Hospital Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Program and a tireless mentor to women in Neurosurgery.

  • Elizabeth Claus

    Professor of Biostatistics; Director of Medical Research, School of Public Health; Director of Stereotactic Radiosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital

    Years active at Yale: 1988-present; PhD Class of 1988, MD Class of 1994

    Dr. Claus is being recognized for her work in basic and clinical science, as well as her teaching, mentoring, clinical care and expertise, and leadership.

    She is professor and director of medical research at the Yale School of Public Health, as well as attending neurosurgeon and director of stereotactic radiosurgery in the Department of Neurosurgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. She is a member of the board of advisors for the Acoustic Neuroma Association, as well as the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States. Dr. Claus’ work focuses on cancer and genetic epidemiology, with an emphasis on the development of risk models for breast and brain tumors. She is the PI of the Meningioma Consortium, the Meningioma Genome-Wide Association Study, and the Yale Acoustic Neuroma Study, as well as a co-investigator of the GLIOGENE (Genes for Glioma) and International Glioma Case/Control projects. In addition to her research activities, Dr. Claus is a board-certified neurosurgeon who completed her residency in neurosurgery at Yale New Haven Hospital and her fellowship in neurosurgical oncology Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Her clinical focus is on the treatment of meningioma, glioma, acoustic neuroma, and brain metastases. In partnership with national patient brain tumor organizations, Dr. Claus is working to develop cost- and time-efficient web- and smartphone- based recruitment strategies to be used in the study of brain tumors. 

  • Alumna

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1955

    Gloria Cochrane was the only African American — and one of only four women — in her medical school class. She went on to an outstanding career in psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

  • K.D. Codish

    Former faculty

    Department: Office of Women in Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 1980-1986

    Dr. Codish is being recognized as the first administrative director and subsequently director of the Office for Women in Medicine. She drafted YSM’s first sexual harassment policies for faculty and convened the schools’ Permanent Committee on the Status of Women. She was a founding member of the Women’s AIDS Coalition as well as director of education and volunteer services at AIDS Project New Haven for many years. She was known for her lifetime commitment to social justice. In 1970, she and two friends founded the Theatre of Light and Shadow, which brought such issues as rape, battering, abortion rights, sexual harassment,and later HIV/AIDS to audiences across the country. She formed the Women’s Self Defense Alliance in the early 1970s and initiated the first of many Women’s Health Weekends and Take Back the Night marches in New Haven. After leaving Yale, Dr. Codish headed the New Haven Police Academy and the police department’s division of training and education. She advised other police departments on recruiting and retaining women and people of color. She encouraged the department to develop a new breed of community-based police officers and switch from a military to a problem-solving philosophy. Her department was considered a model across the country. The National Center for Women and Policing presented her with an innovative policing award, and in 1985, she won the Elm Ivy Award, which honors people whose efforts support the collaboration of the university and its hometown.

  • Eve Colson

    Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics

    Years active at Yale: 1998-2018

    Dr. Colson is being recognized for her absolute commitment to the full mission of the School of Medicine’s educational scholarship and advocacy, clinical excellence, nationally recognized research program, and local and national leadership. Dr. Colson, a Macy Scholar, is fully invested in the educational mission of the school, not only leading clinical education for the Department of Pediatrics, but also co-founding and leading the Interprofessional Longitudinal Clinical Experience, which brings together medical students, physician associate students, and advanced practice nursing students. She is recognized as a local and national expert in educational and clinical scholarship, and is a go-to resource for anyone in the Department of Pediatrics who is considering qualitative methods. Dr. Colson is a tireless advocate for her colleagues and mentor to her juniors, and has served on school-wide committees for faculty engagement, faculty culture, and for status of women in medicine.

    In 2018, Dr. Colson left Yale to become the Professor and Associate Dean, PE/CQI at Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine. 

  • Lynn Cooley

    Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences; C. N. H. Long Professor of Genetics and Professor of Cell Biology and of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology; Dean, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

    Years active at Yale: 2001-present

    Dr. Cooley is being recognized for her seminal research into understanding the biology of germ cells, which are the only cells in our bodies that can form eggs or sperm to transmit genetic information to the next generation. She is also Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

    Dr. Cooley, the C.N.H. Long Professor of Genetics and Professor of Cell Biology and of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, was the Director of the Combined Program in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences before becoming the dean. She is a member of the Connecticut Academy for Science and Engineering and a fellow for the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Cooley is also the recipient of a Pew Scholar Award from the Pew Charitable Trusts, in 1991.

    Dr. Cooley’s current research is focused on intercellular bridges, called ring canals that connect cells as they form eggs or sperm. Ring canals are present in germ cells throughout the animal kingdom, from insects to humans. This conservation over millions of years of evolution suggests ring canals provide an important advantage to the process of germ cell development. Dr. Cooley’s lab uses Drosophila (fruit flies) to investigate ring canal function. The Cooley lab has documented extensive sharing of cellular components through ring canals in both males and females. Her lab is now investigating how ring canals form in the first place, how they are stabilized and the kinds of information shared through ring canals.

  • Cindy Crusto

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Assistant Chair for Diversity, Department of Psychiatry; Director, Program Evaluation and Child Trauma Research at The Consultation Center

    Years active at Yale: 2001- present

    Dr. Crusto is being recognized for excellence in her leadership role addressing culture, context, and human diversity in clinical work and community. She is an associate professor and assistant chair for diversity in the Department of Psychiatry, and the director of program evaluation and child trauma research at The Consultation Center. She is an expert in culture and diversity affecting work, community, research,and program evaluation. She chaired a task force in the American Evaluation Association that developed practice guidelines for addressing culture and context in the profession and in the provision of evaluation services to the public and to evaluation consumers. She is the assistant chair for diversity in the Department of Psychiatry and the chair of the psychology section committee on diversity, equity and inclusion. Dr. Crusto is known for her work in community-engaged research, program evaluation and research, and intervention work in children’s exposure to psychological trauma, particularly childhood exposure to intimate partner violence and its impact on their health and wellbeing. 

    Dr. Crusto was a visiting scholar and an extraordinary professor at the University of Pretoria in South Africa. She mentors psychology pre-doctoral fellows, post-doctoral fellows, psychiatry residents, and medical students. Using “Making the Invisible Visible,” a 3-hour guided museum tour, Dr. Crusto mentors Yale medical students to help them develop, implement, and evaluate art observation to facilitate dialogue about biases and their influence on personal and professional interaction.

  • Anne Curtis

    Professor Emeritus of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging; NIOSH Certified B Reader

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1970; 1970-present

    Dr. Curtis is recognized for her expertise in diagnostic imaging, her skilled teaching, and her advocacy for—and mentoring of—women at YSM. After her internship and residency at Yale New Haven Hospital. Dr Curtis joined the faculty in 1975 as an assistant professor of diagnostic radiology, becoming a full professor in 1985. Dr. Curtis has long championed the cause of women at the school. She has worked to recruit female faculty and students since the late 1970s as director of the Office for Women in Medicine, and then as chair of the Committee on the Status of Women in the School of Medicine. In 1990, she received the Leah Lowenstein Award for promoting humane and egalitarian medical education. 

    Dr. Curtis has lent her talents to numerous panels, including the Dean’s Ad Hoc Grievance Committee, the Senior Appointment and Promotions Committee, and the Medical Students Thesis Awards Committee. She has also sat on numerous committees at YNNH and is past president of its medical board. Her skills in diagnostic imaging have had her delivering lectures and courses in such places as Kentucky, Venezuela, and Utah. Dr. Curtis’s professional services include being a reviewer for the American Journal of Radiology. In the community, she has been a longtime member of the board of directors of the Neighborhood Music School.

  • Kimberly Davis

    Professor of Surgery (Trauma); Chief of the Division of General Surgery, Trauma, and Surgical Critical Care, Surgery; Vice Chairman, Clinical Affairs, Department of Surgery; Trauma Medical Director, Yale-New Haven Hospital; Surgical Director, Performance and Quality Improvement, Yale-New Haven Hospital

    Years active at Yale: 2006- present

    Dr. Davis is being recognized for her excellence in surgical care and leadership roles including vice-chair for clinical affairs of the Department of Surgery. She is the chief of general surgery, trauma,and surgical critical care at Yale, as well as the trauma medical director for Yale New Haven Hospital, the level one trauma center for adult and pediatric patients serving Southwestern Connecticut.

    After earning a BS in molecular biophysics and biochemistry at Yale, Dr. Davis attended Albany Medical College and received her surgical training from the Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital program. Following a fellowship at the University of Tennessee -Memphis, she spent eight years on the faculty at Loyola University Medical Center, in Illinois, prior to returning to Yale in 2006. 

    She received her MBA from the Yale School of Management Leadership in Healthcare program in 2012. She is on the Board of Governors, Committee on Trauma as the Chief of Region I and is president of the Connecticut chapter for the American College of Surgeons. She serves as a member of the American Surgical Association’s Equity Task Force, designed to promote equality across all aspects of surgery. She has published extensively, with more than 100 peer-reviewed publications. 

  • Suzanne Decker

    Assistant Professor

    Years active at Yale: 2010 - present

    Dr. Decker is being recognized for her clinical research and training that focuses on dialectical behavior therapy and substance use disorders. She is assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at YSM and is a staff psychologist at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System. Her work has addressed some of the most challenging aspects of the human condition, including high-risk impulsive behaviors, dual diagnosis issues, emotional dysregulation, and suicidality. She has devoted her work to supporting our veterans, especially female veterans who have experienced trauma, and the psychosocial complexities often overlooked in evidence-based treatments. Her work has resulted in effective adaptations of treatment approaches and the development of new approaches to better serve the needs of patients. In addition, Dr. Decker serves as the director of training for the Advanced Fellowship in Mental Illness Research and Treatment at the Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) 1 New England Mental Illness Research Education Clinical Center (MIRECC). Her excellence in clinical work, research, and training has and is most certainly shaping the way that we care for people and support their human dignity.

  • Esperanza Diaz

    Professor of Psychiatry; Medical Director Hispanic Clinic and Latino Behavioral Health System; Associate Director Psychiatry Residency Program

    Years active at Yale: 1982- present

    Dr. Diaz is being recognized for her research on development of culturally sensitive mental health services to Hispanics with persistent mental disorders. Her professional interests are focused on improving mental health services to Hispanics and on education focusing on interviewing, culturally sensitive services, and mental health disparities. 

    Dr. Diaz is an associate professor of psychiatry and medical director of the Hispanic Clinic and Latino Behavioral Health System. She is also the associate director of the psychiatry residency program.

    Dr. Diaz is a member of the American Society of Hispanic Psychiatry, and is a leadership member of the American Psychiatric Association Hispanic Caucus, as well as the recipient of the 2012 inaugural American Psychiatric Association Assembly Member in Training Mentor Award. She received the Irma Bland Award for Excellence in Teaching Residents. She’s a life fellow at the American Psychiatric Association and is the recipient of the Stephen Fleck M.D. Faculty Award, as an exemplary physician and clinician teacher in the Department of Psychiatry in 2016. 

  • Former faculty

    Years active at Yale: 1985-2008

    Dr. DiPietro is being recognized for her many years of research and teaching about the public health benefits of physical activity. She has dedicated her career to investigating the role of physical activity in successful aging. Dr. DiPietro broke new ground in areas ranging from the measurement of physical activity to the timing and dosing of exercise for specific metabolic outcomes. Before moving to the Milken Institute School of Public Health at The George Washington University to head the Department of Exercise Science and Nutrition Sciences, she was a strong advocate and mentor for young women at the Yale School of Public Health.

  • Gail D'Onofrio

    Professor of Emergency Medicine; Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 1997- present

    Dr. D’Onofrio is being recognized as one of the nation’s foremost experts in emergency medicine, substance use disorders, and heart disease in women. She is also one of only a handful of academic leaders in her field. In 2009, Dr. D’Onofrio was named physician-in-chief of the Emergency Department (ED) at Yale New Haven Hospital as well as the inaugural chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine. She is internationally known for her work in screening emergency department patients for alcohol and drug use and directing them to treatment. Her work has grown in importance during the nation’s opioid crisis as she has led clinical trials demonstrating that administering buprenorphinein the emergency department increases patient participation in addiction treatment. Dr. D’Onofrio is one of the architects of the state of Connecticut’s strategic plan to reduce opioid deaths, working with multiple agencies regionally and nationally to change policies and introduce interventions to stem the crisis.

    Dr. D’Onofrio’s research has changed clinical practice and led to multiple science awards from the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation and the Clinical Research Forum. In 2018, she was appointed to the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse and she was selected to present the keynote speech at the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) national conference. Additionally, the Yale DEM received the Outstanding Department Award from the Academy for Women in Academic Emergency Medicine (AWAEM) which honors her department’s outstanding support of women in academic emergency medicine through organizational initiatives that address the recruitment, development and advancement of its women physicians, promoting gender equality, diversity, opportunity and inclusion. Dr. D’Onofrio is also a dedicated teacher and mentor, having won the Advancing Women in Emergency Medicine award from SAEM.

  • Ethel Dunham

    Former faculty

    Years at Yale: 1919-1950

    Dr. Dunham is being recognized for her significant contributions to neonatology, especially to the care of premature infants. She arrived at Yale in 1919 as the first woman house officer at New Haven Hospital. Edwards A. Park, MD, invited her to join Yale’s newly formed Department of Pediatrics in 1921. Dr. Dunham was placed in charge of the pediatrics outpatient clinic at the Dispensary as well as the nursery for newborn infants. With support from the U.S. Children’s Department, she carried out a large study of morbidity and mortality of infants at New Haven Hospital and found that prematurity was the most important cause of neonatal death. Her rank at Yale rose to associate professor and then associate clinical professor. In 1935, she and her lifelong partner, Martha M. Eliot, MD, left Yale for full-time positions at the Children’s Bureau in Washington, D.C., but kept their formal ties with Yale as lecturers in clinical pediatrics. They returned annually to participate in instruction until 1950. At the Children’s Bureau, Dunham headed research in child development where she worked on standards for care of newborn infants in the hospital. At the time most hospitals did not have special procedures for the care of premature infants. She also headed a committee on hospital care of newborns for the American Pediatrics Society. Both organizations published these standards and recommendations. Dunham’s research was summarized in her book, Premature Infants: A Manual for Physicians (1948). In 1957, she became the first woman to receive the American Pediatric Society’s highest award, the Howland Medal.

  • Dana Dunne

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases); Director, Internal Medicine Clerkship; Associate Chair for Education and Academic Affairs

    Years active at Yale: 1989-present

    Dr. Dunne is being recognized as a distinguished physician for her clinical care, expertise, and teaching skills. She is among few women pioneers, nationally, in her expertise on sexually transmitted infections (STIs). She worked to enhance physicians’ knowledge of the diagnosis and treatment of STIs and provided dozens of CDC training courses in the U.S. and Canada. At Yale she is considered to be the expert in STIs, syphilis, and HIV and is recognized regionally for her clinical excellence and research in the field. In addition, Dr. Dunne exhibited her leadership skills in initiating and delivering a state-of-the-art faculty development workshop to enrich teaching in a safe learning environment at Yale. This workshop put her on the forefront of aspirational educators and teachers nationally and recently in Liberia. She also provides clinical educator development sessions for faculty and residents who teach in the core clerkships. Since these sessions began in 2015, Dr. Dunne has trained hundreds of senior and junior faculty and residents in Yale clinical departments. 

    In addition, she facilitated numerous faculty development sessions on Humanism in Medicine and has participated in numerous clinical research projects related to barriers and drivers of Humanism in Medicine. Dr. Dunne has been a mentor and a role model to many women students, trainees, and faculty at Yale and deserves to be honored for her dedication, enthusiasm, and pursuit of excellence.

  • Ellen Edens

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Associate Fellowship Director, Addiction Psychiatry

    Years active at Yale: 2008-present

    Dr. Edens is being recognized for her role as an innovative educator and mentor. Since 2011, she has had a leadership role as associate director of the addiction psychiatry residency at Yale, an ACGME-accredited program, where she oversees the didactic curriculum and clinical supervision. She is also a co-director of the VA interprofessional addiction fellowship training program, and she is a sought-after mentor and educator, having inspired many trainees. Additionally, she is co-director of the Opioid Reassessment Clinic at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System, treating veterans with chronic pain and comorbidity (such as mental health illnesses and substance use disorder). Her clinical and research interests dovetail in the area of comorbid addiction and pain. Additionally, she is working to develop a curriculum to train interprofessional learners in addiction screening, diagnosis, and initiation of treatment.

  • Marie Egan

    Professor of Pediatrics (Respiratory) and of Cellular And Molecular Physiology; Director, Cystic Fibrosis Center; Vice Chair for Research, Department of Pediatrics

    Years active at Yale: 1992-present

    Marie Egan is being recognized as an internationally renowned leader in cystic fibrosis research and patient care. She is director of the Yale Cystic Fibrosis Center and vice chair for research for the Department of Pediatrics.

    Dr. Egan obtained her medical degree from Mount Sinai School of Medicine and did her residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital, where she also completed a fellowship in the Eudowood Division of Pediatric Respiratory Sciences. She is a reviewer for the Charles Hood Child Health Research Committee, the Drug Monitoring Safety Board of the CF Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health. She is a recipient of the Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Award and the Leah Lowenstein Faculty Teaching Award among others.

  • Anne Eichmann

    Ensign Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) and Professor of Cellular And Molecular Physiology

    Years active at Yale: 2010-present

    Dr. Eichmann is being recognized for her excellence in basic science. She is a recognized leader in the field of vascular biology, an acute mentor and advisor, and a passionate advocate for women in science and in society.

  • Louise Eisenhardt

    Former Faculty

    Years active at Yale: 1934-1967

    Department: Neuropathology

    Louise Eisenhardt, MD, pioneer neuropathologist, archivist, editor, and world expert on brain tumors, is being recognized for her many-faceted contributions to Yale School of Medicine. Born in 1891, she began work in 1915 as an editorial assistant to Harvey Cushing. After editing his book on acoustic tumors, she decided to enter Tufts Medical School where she began her log of intracranial tumor types. She graduated with the highest scholastic record ever attained there, and after residency she became a junior associate in surgery of Dr. Cushing from 1928 to 1934, when she moved to Yale with him to establish the brain tumor registry. She became curator of the registry after his death in 1938. The meticulously kept special Cushing collection of her slides and Cushing's operative records was donated to Department of Neurosurgery in 1997 for more public viewing. She started an additional new neuropathology archive as Curator of theBrain Tumor Registry and this collection is part of the Neuropathology Section in Surgery. When the Journal of Neurosurgery was first published in 1944, Dr. Eisenhardt became its managing editor, a position she held for 22 years. Under her editorship, the journal became known as one of the world's most outstanding scientific publications. She also was the first woman president of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (originally the Harvey Cushing Society), and the March 1965 issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery was dedicated to her, two years before her death. She was a kind and generous teacher, admired and beloved by many in and beyond Yale. Her portrait, painted by Deane Keller was the only portrait of a woman MD that hung at the School of Medicine in 1967.

  • Udeme Ekong

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology)

    Years active at Yale: 2013-present

    Dr. Ekong is being recognized for her excellence in clinical care and research. A recognized authority in pediatric hepatology and pediatric liver transplantation, Dr Ekong is a triple-boarded pediatric gastroenterologist and transplant hepatologist with clinical interests in autoimmune liver diseases, neonatal cholestasis, and pediatric liver transplantation. She is the medical director of pediatric hepatology and pediatric liver transplantation. She trained and practiced at Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago, where she was responsible for the care of babies and children with a wide variety of liver diseases. Dr. Ekong completed medical school at Ahmadu Bello University in Nigeria, and her pediatric residency training at Birmingham Children’s Hospital and Bedford Hospital in the United Kingdom and Lincoln Hospital in New York. She completed her pediatric gastroenterology fellowship training at New York Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, and her transplant hepatology fellowship at Lurie Children's Hospital. Her research focuses on understanding the underlying cause of autoimmune liver disease occurring before and following liver transplantation. She is interested in developing ways to predict which children can discontinue their anti-rejection medications following a liver transplant.

  • Martha  May Eliot

    Former YSM faculty

    Years active at Yale: 1921-1950 

    Dr. Eliot is being recognized for her major role in preventive health in pediatrics and in the administration of federal child health programs, work that she began while at Yale. She came to Yale in 1921 from Johns Hopkins when her mentor, Edwards A. Park, MD, formerly at Johns Hopkins, established Yale’s first Department of Pediatrics. Dr. Eliot served as chief resident and later worked with Dr. Park to design and carry out a community demonstration in New Haven on the effect of cod-liver oil and sunlight in the prevention of rickets, a study funded by the. U.S. Children’s Bureau. Her carefully organized team project paved the way for the elimination of rickets as a serious problem in children and helped set requirements for Vitamin D. With Edith Jackson, MD, she also carried out a study of rickets in Puerto Rio. From 1927 to 1935, Dr. Eliot combined work at Yale with consulting for the Children’s Bureau. By 1934, her rank was associate clinical professor. In 1935, she left New Haven with life partner Ethel C. Dunham, MD, to become assistant chief of the Children’s Bureau but retained her formal tie to Yale as a visiting lecturer in clinical pediatrics until 1950. She served as chief of the Children’s Bureau from 1951 to 1956. As an administrator in the federal government, she established policies for the care of children from the Social Security Act of 1935 to the early postwar period. Dr. Eliot was the first woman president of the American Public Health Association in 1947 and was awarded the Howland medal of the American Pediatric Society in 1967. The American Public Health Association established the Martha May Eliot award in her honor in 1964. In a 1976 oral history, she recalled, "Those years of mine at Yale—I was there for 14 years—were extraordinarily interesting and happy."

  • Beth L. Emerson

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Emergency Medicine) and of Emergency Medicine; Medical Director, Children's Emergency Department; Deputy Quality and Safety Officer, Yale New Haven Children's Hospital

    Years active at Yale: 2009-present

    Dr. Emerson is being recognized for her work as deputy quality and safety officer for Yale New Haven Children’s Hospital and medical director of the children’s emergency department. She attended medical school at the University of Rochester, and completed pediatric residency, chief residency, and pediatric emergency medicine fellowship at Yale New Haven Children’s Hospital. Her primary academic interest is in quality improvement, particularly around handoffs/transitions of care and the use of simulation in quality. Dr. Emerson is a lead investigator in Yale’s Center for Healthcare Innovation, Redesign, and Learning, an AHRQ-funded collaborative improving transitions of care through the health care system. She is a Six Sigma Green Belt. Additionally, Dr. Emerson is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics Education in Quality Improvement for Pediatric Practice planning group, and represents Yale New Haven Children’s Hospital in several national multicenter quality improvement collaboratives.

  • Leigh Evans

    Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine; Executive Director, Yale Center for Medical Simulation; Director, Resident Research

    Years active at Yale: 2002-present

    Dr. Evans is being recognized for her teaching, her extraordinary dedication to her students, and her visionary leadership in the field of emergency medicine education. She is a pioneer in simulation education, known not only for designing and founding the Yale Center for Medical Simulation, but also for expanding simulation education at YSM to become one of the premier programs in the country. Her trial focusing on ultrasound guided central line placement, supported by the Agency for Heath care Research and Quality and published in Academic Medicine, demonstrated
    empirically for the first time that skills learned in the simulation laboratory could be transferred to clinical practice. She is the recipient of the Alvin R. Feinstein Award, given to a Yale faculty member chosen as the outstanding teacher of clinical skills, and of the Charles W. Bohmfalk Teaching Prize.

  • Louise  Farnam

    Alumna

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1920

    Dr. Farnam is being recognized as one of the first three women admitted in 1916 to Yale School of Medicine. It was considered, at the time, “unladylike” for women to attend medical school, but Dr. Farnam had already established her scientific bona fides—she held a PhD in physiological chemistry from Yale. At the school of Medicine, she graduated with honors, won the Campbell Gold Prize for the highest rank in examinations, and was honored by being selected as commencement speaker.

    Her goal in studying medicine was to travel to China to serve as a missionary. She arrived there in 1921 and went to work at China at Yale, the College of Yale-in-China. In 1930, during the war between nationalists and communists, she stayed behind so a wounded soldier could take her spot on an evacuation vessel. Dr. Farnam and her husband, whom she met in China, had to leave the country in 1933. They went to England, where she continued to practice medicine until her passing in 1949.

    She might be best known for the circumstances of her admittance to Yale. Upon her acceptance, and those of classmates Helen May Scoville and Lillian Lydia Nye, the medical school declared an insurmountable obstacle to their admittance. There was no women’s lavatory at the medical school. Farnam’s father, a Yale graduate, a professor of economics, and a member of the board of New Haven Hospital, said that he would pay for a bathroom.

  • Marilyn Farquhar

    Former faculty

    Department: Cell Biology and Pathology

    Years active at Yale: 1973-1990

    Dr. Farquhar is being recognized as a pioneer in the study of cell structure and function. She was a Sterling Professor of Cell Biology at Yale and known for her electron microscope studies. She studies the interplay between cell signaling and protein trafficking. She has been recognized for her seminal work in the regulation of protein trafficking and signaling in endocrine and exocrine cells and for defining the molecular mechanisms of glomerular filtration and pathology.She is professor and founding chair of Cellular and Molecular Medicine at the University of California, San Diego.

    Dr. Farquhar received the E.B. Wilson medal, the highest honor bestowed by The American Society for Cell Biology. She has also received the Excellence in Science Award, established by the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology to honor outstanding achievement by women in biological science.

  • Ada Fenick

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics); Editor, Yale Primary Care Pediatrics Curriculum (www.pcpc.yale.edu); Associate Director for Pediatrics, Medical School Clerkship in Biopsychosocial Approach to Health; Medical Director, Medical-Legal Partnership Project

    Years active at Yale: 2004-present

    Dr. Fenick is being recognized for her outstanding teaching of trainees and her tireless advocacy for underserved children and their families. Dr. Fenick came to Yale in 2004 and has served as a leader and attending in the Pediatric Primary Care Center since that time. She has been recognized as an outstanding teacher as measured by her receipt of several awards, including the prestigious Howard Pearson, MD Outstanding Teacher Award from the Yale Department of Pediatrics in 2013. She is well-known for developing a curriculum that covers primary care topics for pediatric residents that is used by most programs across the country. In addition, Dr. Fenick has been a strong and persistent advocate for the children and families of New Haven. She helped establish and currently serves as director for the Medical Legal Partnership of the Center for Child Advocacy, a program that offers legal advice and assistance to families in need in the Greater New Haven area.

  • Lynn E Fiellin

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medicine) and in the Child Study Center; Instructor, Investigative Medicine Program; Director, Yale Center for Health & Learning Games; Director, play2PREVENT Lab at Yale; Chief, Fitkin Firm Chief, Yale-New Haven Hospital; Director, ForAGirl Program, Yale School of Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 1991-present

    Dr. Fiellin is being recognized for excellence and leadership in clinical research and as a leader and innovator at YSM as founder/director of both the play2PREVENT (p2P) Lab at the Yale Center for Health & Learning Games and the ForAGirl summer program. She has also distinguished herself with leadership roles as Fitkin Firm Chief at Yale New Haven Hospital and as the inaugural director of the Alcohol and Other Drugs Harm Reduction Initiation (AODHRI) at Yale College. She has excelled as an educator, mentor, and role model in these programs.

    Dr. Fiellin has created programs that specifically target impact on youth and young adults, on a local/community and national/international level. In the p2P Lab she established a premiere videogames research program of collaborating researchers, game developers, and community partners who develop and evaluate video game interventions targeting HIV prevention and smoking prevention in adolescents. She has received National Institutes of Health, foundation, and industry funding to build this lab. Dr. Fiellin's program has garnered considerable interest from students and trainees. Because of this interest and given her focus on supporting and promoting the personal and professional growth of girls and women, she created For A Girl, a summer program housed in her lab. There is a well-documented failure to attract girls and young women to the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Dr. Fiellin established ForAGirl as a novel, multifaceted program that focuses on promoting girls' engagement in STEM, medicine, and research. In addition to these innovative programs, she has focused on mentoring women trainees and faculty as a critical aspect of her work.

  • Emily Fine

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1978; 1982-present

    Dr. Fine is being recognized for her clinical excellence, her advocacy for the uninsured and underinsured, and her staunch support of female patients and doctors. She was the first Yale medical student to bear a child during her ob/gyn residency. She then opened the first gynecology practice in greater New Haven that was headed solely by women — she still has a thriving practice — and later worked as the gynecologic consultant for the first self - standing midwife practice affiliated with the university. She has been an assistant clinical professor at Yale New Haven Hospital (YNHH) since 1982. In this role, she has served on many committees, including YNHH’s Tissue Committee and other Quality Assurance committees.

    Dr. Fine has taken her students and residents to missions in Haiti and the Philippines numerous times. For many years she’s been an active voice in the Connecticut chapter of Planned Parenthood, serving on its board and as head of the medical committee. She can be counted on to give her fiery support of state legislation that provides better health and gynecological care for women. She has also been a strong supporter for a healthy work-life balance for doctors and for more women mentors in academic medicine. Dr. Fine helped deliver her three grandchildren and is experiencing a work-life balance by spending lots of time with them. Her other lifelong passion is music. She played in the New Haven Symphony as an undergraduate and while in medical school. She continues to play French Horn in her quintet, Elm City Winds, and with the Yale Medical Symphony Orchestra.

  • Rosemarie Fisher

    Professor Emeritus of Medicine (Digestive Diseases); Director of Resident/Fellow Well-being, Office of the Provost

    Years active at Yale: 1975-present

    Dr. Fisher is being recognized for her many leadership roles, mostly centered around her expertise in graduate medical education. In 1987, Dr. Fisher, a professor of medicine (digestive diseases) and pediatrics, became the medical school’s first program director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program. In 1998, she became the director of graduate medical education at YSM and Yale New Haven Hospital, overseeing 100 training programs covering 1,100 trainees. 

    She was elected to the Council of the Association of Program Directors of Internal Medicine and has served as chair of the Group on Resident Affairs of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). In 2006, the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education gave her the Courage to Lead award to mark her institutional leadership. In 2017, the AAMC presented Dr. Fisher with the Distinguished Service Award. Also in 2017, the YSM honored her by establishing the Rosemarie L. Fisher, M.D. Leadership Award in Graduate Medical Education. She was a trustee of the American College of Gastroenterology, and she chaired the Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. She has published more than 100 articles and has been a visiting professor at more than 20 universities. 

    Dr. Fisher has been recognized both locally and nationally for her excellence in leadership in graduate medical education. In 2006, she was honored by the ACGME as one of the first two recipients of the “Courage to Lead” Award for Institutional leadership.

  • Susan Forster

    Clinical Professor and Director of Medical Studies, Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chief of Ophthalmology, Yale Health

    Years active at Yale: 1977-present

    Dr. Forster is being recognized for her teaching and mentoring of students and faculty and for being a role model for excellence in clinical care. Dr. Forster moved to New Haven in 1977 for her residency. She is now a clinical professor and director of Medical Studies for the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science. She built the Yale Ophthalmology curriculum and has warmly mentored hundreds of Yale medical students. She is internationally recognized for her work in ophthalmic medical education and received the American University Professors of Ophthalmology and the American Academy of Ophthalmology award for Excellence in Medical Student Education. She chairs the Medical Student Education Section of the International Council of Ophthalmology and co-chairs the American Academy of Ophthalmology and American University Professors of Ophthalmology initiative to change the demographic of the ophthalmology practitioner workforce to better reflect the demographic of the population of the United States. She has a commitment to treat the underserved and founded the Eye Department at Cornell Scott Hill Health Center, which was the first Ophthalmology Department in a free-standing Federally Qualified Community Health Center in the United States. She is recognized for her clinical excellence and divides her clinical practice between Yale Medicine Ophthalmology and Yale Health, where she is chief of the department.

  • Francine Foss

    Professor of Medicine (Hematology) and of Dermatology

    Years active at Yale: 2005-present

    Dr. Francine Foss is being recognized as a pioneer in the development of novel therapies for T cell lymphomas and is internationally recognized as a leader in the field. Before coming to Yale she was instrumental in the development of a number of novel treatment approaches for T cell lymphoma. Since coming to Yale, she founded the first international T cell lymphoma symposium, which has become the preeminent meeting in the field, she also co-founded the United States Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium and the T cell Registry. 

    Dr. Foss is a co-director of the International T cell Project and has led efforts to understand rare subtypes of lymphoma. She has mentored many student and investigators who are in academic and research positions around the country. She also has been instrumental in basic studies to understand the mechanism of extracorporeal photopheresis as an immunomodulatory approach to reduce the incidence and mortality from graft versus host disease in stem cell transplantation and has been on the bone marrow transplantation team at Yale. She has recently been awarded a PITCH project grant in collaboration with Dr Elias Lolis for the development of a novel therapeutic agent for T cell lymphomas.

  • Liana Fraenkel

    Professor Adjunct

    Years active at Yale: 1998-present

    Dr. Fraenkel is being recognized for her excellence in research, clinical care, and teaching. She joined the Section of Rheumatology in 1998 after completing a postdoctoral fellowship in rheumatology at Boston University. We were quite fortunate to recruit her to expand our research program at Yale to include clinical epidemiology and health services research, ripe areas of investigation in rheumatology with its plethora of chronic diseases. 

    Dr. Fraenkel was chosen by the senior faculty in our section as the person to launch our investigative program in these areas. 

    Her earliest research experiences took advantage of existing databases at Framingham and focused on risk factors for osteoarthritis and Raynaud's phenomenon. Since arriving at Yale she has pursued her own interests and developed a very well-funded research agenda to investigate the measurement of patient preferences in chronic rheumatic diseases. She has demonstrated the ability to seek out collaborators with appropriate expertise, learn new analytic techniques, and design and complete original studies. She has successfully carried out her proposed projects and published her results in highly regarded peer-reviewed journals. She is also regularly sought out by others to serve as a consultant or co-investigator on grants focused on medical decision-making, risk communication, and quality-of-care initiatives. In addition to being a talented investigator, Dr. Fraenkel is also a consummate teacher and clinician. She consistently receives high praise and accolades from medical students, house staff, and fellows. On all accounts, she is highly worthy of honor as an outstanding faculty member at Yale.

  • Uta Francke

    Former faculty

    Department: Department of Genetics and Department of Pediatrics

    Years active at Yale: 1978-1985

    Dr. Francke is being recognized as an internationally acclaimed genetics researcher and clinician, whose studies have advanced the understanding of many inherited disorders at the molecular level. In 1994, her laboratory discovered the gene for the inherited immunodeficiency Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. In 1999, she co-discovered the gene for Rett syndrome, an autism-like disorder that is one of the most common causes of developmental disability among girls, and she continued to elucidate the molecular pathology of this disorder. She has been an advisor and director at numerous professional organizations and is senior medical director at 23andMe Inc., the personal genomics company. She is also professor of genetics and pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine.

  • Alumna and former faculty

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1977; 1973-1986

    Dr. Frank is being recognized for her commitment to women in medicine and medical education. Hers was the first class at YSM to be comprised of more than 10 percent women. After graduating from YSM, she was on the house staff from 1978 to 1982, and on the faculty from 1982 to 1986. Inspired by the medical historians she met through the Nathan Smith Club, her thesis was an oral history/biography of Leona Baumgartner, PhD '32, MD '34, a famous figure in public health. Dr. Baumgartner’s story introduced Dr. Frank to the purposes and history of the "Yale System," inspiring a lifelong passion both for women in medicine and for medical education. Though her academic career has involved promulgating the legacy of her physician father, a noted researcher in psychotherapy and clinical PTSD research at the Connecticut Veterans Medical Center, her personal focus has remained education. In her more than 20 years of teaching at George Washington University School of Medicine, mostly as director of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry, she has co-edited and contributed to a textbook and developed curricula combining basic and clinical science, built bridges between behavioral science and general medicine, and worked to help students be creative and carve their own paths. As an advocate for social medicine, she has worked with disaster victims and refugees seeking asylum, and now practices community mental health. She is a member of the Society of Distinguished Teachers and was 2005 "Psychiatrist of the Year" in D.C. for coordinating the local academic psychiatric response to evacuees from Hurricane Katrina. In 2018, she became professor emeritus in order to continue to write, teach, and practice (and avoid departmental meetings of every kind)

  • Alyssa French

    Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 1993-present

    Dr. French is being recognized for her unparalleled clinical care and her expertise on preventing interpersonal violence. She is legendary in the emergency department, influencing generations of medical students, residents, and colleagues, and revered for her ability to understand the psychosocial dimensions of patients’ presentations. Dr. French is a nocturnist who goes above and beyond her role to research patient history and to solve seemingly unsolvable challenges, all while teaching that a comprehensive approach often yields the answer.

  • Terri Fried

    Professor of Medicine (Geriatrics)

    Years active at Yale: 1995-present

    Dr. Fried is being recognized for her clinical excellence. As co-leader of the Yale Program on Aging/Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center, she has provided critical insights into the multifactorial nature of older persons’ treatment preferences. Whereas the traditional clinical approach to the elicitation of preferences for life-sustaining treatment has focused on the treatments themselves, Dr. Fried’s research has demonstrated that preferences are influenced by multiple factors, including the burden of treatment, the outcomes of treatment, and
    the likelihood of those outcomes.

  • Helen Robertson (Howe) Gage

    Alumna

    Years active at Yale: 1918-1923; YSPH Class of 1919

    Dr. Gage is being recognized as a pioneering woman physician and public health practitioner. She became the first woman to graduate with a Master’s in Public Health degree (then known as the Certificate in Public Health) in 1919. She was also the first woman to earn the DrPH degree in 1923. A graduate of the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania and Wellesley, Dr. Gage was the wife of Brownell Gage (Yale 1898), one of the founders of Yale-in-China. They lived in Changsa, Hunan for several years, where she volunteered her services in the hospital. It was after their return that she attended Yale. Gage’s thesis was the history of influenza epidemics through 1889. Her doctoral thesis was a historical study on the foundation and development of the Connecticut State Board of Health. She later served as health officer in Suffield, Connecticut, and was a lecturer on hygiene and sanitation.

    Dr. Gage juggled her roles as wife and mother and still served in a meaningful role in the state of Connecticut as a public health officer and lecturer on hygiene and sanitation during a point in history when infectious disease and sanitation were at the root of society’s most pressing public health issues.

  • Former faculty

    Department: Psychiatry

    Years active at Yale: 1980-1987

    Dr. Gallagher is being recognized for her development of new small molecule treatments for neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders, including a possible treatment for Parkinson’s Disease and restless leg syndrome. In 1987, Dr. Gallagher and a fellow researcher, John Tolman, left Yale and created Neurogen, a biotechnology company that developed those treatments.

    Neurogen Corporation’s clinical development programs included aplindore, for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and restless legs syndrome, and,a VR1 receptor antagonist to treat pain and cough. Neurogen had a collaboration and licensing agreement with Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited, to research, develop, and commercialize small molecule medicines that work by targeting the VR1 receptor; and a licensing agreement with Wyeth Pharmaceuticals to acquire worldwide rights to aplindore.

  • Alison Galvani

    Burnett and Stender Families Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases); Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Modeling and Analysis (CIDMA)

    Years active at Yale: 2004-present

    Dr. Galvani is being recognized for her excellence in research at the interface of disease modeling and climate change. She analyzes the cost-effectiveness of programs designed to tackle climate change with respect to their impact on health outcomes both locally and globally. Dr. Galvani developed a model that uses demographic and fertility patterns to quantify the effect of a Zika vaccine. She directs the Center for Infectious Disease Modeling and Analysis (CIDMA) at the Yale School of Public Health. Her contributions to global health also include identifying how climate change, as well as greenhouse gas pollution, influence morbidity and mortality associated with such mosquito borne illnesses as dengue fever and malaria, bacterial diseases from contaminated water such as cholera, and such respiratory diseases as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  • Guadalupe Garcia-Tsao

    Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases); Chief, Digestive Diseases, VA-CT Healthcare System; Director, Clinical and Translational Core, Yale Liver Center; Program Director, VA-CT Hepatitis C Resource Center

    Years active at Yale: 1989- present

    Dr. Garcia-Tsao is being recognized as a leading researcher in liver disease and for blazing a trail for women entering the field of hepatology. As the only female resident in her class in Mexico, dismissed sexist and harassing comments as “idiotic,” and turned those obstacles into stepping-stones.

    Dr. Garcia-Tsao’s specialty is patient-oriented research into cirrhosis and its complications; she has more than 200 journal publications to her credit. She has put her expertise to use writing the 2017 AASLD guidelines for the management of portal hypertension as well as the VA recommendations for the management of the disease.Dr. Garcia-Tsao’s ability to simplify complicated clinical problems has drawn students and peers alike. She is a speaker in high demand at conferences worldwide and has mentored more than 75 people in various stages of their careers.

    She is chief of digestive diseases at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System. She is also director of the clinical core of the NIH-funded Yale Liver Center and has served as associate editor of the journal Hepatology. She was president of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) in 2012. 

    Dr. Garcia-Tsao has received many named lectureships, including the Telfer Reynolds lectureship at the University of Southern California, the Resnick lecture at Harvard, the David Alpers lecture at Washington University,and the Gerald Klatskin Lecture at Yale—a lecture usually reserved for outside speakers.

  • Alexandria Garino

    Assistant Professor in the Physician Associate Program, Department of Medicine; Program Director

    Years active at Yale: 2006-present

    Dr. Garino, program director for the School of Medicine’s Physician Associate Program, is recognized for her leadership and her excellence in medical skills education. Garino displayed the all-around skills necessary in a physician assistant early in her career, having worked in administrative positions in publishing and information technology at St. John’s University until she could no longer ignore the siren call of healthcare. Garino earned her physician assistant certificate from Catholic Medical Center, in New York, and then a master’s in biostatistics and clinical research design at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, in NY—all while working toward her PhD, which she received from Fordham University in 2018.

    After joining the Yale faculty as an assistant professor in the Physician Associate Program, she became an expert in faculty skills development, preparing clinicians for their new roles as educators. One of her many talents as a teacher is improving clinical anatomy recall in PA students. Her research also studies how students in healthcare professions react to and use feedback. Garino has served on numerous committees within the Physician Associate Program and at the medical school and has worked to expand her program’s online presence. In her spare time, she has also served as a mentor to youth for the Unitary Society of New Haven. Garino was named director of the program in 2017 after having served as interim director for a year.

  • Inginia Genao

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medicine); Associate Chair for Diversity and Inclusion; Medical Director, Adult Primary Care Center

    Years active at Yale: 2005- present

    Dr. Genao is being recognized for excellence in clinical medicine and for her efforts to bring diversity and inclusion to YSM and Yale New Haven Hospital. 

    Dr. Genao trained in Internal Medicine at the University of Rochester, then became assistant professor in the Department of Medicine at Emory University where she was director of the Department of Multicultural Affairs and the founder and director of the International Medical  Center, Division of Medical Affairs for the Grady Health System in Atlanta, Ga. Dr. Genao then accepted a faculty development fellowship in General Medicine at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She then accepted a fellowship in the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University, where she studied National Health Policy pertaining to Hispanic health. In 2005, she became assistant professor at Yale,where for many years she directed the adult medicine Primary Care Center. She recently became the first associate chair for diversity and inclusion in the Department of Medicine. 

    She has received the National Hispanic Medical Association Health  Leadership Award and was  featured in Connecticut State Medical Society Action News. She has received many grants for teaching, particularly pertaining to cultural sensitivity among patient populations. She speaks internationally and nationally on race relations, racial bias, social injustice,and physicians’ personal and professional resiliency within culturally biased and unjust systems. 

  • Katja Goldflam

    Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine; Associate Residency Director

    Years active at Yale: 2010-present

    Dr. Goldflam is being recognized as a driver of innovation in the Department of Emergency Medicine’s educational program, transforming its educational conferences to a better adult-education focused learning environment for residents. She has also been a major contributor to the development of the department’s new year-long EM Resident Wellness curriculum. She is recognized as a superb teacher in the regional and national arena, teaching at national
    educational conferences, including the CORD Academic Assembly wilderness and ultrasound courses, the Yale emergency and critical care ultrasound course, and advanced wilderness life support courses. In 2017, she was awarded the National Junior Faculty Teaching Award by the American College of Emergency Physicians.

  • Patricia Goldman-Rakic

    Former faculty

    Department: Department of Neurobiology, Department ofPsychiatry, Department of Neurology,and Department of Psychology

    Years active at Yale: 1979-2003

    Dr. Goldman-Rakic is being recognized for excellence in research and teaching and was an internationally recognized expert in cortical neuroscience.She earned her bachelor's degree in neurobiology from Vassar in 1959, and her doctorate from the University of California, Los Angeles ,in developmental psychology in 1963. She completed postdoctoral positions at UCLA and New York University, and worked at the National Institute of Mental Health in neuropsychology and as chief of developmental neurobiology before leading a program on cortical neuroscience at Yale. 

    Dr. Goldman-Rakic, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Neuroscience,was the first to discover and describe the circuitry of the prefrontal cortex and its relationship to working memory, and the first to describe columnar inputs to the principal sulcal prefrontal cortex. She envisioned an overall organization of networks throughout the forebrain and her 1987 paper,“Circuitry of the prefrontal cortex and the regulation of behavior by representational memory,” is listed as one of the 100 most influential papers in cognitive science. Dr. Goldman-Rakic initiated research that is critical to our understanding of schizophrenia, ADHD, Parkinson's disease and dementia.Dr.Goldman-Rakic died in 2003.

  • Rosana Gonzalez-Colaso

    Assistant Professor in the Physician Associate Program, Department of Medicine; Faculty Director, Workforce Development and Research, Equity Research and Innovation Center (ERIC); Associate Director, Teamwork Curriculum, Interprofessional Longitudinal Clinical Experience

    Years active at Yale: MPH Class of 2004; 2005-present

    Rosana Gonzalez-Colaso is being recognized for excellence in medical education, mentoring and for her leadership as director of the research curriculum in the Physician Associate Program (PA). As a PharmD, MPH, she brings a unique interprofessional education and practice perspective to the YSM Physician Associate Program’s teaching and research mission. She has used this perspective to contribute significantly to the development, implementation, and evaluation of the Interprofessional Longitudinal Clinical Experience (ILCE) for medical, nursing, and PA students, now mandatory for all first-year students. As director of PA research education, she has designed and successfully overseen a comprehensive overhaul of the PA research curriculum. Gonzalez-Colaso introduced innovative teaching methods in population health topics, and launched multiple global health clinical electives. Her work in the global health curriculum has also enhanced Yale’s leadership in PA global health education. 

    Gonzalez-Colaso is committed to reducing health disparities among patients with limited English proficiency. As a faculty member at the Equity Research and Innovation Center (ERIC), she has contributed to the development of culturally and linguistically sensitive research methods. She has contributed significantly to the education of PA and medical students and, through her emphasis on global health research, has enhanced the image of the Yale PA program nationally.

  • Valentina Greco

    Carolyn Walch Slayman Professor of Genetics

    Years active at Yale: 2009-present

    Dr. Greco is being recognized for her accomplishments in research, for mentoring young people, and for advancing women’s rights. Her work has transformed our understanding of tissue regeneration by identifying critical cellular and molecular mechanisms that sustain stem cells through novel imaging methods for tracking and manipulating stem cells in an intact, uninjured mouse. Real time in vivo imaging of skin epithelium has demonstrated that location dictates stem cell fate, that stem cells are dispensable for tissue growth while the niche is required, and that tissue correction preserves homeostasis revealing that our tissues may have innate mechanisms for battling tumors in their earliest stages.

  • Sylvia P. Griffiths

    Former Faculty

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1948

    Dr. Griffiths is being recognized as a pioneer in pediatric cardiology,as well as a consummate clinician,and esteemed teacher and mentor. When Dr. Griffiths graduated from the Yale School of Medicine in 1948, there were only seven women among 57 students. In 1955, after her fellowship in pediatric cardiology at Yale, she joined the faculty of the College of Physicians and Surgeons and was one of two physicians who began the pediatric cardiology service. In 1960 she was named one of the 50 founders of the Subspecialty Board of Pediatric Cardiology. At Columbia she directed the Pediatric Cardiac Clinic from 1972 to 1990, becoming professor of clinical pediatrics in 1977. Dr. Griffiths is now in her seventh decade of teaching at Columbia. She is the author of more than 150 scientific publications. In 1996, her colleagues and former students established the Sylvia P. Griffiths, MD Lectureship and Teaching Day, held annually to honor her outstanding humanistic qualities and her dedication to teaching. Her first mentor in pediatric cardiology, the late Ruth C. Whittemore, MD, who was on the faculty at Yale, gave the inaugural lecture.

    In keeping with the Yale System of education Dr. Griffiths remains a lifelong learner. In addition to keeping abreast of pediatric cardiology, she takes courses at Columbia and at Hunter College in such subjects as art history and opera. She recalls many decades of conversation with her late husband, Dr. Raymond B. Griffiths, who until his retirement was executive editor of the Journal of Cell Biology.

    Dr. Griffiths enjoyed a sense of being a pioneer but said, "Women in medical schools are no longer a handful. We're now a big armful."

  • Nora Groce

    Former faculty

    Department: School of Public Health

    Years active at Yale: 1990-2008

    Dr. Groce is being recognized as an anthropologist and global health expert who is widely known for her work on vulnerable populations in low-and middle-income countries. She’s particularly known for her work on people with disabilities in the developing world. Her doctoral dissertation, Everyone Here Spoke Sign Language: Hereditary Deafness on Martha’s Vineyard, (published by Harvard University Press in 1985) is considered a classic work in disability studies and ethnographic literature.

    While at Yale, she helped establish and run the Global Health Division at the Yale School of Public Health in 1991, teaching courses on global health, international development,and social justice. In 2008, she left for University College London, where she took the Leonard Cheshire Chair and became director of the Leonard Cheshire Disability and Inclusive Development Centre. Her research has centered on such subjects as poverty and disability, domestic violence, the impact of HIV/AIDS on people with disabilities, disabled populations’ access to health care,and social justice.

    Author of over 250 journal articles, books and reports, she is a regular advisor for United Nations agencies, national governments and non-governmental organizations. She sits on many scientific advisory panels and review boards.

  • Former faculty

    Years active at Yale: 1957-2003

    Dr. Gryboski is being recognized as a clinician, educator, and scholar. After receiving her medical degree from Yale School of Medicine, she completed her pediatric residency and chief residency at Yale, where she practiced medicine and was promoted to professor in 1979. As a researcher, she helped lay the foundations upon which the field of pediatric gastroenterology was developed. Her reputation as the leading authority in pediatric gastroenterology led her to treat patients from all over the world. She authored a pioneering paper that documented the identifying characteristics of Crohn's disease in children. She served on various National Institutes of Health panels and in 1996 won the Schwachman Award as a leading scholar in the field of pediatric gastroenterology. One of her great accomplishments was the publication in 1975 of the single- authored textbook Gastrointestinal Problems in the Infant. The task of writing this comprehensive text is even more impressive when one realizes it was written at home on a typewriter and at a time before electronic Medline searches were possible. This text was one of the first and leading efforts to chronicle the rapidly progressing field of pediatric gastroenterology in the late 1960s and 1970s.

  • Janet Hafler

    Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics); Associate Dean for Educational Scholarship; Director, Teaching and Learning Center

    Years active at Yale: 2009 -present

    Dr. Hafler is being recognized for her leadership and expertise in medical education and medical education research. Her responsibilities as director of the School of Medicine Teaching and Learning Center (TLC) include overseeing three areas in medical education: assessment of students, the curriculum, and educators; educator development programs;and educational technology.

    Dr. Hafler focuses on assisting faculty, students, and residents to explore innovative ways to effectively promote learning in both the classroom and the clinical setting. Promoting, influencing, and nurturing a climate in which physicians, residents,and students can teach and learn has been foremost among her career objectives. Through the TLC, Dr. Hafler directs the medical education fellowship for faculty educators, as well as medical education elective courses for medical students and residents. Most recently, she has led the TLC in designing and implementing the Master’s in Health Sciences with a pathway in Medical Education (MHS-Med Ed), a two-year program focusing on a research project. She also collaborates with Yale New Haven Hospital residency programs in offering resident-as-teacher programs for all residents.

    Dr. Hafler runs an active research program applying qualitative research methods in medical education. She collaborates with and mentors clinicians and faculty on the elements of qualitative research in the field of medical education and medical care. In turn, mentored faculty members have learned to develop and demonstrate the tools necessary to effectively teach and lead others. She frequently serves as visiting professor internationally and has been invited to present regularly at regional and national professional meetings.

  • Ruth Halaban

    Senior Research Scientist in Dermatology

    Years active at Yale: 1973-present

    Dr. Halaban is being recognized as a senior research scientist for her contributions to cancer research. She won the Swebilius Cancer Research Awards in 1976 and in 2005, and the Ruth Estrin Memorial Awards for Cancer Research in 1985 and 2004. She won an award for meritorious contribution in the field of melanocyte biology from the American Skin Association and is the recipient of a Lifetime Achievement in Melanoma Research Award, by the Society of Melanoma Research. 

    She is director of the Cell Culture Core and co-director of the Yale Skin Diseases Research Core Center.

  • Pauline Hald

    Former researcher

    Years active at Yale: 1926-1944 

    Pauline Hald is being recognized for her outstanding contributions to the field of Laboratory Medicine and as a pioneer woman researcher. Her greatest contribution to medicine is that she is the first person to describe a reliable technique using the flame photometer to allow one to measure the serum sodium and potassium concentrations, a technique that changed the face of clinical care around the world. After graduating from Wellesley College in 1924, she was hired by Dr. John Peters at Yale to work in his lab. It was there that her technique for measuring electrolytes was developed, and she published her work as sole author in 1946. Her technique using the flame photometer is synonymous with John Peters’ name in the history books of medicine. After running his laboratory, she went on to be the director of Yale New Haven Hospital’s Laboratory of Clinical Chemistry, where she worked until her retirement many years later.

  • Beatrix McCleary Hamburg

    YSM Alumna

    Years active at Yale: 1948-1950

    Dr. Hamburg is being recognized as an internationally renowned researcher, advocate, and policy maker in the field of adolescent psychiatry, mental health, and violence prevention. She entered Vassar College in 1940 as the first self-identified student of African descent to enroll since the college’s founding in 1861. She received her medical degree in 1948, becoming the first female African American graduate of YSM. 

    During her first academic appointment at Stanford University School of Medicine, Dr. Hamburg was drawn to problems of teenage violence and bullying. Her research on normal adolescence, adolescent psychopathology, and endocrine-behavior interactions focused on understanding behavioral and developmental issues among adolescent children, especially ethnic minorities. She incorporated these insights into a novel, school-based counseling program that proved to be an effective intervention for children, and more generally, for work in the field of conflict resolution. While pursuing research, she also headed psychiatric clinical services at Harvard and Mount Sinai and engaged in national forums focused on adolescent development and minority health. Her success in the academic arena attracted the attention of the William T. Grant Foundation where she served from 1992 to 1998 as president, guiding the foundation’s work to support healthy lives and violence reduction among children. Afterward, she remained engaged in advisory and advocacy work. She was named the DeWitt Wallace Distinguished Scholar at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University and served as director of the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

  • Joni Hansson

    Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 1996-present

    Dr. Hansson is being recognized for her expertise in clinical medicine and teaching. She has received national recognition by being inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society and the Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society while a medical student and she was the recipient of the Patrick and Catherine Weldon Donaghue Medical Research Foundation’s Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Award. She was twice the recipient of the prestigious Samuel Kushlan Award for clinical medicine and teaching and she also received the Frank Parker award and the Janet Glasgow Memorial Achievement Citation.

    Dr. Hansson joined Metabolism Associates in 1996, a private practice specializing in kidney disease.
    Her clinical research area of expertise is in peritoneal dialysis and she has published on the difficulties of education of physician trainees in this area. She is a constant member of the North American Chapter of the International Society of Peritoneal Dialysis for which she serves as Secretary, the American Society of Nephology, and the International Society of Nephrology and has served on the planning and program committees of the National Kidney Foundation meetings. She has served as program director of the Nephrology fellowship at Saint Raphael Hospital and later as the site director of the Yale New Haven Hospital Nephrology fellowship at the Saint Raphael campus. From 2014-2016 she served as president of the medical staff of Yale New Haven Hospital (YNHH). She now serves on the Medical Staff Engagement Committee and as chair of the Medical Staff Professionalism Committee. She has recently been elected tothe Board of Trustees of YNHH. Dr. Hansson combines tireless clinical work with her interests in teaching, training of house staff and fellows, and hospital administration. Her selfless efforts on behalf of patient care, teaching and administration within the YNHH system have been unsurpassed.


  • Florence Haseltine

    Former faculty

    Department: Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences,and Pediatrics

    Years active at Yale: 1976-1985

    Dr. Haseltine is being recognized for her role at the forefront of health technology since the early 1980s. She is an innovator and inventor who holds numerous patents.She has tirelessly promoted the advancement of women and was the founding editor of the Journal for Women’s Health. Before moving to the National Institutes of Health, she was an associate professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at YSM.

    In 1990 she founded the Society for the Advancement of Women’s Health Research (SWHR). From 1985 till 2012 she served as director of the Center for Population Research at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. She was named emerita scientist upon her retirement from NIH in 2012.

    In addition to her advocacy for women’s health, she is known for the study of sex differences. Dr. Haseltine consults in medical and biomedical research for developers of databases, scientific software, webpage designers, and manufacturers of medical devices.She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the National Academy of Inventors, and in 2012 received the Lifetime Achievement Award for the Health and Dignity of Women and Girls from the Friends of the United Nations Population Fund.

  • Sally Haskell

    Professor

    Years active at Yale: 1992-present

    Dr. Haskell is being recognized for her excellence in women’s health advocacy and leadership, clinical science, and mentorship. Dr. Haskell is the deputy chief consultant for clinical operations and the director of Comprehensive Women’s Health for the Veterans Health Administration. In this role she leads policy and operations for women veterans’ healthcare nationally. Dr. Haskell’s background is in general internal medicine. She trained at Emory University and served on the general medicine faculty at the University of Vermont. She joined the Yale faculty in 1992 and served as the director of the Women’s Health Program at VA Connecticut Healthcare System before becoming New England regional medical director for VA Women’s Health, and then moving into VA Central Office leadership. In her national leadership role Dr. Haskell has overseen numerous initiatives, including development of women’s health clinical policies, reducing gender disparities in clinical performance measures, information technology initiatives to enhance clinical care of women, national site assessment programs, and many others. Dr. Haskell has a long-term interest in chronic pain in women. Her research career is notable for the development of the Women Veteran Cohort study that focuses on gender differences in medical and mental health outcomes after combat exposure in Iraq and Afghanistan. Since 2013, Dr. Haskell has mentored women’s health scholars in policy and research through her role as director of the Women’s Health fellowship program. In 2017 Dr. Haskell was honored by the Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame.

  • Kathryn Hawk

    Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine; NIDA K12 Drug Use, Addiction, and HIV Research Scholar (DAHRS)

    Years active at Yale: 2014-present

    Dr. Hawk is being recognized for her deep commitment to clinical science research that focuses on improving clinical practice with regard to prevention of opioid overdoses and Emergency Department-initiated treatments for opioid use disorders and facilitated referrals. As morbidity and mortality associated with the opioid epidemic continues to increase, Dr. Hawk is at the forefront of developing and testing interventions to improve the health of this vulnerable population. She is a recent graduate of the National Institute on Drug Abuse K12 Scholars program at Yale. She has worked extensively with Connecticut state agencies, including as an advisor to the Department of Consumer Protection Pharmacists as Prescribers Naloxone Training Program, with the Department of Corrections on a naloxone distribution program, and with the Connecticut Department of Public Health Drug Overdose Program.
    Currently, Dr. Hawk is a co-investigator on four large, federally funded research projects related to improving the care of patients with opioid use disorder.

  • Alicia Heapy

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Years active at Yale: 2004-present

    Dr. Heapy is being recognized for her excellence in clinical science. She is currently associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry at YSM, as well as the associate director of the Pain Research, Informatics, Multimorbidities, and Education (PRIME) Center at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System. She is known for her innovative work in using interactive voice response (IVR) technology to make cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for chronic pain more accessible to veterans. After conducting a randomized non-inferiority trial of IVR CBT, she received several grants to continue studying the best ways to deliver IVR CBT, as well as how to best implement IVR CBT throughout the VA Healthcare System.

  • Former faculty

    Department: Endocrinology

    Years active at Yale: 1968- now retired

    Dr. Hendler is being recognized for her role in clinical medicine and research, specifically her knowledge of metabolism and metabolic disorders. Dr. Hendler was born and raised in Argentina,where she trained in the early 1960s as an endocrinologist. She came to Yale in 1968 as a postdoctoral fellow after a previous position as research associate in the Department of Medicine at George Washington University, Washington, DC. She subsequently became assistant professor in endocrinology at Yale and then research scientist, holding a position on NIH-funded studies. She developed considerable expertise as an advocate for research subjects.

    Her studies in the areas of diabetes mellitus, obesity and insulin resistance resulted in 38 publications. She was the primary investigator on a Pfizer-funded trial of inhaled insulin.

  • Janet Henrich

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medicine) and of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences

    Years active at Yale: 1982- present

    Dr. Henrich is being recognized for excellence in medical education and training, and in women’s health. She has had a longstanding interest in women’s health education and training, and in clinical issues related to menopause. She, along with colleagues at the Office of Research on Women’s Health at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other government women’s health offices, examined women’s health education and training in U.S. medical schools and made recommendations to Congress for a core curriculum on women’s health. With research colleagues at the NIH, she established new population-based estimates for follicle stimulating hormone in U.S. women and assessed its efficacy in distinguishing between reproductive stages. At Yale, she directed one of the first National Centers of Excellence in Women’s Health and helped create an interdisciplinary women’s health residency education and training model. 

    She has contributed to the incorporation of women’s health issues into medical training as associate editor, section editor and chapter author in major textbooks. She is currently associate editor of Scientific American Medicine and is responsible for developing its women’s health section. She received the Society of General Internal Medicine Award for Scholarship in Medical Education for her national leadership role in developing collaborative, interdisciplinary approaches to women’s health education and training. These efforts span the educational spectrum, including co-directing, in Yale College, one of the first undergraduate women’s health courses in the nation.

  • Susan A. Higgins

    Professor of Therapeutic Radiology and of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences; Medical Director for Radiation Oncology at Shoreline Medical Center, Yale New Haven Hospital, Therapeutic Radiology; Associate Director, Department of Therapeutic Radiology Residency Training Program

    Years active at Yale: 1996-Present

    Dr. Higgins is being recognized for excellence in clinical science, clinical care, teaching, and mentoring. She holds joint appointments in therapeutic radiology and obstetrics and gynecology. Her clinical work and research have focused on the treatment of women with breast and gynecologic cancer and she served as the director of the gynecologic clinical service in the Department of Therapeutic Radiology for 15 years. She also held leadership roles as a disease team leader for both gynecologic and breast cancers in the Smilow Cancer Center. She has received national recognition for her clinical expertise and has served as an oral board examiner for the American Board of Radiology and as a member of multiple national guidelines committees, including the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Guidelines Committee for the treatment of Cervical, Uterine and Vulvar Cancer. 

    Over the past 20 years Dr. Higgins has contributed to the educational mission of the Department of Therapeutic Radiology and the School of Medicine at multiple levels. She is recognized as a key leader in resident education within her department, serving as the Associate Director of the Residency Training Program for the past 14 years. In addition, she has taught and mentored hundreds of Yale medical students as well as residents and Fellows in all oncologic subspecialties.

  • Roberta Hines

    Nicholas M. Greene Professor of Anesthesiology; Department Chair and Chief, Anesthesiology

    Years active at Yale: 1982-present

    Dr. Hines is being recognized for her deep scholarship as well as for breaking the glass ceiling in the field of anesthesiology. In 1994, Dr. Hines, the Nicholas M. Greene Professor of Anesthesiology, became the first woman at Yale to be named chair of a clinical department. In this post, which she still holds, she has greatly expanded its size, vision, and prominence. It is now a multidisciplinary department that provides anesthesia care for 60,000 patients a year. She helped convince the department to become one of the first in the country to assume responsibility for patient care after cardiac surgery. Dr. Hines is also a mentor and champion for women in anesthesiology. 

    At least eight graduates under her tutelage went on to become department chairs. Dr. Hines continues to guide women toward leadership positions and believes that diversity and a proper work-life balance are critical to maintaining healthy departments. For more than a quarter-century, Dr. Hines has been an examiner for the American Board of Anesthesiology. She also has served as president for both the Association of University Anesthesiologists and the Association of Academic Anesthesiology Chairs. She has edited key textbooks in her field. Over her distinguished career, Dr. Hines has been invited to give presentations on five continents and has been a visiting professor at hospitals and universities in eight states and Washington, D.C.

  • Joy Hirsch

    Elizabeth Mears and House Jameson Professor of Psychiatry and Professor of Comparative Medicine and of Neuroscience

    Years active at Yale: 1977-1992, 2013-present

    Dr. Hirsch is being recognized for her excellence in research in the neurosciences. She established the Brain Function Laboratory at Yale in 2013, which has made fundamental contributions to understanding the neural processes for cognitive control, and has developed brain-mapping procedures so that surgeons can protect brain functions during surgeries. With her students and colleagues, Dr. Hirsch has developed an imaging diagnostic for autism, and has discovered neural mechanisms associated with over-eating behaviors, anxiety disorders, and addictions. 

    The Hirsch Lab studies the neural circuitry and fundamental mechanisms of the brain that enable human cognition, language, motion, decision making and perception in both healthy/typical patients and those with neurological, developmental and psychiatric disorders. 

    Dr. Hirsch first came to Yale in 1977 as a research associate in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, and she became an assistant professor there in 1979 and an associate professor in 1984. From 1992 to 2013, she had professorships at Cornell University and Columbia University. She returned to Yale in 2013 as a professor of psychiatry and neurobiology. 

  • Susan Hockfield

    Former YSM faculty

    Department and Positions: Professor and Provost, Yale University

    Years active at Yale: 1985-2004

    Dr. Hockfield is being recognized for her achievements in scientific research and university administration. As the William Edward Gilbert Professor of Neurobiology, she pioneered the use of monoclonal antibody technology while demonstrating that early experiences result in lasting changes in the molecular structure of the brain. Dr. Hockfield focused her research at Yale on the development of the brain and on glioma, a deadly form of brain cancer. 

    While at Yale, Dr. Hockfield became dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and later served as provost. In 2004 she became the 16th president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a post she held until 2012. She continues to hold a faculty appointment as professor of neuroscience and as a member of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research.Dr. Hockfield has been awarded the Marie Curie Visiting Professorship at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government,and the Carnegie Corporation/Vartan Gregorian Affiliated Fellowship at the American Academy of Rome.

    She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  • Erin Hofstatter

    Associate Professor Term; Co-Director, Cancer Genetics and Prevention Program

    Years active at Yale: 2010-present

    Dr. Hofstatter is being recognized for her contributions to YSM across clinical science, research, mentoring, and teaching. She is a medical oncologist with clinical and research expertise in breast cancer and clinical breast cancer genetics. As co-director of the Yale Cancer Center Genetics and Prevention Program and director of the Breast Cancer Prevention Clinic, she provides expert care and genetic counseling to patients who may be at increased risk of breast cancer. She is a dedicated and caring clinician and researcher. 

  • Nina Horowitz

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (Oncology)

    Years active at Yale: 1979-present

    Dr. Horowitz is recognized as a dedicated clinician as well as the first woman to enter a private surgical practice in the New Haven area. She graduated from Yale college in 1975 (the third class of women). She came to Yale New Haven Hospital in 1979 as an intern and then resident. In 1984, Dr. Horowitz was appointed a clinical instructor. She rose to assistant professor of surgery in 2010. Her specialty is breast surgical oncology, and though she maintains a busy practice, her commitment to educating and mentoring students remains deep. Dr. Horowitz spends two months providing fellows with patient evaluation, disease diagnosis, and surgical techniques. She has received the Leah Lowenstein and C. Elton Cahow teaching awards at Yale. Dr. Horowitz was also the recipient of the Women of Strength Award from the Get in Touch Foundation and the Yale Cancer Center Award for Clinical Excellence. 

    She has sat on numerous committees at YSM, including the Interdisciplinary Breast Fellowship Interview and Selection Committee, the Clinical Competency Committee, and the Medical Operations Committee. Dr. Horowitz was instrumental in developing patient education materials for the Patient Education Task Force and continues to participate actively in clinical trials.

  • Dorothy M. Horstmann

    Former faculty

    Years active at Yale: 1942-1982

    Dorothy M. Horstmann was a noted epidemiologist whose findings that poliovirus is present in the blood of infected patients laid the groundwork for the development of a vaccine. 

    She was a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, where she obtained her undergraduate degree and of the University of California, San Francisco, where she earned her medical degree in 1940. She completed her residency at Vanderbilt University Hospital. She arrived in New Haven in 1942 as the Commonwealth Fund Fellow in the Section of Preventive Medicine, which was then part of the Department of Internal Medicine.

    In 1961, Dr. Horstmann became the first woman at the School of Medicine to earn tenure as a full professor when she became professor of epidemiology and pediatrics. Eight years later, in 1969, became the first woman to receive an endowed chair at Yale University. In 1975, she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences; she was also an elected member of the Association of American Physicians and held an honorary membership in the Royal Society of Medicine. Aside from a brief stint teaching medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and researching under a National Institutes of Health fellowship in London, she spent her entire academic career at Yale. She retired in 1982 as an emeritus professor and a senior research analyst. She died in 2001. The School of Medicine created an endowed lectureship in her name in recognition of her achievements throughout her long career at Yale.

  • Margaret Hostetter

    Former YSM faculty

    Department: Pediatrics

    Years active at Yale: 1998-2010

    Dr. Hostetter is recognized for going where few women had gone before: leadership posts in pediatrics departments at leading universities. She joined the Yale faculty as a professor of pediatrics and director of the Yale Child Health Research Center. In 2002 she was named the Jean McLean Wallace Professor and chair of the department of pediatrics. At the time, there were no other women chairs at the Yale School of Medicine—and very few across the country. 

    Between 2000 and 2010, Dr. Hostetter was also professor of microbial pathogenesis. She is one of only three women to be elected president of the Society for Pediatric Research and the American Pediatric Society over the past 125 years. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine, the American Society of Clinical Investigation (ASCI), and the Association of American Physicians (AAP). It is rare for pediatricians to be elected to both the ASCI and the AAP. Her research has also won research honors including the E. Mead Johnson Award, the Samuel Rosenthal Award, and the Maxwell Finland Lecture in Infectious Diseases.

    In 2010, Dr. Hostetter left Yale to become chief medical officer and director of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. True to form, she was the first woman to hold those posts.

  • Edith Hsiung

    Former faculty

    Department: Virology; Epidemiology and Public Health (Laboratory Medicine)

    Years active at Yale: 1953-2000 

    Dr. Hsiung (1918-2006) was a pioneer in establishing thefield of diagnostic virology.Except for several years in the 1960s, she spent her career at Yale and the affiliated Veterans Medical Center in West Haven. Born in Hupei, China, she moved to the United States and earned her PhDin microbiology at MichiganState University. She came to Yale in 1953, initially as a postdoctoral student working with Dr. Joseph Melnick on poliovirus and related enteroviruses. In 1960, she was appointed the first director of the Virology Laboratory at Grace-New Haven Hospital.The first of four editions of her textbook, Diagnostic Virology, appeared in 1964. In 1967, she became chief of the Virology Research Laboratory at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in West Haven and a professor in the Department of Laboratory Medicine at Yale.

    She was the first director of the national Virology Reference Laboratory of the Veterans Administration in 1985. She trained generations of researchersanddeveloped new laboratory methods of cell culture in order to find, identify, and study the behavior of viruses. She also developed animal models, especially the guinea pig, to study viral pathogenesis and test treatments by antivirals. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, she worked on antivirals for HIV.Dr. Hsiung received many awards, among them the Becton-Dickinson Award from the American Society for Microbiology in 1983. She published a scientific autobiography, Mysteries and Miracles, in 1995. She was known as a valuable mentor to generations of medical students and post-doctoral fellows.

  • Ann Hubbard

    Former faculty

    Department: Cell Biology

    Years active at Yale: 1973-1980

    Dr. Hubbard conducted research for the National Institutes of Health in the biogenesis and trafficking of newly synthesized plasma membrane in polarized epithelial cells, focusing specifically on liver hepatocytes. She also taught histology to first year medical students. Dr. Hubbard came to Yale as a post-doctoral fellow in 1973 and was promoted to assistant professor in 1975. In 1980, Dr. Hubbard went to Johns Hopkins, where she is an associate professor in cell biology.

  • Jeannette Ickovics

    Samuel and Liselotte Herman Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Yale School of Public Health; Dean of Faculty, Yale-NUS College; Founding Director, CARE: Community Alliance for Research and Engagement

    Years active at Yale: 1991-present

    Dr. Ickovics is being recognized for her community-engaged research. She is an expert on maternal and child health and community health with a focus on large-scale prevention interventions. Dr. Ickovics investigates the interplay of the complex psychological, medical, and social factors that influence the health of the person and of the community. She uses this lens to examine the challenges faced by those who have often been marginalized by the health care system and by society. Dr. Ickovics has participated in numerous national and international health care initiatives, including a multi-country project to prevent chronic disease, sponsored by the Oxford Health Alliance in England, and promoting an innovative model of group prenatal care domestically and abroad to improve maternal and child health outcomes.

    Dr. Ickovics is a visiting professor at Yale-National University of Singapore for the 2017-2018 academic year. She was founding director of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the School of Public Health. She is the director of CARE: Community Alliance for Research and Engagement, and deputy director for the Yale Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS (CIRA), where she co-directs an NIH training program for pre- and postdoctoral fellows.

  • Avlin Imaeda

    Associate Professor Term; Fellowship Program Director

    Years active at Yale: 2007-present

    Dr. Imaeda is being recognized for her clinical excellence and medical education. She has been fellowship program director for Digestive Diseases since 2012. During her tenure, the program thrived. This is in large part due to Dr. Imaeda's laser focus, as well as her excellent organizational and leadership skills. Dr. Imaeda specializes in diseases of the small bowel and obscure GI bleeding. Her practice is at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System, where in addition to routine endoscopy, she reads small bowel capsules and performs double balloon enteroscopy. She has been active in the Association of Specialty Providers and the American Gastroenterological Association, fostering improvements at Yale and nationally in medical education and training and quality improvement in GI care.

  • Melinda Irwin

    Associate Dean of Research and Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); Associate Director (Population Sciences), Yale Cancer Center; Co-Program Leader, Cancer Prevention and Control, Yale Cancer Center; Deputy Director (Public Health), Yale Center for Clinical Investigation

    Years active at Yale: 2001-present

    Dr. Irwin is being recognized for her research over the past 15 years to improve the quality of life of cancer patients and survivors. She is an expert in the field of lifestyle factors and chronic diseases. Dr. Irwin has received funding from the NIH, American Cancer Society, American Institute for Cancer Research, Komen for the Cure, Livestrong Foundation, and other foundations, and has published her research findings in top medical journals. For the past 10 years, she has been the director of Training and Education on the NCI-Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer (TREC) Initiative. At Yale, Dr. Irwin has advised, mentored, and trained over 100 trainees on public health-related studies. Dr. Irwin also serves on various national advisory committees to develop consensus statements on physical activity, diet, weight, and cancer prevention and control.

  • Akiko Iwasaki

    Waldemar Von Zedtwitz Professor of Immunobiology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology; Professor of Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

    Years active at Yale: 2000-present

    Dr. Iwasaki is being recognized for her research into how the innate immune system recognizes viruses and how it uses that information to generate protective adaptive immunity. 

    She studies immune responses to herpes simplex viruses in the genital tract and influenza infection in the lung. Recently, her lab has also focused on how autophagy mediates innate and adaptive immune responses to these and other viral pathogens. The goal is to use this knowledge to design vaccines or microbicides to prevent transmission of viral and bacterial pathogens. 

    Her lab’s focus is on mucosal surfaces, major sites of entry for infectious agents. Those surfaces are intricately lined with cells and lymphoid organs that provide protective antibody and cellular immunity. A key area of study is how antigens in the mucosa are taken up, processed, and presented by antigen-presenting cells. Iwasaki and her team are trying to understand how immunity is initiated and maintained at the mucosal surfaces, particularly by the dendritic cells through natural portals of entry for pathogens that can lead to disease. 

    While still a graduate student at the University of Toronto, Dr. Iwasaki was among the first to demonstrate that antigen-presenting cells were found in the blood, not in muscle. Until then, muscle cells were thought to play a key role in alerting the immune system to foreign proteins, or antigens.

  • Edith B. Jackson

    Former faculty

    Years active at Yale: 1923-1959

    Dr. Jackson is being recognized as a pioneer in the treatment of infants and young children. She was a faculty member of the Yale Department of Pediatrics from 1923 to 1959, and responsible for many of the advances in the care of infants and children throughout the world. She became well-known for her work in trying to humanize the delivery of services to children and families in hospitals and other human services institutions. She is best known for her success in establishing rooming-in for newborns so that they could be as close as possible to their mothers from the beginning. Throughout her life, Dr. Jackson was committed to providing the most sensitive care to parents and children. 

    The Edith B. Jackson Child Care Program remains as a living memorial to her lifetime commitment to the welfare of infants and children.

  • Former faculty

    Years active at Yale: MPH Class of 1967, 1967-1992

    Alberta S. Jacoby is being recognized for being at the forefront of the field of health communication. She taught and produced documentaries at the Yale School of Public Health (then the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at the Yale School of Medicine).

    She was born in Worthington, Minn., was an alternate on the 1928 Olympic diving team, and became a champion golfer. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Minnesota and received a master's degree in public health from Yale in 1967, the year she joined the faculty. She began to show films on health during World War II as a program director for the Office of War Information, an information officer at the Public Health Service and, finally, chief of information for the National Institute of Mental Health.

    She went into filmmaking herself in 1949, when she and her director-husband, the late Irving A. Jacoby, formed the Mental Health Film Board. A production company, it made more than 100 documentaries, some of which won awards, on subjects such as psychiatric illnesses, drug abuse, juvenile delinquency, and hospice care.

    At Yale, she taught a course entitled Health Communications. With her assistance, student crews made films about local health agencies to educate the public about what the agencies did. She mentored a select group of students who went on to pursue successful careers in health communication.

  • Simona Jakab

    Associate Professor of Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 2009- present

    Dr. Jakab is being recognized for her excellence as a clinician-educator. In her role as associate firm chief of the liver inpatient service, she is dedicated to improving the management of patients with advanced liver disease, in particular the difficult inpatient to outpatient transitions of care. She also strives to maximize the teaching experience for students and residents rotating through the service, from highly appreciated orientation sessions and specific teaching curricula, to using electronic medical record order sets and clinical protocols following national guidelines. 

    Her mentorship and commitment to the education of future generations was recognized by teaching awards such as the Howard M. Spiro Digestive Diseases Fellowship Teaching Award and the Edwin C. Cadman Award, Yale University School of Medicine/Internal Medicine Primary Care Residency Program.

  • Ania Jastreboff

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology) and of Pediatrics (Endocrinology); Director, Weight Management & Obesity Prevention; Medical Director, Yale Stress Center

    Years active at Yale: PhD Class of 2011; 2007-present

    Dr. Jastreboff is being recognized for her excellence in clinical care and research.

    As a neurobehavioral endocrinologist, the goal of Dr. Jastreboff’s research is to better understand how the brain controls eating behaviors. She utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine neural responses in reward-motivation, decision-making, and homeostatic brain regions to various food-related cues (such as food images, oral glucose and fructose ingestion, and intravenous insulin administration via euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp technique) and relate the observed neural responses to food-related behaviors (such as food craving and food intake).

    Dr. Jastreboff has presented her work at national and international meetings and served as an associate scientific advisor for Science Translational Medicine. In 2013, she received an American Society of Clinical Investigation (ASCI) Young Physician-Scientist Award, a prestigious early investigator recognition award.

    Her clinical expertise is caring for patients with obesity, as well as prediabetes, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. By implementing a holistic patient-care approach, she aims to guide patients to long-term metabolic health and improved quality of life. She is currently working to develop a comprehensive weight management program at Yale, bringing together a multispecialty team of experts to care for patients with obesity.

  • Michele Johnson

    Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging and of Neurosurgery; Director, Interventional Neuroradiology

    Years active at Yale: 1999-present

    Dr. Johnson is recognized for her inside-out knowledge of the human body and for her passion in sharing her expertise. Dr. Johnson, the daughter of chemists, received her BA in chemistry at the University of Delaware in 1975 and her MD from Temple University School of Medicine in 1979. This was at the dawn of such noninvasive scanning methods as magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography, and Dr. Johnson was hooked on using scans to solve medical mysteries. She came to YSM in 1999 as director of interventional neuroradiology. She has since received a secondary appointment in neurosurgery, and since 2010 has been chief of neuro CT and neuroinvasive procedures. Dr. Johnson examines the entire body, but her specialty is imaging the neck, spine, head, and vascular systems.

    Dr. Johnson received a Yale Medical Education Fellowship, in which she focused on interdisciplinary teaching across subspecialties. When teaching students, Dr. Johnson stresses collaboration and creativity. She also pushes radiology trainees to try to look at a two-dimensional image and imagine a three-dimensional one. In 2014, she became professor of diagnostic radiology, surgery, and neurosurgery, becoming the first African-American woman named a full professor at YSM. Dr. Johnson is also a fellow with the American Society of Radiology and vice president of the American Society of Spine Radiology.

  • Elizabeth Jonas

    Professor of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology) and Neuroscience

    Years active at Yale: 2002-present

    Dr. Jonas is being recognized for excellence in research, teaching and women’s issues. She received her BA in history at Yale University and her MD from NYU School of Medicine. At Yale she trained in neurology and internal medicine and served as chief resident in neurology. She carried out postdoctoral training with Dr. Leonard Kaczmarek in the Yale Department of Pharmacology, where she developed a technique to record from intracellular ion channels in living cells and found that neuropeptide-containing granules release intracellular calcium for their own secretion. She also found that mitochondria release calcium for the potentiation of neurotransmitter release during high intensity synaptic activity. Leading her own research group, she rose to the rank of professor, focusing her lab work on understanding the role of mitochondrial metabolic control in learning and memory formation and on mitochondrial dysfunction in synapses within neurons undergoing developmental and neurodegenerative brain disorders. She recently garnered the Senator Jacob Javits Award in Neuroscience and was elected co-chair of the bioenergetics subgroup of the Biophysical Society. 

    In addition to mentoring undergraduate, graduate students, and post-doctoral fellows at Yale since 2000, Dr. Jonas has mentored students at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass. Dr. Jonas has trained undergraduates and, more recently, medical students interested in basic science research. She also lectures to undergraduates and house staff on the cell biology of neurological disease. She is passionate about ameliorating women’s difficulties in medicine and science and serves as co-chair of the Status for Women in Medicine and as chair of the planning committee of “100 years of Women in Medicine at YSM: Celebration and Reflection.”

  • Ayana Jordan

    Assistant Professor

    Years active at Yale: 2011- present

    Dr. Jordan is being recognized for her commitment to serving minority populations and specifically in treating patients with substance use disorders, given the intense stigma associated with these disorders. Dr. Jordan completed residency and specialized addiction training at Yale, and has a particular interest in using her research background to address clinical questions in the black community.Currently, she is an assistant professor at Yale and a physician attending at Connecticut Mental Health Center. She is committed to increasing access to addiction services within minority communities, both nationally and abroad. Dr. Jordan has done research in Sierra Leone, West Africa, examining the link between mental illness, substance use, and stigma, and has served as an expert witness discussing these issues.In Connecticut, Dr. Jordan is working with black churches to offer an evidence-based therapeutic modality shown to be effective in decreasing substance use. She is interested in making connections with key stakeholders to make this project a success. She has a national presence as well, having recently been elected to the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Early Career Psychiatrists Trustee at Large.

  • Karen Jubanyik

    Associate Professor Term; Director, Emergency Medicine Clerkship

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1994; 2000-present

    Dr. Jubanyik is being recognized for excellence in teaching and mentoring, clinical care, and science, as well as for her leadership and advocacy in issues affecting women. 

    A 1994 graduate of YSM, she completed residencies at Yale New Haven Hospital in internal medicine and emergency medicine, as well as a fellowship in women’s health. After joining the faculty, she served as the associate program director for the emergency medicine residency. She was subsequently named EM clerkship director. In 2008, she was selected to be an academic advisor in the office of student affairs, responsible for advising medical students as they navigate medical school, career decisions, and, (as a mother of four children herself), work-life balance. Dr. Jubanyik has won multiple awards for her teaching. In 2002, the Yale New Haven Hospital emergency medicine residents awarded her the Outstanding Faculty Teaching Award. The YSM Class of 2009 presented her with the Francis Gilmore Blake Award, for most outstanding teacher of clinical sciences. And in 2016, she was selected for the Leonard Tow Humanism Award. Since 2005, she has been on the executive board of the Connecticut College of Emergency Physicians.

  • Amy Justice

    C.N.H. Long Professor of Medicine (General Medicine) and Professor of Public Health (Health Policy); Clinical Research Director, Microbial Cancers

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1988; 2003-present

    Dr. Justice is being recognized for her excellence in clinical science and mentoring. She is a clinical epidemiologist and health services researcher whose research has been directed at the interplay of HIV/AIDS, alcohol/substance abuse,and aging,and addresses the challenge of treating an aging population infected with HIV or Hepatitis C infection. In addition to being a leader in research on elderly patients with HIV infection, Dr. Justice has harnessed data in the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System Electronic Medical Record to develop multiple large-scale national cohorts. She has enhanced these cohorts with external data, including the National Death Index and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, patient completed surveys, DNA and tissue repositories and stored pathology. Dr. Justice has published more than 400 manuscripts and has presented work at conferences around the world. Dr. Justice has worked within the VA Healthcare System for three decades, serving as a primary care provider for two decades. She served as section chief of general medicine at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, for 13 years. She has mentored more than 40 doctoral and postdoctoral fellows and junior faculty who have garnered awards that include the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation award, VA and NIH career development awards, and the National Library of Medicine Awards.

  • Manisha Juthani

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases); Program Director, Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program; Associate Program Director for Career Development, Traditional Internal Medicine Residency Program; Director of Internal Medicine Fellowship Programs

    Years active at Yale: 2002-present

    Dr. Juthani is being recognized for excellence as an investigator in geriatric infectious diseases, for her leadership in the Infectious Diseases and Internal Medicine training programs, and for her mentorship of many physicians in training at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Juthani has been at the forefront of investigation at the interface of geriatrics and infectious diseases with foundation and National Institutes of Health funding to support her work. Most notably, she was the Principal Investigator of an R01-funded research project that resulted in the 2016 JAMA publication entitled, “Effect of Cranberry Capsules on Bacteriuria Plus Pyuria Among Older Women in Nursing Homes: A Randomized Clinical Trial.” This publication received widespread attention in the lay press, including The New York Times, CNN, and The New Yorker, which identified this research as one of the most notable medical findings of 2016. She is a nationally recognized expert on asymptomatic bacteriuria and UTI in older women, participating in recent Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) consensus guidelines and speaking at the IDSA national meeting on these topics. On a parallel front, she has been an avid supporter of trainee development, particularly of physician scientists. Given her own investigative expertise and as co-PI of the Infectious Diseases T32 Training Grant, she has been able to bring these experiences to Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases trainees in her leadership roles within these programs.

  • Susan Kaech

    Professor Adjunct-Immunobiology

    Years active at Yale: 2004-2018

    Dr. Kaech is being recognized for excellence in research. She is driven to understand how different types of memory T cells are generated during an immune response and how some T cells persist to provide protective immunity upon reinfection. Gaining knowledge in these areas will have a significant impact on the development of vaccines and immunotherapies to fight infectious disease, cancer, and autoimmunity. 

    Her lab has been studying regulatory pathways that control whether an effector T cell lives and adopts a memory cell fateor terminally differentiates into a shorter-lived effector cell and dies. Her discoveries have shown that memory T cell fate determination is influenced by environmental cues and a balance of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Currently, her lab is trying to understand how signals in the tissue microenvironment and nutrient availability specify memory T cell properties and regulate their long-term survival and homeostasis; the lab also seeks to understand the metabolic determinants of memory T cell longevity and self-renewal and to determine the functional and metabolic connections between T cells and cancer cells.

    Dr. Kaech performed her graduate work at Stanford University and a post-doctoral fellowship at Emory University. She has received numerous awards including the Burroughs-Wellcome Foundation Award in Biomedical Sciences, the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, and has been a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Early Career Scientist.

  • Shanta E. Kapadia

    Lecturer in Surgery (Gross Anatomy)

    Department: Surgery

    Years active at Yale: 1975-present

    Dr. Kapadia is being recognized for excellence in medical student education that she has displayed in the anatomy lab for decades and has now extended into the digital age. She has served at Yale as a lecturer, professor, and research scientist since 1975. Dr. Kapadia is a beloved figure in her classrooms, and she has many honors to show for it. Students have chosen her as teacher of the year three times, and twice honored her with Charles W. Bohmfalk Prize for “outstanding contribution to the basic sciences teaching program.” She has twice won the Leah M. Lowenstein Award for providing “a model for the principle of equal opportunity.” 

    In 1997, the American Medical Women’s Association honored her with the Gender Equity Award for providing “a gender-fair environment for the education and training of women physicians and assuring equal opportunity for women and men to study and practice medicine.” Dr. Kapadia has brought her talents online, performing dissections in anatomy classes the school has provided through Coursera.

  • Jennifer Kapo

    Sherwin B. Nuland and Michael K. Vlock Associate Professor of Palliative Medicine; Chief, Palliative Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 2011- present

    Dr. Kapo is being recognized for her exemplary leadership as the inaugural chief of the Yale Palliative Care Program and Yale New Haven Hospital Palliative Care Service. The program has achieved tremendous growth in its first six years, both in clinical services provided and patients/families served. The size and expertise of the palliative care faculty and interdisciplinary team have expanded rapidly with a resulting increase in clinical and scholarly collaborations across Yale.

    Dr. Kapo tirelessly promotes excellence in the quality of care for patients and their families, while skillfully stewarding resources toward further program building to serve a wider community. These efforts are balanced by her championing of resilience practice and core values so the palliative care team can continue to thrive. Dr. Kapo is also a master palliative care clinician. She is a nationally recognized leader in palliative care as a clinical program chief, clinician, educator, mentor, and scholar.

  • Susan Kashaf

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medicine)

    Years active at Yale: 2001-present

    Dr. Kashaf is being recognized for excellence in clinical teaching and mentoring. She joined the faculty as a general internist at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System in West Haven after finishing her Yale internal medicine residency in 2001. As a clinician-educator, she has spent nearly 20 years teaching residents and medical students in clinical and classroom settings. As a result of her teaching, Dr. Kashaf developed a passion for the science of feedback and the art of teaching clinical skills. She collaborated in the development of curricula to advance these concepts in the core experiences of Yale medical students and applied those ideas to practice via 10 years of service on the YSM Clinical Skills Committee. She directed the Focused Visit Workshop and by served as a clinical assessment coach. Dr. Kashaf was recently named Director for Remediation at the Yale School of Medicine. She received YSM Leah Lowenstein Teaching Award in 2017 in recognition of her commitment to teaching. 

    Dr. Kashaf has served the greater Yale medical community on YSM’s Faculty Advisory Council, where she was elected by her peers to represent the VA and was subsequently selected to serve on the 2016 Dean’s Committee on the Clinician Educator Track. Dr. Kashaf enjoys mentoring students and residents, finding inspiration in the support she continues to receive from the Yale medical community.

  • Rachel Katz

    Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry

    Years active at Yale: 2014-present

    Dr. Katz is being recognized for her leadership, clinical excellence, and scholarship, and for being a pioneer in the field of interventional psychiatry.

    She completed her psychiatry residency at Yale in 2017 and has already launched an outstanding career in the Department of Psychiatry and Yale New Haven Hospital, leading the Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation program in the section of Interventional Psychiatry. A natural leader in her residency class, she took an active role in teaching medical students and fellow residents. She was outstanding as the chief resident in Interventional Psychiatric Services, both in developing scholarly work and developing improved techniques in administering services. As chief resident, she published half a dozen papers in psychiatric journals, presented at the American Psychiatric Association annual meeting, the International Society of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Neurostimulation, the annual conference on Brain Stimulation and the annual European Conference on Neurostimulation. She also served as editor in chief of the American Journal of Psychiatry’s Residents’ Journal. Her peers and mentors alike have admired her poise under pressure, her clinical skills, her willingness to mentor junior residents, and her unflagging devotion to providing the best care possible to her patients. In addition to all of these professional skills, she counts many colleagues as friends and regularly contributes to holiday festivities as a vocalist in our own department of psychiatry holiday band.

  • Joan Kaufman

    Former YSM faculty

    Department: Department of Psychiatry

    Years active at Yale: 1998-2015

    Dr. Kaufman is being recognized for her clinical scientific skills and her support for women’s careers. While at Yale, her supreme intellect and unparalleled level of organization enabled her to take care of patients, run a summer camp for children with behavioral disorders, administer her NIH grants, perform research,participate in a multitude of collaborations, write a book,and raise a family. She also found time to plan get-togethers and help her friends share childcare responsibilities. She understood the concept of “it takes a village” and practiced it, and the effort that she personally put in was above and beyond... there was always one more thing she could fit into her schedule to help women who bore the burdens of simultaneous careers and childcare duties.

    Dr. Kaufman is now the director of research at the Center for Child and Family Traumatic Stress at Kennedy Krieger Institute, and a professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Her research is in child abuse and neglect, and spans from neurobiology to social policy. She uses tools from psychology, genetics, and neuroscience to understand resilience and mechanisms of disease risk in this vulnerable population. She wrote Broken Three Times: A Story of Child Abuse in America, a non-fiction book that follows one family through the child welfare system. Dr. Kaufman is also first author on the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia child psychiatric diagnostic interview.

  • Joy Kaufman

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Director of Program and Service System Evaluation at The Consultation Center; Director of Evaluation Research, Division of Prevention and Community Research; Deputy Director, The Consultation Center, Psychiatry

    Years active at Yale: 1995-present

    Dr. Kaufman is being recognized for outstanding leadership and excellence in community-engaged research and evaluation and for teaching and mentoring. Dr. Kaufman has gained local, regional,and national recognition for her work that emphasizes strengthening community-based support and resources for children, youth, and families. More recently, Dr. Kaufman has become a trailblazer in the field of psychology in training mental health consumers on how to conduct community-based evaluations on the services they have received. At the core of her work is empowerment — giving voice to those who have been silenced or ignored.

  • Paula Kavathas

    Professor of Laboratory Medicine, of Immunobiology and of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology; Associate Chair for Academic Affairs, Laboratory Medicine - Education; Institutional Leader CIRTL Network; Chair, Women's Faculty Forum (2013-2017)

    Years active at Yale: 1986-present

    Dr. Kavathas is being recognized for excellence in research, teaching, and in promoting women’s issues at Yale. 

    Dr. Kavathas has been active in women’s issues as a member and former co-chair of SWIM and chair of the Women’s Faculty Forum (2013-2017). She has played a major role in an exhibition of portraits of Yale’s first women PhDs in Sterling library, a conference titled “Gender Rules,” publication of The View, a demographic analysis of the status of women at Yale, expansion of the Phyllis Bodel Childcare Center, and changes in parental leave policies. 

    Passionate about science literacy, for 18 years she headed a science outreach program with Yale grads and postdocs in the New Haven public schools and received an Elm/Ivy award for this work. During the past 11 years she has taught a freshman seminar on immunology and microorganisms, and a course for non-science majors on immunity and contagion. She is an institutional leader for a network of 42 universities training the next generation of faculty in STEM to improve science education.

    Dr. Kavathas has been a pioneer in defining new genes in the major histocompatibility region critical in pathogen recognition. She also developed a novel approach for cloning genes for such cell surface proteins as CD4 and CD8, which define the two major subsets of T cells. After joining the Yale faculty in 1986 she continued studies on the cell surface CD8 co-receptor proteins.

  • Barbara Kazmierczak

    Gustavus and Louise Pfeiffer Research Foundation M.D.-Ph.D. Program Director and Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbial Pathogenesis; Professor, Microbial Pathogenesis; Director, MD-PhD Program, Yale University

    Years active at Yale: 2001- present

    Dr. Kazmierczak is being recognized for her excellence in research, mentorship, and teaching. She displays encyclopedic knowledge in her field and in other medical/scientific fields. As director of Yale’s MD/PhD Program, she shows a sense of commitment and mentoring at a level achieved by only the finest physician-scientists.Her research program examines bacterial and host determinants that predispose to infection by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This opportunistic human pathogen is ubiquitous in soil and freshwater environments, but rarely infects immunocompetent hosts. By understanding the function and regulation of virulence factors that enable it to establish acute or chronic infections, as well as innate immune pathways that recognize and restrict Pseudomonas in a mammalian host, Dr. Kazmierczak hopes to improve our ability to treat infections caused by this multi-drug resistant pathogen.  Many of the discoveries that her group has made are generalizable to other “accidental” pathogens and have provided insight into how the innate immune system can distinguish between more and less virulent pathogens. Dr. Kazmierczak has received awards from the American Society of Clinical Investigation and the Infectious Disease Society of America.

  • Former YSM faculty

    Department: Department of Epidemiology and Public Health

    Years active at Yale: MPH Class of 1966; 1969-1983

    Dr. Kelsey, who received her MPH from Yale in 1966 and her PhD in epidemiology in 1969, is being recognized for her work in the epidemiology of diseases of the musculoskeletal system and of falls in older adults. She is the author of a textbook, Methods in Observational Epidemiology. Her students remember her as a teacher, mentor, counselor, and friend who inspired them in their careers in epidemiology. 

    After receiving her doctorate, Dr. Kelsey stayed at Yale as a faculty member for 14 years, leaving in 1983 to serve as head of the Division of Epidemiology at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. In 1991 she joined the faculty at Stanford University as chief of the Division of Epidemiology in the medical school. She was also a member of advisory committees and study sections for the National Institutes of Health and the Environmental Protection Agency.

    In 2000 she received the Distinguished Alumni Award from the Yale Department of Epidemiology and Public Health. She also received the Wilbur Cross Medal from Yale in 1995 and the American Public Health Association's John Snow Award in Epidemiology in 1991. She was an honorary fellow of the American College of Epidemiology.

  • Margaret Alice Kennard

    Former YSM faculty

    Years active at Yale: 1931-1943

    Dr. Kennard is being recognized for her significant role in the early years of developmental neuropsychology. With a recent MD from Cornell (1930) and a year of internship, Kennard first came to the Department of Physiology as an honorary research fellow in 1931-1932 and remained until 1943, but only reached the rank of assistant professor. She worked in the laboratory of John F. Fulton, MD, chair of the department, using primates as subjects both from the Fulton laboratory and from that of Gertrude Van Wagenen, PhD. Her experiments, complementing those of Fulton and his colleagues, were on behavioral responses to lesions in the cortex or sub-cortex of infant, juvenile, and adult primates. She examined which functions (such as limb movement, posture, grasping, and recall of learning) were hampered by lesions at different ages, and which functions were spared. She was especially interested in the neural mechanisms by which the brain partially compensated after lesions, and how her work could apply to brain- damaged pediatric patients. In 1942, Dr. Kennard passed the specialty boards in psychiatry and neurology and, after leaving Yale, held a succession of clinical positions. She served as president of the Society for Biological Psychiatry in 1956-1957. A conclusion she reached at Yale concerning brain plasticity in infants in particular cases was over-simplified in the 1970s to become widely known as the “Kennard Principle.”

  • Rasha Khoury

    Alumna

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 2008

    Dr. Khoury is being recognized for her commitment to clinical care of women affected by war and infectious disease. After her graduation from the School of Medicine, Dr. Khoury went to the University of California, San Francisco for a residency in obstetrics and gynecology, then to Harvard to obtain her public health degree. In 2014, she joined Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF), serving in Iraq, Ivory Coast, Lebanon, Sierra Leone, and most recently, in Afghanistan. In Afghanistan, she worked in a war zone, one of a few female doctors in Khost. While she was in Sierra Leone in 2014, MSF closed its maternity project to concentrate on the Ebola outbreak. Dr. Khoury is a Palestinian who grew up in East Jerusalem.

    “I was looking for a way to put all my skills to meaningful use,” she said in a blog post of her decision to join MSF, “to practice humanitarianism and to stand in solidarity with women and societies that have been eroded by war, poverty, and epidemics, yet simultaneously feared, much like my own society ... I was also looking for ways to be, what I felt I was, a citizen of the world.”

  • Alexa Kimball

    Alumna

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1994

    Dr. Kimballis being recognized for her leadership, clinical expertise, and mentorship. In 2016, she was named chief executive officer of Harvard Medical Faculty Physicians (HMFP) at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC).Kimball, a professor of dermatology at Harvard, is an international expert on psoriasis and hidradenitis suppurativa. She has published more than 250 peer-reviewed scientific papersand has been recognized for her research on physician workforce economics, quality of life and outcomes. In 2016, she was named Mentor of the Year by the Women’s Dermatologic Society. 

    HMFP is the physician group at BIDMC, with more than 1,200 Harvard Medical School faculty members working across 13 clinical departments. Dr. Kimball has also served as senior vice president and medical director of the Massachusetts General Physician Organization, whichemploys physicians affiliated with Massachusetts General Hospital, and vice chair of Dermatology at MGH.

  • Barbara Kinder

    Former faculty

    Department: Surgery

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1971; 1977-2004 

    Barbara Kinder, M.D., is recognized as a trailblazer in endocrine surgery and a champion for female surgeons at Yale. In her Yale class of 100 students, only eight students were women. During her residency in surgery, Dr. Kinder was one of the first two women to finish a general surgical residency here. Her mentors were men –luckily, men who thought that women were just as capable as men at performing surgery. She joined the Department of Surgery faculty in 1977, where men again championed her rise through the academic ranks. She was appointed as Chief of Surgical Service at the West Haven Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in 1989. At Yale, Dr. Kinder also helped develop the then-nascent field of endocrine surgery. From 1984 to 1990, she was the Chief of Endocrine Surgery, and from 1990 till her retirement in 2004 she was the William H. Car malt Professor of Surgery. In 1987, she won the Leah Lowenstein Award for medical student teaching. Dr. Kinder was a founding member of both the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons (where she served as president in 2001) and the International Association of Endocrine Surgery. For her efforts in mentoring other women in surgery, in 1996 Dr. Kinder received a Distinguished Member Award from the Association of Women Surgeons. As a member of the school’s admissions committee, she sought out applicants who were concerned about social justice.

  • Harriet Kluger

    Professor of Medicine (Medical Oncology); Director, Yale SPORE in Skin Cancer, Yale Cancer Center; Director, , Yale Immuno-Oncology Training Program; Associate Cancer Center Director for Education, Training and Faculty Development, Yale Cancer Center; Deputy Section Chief, Medical Oncology

    Years active at Yale: 2002-present

    Dr. Kluger is being recognized for excellence in the translation of basic science research into novel therapeutic clinical trials in the areas of metastatic melanoma and renal cell cancer. A tenacious advocate for the best clinical care for every patient, she inspires the same excellence in every member of the multidisciplinary team with whom she works. As a national leader in the field, her innovative ideas about how to manage patients with melanoma brain metastases has resulted in a significant improvement in their survival. Despite the current economic and personal challenges of practicing academic medicine, she remains a dedicated mentor for women in her field, allowing them to also follow along the same scholarly path.

  • Pinar Kodaman

    Assistant Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences; Director, Advanced Endoscopic Reproductive Surgery Program; Director, Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Elective

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 2001, PhD Class of 2001, 2008- present

    Dr. Kodaman is being recognized as an amazing clinician-surgeon, as well as a wonderful teacher and mentor. Those fortunate enough to have trained under her aspire to reach her level of patient-centered excellence.

  • Diane Krause

    Professor of Laboratory Medicine, of Cell Biology and of Pathology; Assoc. Director, Yale Stem Cell Center; Assoc. Director, Transfusion Medicine Service; Medical Director, Clinical Cell Processing Laboratory; Medical Director, Advanced Cell Therapy Laboratory

    Years active at Yale: 1997-present

    Dr. Krause is being recognized for her advances in the study of stem cells and how they may be used to fight and treat disease. Using bone marrow-derived stem and progenitor cells she studies the molecular mechanisms that regulate their self-renewal and differentiation. Her hope is to translate her findings to better strategies for bone marrow/stem cell transplantation, as well as for developing novel strategies for treating leukemia and lymphoma. 

    In her lab, Dr. Krause, the associate director of the Yale Stem Cell Center, is also trying to determine the extent to which marrow-derived cells can differentiate into epithelial cells and assess how this correlates with tissue damage, as well as the mechanisms by which it occurs. She is also studying the molecular mechanism(s) that regulate gene expression during normal and malignant hematopoiesis. 

    The Yale Stem Cell Center recently celebrated its first decade of research and discovery. With new faculty focusing on stem cells and dozens of researchers from more than 20 departments at Yale also working on stem cells, the center has created a strong stem cell community.

  • Chandrika Kumar

    Associate Professor Term; Associate Program Director, Clinical Fellowship in Geriatric Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 2009-present

    Dr. Kumar is being recognized for her contributions to the field of geriatrics. She is an outstanding clinician, teacher, mentor, and leader and she has inspired many junior trainees. She is deeply admired for her compassion and commitment to her patients and trainees.

  • Ann M Lacy

    Alumna

    Years active at Yale: PhD’59; 1954-1959 

    Dr. Lacy is being recognized for her contributions to microbiology and genetics research, and teaching, especially advocating for women's education. A pioneering woman in science, she was one of the few women to earn a PhD in her field in the 1950s. She was a professor of biological sciences and genetics at Goucher College from 1959 to 1998, focusing her research on the genetics of tryptophan biosynthesis, and was a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science among other honors. Her training and mentorship over the years enabled and inspired hundreds of women to pursue further training and careers in science.

  • Jill Lacy

    Professor of Medicine (Medical Oncology)

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1978; 1978-present

    Dr. Lacy is being recognized for her outstanding clinical care and research for cancer patients, her unstinting mentorship, and her steady leadership. Dr. Lacy, a 1978 graduate of YSM, is a professor of medicine in the section of oncology. She began her career as the AIDS crisis exploded, focusing her research on cancers related to the HIV and Epstein-Barr viruses. In recent years she also turned her attention to gastrointestinal and brain tumors, serving as principal investigator on dozens of clinical trials to combat these cancers. 

    Since 1997, she has served as director of the school’s Medical Oncology Fellowship Program, and since 2013 she has also been director of the combined Hematology-Oncology Fellowship Program. She is not only responsible for the educational content, but also devotes much of her time as an active lecturer and teacher in the program. As interim chief of medical oncology between 2001 and 2004, Dr. Lacy led a program that saw a 20 percent increase in clinical volume and a 50 percent increase in clinical trial accrual. She works on the GI Oncology Clinical Program to provide the best level of care for patients, including offering them clinical trials. 

    Beyond Yale, Dr. Lacy has served on numerous committees with the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and has worked with the group to recruit minority students. She has mentored many students who have moved on to some of the country’s upper-echelon research universities.

  • Suzanne Lagarde

    Former resident and fellow

    Years active at Yale: 1975-1980

    Dr. Lagarde is being recognized for her leadership role in the New Haven community and her advocacy for the underserved. She currently serves as CEO of Fair Haven Community Health Care, a Federally Qualified Health Center providing comprehensive health care to over 18,000 residents of southern Connecticut. In her four years at the helm of Fair Haven, she has overseen considerable growth, with the addition of several new clinical sites and new clinical services. She currently oversees the health center's efforts in practice transformation, transitioning from volume-based to value-based health care delivery.

    Dr. Lagarde has devoted her career to improving health care for the underserved. In acknowledgement of her many contributions, she has received numerous community service awards. In 2015, she was the recipient of the Healthcare Leadership and Innovator Award from the Connecticut State Medical Society, one of the medical society's highest recognitions. In 2018, she was honored with the American Cancer Society's Lane Adams Quality of Life Award, national recognition for work providing access to high-quality, compassionate care to the underserved.

  • Marie-Louise Landry

    Professor of Laboratory Medicine and of Medicine (Infectious Diseases); Director, Clinical Virology Laboratory; Director, Medical Studies; Vice Chair, Laboratory Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 1981-present

    Dr. Landry is being recognized for her advances in the field of virology and as an outstanding educator who has won multiple awards for her teaching. In her time at Yale she helped to establish the national Virology Reference Laboratory at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System. She also established the Clinical Virology Laboratory within the Department of Laboratory Medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital, considered one of the premier virology laboratories in the country. She has more than 180 publications on diagnostic testing, and serves as the main teacher of medical virology for Yale medical students. She has twice received the Bohmfalk Teaching Prize, given annually, as outstanding teacher of basic sciences at Yale. She was also named outstanding teacher of 2012 by Yale pathology and laboratory medicine residents.

  • Lucia Languino

    Former faculty

    Years active at Yale: 1994-2002 

    Dr. Languino is being recognized for contributions to cancer research. She joined Yale Pathology in 1994 as assistant professor and focused her studies on integrin-mediated mechanisms of cancer progression, obtaining an R29 NCI award, a DOD award, and the first of many NCI R01 awards. She was promoted to associate professor in 2000. In 2002, Dr. Languino moved to the Department of Cancer Biology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School as a tenured professor. Her expertise in signaling mediated by adhesion receptors, as well as in prostate cancer progression, was unique and offered a novel dimension to transduction and integration of regulatory signals. Dr. Languino has actively pursued translational aspects of prostate cancer research, focusing on the identification of integrin antagonists as potential molecular therapeutics in prostate cancer.

     At Sidney Kimmel Medical College, where she moved in 2010, Dr. Languino integrated her expertise with other scientists in the comprehensive Prostate Cancer Program. Dr. Languino has been a member and discussion leader of NCI panels and is a chartered member of the NIH Tumor Progression and Metastasis Study Section (2014-2018). Her scientific contributions have been internationally recognized in over 100 papers. Her efforts have been recognized by awards from the NCI, the Prostate Cancer Foundation, and by the Dean Transformational Award. Her most recent experiments on exosome-mediated cancer progression are recognized as high-impact studies investigating novel aspects of cancer biology. She is currently the Director of the Jefferson Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences PhD Program in Genetics, Genomics and Cancer Biology.

  • Yan Lee

    Assistant Professor of Surgery; Assistant Professor of Surgery (Otolaryngology); Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

    Years active at Yale: 2017-present

    Dr. Lee is being recognized for her excellence in clinical care and teaching. She is a member of the American Academy of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery and is involved with teaching residents and medical students. She has a strong interest in both aesthetic and reconstructive surgeries, including cosmetic and functional rhinoplasty, facial rejuvenation, eyelid surgery, repair of traumatic defects of the face and scalp, removal of skin cancers and MOHS reconstruction, and treatment for facial nerve paralysis. Much of her work focuses on patients who have been disfigured as a result of traumatic injury or disease and she is dedicated to helping them recover physically, as well as mentally. Her research interests include investigating biomarkers that correspond to the aging process, studying the effect of various cartilaginous autografts in functional and cosmetic rhinoplasty, and optimizing facial fracture management.

  • Former faculty

    Years active at Yale: 1973-84

    Dr. Lerner is being recognized as a mentor and researcher. She collaborated on basic biochemistry research with her husband, Aaron Lerner, MD, PhD, the chair of Dermatology. He credited her with coining the term melatonin to describe one of the hormones affecting skin pigmentation. She taught many students rotating in dermatology, and also precepted residents, all the while raising four sons. She and her husband were devoted supporters of student literary endeavors, including the second year show. Her career was tragically cut short by Alzheimer's Disease, and in her honor the Lerner family commissioned Julia Frank, MD ’77, to write a short book for teenagers: Alzheimer's Disease, The Silent Epidemic, which they published. The book contains an epilogue of Dr. Lerner's thoughts as her disease progressed, including, poignantly, her statement "I've lost a kingdom."

  • Rachel Liu

    Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine; Director of Point-of-Care Ultrasound Education for YSM

    Years active at Yale: 2012-present

    Dr. Liu is being recognized for her exceptional dedication to education, clinical care, and scholarship. One of her most important contributions to YSM is her lead in launching a longitudinal program for educating medical students in the use of point-of-care ultrasound. She led the Yale School of Medicine ultrasound student teammates at the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) National Ultrasound Competition, SonoSam, that placed in the top 10. Dr. Liu created these games in 2016 with a colleague from Ohio State, in an effort bring ultrasound into core curricular medical school education. Dr. Liu was also honored to receive the 2018 AIUM Carmine M. Valente Distinguished Service Award for the creation of the event and the impact it has in medical student education at the
    national level. Dr. Liu is a recognized leader in the field of emergency ultrasound, an outstanding mentor, and an exemplary role model for women physicians. She is currently chair of the American College of Emergency Physicians Emergency Ultrasound Section, and the immediate past-president of the Academy of Emergency Ultrasound
    in the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. Dr. Liu is the recipient of the 2015 YSM Charles W. Bohmfalk Teaching Prize and the Yale Rosenkranz Award for Pedagogical Innovation. In 2018, students selected her to win the YSM Francis Gilman Blake Award for outstanding teaching of the medical sciences.

  • Virginia LiVolsi

    Former faculty

    Department: Department of Pathology

    Years active at Yale: 1974-1983

    Dr. LiVolsi is being recognized for her clinical acumen as a pathologist. She has appeared multiple times in Philadelphia magazine's annual Top Docs issue, America's Top Doctors, and Best Doctors in America. She has also received numerous awards from professional societies for her mentoring, service, and research. At the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, she is director of the Office of Strategic Initiatives and Quality Improvement, anatomic pathology professor of otorhinolaryngology, head and neck surgery professor of pathology and laboratory medicine.

  • Xiaomei Ma

    Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); Co-Leader, Cancer Prevention and Control

    Years active at Yale: 2003-present

    Dr. Ma is being recognized for public health research, teaching, and mentoring. She is a professor at the Yale School of Public Health and co-leads the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Program at the Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center. As an epidemiologist, she studies the etiology and health outcomes of different types of cancer. Dr. Ma’s research has addressed the impact of immunological factors, chemical exposures, and genetic characteristics on the risk of cancer. In addition, she has assessed the patterns of care and cost implications of cancer screening and treatment in older adults. 

  • Sharmila Majumdar

    Former faculty

    Years active at Yale: PhD 1987; 1983-1989

    Dr. Majumdar is being recognized for her vision and leadership on a broad range of research projects in basic and clinical MRI. Dr. Majumdar began her career at Yale, first as a PhD student, then postdoc, and faculty member. She has published hundreds of papers in highly regarded journals; was awarded the prestigious Gold Medal award by the International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine; and has also received university-wide awards for her excellence in teaching. She is a professor and vice chair of research in the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging and professor in the Department of Bioengineering and the Department of Therapeutic Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco.

  • Cynthia Mann

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1976; 1976-present

    Dr. Mann is recognized for excellence in pediatric care and practice in the community as well as her decades of education of Yale medical students and residents. A 1976 graduate of the School of Medicine, she stayed on for a residency in pediatrics. On the first day of her residency, an attending physician said women “do not belong in medicine.” Two days later, a resident dropped out—a male, leaving Mann and another female resident to cover for him. Dr. Mann has been a tireless advocate for women and patients in her field ever since. For years she worked to promote healthcare for women, and with the American Academy of Pediatrics, has strongly supported the Children’s Health Insurance Program. 

    In addition to serving as an associate clinical professor of pediatrics at YSM, Dr. Mann is a much sought-after pediatrician in private practice in greater New Haven. She was the longtime chief of pediatrics at the Community Health Care Plan in New Haven and has also served as chief resident at Bridgeport Hospital. She continues to mentor Yale students and residents in her office.

  • Laura Manuelidis

    Professor of Surgery (Neuropathology); Section Chief Neuropathology (Surgery); faculty Virology and Neurosciences

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1967; 1967-present

    Dr. Manuelidis is being recognized for scientific innovation. She discovered major human DNA repeats, and showed they defined functionally specific chromosome domains. Her in-situ 3-D analyses revealed compact individual chromosome territories that changed the spaghetti-like concept of nuclear chromatin.These approaches are used in tumor diagnostics today. She also is known for substantial contributions to the transmission and pathogenesis of human Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), kuru, and other "slow viral" agents in small animal models. The latency and environmental spread of these infectious agents, and their destruction by nucleases, indicates they are viruses, rather than protein only (prions). She recently found and sequenced a new group of circular "SPHINX" DNAs from the mammalian brain; these and other hidden viral agents can participate in neurodegeneration and evolution. 

    Dr. Manuelidis was an advisor to Congress on Health and Human Services for Alzheimer’s and related dementias, served on other National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Food and Drug Administration, and Medical Research Council boards, was awarded the Chromosoma prize, and was an organizer of international genetics and other meetings in addition to teaching and working clinically as chief of service for many years. She has published poetry in magazines as well as two poetry books; see https://medicine.yale.edu/lab/manuelidis/poetry/.

  • Former faculty

    Departments: Internal Medicine, Laboratory Medicine

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1963; 1972-1997

    Dr. Marchesi is being recognized for seminal work on the blood protein involved with hemophilia. Her ability to isolate and characterize such a large protein enabled many clinical applications. Dr. Marchesi entered YSM in 1957 as one of five women in a class of 80. She interrupted her medical studies to do graduate work at Oxford University, where she studied the metabolism of Vitamin B12 and earned a D. Phil degree in 1961 before returning to Yale for her MD in 1963. She then spent the next four years first at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis and then at Montefiore Hospital in New York City. This was followed by a fellowship at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD, where she worked on the blood protein linked with hemophilia. 

    She returned to Yale in 1972 and spent the rest of her career focused on clinical hematology and clinical medicine. At Yale she turned her attention to the study of platelet glycoproteins that are part of the blood clotting mechanism and then began pioneering studies on mutant forms of structural proteins involved in hereditary eliptocytosis. Dr. Marchesi retired in 1997. She was known as both a critical thinker and a compassionate physician.

  • Bridget Martell

    Assoc Clinical Prof of Medicine

    Years Active at Yale: 1997-present

    Dr. Martell is being recognized for her excellence in teaching, leadership in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, expertise in developing drugs, and as a champion and mentor for women to become executive leaders in the “C-suite.” As a former member of the Yale medical house staff and chief resident in the Department of Medicine, she was the consummate teacher and mentor to younger house staff; even as she became notable in the pharmaceutical industry, she continued her teaching and precepting activities at Yale in the Preclinical Medical School Clerkship, as an attending at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System, and currently at the HAVEN Free Clinic. She started her clinical research career at Yale with a VA Career Development Award and was a faculty auditor of the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program and this is what ultimately inspired her to understand drug development holistically. She is an innovator and leader in her role as the founder and managing director of BAM Consultants, LLC, where she is a strategic/scientific advisor to many early and mid-stage biotechnology companies. Additionally, she is an Entrepreneur-in- Residence at the Yale Office of Cooperative Research, where she mentors those Yale Innovators with strong interests in the private sector. She is particularly important to the Yale residents whom she mentors through this terra incognita.

  • Kelsey Martin

    Alumna

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1992

    Dr. Martin is being recognized for her roles in research, teaching, mentoring,and administration.In July she was named dean of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Before her appointment as dean, she had served as interim dean, executive vice dean, and associate vice chancellor.

    Her lab integrates cell biological, molecular and electrophysiological approaches to understand how experience changes brain connectivity to store memories.

    Dr. Martin has been a leader in UCLA’s drive to promote cross-disciplinary cooperation among scientists in neuroscience and other brain-related research. She has received numerous awards, including a W.M. Keck Foundation Distinguished Young Scholar in Medical Research Program Award, the Jordi Folch-Pi Award from the American Society for Neurochemistry and the Daniel X. Freedman Award from the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression.After receiving a degree in English and American Language and Literature at Harvard she served as a Peace Corps volunteer in the Democratic Republic of Congo. She then entered the MD/PhD program at Yale, where she studied influenza virus-host cell interactions. She did her postdoctoral training in neurobiology at Columbia University, and joined the UCLA faculty in 1999.

    Dr. Martin is on the editorial board of Cell and the scientific advisory boards of the Burroughs Wellcome Career Awards in Medicine and the McKnight Scholar Awards.

  • Robin Masheb

    Senior Research Scientist in Psychiatry; Director, Veterans Initiative for Eating and Weight (The VIEW at VA CT)

    Years active at Yale: 1998-present

    Dr. Masheb is being recognized for her accomplishments in research and education in health psychology and behavioral medicine. She is currently director of the Veterans Initiative for Eating and Weight (The View), a program she founded in 2013 that serves as the first and only center dedicated to research and expert consultation for eating and weight in veterans. Her scholarly work has focused on advancing the fields of obesity, eating disorders, and pain for underserved populations. She has been awarded multiple NIH and VA grants focusing on the development of behavioral treatments to address these issues, and has over 140 peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Masheb is a fellow of both the American Psychological Association’s Division of Health Psychology, and the Society of Behavioral Medicine. She has been an active educator at the individual level training YSM medical students, graduate students, interns, and postdoctoral fellows; at the University level teaching in the classroom, and participating on multiple internship and postdoctoral training committees; and at the national level, serving as director of education for the VA PRIME Center of Innovation (COIN) located at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System.

  • Linda Mayes

    Arnold Gesell Professor of Child Psychiatry, Pediatrics and Psychology in the Yale Child Study Center; Chair, Yale Child Study Center; Special Advisor, Dean

    Years active at Yale: 1982-present

    Dr. Mayes is being recognized as a world-renowned scholar and researcher, as well as the director of the Yale Child Study Center. She is the Arnold Gesell Professor of Child Psychiatry, Pediatrics, and Psychology. She is on the directorial team of the Anna Freud Centre and is a special advisor to the dean. 

    She is also a professor of epidemiology and public health; Albert J. Solnit Integrated Training Program; Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training Program; Edward Zigler Center in Child Development and Social Policy; Drug Use, Addiction and HIV Research Scholars; Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Research Clinic; and Women’s Behavioral Health. 

    Dr. Mayes has been the recipient of numerous awards throughout her career, including the James Hudson Brown-Alexander Coxe Research Award at the Yale School of Medicine, and the Johnson and Johnson Advanced Pediatric Research Award. She serves on the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child and is the president of the Psychodynamic/Psychoanalytic Research Society. She is a fellow of the Bush Center on Social Policy.

  • Susan Mayne

    Former faculty

    Department: School of Public Health; Yale Cancer Center

    Years active at Yale: 1988-2015

    Dr. Mayne is being recognized for her studies of the role of nutrition in cancer etiology, and for her leadership in public health.Since January 2015, she has been the director of the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. She is passionate about food safety and the role of nutrition in public health, and is a champion of collaboration among academia, industry,and government to advance science for public health impact. 

    At Yale she was the CEA Winslow Professor and chair of the Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology at the School of Public Health, and associate director for population sciences at Yale Cancer Center. 

    Dr. Mayne also served two consecutive terms on the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academy of Sciences, and a five-year term on the Board of Scientific Counselors for the U.S. National Cancer Institute.She was on a nutrition advisory committee for the FDA, and has worked closely with other government agencies, including the U.S. Department of Agriculture, on developing practical applications of research.

  • Carolyn M. Mazure

    Norma Weinberg Spungen and Joan Lebson Bildner Professor in Women's Health Research and Professor of Psychiatry and of Psychology; Director, Women's Health Research at Yale

    Years active at Yale: 1982-present

    Dr. Mazure is being recognized for excellence in clinical science, expertise in women’s health, her leadership roles, and her advocacy for women. As the Norma Weinberg Spungen and Joan Lebson Bildner Professor in Women’s Health Research, and professor of psychiatry and psychology, she has been an active clinician, NIH-funded researcher, and director of psychiatry’s adult inpatient program at YNHH. 

    Her contributions in women’s health began with her own internationally recognized research in depression. Focusing on the gender differences in this disorder, she was the first to demonstrate how stress is a more potent pathway to depression in women than men, and to use these findings to inform treatment interventions. 

    Understanding the importance of gender differences in depression, combined with the recognition that such data are lacking in other fields, she created Women’s Health Research at Yale. Since its inception in 1998, the center has been recognized as a national model for launching research on the influence of sex and gender on human health, translating findings into practice, and providing mentored training. 

    This center has provided funding for more than 90 pilot projects in fields from cardiovascular disease to cancer. Fifty-five percent of the PIs are women—many of whom are junior or mid-level faculty whose careers were advanced with this support. 

    As associate dean for faculty from 2002 to 2014, Dr. Mazure initiated policies to support a growing faculty and advance equity for women.

  • Shirley McCarthy

    Professor Emeritus of Diagnostic Radiology

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1979; 1984-present

    Dr. McCarthy is being recognized for excellence in clinical care and science, leadership in her department and in women’s advocacy, and for outstanding mentoring. She graduated from YSM in 1979 after completing a PhD in mammalian physiology at Cornell University. Following her graduation from medical school, she completed a residency in diagnostic radiology, and a fellowship in cross sectional imaging at the University of California, San Francisco. She returned to Yale in 1984 as an assistant professor in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology, with a secondary appointment in obstetrics and gynecology. 

    As vice chair for academic affairs in her department, Dr. McCarthy promoted mentoring and helped junior faculty understand what it takes to be promoted. She has been awarded multiple Best Doctor awards, elected as a fellow in the International Society of Magnetic Resonance, and the Society of Body Computed Tomography. 

    She has been a long-time advocate for gender equity, co-organizing the senior women on the faculty in 1999 to produce the “Bill of Rights,” focusing on how to achieve gender equity. She served on the Committee on the Status of Women in Medicine for decades, co-chaired The Yale Women Faculty Forum. Under her watch, a University-wide committee was established to review cases of sexual harassment. She chaired the Medical School Council for years and has mentored numerous students, trainees and junior faculty. Dr. McCarthy became professor emeritus in 2016.

  • Diane McMahon-Pratt

    Professor Emeritus of Public Health

    Years active at Yale: 1985- present

    Dr. McMahon-Pratt is being recognized for her expertise in microbial diseases and for her leadership in seeking gender parity in pay and lab space at YSM. In 1995, she was named professor of public health and now holds emerita status. Her laboratory focuses on the parasitic protozoan, usually spread by tropical sand flies,that causes leishmaniasis.

    McMahon-Pratt has worked with labs in South America and around the world to find treatments as well as vaccines for leishmaniasis. She has organized workshops with tropical disease experts at the National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization. 

    McMahon-Pratt has earned many awards for her work, including the Bailey K. Ashford Medal from the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. In 2016, she was elected as a member of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering. At Yale, McMahon-Pratt has served on such committees as the Downs Fellowship and appointment and promotions panels. She was also member and vice-chair of the Status of Women in the School of Medicine. 

  • Jennifer McNiff

    Professor of Dermatology and Pathology; Director, Yale Dermatopathology Laboratory

    Years active at Yale: 1992-present

    Dr. McNiff is being recognized for being a leader and teacher in the field of dermatopathology. She has been a Yale faculty member since 1992 and director of the Yale Dermatopathology Laboratory since 1996. She was a past president of the American Society of Dermatopathology, an organization that is dedicated to improving the quality of dermapathology and the treatment of skin diseases. In 2011, Dr. McNiff received a national teaching award, the Walter R. Nickel Award for Excellence in Teaching of Dermapathology. She has given over 100 invited national and international lectures and courses. She has been on the editorial boards of several prominent dermatology and pathology journals. She has over 150 peer-reviewed publications and book reviews. Dr. McNiff has also been an active member of the Yale School of Medicine community. She has been a member of the Dean's Committee for Facutly Grievance; the Deans's Committee on Faculty Compensation; the Term Appointments and Promotion Committee; the Ethel F. Donaghue Women's Health Investigator Program Scientific Review Committee; Dean's Committee on Sexual Harassment; and co-chair of the Committee on the Status of Women in Medicine (SWIM) from 2006 to 2010.

  • Marcia Mecca

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Geriatrics)

    Years active at Yale: 2012-present

    Dr. Mecca is being recognized for her excellence as a clinician educator. In addition to providing outstanding general clinical geriatrics care, she tirelessly works to improve prescribing for older persons through her efforts to develop and disseminate a new model for addressing polypharmacy. The multidisciplinary clinic that she has developed both directly improves patient care and serves as a highly effective means for teaching trainees from multiple disciplines about appropriate medication prescribing.

  • Laura Ment

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neurology); Associate Dean for Admissions and Financial Aid; Director, START Program

    Years active at Yale: 1979 to present

    Dr. Ment is being recognized for her leadership roles at the School of Medicine and for her treatment of preterm patients with severe neurological problems.

    When she arrived at Yale to take up appointments in pediatrics and neurology, preterm infants were just starting to survive, but many had serious neurologic problems. Dr. Ment went on to become the associate dean of admissions and financial aid, but she’s always said that treating her patients was “the nicest job at Yale.” 

    Over the course of her career, Dr. Ment has won the Bernard Sachs Award from the Child Neurology Society and the Francis Gilman Blake Award from YSM. Children who were less than a day old when Dr. Ment treated them were imaged and tested for the next 20 years. To this day, she displays baby pictures, class photos, prom pictures and, most recently, pictures of her former patients as adults working at such places as a New York publishing house, the New Haven Police Department, and an airbase in Afghanistan. 

    Dr. Ment used innovative MRI studies to examine injury and recovery in the developing brain. These data have provided information about neural systems in the premature baby. But Laura says she’s most proud of the students she trained. “They’ve all done amazing things to help those most in need,” she said. 

  • Kathleen Ries Merikangas

    Former faculty

    Departments: Epidemiology and Public Health,Psychiatry and Psychology

    Years active at Yale: 1984-2003

    Dr. Merikangas is being recognized for a long and illustrious career. She is the author of more than 300 scientific publications with more than a thousand citations each. With her Yale colleague Neil Risch, PhD, she proposed the genome-wide case-control association that has led to the identification of genetic markers for hundreds of complex disorders. She was also the co-principal investigator of several large population studies of mental disorders in the United States and the World Mental Health Consortium that provided prevalence rates of mental disorders and their associations with physical conditions. 

    Dr. Merikangas also led the first nationally representative study of adolescent mental disorders in the United States. Her major research findings include: patterns of familial transmission of bipolar disorder and co-aggregation with substance use disorders; mental disorders as predictors of substance abuse disorders; sleep patterns and associations with health and function; and familial patterns of mania and depression in multigenerational family studies; dysregulation of motor activity as a core feature of bipolar disorder using mobile technologies. She’s been the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including the Rema Lapousse Award for contributions to mental health research, by the American Public Health Association; the Howard Rome Endowed Lecture, at the Department of Psychiatry at the Mayo Clinic; the Paul Hoch Award for Career Contribution to Research in Psychopathology Association; and the Prechter Endowed Lecture, at the Depression Research Center at the University of Michigan. Dr. Merikangas has been involved in the training and mentoring of young scientists. In recognition of her contribution to training at the National Institute of Mental Health, she received the 2015 Outstanding Mentor Award, in the NIMH Intramural Research Program.She has mentored more than 30 postdoctoral fellows or junior faculty, many of whom are now faculty at universities in the United States, Europe and Asia. 

    Currently she is the senior investigator and chief of Genetic Epidemiology Research Branch at the National Institute of Mental Health, as well as adjunct professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

  • Tandy Miller, PhD

    Former YSM Faculty

    Years active at Yale: 1994-2005

    Dr. Miller is being recognized for her contributions to the identification and prevention of psychosis and schizophrenia. She helped develop the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes and the Scale of Prodromal Symptoms, two key assessment instruments in the field for the diagnosis, and symptom rating, of "prodromal" symptoms (that is, precursors of psychotic disorders). She had an international reputation for her work with these instruments and was much in demand as a speaker and trainer. In addition, she was the principal developer of the PRIME Screen. Dr. Miller was also clinical director of PRIME, a specialized outpatient clinic at Yale School of Medicine that was one of the first of its kind to provide early detection and intervention for persons presenting with recently developing prodromal symptoms indicative of risk for serious, lifelong mental illness. In this role she was beloved by patients, families, and staff alike for her buoyant optimism and enthusiasm. She remained at Yale and PRIME until her untimely passing from breast cancer in 2005.

  • Brienne Miner

    Assistant Professor

    Years active at Yale: 2015-present

    Dr. Miner is being recognized for her excellence in clinical care, clinical science, and teaching and mentoring. Her clinical and teaching skills have inspired many trainees throughout her career and her commitment to her clinical research is also inspiring.

  • Mary Jane Minkin

    Medical Services Provider

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1975; 1979-present

    Dr. Minkin is being recognized for excellence in clinical care and in teaching and mentoring. As a resident at Yale New Haven Hospital she received the Betsy Winters teaching prize. While on faculty she was honored with the Francis Gilman Blake award from medical students in 1992. She won the Association for Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics teaching prize for resident training three times. In 2009, the Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame honored her in its celebration of “A New Century of Women in Healthcare.” 

    One of 20 women to graduate from YSM in 1975, she completed a residency at Yale—a year after the first woman completed that residency. M.J., as she is called, joined a private practice group and became a well-known obstetrician/gynecologist, sought after by patients and sitting on several important committees. As Minkin and her patients got older, her focus shifted from obstetrics to menopausal health care. She co-founded and co-directs the Sexuality and Intimacy Program at Smilow Cancer Hospital. She also launched a website, madameovary.com, for furthering care for women and educating providers. She has taught medical students and residents for decades.

  • Ruth Montgomery

    Professor; Director, Yale CyTOF Facility; Associate Dean for Scientific Affairs

    Years active at Yale: 1987-present

    Dr. Montgomery is being recognized her professional role at YSM and her research accomplishments. Her research addresses how individual variations contribute to disease susceptibility, specifically examining immune responses that result in divergent outcomes to infections. She has published new methods and collaborated in development of new statistical and computational approaches. She launched the CyTOF facility at Yale, led Yale’s first published reports using this technique, and recently acquired one of the country’s first imaging CyTOFs. As associate dean for scientific affairs, Dr. Montgomery supports informatics and computational analysis for translational research and facilitates access to the exceptional resources of our institution. 

    Dr. Montgomery came to Yale in 1987 as a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Cell Biology, after obtaining her PhD at Rockefeller University. Her project then was on endocytosis in macrophages full of indigestible material. 

    She serves annually as a judge for the statewide high school science fair, is an elected Councilor of the Society of Leukocyte Biology, and associate editor of Nature Molecular Phenomics.

  • Laura Morrison

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Geriatrics); Director of Hospice and Palliative Medicine Education and Director, Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship

    Years active at Yale: 2013-present

    Dr. Morrison is being recognized for her excellence in clinical teaching and mentorship. She impresses those with whom she works with her compassion, her desire for excellence, and above all her integrity. As the inaugural Director of Palliative Care Education, she has lead the educational programs in palliative medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital and Yale School of Medicine, including developing and leading the first Yale Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship Program, which welcomed its first fellows in July 2015. This program has developed into a nationally recognized model, thanks to Dr. Morrison's leadership and ongoing reach for improvement and excellence. She has demonstrated an endless commitment to growing the educational program through individualized mentorship of fellows, as well as numerous trainees, peers, and colleagues. Her educational program aimed at helping providers improve their serious illness communication skills is a key part of many training programs at Yale, including the medicine residency, and the oncology, critical care and pulmonary, geriatrics and palliative medicine fellowship programs. Dr. Morrison is a national leader in palliative medicine education. She has contributed to hospice and palliative medicine training, with roles in the creation of the Hospice and Palliative Medicine competencies, entrustable professional activities, curricular milestones, and in defining new ACGME reporting milestones for interpersonal and communication skills across specialties.

  • Karla M Neugebauer

    Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry and of Cell Biology

    Years active at Yale: 2013-present

    Dr. Neugebauer is being recognized as one of the foremost researchers on the biology of RNA, in particular RNA splicing. Important contributions include the roles of SR proteins in alternative splicing, the assembly of splicing factors in Cajal bodies, and the tight coupling, both spatial and temporal, of splicing with transcription. She is an elected member of the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO). Dr. Neugebauer has strongly promoted the advancement of women through the initiation and management of the Women in Life Science database, which has significantly increased the participation and recruitment of women to conferences, review panels, and academic positions in Europe, as well as through her membership on panels and committees at Yale and beyond. 

  • Christine Ngaruiya

    Assistant Professor

    Years active at Yale: 2013-present

    Dr. Ngaruiya is being recognized for her scientific research on global, noncommunicable diseases, and her commitment to raising public awareness about public health issues. She participated in the nationally renowned program, Public Voices, publishing articles in multiple media outlets, including Time and the Huffington Post, on topics pertaining to science and academia. She is a recipient of the Hecht-Albert Pilot Innovation Award for Junior Faculty as well as the Yale University Provost Faculty Development Fund. She is an outstanding role model, especially for women and international students, and advises medical students, residents, and fellows. During her tenure on the faculty at Yale, she has mentored trainees at the Schools of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, as well as Quinnipiac University.

  • Linda Niccolai

    Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases); Director, Development Core at Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS; Director, HPV Working Group at Yale; Co-Director, CT Emerging Infections Program at Yale

    Years active at Yale: 2002-present

    Dr. Niccolai is being recognized for her excellence in research. She was responsible for a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendation that young children receive annual flu vaccinations. In 2003, she led a research surveillance team to track influenza hospitalizations of young children. They discovered that nearly three-quarters of those admitted to the hospital were otherwise healthy and were not in a group recommended to receive the vaccine. Four of the five children who ultimately died of the flu had not been immunized.

    Last year, Dr. Niccolai received a $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to monitor the effectiveness of the HPV vaccine. Although the vaccine is recommended for both boys and girls at ages 11 and 12, some clinicians and parents choose to delay administering the vaccine. This may increase the risk of sexually transmitted infection. The results of the NIH study have the potential to help guide new strategies that will encourage parents to vaccinate their children before they become sexually active.

    Dr. Niccolai is the director of the Development Core at the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS and the director of the HPV Working Group at Yale. She co-directs the Connecticut Emerging Infections Program, a collaboration between the Yale School of Public Health and the Connecticut Department of Public Health.

  • Laura Niklason

    Nicholas Greene Professor of Anesthesiology and Professor of Biomedical Engineering; Division Chief; Vice Chair, Research

    Years active at Yale: 2006-present

    Dr. Niklason is being recognized for her outstanding research. Her research focuses primarily on regenerative strategies for cardiovascular and lung tissues. Dr. Niklason’s engineered blood vessels are currently in clinical trials, and are the first life-sustaining engineered tissue to be studied in any Phase III trial. Her lab was also one of the first to describe the engineering of whole lung tissue that could exchange gas in vivo, and this work was cited in 2010 as one of the top 50 most important inventions of the year by Time Magazine. She was inducted into the National Academy of Inventors in 2014, and was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2015.

  • Marcella Nunez-Smith

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medicine) and of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); Director, Equity Research and Innovation Center; Director, Center for Research Engagement; Core Faculty, National Clinician Scholars Program; Deputy Director of Health Equity Research and Workforce Development, Yale Center for Clinical Investigation; Director, Yale-Commonwealth Fund Fellowship

    Years active at Yale: 2006 -present

    Dr. Nunez-Smith is being recognized for excellence and leadership in clinical research as well as leadership at YSM as an academic advisor. In addition to her teaching roles, she is deputy director of the Yale Center for Clinical Investigation, and core faculty for the National Clinician Scholars Program at the Yale School of Medicine. An associate professor in general internal medicine and in chronic disease epidemiology and social behavioral sciences at the School of Public Health, she is also the founding director of the Equity Research and Innovation Center (ERIC). 

    Research at ERIC focuses on promoting health and healthcare equity for disparity populations with an emphasis on developing healthcare workforce diversity, developing patient reported measurements of healthcare quality, and identifying regional strategies to reduce the global burden of non-communicable diseases. A core mission of ERIC is to lead and support community engaged research and promote innovative mixed methods approaches. Dr. Nunez-Smith is the lead principal investigator on several NIH and foundation-funded grants and serves as a standing member and alternate chair of the Health Disparities and Equity Promotion study section for NIH. 

    Originally from the United States Virgin Islands, she attended Jefferson Medical College, where she was inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society, and she earned a BA in biological anthropology and psychology at Swarthmore College.

  • Former faculty

    Department: Psychiatry

    Years active at Yale: 1969-2009

    Dr. Oberkirch is being recognized for treating adolescents and adults, patients struggling with addiction, and those with a history of committing violent crimes. She co-directed the Office for Women in Medicine, the affirmative action wing of the office of the dean of YSM. That office was instrumental in helping ensure that women’s salaries were commensurate with men’s. 

    Dr. Oberkirch also worked at the Connecticut Mental Health Center and then at Whiting Forensic Institute in Hartford, where she treated people with a history of violent crime. She started a private practice after she completed her residency. For years, she has been on the clinical faculty as an assistant professor, treating patients for half a day each week. Dr. Oberkirch is also known for her artwork, some of which is on display on the fourth floor of the new Ronald McDonald House.

  • Mary O'Connor

    Professor of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation; Director, Center for Musculoskeletal Care

    Years active at Yale: 2015-present

    Dr. O’Connor is being recognized for her efforts to promote diversity in orthopedic surgery and address health care disparities in musculoskeletal care. Before joining Yale as the inaugural director of the Center for Musculoskeletal Care in 2015, Dr. O'Connor had numerous leadership roles at Mayo Clinic and as president of the International Society of Limb Salvage, the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons, the Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons, and the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society. She has chaired the Movement is Life Executive Committee since its creation nine years ago, a multi-stakeholder group devoted to health equity for musculoskeletal patients.

  • Stephanie O'Malley

    Elizabeth Mears and House Jameson Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Division of Substance Abuse Research in Psychiatry; Deputy Chair, Clinical Research

    Years active at Yale: 1984-present

    Dr. O’Malley is being recognized for her contributions to the understanding of substance abuse. A professor of psychiatry and director of the Division of Substance Abuse Research in Psychiatry, her research interests include alcoholism, psychiatry, smoking, substance-related disorders, and risk reduction behavior. The goal of her laboratory is to develop efficacious treatments for alcohol use disorders and nicotine dependence and to provide the scientific case for the regulation of tobacco products. She has published numerous studies in peer-reviewed journals. Dr. O’Malley’s study on the efficacy of naltrexone was pivotal to the approval of naltrexone by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of alcoholism in 1994. 

    She is affiliated with numerous organizations that share her interest in substance abuse, addiction, and other mental health issues. They include the Center for Nicotine and Tobacco Use Research at Yale, the Connecticut Mental Health Center: Division of Substance Abuse, and Yale Cancer Center, among many others. 

    She is the recipient of awards including the Sidney J. Blatt Award from the Psychology section of the Department of Psychiatry and the Presidential Citation for Leadership and Research in the Field of Addiction, given by the American Psychological Association. She’s an elected member of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering and the recipient of the Betty Ford Award in 2008.

  • Jennifer Ouellet

    Assistant Professor

    Years active at Yale: 2012-present

    Dr. Ouellet is being recognized for her commitment to education and clinical care. She joined the Geriatric fellowship program in 2015. She was a fantastic fellow who later on went to complete a clinician educator year. She thrives in educating the next generation of medical and surgical residents in geriatric concepts of patient-centered interprofessional care. Her caring, eagerness, and enthusiasm in providing excellent care is visible through an increase in consult requests by medical and surgical colleagues.

  • Former faculty

    Department: Internal Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 1963-2006

    Dr. Papac, a professor emeritus of medical oncology, is being recognized for her contribution as a pioneer in cancer research as well as being a teacher and mentor to generations of accomplished physicians. She was one of the first women to be awarded tenure in the Department of Internal Medicine. Dr. Papac played a pivotal role in developing contemporary concepts of cancer chemotherapy.

  • Shefali Pathy

    Assistant Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences; Medical Director YNH Women's Center, Yale-New Haven Hospital Primary Care Center; Clerkship Director, Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences

    Years active at Yale: MPH ’97; 2008-present

    Dr. Pathy is being recognized for being a tireless advocate for medical students and for the women of New Haven. She has spent her entire career working in an urban health setting as well as in an active role teaching medical students and Ob/Gyn residents. She currently serves as the Ob/Gyn clerkship director at Yale School of Medicine and the Medical Director of the Yale New Haven Hospital Women's Center.

  • Melissa Perkal

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Trauma); Director of Surgical Preceptor Program

    Years active at Yale: 1984-present

    Dr. Perkal is recognized for her surgical, teaching, and service skills, and for improving treatment for veterans. Dr. Perkal is an associate professor of surgery at the Yale School of Medicine. Since 2003, she has served as director of the surgical intensive care unit and assistant chief of surgery at the West Haven Veterans Administration Hospital. She has studied not only how best to treat her patients, but also how to communicate better with them. She is a member of the executive committee of the Association of VA Surgeons and an abstracts reviewer for the American Geriatric Society. 

    At Yale, Dr. Perkal has served as president of the Yale Surgical Society and as assistant director for the Medical Student Surgical Clerkship Program. She has won the Betsy Winters Outstanding House Staff Teaching Award as well as the Department of Surgery’s Edward Storer Outstanding Teacher Award. In 2002, she was made a member of the Yale Society of Distinguished Teachers. Dr. Perkal has delivered lectures on women and surgery training at Yale and on withdrawing care. She is focused on improving patient care and on teaching surgical residents about geriatric issues.

  • Ismene Petrakis

    Professor of Psychiatry; Chief of Psychiatry, VA Connecticut Healthcare System

    Years active at Yale: 1992-present

    Dr. Petrakis is being recognized for her contributions to our understanding of addiction, primarily alcohol use disorders with and without comorbidity of such psychiatric illnesses as posttraumatic stress disorders. Her research focus is on finding treatments for patients with a dual diagnosis and understanding the neurobiological mechanisms underlying alcohol dependence comorbidity. 

    Dr. Petrakis, a professor of psychiatry and director of the Mental Health Service Line at the VA Connecticut Health Care System, is also the director of the Addiction Psychiatry Residency at Yale and principal investigator of a National Institute of Drug Abuse postdoctoral training program. She is the founding director of the VA Interprofessional Addiction Fellowship. She has had grant funding from National Institutes of Health, the Veterans Administration, the Department of Defense and such foundations, as the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression to conduct clinical trials as well as human laboratory research. She works closely with other agencies that share her interests, including the Center for the Transactional Neuroscience of Alcoholism, the VA PTSD National Center, and the Connecticut Mental Health Center, among many others.

  • Melinda Pettigrew

    Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

    Years active at Yale: 2002-present

    Dr. Pettigrew is being recognized for her clinical leadership in fighting microbial resistance, her key role in steering the academic course of the School of Public Health, and for working to make Yale a haven for female scholars. Pettigrew is a professor of epidemiology (microbial diseases). She was named senior associate dean for academic affairs for the School of Public Health in 2017 after serving as associate dean since 2011. In these positions, Pettigrew has overseen the school’s curriculum development and has helped Yale stand out and attract the brightest future leaders in public health. She developed the flagship course in her research specialty, infectious diseases, and is a committed teacher and academic advisor. 

    Pettigrew is an expert on Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, chief causes of bacterial infections that are often treated with antibiotics. She has won national acclaim for her role in the Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group, a group of NIH-funded scientists that set the research agenda for stemming the growing threat of antibiotic resistance. Pettigrew works to ensure that special populations, like immunosuppressed patients and ethnic minorities, get proper representation in clinical trials. She serves as the school’s Title IX coordinator, addressing complaints about gender-based discrimination and sexual misconduct. She sits on the executive board of the medical school’s Committee on the Status of Women in Medicine.

  • Marina Picciotto

    Charles B. G. Murphy Professor of Psychiatry and Professor in the Child Study Center, of Neuroscience and of Pharmacology; Deputy Chair for Basic Science Research, Dept. of Psychiatry; Deputy Director, Kavli Institute for Neuroscience

    Years active at Yale: 1996-present

    Dr. Picciotto is being recognized for her accomplishments in research and leadership. She was elected to the National Academy of Medicine, is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, past Treasurer of the Society for Neuroscience, and past President of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. She serves as editor in chief of the Journal of Neuroscience

    The Picciotto laboratory identified the primary receptor required for nicotine reward and addiction. Dr. Picciotto also discovered a role for acetylcholine and its receptors in behaviors related to anxiety and depression in the mouse and translated that work with colleagues in the Department of Psychiatry to identify abnormalities in cholinergic signaling in depressed patients. In addition, she identified the receptor responsible for nicotine’s ability to decrease appetite and has identified molecular mechanisms underlying long term effects of developmental nicotine exposure. These studies have contributed to medications in development for addiction, anxiety, and other disorders.

  • Margaret Pisani

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary); Co-Director Sleep in the ICU Task Force

    Years active at Yale: MPH' 01; 2001-present

    Dr. Pisani is being recognized as a mentor, program director, master clinician, and clinical researcher. She is a leader nationally, through her work within the American College of Chest Physicians, and locally, as the former program director of Yale's Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine program a position she held for 10 years. In this context, she has mentored countless postgraduate learners. She is widely considered a "jack-of-all-trades," as she has mentored research projects in a diverse range of topics ranging from interventional pulmonology to community-engaged qualitative research. Dr. Pisani is a national expert in delirium critical care settings.

  • Mary Polan

    Professor of Clinical Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1975; 1970-1990

    Dr. Polan is being recognized for her talent in combining rigorous scientific research with a humanistic clinical approach in a career that has spanned women's health, clinical medicine, medical education and governmental organizations. Dr. Polan earned a PhD in molecular biophysics and biochemistry in 1970, followed by a medical degree from YSM in 1975, then residency and a fellowship in reproductive endocrinology. In 2001, she earned a master’s of public health degree in the Maternal and Child Health Program at the University of California, Berkeley.

    She was at YSM until 1990, with intervals as a visiting professor in Iran in 1978 and China in 1986. In 1990, she moved to Stanford University School of Medicine, where she was chair of the department of obstetrics and gynecology and is the Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor until 2005. 

    Dr. Polan has published more than 130 articles, chapters, and books. At Stanford her focus has been on reproductive endocrinology and infertility and on gene expression patterns in uterine fibroids. Recently, she organized a team of surgical volunteers to travel to Eritrea to help repair damage caused by prolonged labor during childbirth. 

    The National Institutes of Health appointed Dr. Polan co-chair of the Task Force on Opportunities for Research on Women's Health in 199. From 1995 to 1998, she was a member of the Director's Panel on Clinical Research and was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1993. Dr. Polan also serves on the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and the American Medical Women's Association. She is a Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  • Carol Portlock

    Former faculty

    Dr. Portlock is being recognized as a pioneer in understanding the natural history of low grade lymphoma. As well, she was a wonderful mentor to women in oncology.

  • Alumna

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1983

    Dr. Poussaint is being recognized as an outstanding academician, clinical researcher, and clinician. She is professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and director of neuro-oncologic imaging in the Boston Children’s Hospital Department of Radiology. She serves as director of the Pediatric Neuroradiology Fellowship. She is also chair of the Boston Children’s Hospital Institutional Review Board.

    Dr. Poussaint is principal investigator and director of the Neuroimaging Center of the NIH-funded Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium. She has special expertise in the imaging of normal brain development and maturation, as well as numerous neurologic diseases affecting the fetus, newborn, child, and adolescent. In her leadership roles, she has focused on refining MR imaging methods for the diagnosis and treatment of brain tumors in children.

    Dr. Poussaint received the American Society of Pediatric Neuroradiology’s Gold Medal Award, which is awarded to recognize exceptional service, achievements, professional, and personal excellence. This award honors superb pediatric neuroradiologists, scientists, physicians, and mentors who are also truly outstanding people.

    She received her medical degree from Yale School of Medicine with honors. After an internship in pediatrics at Yale New Haven Hospital, she completed residency training in diagnostic radiology and a fellowship in neuroradiology at Massachusetts General Hospital. She served on the neuroradiology faculty at Massachusetts General Hospital, and then joined the faculty at Boston Children’s Hospital as an attending neuroradiologist. She is a member and past vice-chair of the Harvard Medical School Faculty Council and a member of the HMS Subcommittee of Professors.

  • Manju Prasad

    Professor of Pathology; Director, Endocrine, Head & Neck Pathology; Director, Immunohistochemistry Laboratory; Director, Endocrine, Head and Neck Pathology Fellowship

    Years active at Yale: 2009-present

    Dr. Prasad is being recognized for her excellent contributions to patient care, clinical science, and teaching. Dr. Prasad completed her medical education in Varanasi, India. She trained and practiced as a pathologist in her native country for 12 years before immigrating to the U.S., where she retrained for board certification in Anatomic and Clinical Pathology at the New York Presbyterian Hospital of Cornell University. She became an oncologic surgical pathology fellow at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center for two years, concentrating on head and neck pathology during the second year.

    Dr. Prasad joined Yale in 2009 and started the Endocrine, Head and Neck subspecialty program. She continues to be the director of the program which supports an ACGME-accredited fellowship. Dr. Prasad has devoted her entire professional career to the study of malignancies of the endocrine and head and neck organs, publishing nearly 100 peer-reviewed scholarly articles, book chapters, reviews, and letters. She has published extensively on primary melanomas of the sun-protected head and neck mucosa. Currently, Dr. Prasad is involved in genotype-phenotype correlation in thyroid cancers. Her group published that a single point mutation in BRAF V600E was the most common mutation in papillary thyroid microcarcinomas and that children with thyroid cancers were far more likely than adults to have large translocations involving genes such as RET, NTRK1, NTRK3 and ETV6. Dr. Prasad is a contributor to two of the World Health Organization’s Blue Books on endocrine tumors and on head and neck tumors. She is a past-president of the North American Society of Head and Neck Pathology.

  • Deborah Proctor

    Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases); Medical Director, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Program; Site Director, Universidad del Valle, Cali, Columbia and Yale/Stanford, Johnson and Johnson Global Health Scholar Program; Board of Directors and Treasurer, Honduras Children's Project

    Years active at Yale: 1998-present

    Dr. Proctor is being recognized for her leadership role in both clinical and teaching expertise. In her clinical role, she started and continues to lead the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Program at Yale. In her teaching and mentoring roles, she reinstated the national GI fellowship matching program and other fellowship programs followed suit. Her leadership within gastroenterology is nationally recognized by her election to the board of the American Gastroenterological Association.

  • Former faculty

    Dr. Provence is being recognized as a pioneer in developmental pediatrics. She was a major member of Ernst Kris' research team in the 1950s that was involved in the groundbreaking psychoanalytic study of firstborn children. Along with Rose Coleman Lipton, she wrote Infants in Institutions: A Comparison of Their Development with Family-Reared Infants During the First Year of Life in the early 1960s, which presented research on standard adoption nurseries that soon led to their being revamped or closed. She was an early childhood authority nationally and internationally. She became a full professor at the Child Study Center in the mid 1960s, long after most men of similar age and accomplishment.
  • Elena Ratner

    Associate Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences; Co-Chief, Section of Gynecologic Oncology

    Years active at Yale: 2004-present

    Dr. Ratner is being recognized for her contributions to YSM across clinical science, teaching and mentoring, women's health advocacy, leadership, and most of all clinical care and expertise. Her patients admire her for many things: her clinical/surgical acumen, her humanity for and commitment to her patients, and the breadth of her dedication to the field of gynecologic oncology and cancer survivors. She is the co-chief of the Section of Gynecologic Oncology, co-director of Discovery to Cure (a research and education arm of Yale’s gynecologic oncology practice), director of Discovery to Cure Early Ovarian Cancer Detection program, and a founder and director of the Sexuality, Intimacy, and Menopause Program. She also conducts research in her lab developing targeted drugs for ovarian cancer. 

  • Carrie A Redlich

    Professor of Medicine (Occupational Medicine); Director, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1982; MPH Class of 1988; 1983-present

    Dr. Redlich is being recognized her for accomplishments in clinical science and for her efforts on behalf of women at YSM. Dr. Redlich is trained in internal medicine, pulmonary medicine, and occupational and environmental medicine. She served on ELAM –Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine from 2014 –2015, the Ad Hoc Task Force on Gender Equity at the Yale School of Medicine from 2014 –2015 and SWIM from 2015 to present. Her clinical practice and research interests focus on occupational and environmental lung diseases, in particular work-related asthma, and health effects and prevention of exposure to isocyanates, chemicals widely used to produce polyurethane foams and coatings and other products. 

  • Eleanor Reid

    Assistant Professor

    Years active at Yale: 2015-present

    Dr. Reid is being recognized for her innovative global palliative care research and implementation. She has contributed nationally and internationally to our understanding of the important role of palliative care in emergency departments, as well as its cost effectiveness, through presentations at conferences such as the International Association of Geriatrics and Gerontology World Conference and the New England Regional Meeting of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. She is an integral component of emergency medicine development at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda and she is a mentor and research advisor to emergency medicine residents in Mbarara, Uganda. She has authored multiple chapters for the African Federation for Emergency Medicine
    handbook, and taught the World Health Organization’s Basic Emergency Care course in Kampala.

  • Anna Reisman

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medicine); Director, Program for Humanities in Medicine; Director, Yale Internal Medicine Residency Writers' Workshop

    Years active at Yale: 1999-present

    Dr. Reisman is being recognized for her superb leadership and teaching in the humanities and medicine, and especially in writing and medicine. She received her BA in English from Yale and her MD from NYU School of Medicine. She was instrumental in the development of the Yale Internal Medicine Residency Writers’ Workshop and has co-directed the highly popular workshop, along with Lisa Sanders, MD, for many years. They have taught the craft of writing to more than 150 residents, many of whom have gone on to publish narratives and essays is a variety of journals and other publications.

    Dr. Reisman initiated and directs a series of Op-Ed Writing Workshops for the Yale MD and Nurse Practitioner residents at the Connecticut VA’s Center of Excellence in Primary Care Education, as well as for the Yale National Clinician Scholars Program. Since 2015, she has directed the Program for Humanities in Medicine and has mentored medical students who have initiated programs in the arts, writing, and humanities. She is faculty director of the unique near-peer-led Reflective Writing Workshops which were implemented into the clerkship curriculum in 2016. Dr. Reisman is an extraordinarily generous and effective writing mentor for many students, residents, fellows, and faculty, and has received the Department of Medicine’s Faculty Achievement Award in Education. She has published nearly 100 essays, reviews, and commentaries in a wide variety of medical and lay media.

  • Caroline A. Riely

    Former Faculty

    Years active at Yale: 1975-1988

    Dr. Riely is being recognized for her professional accomplishments in all facets of academia. She moved quickly from a laboratory-based career to a vocation in consummate empathetic patient care and clinical scholarship. Her strong advocacy of women and family health and welfare was reflected in her studies of liver disease in pregnancy and pediatrics, and in promotion of the gender-specific impacts of decompensated liver disease, and of sexuality and its emotional importance for both genders after liver transplantation. An adult hepatologist by training, she was an autodidact in liver disease in children, and earned the respect of a growing cadre of pediatric hepatologists. Her seminal and landmark observations in Alagille syndrome were rewarded by spending a six-month sabbatical with famed pediatric hepatologist, Daniel Alagille. 

    Dr. Riely had a scholarly interest in all things hepatological, including genetic metabolic disorders, viral hepatitis (especially hepatitis C and its treatment), occupational liver disease, fatty liver disease, and liver transplantation. She participated fully in the governance and public face of hepatology, she held office in many local and national committees, and participated regularly in grant reviews. Accordingly, she acquired recognition, and many honors and awards. She was a member of a dozen professional societies, and was for a long time Women's Health Representative for the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease, and a councilor-at-large to the association. Her sense of humor, practicality, and calm demeanor reduced the angst level of the proceedings. She mentored fellows and graduate students at Yale and in Memphis, was a frequent reviewer of articles, and a popular invitee to lecture in Europe, South America, South Africa, and Australia, as well as in North America.

  • Rita Rienzo

    Assistant Professor in the Physician Associate Program, Department of Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 1998-present

    Rita Rienzo is being recognized for her excellence in medical education and mentoring, and for her leadership role in the Physician Associate Program. After graduating with an MMSc. from Emory University in 1994, Rienzo worked as a physician assistant on the surgical service at Yale New Haven Hospital (YNHH) for five years, a role that gave her a chance to both role model excellent surgical care as well as mentor and teach other PA and medical students in surgery. Her leadership in medical education was quickly recognized, and in 2003, she became the manager for all physician associates in surgery at YNHH. 

    In 2007, she joined the PA faculty as an assistant professor. As the clinical coordinator for that program, she spends most her time managing the clinical curriculum as well as counseling PA students. She was the recipient of YSM’s Medical Education Fellowship in 2011-2012. Her expertise in medical education for physician assistants has been recognized with invitations to give talks regionally, nationally, and internationally. She has been honored for her outstanding teaching with several awards, including the Physician Assistant Education Association Rising Star Award in 2008. She has been a multiple recipient of the Jack Cole Society Award presented by the graduating PA class, most recently in 2016.

  • Marie Robert

    Professor of Pathology

    Years active at Yale: 1994-present

    Marie Robert is being recognized for her expertise in pathology and within the Yale community for her leadership and advocacy for women. A specialist in the causes of gastrointestinal, liver, and pancreatic diseases, she has many decades of experience in teaching and partnering with colleagues to improve the diagnosis and treatment of these diseases. Dr. Robert is currently an active research leader and collaborator in the departments of pathology, medicine (digestive diseases, oncology), surgery, and immunobiology. She served for 10 years as the director of the program in gastrointestinal pathology and director of the fellowship in gastrointestinal pathology at Yale. She founded the National Gastrointestinal Pathology Study Group in 1997, a research group of GI pathologists at major U.S. academic institutions. She has served as the president of the Rodger C. Haggitt Gastrointestinal Pathology Society, the national organization representing academic GI pathologists. 

    She also sat on the education committee of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology and Surgical Pathology Committee and of the College of American Pathology, both leading organizations in the field. At Yale, Dr. Robert chaired the Status of Women of Medicine Committee from 2015 to 2017, working closely with the committee of senior women leaders and YSM leadership to improve equality. Under her watch, several key initiatives were established. These include creating the Faculty Advisory Council, providing equal representation by women on search committees and governance boards, and establishing goals of parity for women faculty in recruitment, retention, promotion, and resource allocation.

  • Sara Rockwell

    Professor Emeritus of Therapeutic Radiology; Associate Dean for Scientific Affairs

    Years active at Yale: 1974-present

    Dr. Rockwell is being recognized for being at the forefront of radiation biology research and teaching. She taught radiation biology, pharmacology, cancer biology, ethics, and career development skills in several Yale courses and lecture series. Her laboratory research focused on studying the unphysiological microenvironments of cells within solid tumors, with the goal of improving the treatment of cancer. She was among the first researchers to study the effects of hypoxia on the response of malignant cells in culture and solid tumors in vivo to radiation, anticancer drugs, and combined modality therapy and among the first to consider the implications of the hypoxia found in microscopic tumors for the development and evolution of solid malignancies. The results of this research have been published in over 200 scientific publications and presented in over 250 papers at national and international scientific meetings. Professor Rockwell has received numerous awards for her educational and research activities, including election to membership in the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering and selection as a Fellow of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

  • Naomi Rogers

    Professor in the History of Medicine and of History

    Years active at Yale: 1994-present

    Dr. Rogers is a professor in the Section of the History of Medicine and the Program in the History of Science and Medicine (Yale School of Arts and Sciences), where she teaches undergraduates, graduate students, and medical students. She has given lectures to medical students on the history of intersex, paying for medical care, medical student activism, and doctors, disease and nutrition.Her historical interests include the history of disease; gender and health; disease and public health; disability; medicine and film; and alternative medicine in 19th and 20th century America. She was recently invited to lecture on the history of polio at Birkbeck College, University of London, and at the Casa Oswaldo Cruz in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. At Yale, she has courtesy appointments in the departments of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and History. 

    She has numerous publications, and her current book project examines American health activists since 1945. In 2017, she gave the keynote Garrison Lecture at the annual meeting of the American Association for the History of Medicine on “Radical Visions of American Medicine: Politics and Activism in the History of Medicine.”

  • Michal Rose

    Professor; Director, VA Comprehensive Cancer Center; Chair, Data and Safety Monitoring Committee, Yale Cancer Center

    Years active at Yale: 1997-present

    Dr. Rose is being recognized for her tireless efforts as chief of oncology at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System in West Haven. She has helped to foster the career of junior faculty. She is a well-respected leader.

  • Julie Rosenbaum

    Physician Chief, Internal Medicine - Yale Health

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1996; 2003-present

    Dr. Rosenbaum is being recognized for her leadership in teaching and education, as well as her tireless advocacy for outstanding primary care. As a core member of the Yale Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency program for 15 years, she has challenged her trainees to provide evidence-based care with a human connection. She serves as editor-in-chief of the Yale Office-based Medicine Curriculum, a nationally disseminated ambulatory teaching tool in use at over 230 residencies and health professions training programs. Dr. Rosenbaum also serves as a leader in education around medical ethics and professionalism, as the director of the Workshop on Professional Responsibility for medicine interns, and as a teacher for various student courses. She has also been named a Bioethics Center Scholar at the Yale Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics. Her interest in the ethical principle of social justice led her to develop with Dr. Tracy Rabin the Yale Primary Care Curriculum in Community Engagement, which focuses on the social determinants of health and health advocacy. She seeks to inspire young physicians to find their own voices and develop skills to improve the health of their communities. Her leadership of the Women in Medicine Program for the Primary Care Residency has fueled a network of mentorship and support for women trainees. Dr. Rosenbaum has served on the New England Comparative Effectiveness Public Advisory Committee, the Society of General Internal Medicine Ethics Committee, the American College of Physicians (ACP) Ethics, Professionalism, and Human Rights Committee, and currently serves on the ACP Medical Knowledge Self-Assessment Program General Internal Medicine Committee.

  • Alumna

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1953 

    Dr. Rosenberg is being recognized as a superb teacher, mentor, and clinician. Gustave L. Davis, MD, clinical professor of pathology, remembers her from when she was an assistant professor and he was a medical student summer fellow in pathology at SUNY Upstate Medical University. Part of his duties included presenting clinical cases at the weekly Surgical Pathology conference chaired by Dr. Rosenberg and her surgeon husband, Irwin Rosenberg, MD ‘53. Upon graduation, she sent Dr. Davis to Barnes Hospital St. Louis to train with her mentor Lauren Ackerman, MD. He credits his decision to become a pathologist to Dr. Rosenberg. 

    Dr. Rosenberg left Syracuse and had a very successful career at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, achieving national renown as a renal pathologist. She and her husband are retired and live in Brunswick, Maine.

  • Lynda Rosenfeld

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) and Pediatrics; Director, Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology Fellowship Program, Cardiovascular Medicine; Firm Chief, Goodyer Teaching Service, Internal Medicine; Medical Director, HVC Anticoagulation Clinic, Cardiovascular Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 1979-present

    Dr. Rosenfeld is being recognized for her accomplishments in clinical practice, teaching,and mentoring. She was the first female cardiology fellow and the first fellow to do additional training in cardiac electrophysiology. She has always emphasized patient care and teaching and she is the director of the Yale Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology Fellowship Program; she has served on the Heart Rhythm Society Education Committee, the Department of Medicine Internship selection committee, the admissions committee, YSM, and on the board of Yale Medicine. 

    Her research interests include device and drug therapy of arrhythmias, arrhythmias complicating the management of adults with congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation, and the cardiac manifestations of sarcoidosis and the remote monitoring of cardiac implantable electronic devices. Dr. Rosenfeld was recognized for her accomplishments in teaching in 2010 when she became a recipient of the Cardiovascular Faculty Teaching Award.

  • Marjorie Rosenthal

    Associate Professor in Pediatrics (Gen Pediatrics)

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1995; 2005-present

    Dr. Rosenthal is being recognized for her tireless commitment to community engagement and community-based participatory research at Yale and in New Haven. As a co-director of Yale's National Clinician Scholars Program, Dr. Rosenthal has served as an exceptional mentor to countless postgraduate learners in research who have worked toward advancing health equity in the region. Her humanism, empathy, and infectious enthusiasm are widely appreciated. She is the recent recipient of both teaching and humanism awards from the School of Medicine.

  • Ronnie Rosenthal

    Professor of Surgery; Surgeon-In-Chief, VA Connecticut Healthcare System

    Years active at Yale: 1994-present

    Dr. Rosenthal is being recognized for her leadership provided over 20 years as chief of surgery at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System. She also oversees surgical care for all the VAs in the New England Region (VISN 1) in her role as the chief surgical consultant for VISN 1, in which she has served for nearly a decade. She is an active general surgeon with a special interest in the surgical care of the older patient, and has authored many articles and chapters on geriatric surgery in major medical and surgical textbooks. Her recent scholarly interests include a grant-funded project developing a geriatric surgery quality program with the John A. Hartford Foundation (JAHF) and the American College of Surgeons (ACS). Her national presence includes involvement with ACS geriatric surgery programs since 1995 and she currently co-directs the ACS-NSQIP Geriatric Pilot Project, a collaborative of 23 hospitals across the U.S.and Canada that is investigating the benefits of adding geriatric-specific variables to surgical outcome models. Dr. Rosenthal has participated in the development of educational competencies in geriatrics for the surgical care of this patient population and is the lead editor of the major textbook on this subject, now in press in its third edition. She also currently directs a funded VA clinical initiative that provides comprehensive in-home preoperative assessment and perioperative geriatric co-management designed to return older adult veterans safely to their homes after major surgery.

  • Carla Rothlin

    Professor; Associate Professor of Pharmacology

    Dr. Rothlin is being recognized for her research excellence in basic science research in autoimmune disease, including asthma, lupus, Crohn’s disease, and colitis. In 2016, she became one of the inaugural Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Faculty Scholars. Supported by HHMI, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Simons Foundation, this program supports early-career scientists who pursue primarily basic research projects.

     

    Also in 2016, in a paper published in Science, Dr. Rothlin and colleagues identified a receptor called TYR03, located on innate immune cells, that controls the strength of the immune response, and could be a potential drug target for treating allergies. Her current work focuses on understanding exactly how macrophages, considered sentinel cells of the innate immune system, coordinate the healing and rebuilding of damaged tissue.

     

  • Nancy Ruddle

    Professor Emeritus of and Senior Research Scientist in Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

    Years active at Yale: 1968-present

    Dr. Ruddle is being recognized for studies of the immune system and autoimmune disease. She is known for her discovery and analysis of lymphotoxin, a protein produced by T cells and a key element in the protective immune system that destroys tumor cells. She and her laboratory colleagues have studied the lymphotoxin/tumor necrosis factor family, and their roles in lymphoid organ development and pathogenesis of viral and autoimmune disease. Her lab studies acute inflammation and animal models of autoimmune diseases, including Type 1 diabetes mellitus and multiple sclerosis. In more than 170 scientific articles that Ruddle has authored or co-authored, she has studied the immunology of such diseases as leukemia, experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, and Leishmania amazonensis infection, among others. She continues to generate insight into the regulation and function of lymphoid organs through her analysis of the vessels crucial for their function.

  • Basmah Safdar

    Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine; Co-Chair, Chest Pain Center

    Years active at Yale: 2004-present

    Dr. Safdar is recognized for her outstanding work as a clinical scholar in sex and gender-specific research with a focus on cardiovascular health in emergency care. Her area of interest is to improve diagnostics and treatment of coronary microvascular disease in relation to persistent chest pain in a multi-system model. A national leader supporting women in medicine, Dr. Safdar is past president of the Academy for Women in Academic Emergency
    Medicine (AWAEM); chair of the AWAEM Research Committee, and co-chair of the 2014 Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Annual Consensus Conference on Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Medicine “to Understand, Investigate and Translate the Impact of Gender on Patient Outcomes.” She is also former medical
    director of the YNHH Women’s Heart Program. She recently served as President of Academy for Women in Academic Emergency Medicine (AWAEM) and used this platform to collate faculty development resources for mid-career women faculty in emergency medicine. She has mentored several undergraduates, medical students, residents and faculty.  In 2014, she received the Academy for Women in Emergency Medicine Momentum Leadership Award, and in 2017 she received an American Medical Association Joan F. Giambalvo Fund for the Advancement of Women Award.

  • Elizabeth Samuels

    Years active at Yale: 2016-present

    Dr. Samuels is being recognized for her clinical research focused on emergency department-based harm reduction intervention; racial, LGBTQ, and gender disparities in care; and leveraging social emergency medicine to improve population health. She was selected to serve on the Dean's Advisory Council for LGBTQI Affairs and in2016 she  participated in an online panel presentation hosted by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy on innovative strategies to link drug overdose survivors to effective treatment for their substance use disorders. Dr. Samuels is the recipient of the University Emergency Medicine Foundation Community Impact award and the American Medical Women’s Association Glasgow-Rubin Citation for Academic Achievement award.

  • Lisa Sanders

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medicine)

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1997; 1997-present

    Dr. Sanders is being recognized for an unusual career path – from mass media to medicine, then straddling both - that has enlightened peers, patients, and the public alike. Dr. Sanders is best known as the author of the widely read “Diagnosis” column in The New York Times, which chronicles how doctors unravel medical mysteries. The column was the spark that ignited the hit Fox TV series “House,” for which she served as technical consultant. Dr. Sanders was an Emmy Award-winning producer and writer for CBS and ABC News. Her interest in medical stories led her to enroll in the Yale School of Medicine. After receiving her M.D. in 1997, Dr. Sanders interned at the Yale Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency Program, serving as chief resident in 2000-2001. Since 2011 she has been an associate professor of medicine, focusing on issues surrounding obesity. She wrote two books: The Perfect Fit Diet, and Every Patient Tells a Story: Medical Mysteries and the Art of Diagnosis. She continues to write for The New York Times in her “Think Like a Doctor” column. Dr. Sanders served as acting medical director for the Henry S. Chase Outpatient Center in Waterbury in 2005-2006. She continues to write and speak about diagnoses, particularly diagnostic errors. Dr. Sanders has also led several courses and workshops for doctors.

  • Karen Santucci

    Professor of Pediatrics (Emergency Medicine) and of Emergency Medicine; Medical Director, Pediatric Emergency Medicine; Section Chief, Pediatric Emergency Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 1999-present

    Dr. Santucci is being recognized for her outstanding work in pediatric emergency medicine, especially for her role in the creation of AMISTAD, a program that brings in adolescent and teenage students from local area schools to act as patients so that Yale’s medical students can develop their training and learn to work with an often-challenging age group. In 2015, she was honored with the Leah Lowenstein Award.

  • Alumna

    Years active at Yale: 2004-2006

    Dr. Scherer is an attending trauma surgeon. She is being recognized for her work in policy at Yale. This has profoundly shaped her perspective on patient care, teaching, and research efforts. Dr. Scherer was born and raised in Austin, Texas. She attended Mount Holyoke College in Western Massachusetts, where she earned a BA in Chemistry in 2004. She moved to New Haven, Connecticut following college where she attended the Yale School of Public Health. She completed an internship between her first and second year at the Government Accountability Office in Washington, DC. In 2006, she earned her MPH with a focus in Health Policy and Administration. She completed her basic science courses for medical school in College Station, Texas at Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine. She had the opportunity to complete her clinical years at Scott & White in Temple. She earned her MD in May of 2010. Dr. Scherer has been a general surgery resident at University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) and was honored to be selected as an administrative chief during her chief year. She completed a fellowship in trauma and critical care at UTHSCSA.

  • Helen  May  Scoville

    Alumna

    Years active at Yale: 1916-1929 

    Dr. Scoville is being recognized as one of the first two women to graduate from Yale School of Medicine (1920), and as an early member of the Department of Pathology. Like Louise Farnam, MD, she was born into a prominent New Haven family. Her father was Minister in charge at Trinity Church on the Green. Dr. Scoville graduated from Wellesley College before entering medical school in 1916. In 1918, while still a medical student, she became a laboratory assistant in Experimental Medicine, and in 1920 joined the Department of Pathology under Milton Winternitz, MD. From 1922 to 1929 she held the rank of instructor in Surgery and Pathology. In addition to the regular work of the department, she co-authored an article on carcinoma in the ileum with surgeon William F. Verdi, MD. In 1929, Dr. Scoville left Yale, and in 1931 she became the pathologist at Mercy Hospital (now Berkshire Medical Center) in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, succeeding a man who had resigned. During World War II, she was active in mobilizing laboratory technicians in her region.

  • Margretta Seashore

    Professor Emeritus of Genetics

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1965; 1974-2015

    Dr. Seashore is being recognized for her excellence in clinical science, leadership in genetics and as director of the Genetic Consultation Service since 1977. She also played a pioneering role as an early female faculty member at the Yale School of Medicine.

    Dr. Seashore is a professor emerita of human genetics and pediatrics. A 1965 graduate of YSM, she came to Yale in 1974 as an assistant clinical professor in human genetics and pediatrics and became an assistant professor in 1978. Dr. Seashore was named director of the Genetics Consultation Service at Yale New Haven Hospital in 1997.

    The author of more than 50 peer-reviewed publications, she was listed in the 1999-2001 edition of Biographee, Who’s Who in American Women. Her many honors include The Perkins Prize for Scholarship, Yale University; the 1964 Henry R. Viets Grant for Student Research; and the Moseby Book Award for Scholarship. She is a founding fellow of the American College of Medical genetics, American Medical Association. She is also a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Society of Human Genetics and is an American Academy of Pediatrics fellow.

  • Coralie Shaw

    Professor Emeritus of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging

    Years active at Yale: 1983-2007

    Dr. Shaw is being recognized for her expertise in clinical care and for mentoring students as director of the Diagnostic Radiology Residency Program from 1989-2007. Dr. Shaw’s specialty was thoracic radiology. She was a charter member of the Association of Program Directors in Radiology, and served as the group’s president in 2000-2001, and received its Achievement Award in 2005. Dr. Shaw spent her career sharing her knowledge and experience with students, residents, and fellows. She served as curriculum committee chair from 1989-2007 anda member (and longtime chair) of the resident review and resident selection committees. YSM honored her mentoring work with the Leah Lowenstein Award in 1994 and the Society of Distinguished Teachers Award in 2003. She was an active member of SWIM. Dr. Shaw spends her retirement enjoying the success of her residents who went on to become deans, chairs, acclaimed researchers, and book authors.

  • Sally Shaywitz

    Audrey G. Ratner Professor of Pediatrics (Neurology); Co-Director, Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity

    Years active at Yale: 1977-present

    Dr. Shaywitz is being recognized for her excellence in clinical medicine and research in dyslexia. She is the author of more than 250 scientific publications, including the groundbreaking Overcoming Dyslexia (Knopf, 2003), which details critical scientific findings in dyslexia and how to translate scientific knowledge into clinical practice. Together with her husband, Dr. Bennett Shaywitz, their research provides the basic framework: conceptual model, epidemiology, and neurobiology for the study of dyslexia. Dr. Shaywitz originated and championed the “Sea of Strengths” model of dyslexia, which emphasizes a sea of strengths in higher critical thinking and creativity surrounding the encapsulated weakness in decoding words found in dyslexia. Her data validates the unexpected nature of dyslexia: you can have a very high IQ yet read at a low level. Dyslexia has a high prevalence, one out of five, and achievement gaps are already present by first grade. 

    Dr. Shaywitz, the Audrey G. Ratner Professor in Pediatrics; co-director and co-founder, Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity, has developed the Shaywitz Dyslexia Screen, an evidence-based screener to identify students at-risk for dyslexia in grades k-2. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and has testified before the House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space and Technology and the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. She is annually voted one of the Best Doctors in America, and is known by her patients and colleagues as a doctor who cares about each patient as well as all those affected by dyslexia. Both Drs. Bennett and Sally Shaywitz are featured in a Sept. 25, 2018 article in the New York Times Science section, as Scientists at Work: Decoding Dyslexia, a Life's Work in Progress.

  • Alumna

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1968; 1968-1972

    Dr. Short is being recognized for a unique career in medicine, encompassing activism for women physicians at Yale and more widely, an academic career, advocacy for medical school issues to the NIH, Congress, and the White House, federal government service, and a 15-year post-retirement career working with not-for-profits.

    Dr. Short is a professor emerita of internal medicine and medical genetics. She retired from Georgetown, but spent her early career at Stanford School of Medicine. A 1968 graduate of YSM, she was an intern and resident at Yale New Haven Hospital and a genetics fellow at Yale from 1970-72. During that time, she was active in promoting the careers of women at YSM and nationally. With Phyllis Bodel, MD, she conducted a survey of women graduates of YSM. Their findings challenged the then prevailing opinion that women were less likely to persevere and succeed in their medical careers, demonstrating that Yale women remained active in their profession and many were notable as researchers and clinicians. Drs. Bodel and Short went on to achieve a stay in the tenure clock for female faculty on maternity leave, and were instrumental in moving notable women scientists from the Yale research ranks to tenure track faculty positions.

    Dr. Short continued this work at Stanford University School of Medicine. In 1983, she published Women in Academic Medicine in the Macy Foundation Symposium on the Status of Women in Science. She served as the director of research policy for the Association of American Medical Colleges, the medical director for academic affairs at the Department of Veterans Affairs, and as a member of Hillary Clinton’s White House Health Care Task Force. After retirement from medicine, she became active in Los Angeles with not-for-profit organizations, including Hillsides, an LA County service agency for children.

  • Andrea Silber

    Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine (Medical Oncology)

    Years active at Yale: 1981- present

    Dr. Silber is being recognized for excellence in clinical medicine and in promoting women’s health and the care of underserved minorities. Dr. Silber came to Yale in 1981. She started the Sister-to-Sister program, which employed culturally sensitive outreach to increase breast cancer screening for minorities. This work was recognized with an award from the Susan G. Komen foundation. She continues to address cancer health inequity, most recently with the N OWN IT! program (Oncologists Welcome New Haven into Trials), which promotes community engagement in clinical trials as a strategy to improve cancer outcomes for minorities. She is the recipient of the Connecticut Cancer Partnership Cancer Champion Award, the Women of Strength Award from the Get In Touch Foundation, the Physician of the Year award from Business New Haven, the Lane Adams Quality of Life Award and the Cover Girl Women at Their Best Award. 

  • Michelle Alejandra Silva

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Connecticut Latino Behavioral Health System, Psychiatry

    Years active at Yale: 2005- present

    Dr. Silva is being recognized for teaching and mentoring, clinical care and expertise, and women’s advocacy. Her kindness and skill are evident in her work, including her efforts at HAVEN Free Clinic. Her leadership style is worthy of emulation. Dr. Silva is dedicated to helping those around her, actively transforming the environment around her into a better, more loving,and empowered space.

  • Marina Silveira

    Assistant Professor

    Years active at Yale: 2017-present

    Dr. Silveira is being recognized for her contributions to academic hepatology. She is a brilliant hepatologist, with particular interests within autoimmune liver diseases. She is an ideal role model for house staff in many ways. Her attention to detail and vast knowledge base in topics of hepatology and gastroenterology is highly impressive and admirable. She is also a phenomenal clinical instructor, evidenced by her ability to instill a passion for hepatology among those she teaches. She is also excellent in academic research which is apparent through her numerous publications within the field of hepatology. Finally, Dr. Silveira is a pioneer within the field of research in autoimmune liver disease, with unique translational research ideas that have the potential to help shape the future of hepatology. 

  • Sofia Simmonds

    Former faculty

    Department: Biochemistry

    Years active at Yale: 1945-2007

    Dr. Simmonds started at Yale as a researcher and instructor of physiological chemistry. She became a full professor of biochemistry in 1975. She later served as the associate dean of Yale College.

    Dr. Simmonds was the co-author, with her husband Joseph Fruton, of General Biochemistry, the first comprehensive biochemistry textbook. She received the American Chemical Society’s Garvan Medal in 1969, which recognizes contributions to chemistry by women scientists.

  • Jody L. Sindelar

    Professor of Public Health (Health Policy), Professor of Economics, and Professor in the Institution for Social and Policy Studies; Research Associate, NBER

    Years active at Yale: 1984-present

    Jody Sindelar, PhD is being recognized for excellence in research, as well as her efforts in advocating for women. She is an expert on the economics of substance abuse and obesity. She served on the Committee for the Status of Women in Medicine (SWIM) for years and in 2010 chaired a faculty committee to look at salary discrepancies due to gender. She was also in charge of salary issues assessment when the Commission on Women Faculty was formed as a response to the Bill of Rights put forth in 2000.

  • Rajita Sinha

    Foundations Fund Professor of Psychiatry and Professor in the Child Study Center and of Neuroscience; Director, Yale Interdisciplinary Stress Center; Chief, Psychology Section in Psychiatry; Co-director of Education, Yale Center for Clinical Investigation

    Years active at Yale: 1990-present

    Dr. Sinha is being recognized for her achievements in research that ask, “What makes us engage in behaviors that either hurt us or our loved ones and make us more vulnerable to chronic diseases, or engage in behaviors that help us thrive, flourish and maintain healthy lives?” In 2007, Dr. Sinha founded the Yale Stress Center, where she continues to serve as director. The center is dedicated to the study, prevention and treatment of stress-related chronic conditions that affect biological, psychological, behavioral, and physical health outcomes. Initial support came from one of the largest trans-disciplinary consortium grants awarded by the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Sinha brings together leading scientists and faculty at Yale and other institutions to address the complex biobehavioral scientific challenges posed by brain stress and self-control processes affecting addictive behaviors. She has developed novel interventions to address stress and its toxic effects on the brain and behavioral and cognitive functions to impact health outcomes. 

    Dr. Sinha has been elected Fellow to the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, a member of the National Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research, and a member of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. She has also served on the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism National Advisory Council.

  • Carolyn Slayman

    Sterling Professor of Genetics and Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology; Deputy Dean for Academic & Scientific Affairs

    Years active at Yale: 1967-2016

    Carolyn Walch Slayman is being recognized for her outstanding leadership at the School of Medicine and her excellence in basic science research. She was the School of Medicine’s first deputy dean for academic and scientific affairs, Sterling Professor of Genetics, and professor of cellular and molecular physiology. 

    Dr. Slayman came to Yale in 1967 as an assistant professor in the departments of microbiology and physiology. She helped to establish the graduate program in what was then the Department of Human Genetics (now Genetics) in 1972, serving as director for 12 years. She became the first woman to head a department at the School of Medicine when she was named chair of the Department of Genetics in 1984. She was recognized for her research on the biochemistry of membrane transport, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for over 35 years. In 1995, she became the first woman to hold a deputy deanship. 

    Dr. Slayman was a beloved figure at the School of Medicine for almost 50 years. She was a devoted mentor, dedicating her time and efforts to scores of early career investigators and helping to establish the annual Junior PI Retreat. She spearheaded many scientific and academic initiatives, including the renovation and modernization of the medical school’s laboratory space, and the award and renewal of its NIH Clinical and Translational Science Award. Dr. Slayman passed away on December 27, 2016.

  • Carol Soroka

    Senior Research Scientist in Medicine (Digestive Diseases); Technical Director, Liver Center Morphology Core

    Years active at Yale: 1986-present

    Dr. Soroka is being recognized for her excellence in basic science and her critical position at the Yale Liver Center as a cell biologist who trained with Marilyn G. Farquhar (1986-1990), morphologist and laboratory supervisor. During her 25-year career with the Liver Center and in the laboratory of James Boyer, MD, she has mentored many postdoctoral fellows, is always available for advice, and selflessly and tirelessly coordinates the activities of many of the center faculty, students, and staff. These qualities, together with her keen scientific judgement, make her an indispensable member of the Yale scientific community.

  • Stephanie Spangler

    Vice Provost for Health Affairs and Academic Integrity; University Title IX Coordinator; Clinical Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Services

    Years active at Yale: 1976-present

    Dr. Spangler is being recognized for excellence in clinical medicine and in the promotion of diversity and equity at YSM and the University. She did her residency at Yale in ob/gyn; was chief of ob/gyn, for Yale University Health Services (YUHS) from 1986 to 1989; served as acting director YUHS from 1989 to 1990; and director of YUHS from 1990 to 1995. YUHS is a multispecialty group practice that provides comprehensive health care coverage to more than 40,000 faculty, staff, students, and dependents. Since 1995, Dr. Spangler has served as deputy provost for health affairs and academic integrity. In this role, she is responsible for a number of health-related areas and for activities that relate to academic ethics and compliance, including the Office of Academic Integrity, institutional conflicts of interest, and HIPAA privacy. She serves as member of the University Labor-Management Policy Board, and has served as associate vice president for West Campus planning and program development. In 2011, she was
    appointed as the University Title IX Coordinator, responsible for overseeing Yale’s policies and programs to address and prevent sex-based discrimination. She has served on the Board of Directors of the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs and currently serves on the Board of Trustees of Northeast Medical Group. She is working to improve campus climate and promote fair and equal access to resources for all branches of the medical school faculty.

  • Assistant Professor of Medicine (General Medicine)

    Years active at Yale: 2003-present

    Dr. Spelman is being recognized as a passionate clinician-educator at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System. After completing her MD degree at New York University, she completed her internship, residency, and chief residency in internal medicine at Yale. Not only is she a tireless educator for resident and medical students, but she demonstrates amazing clinical skills and care for the veterans she treats. She is a passionate advocate for her patients, and routinely fights to help her patients get the care they need. She represents the best of Yale's values.

  • Susan Spencer

    Former faculty

    Departments: Neurology and Neurosurgery

    Years active at Yale: 1975-2009

    Dr. Spencer, a pioneering woman in medicine,was an internationally recognized expert in epilepsy and epilepsy surgery. She was the co-director of the Yale Epilepsy Program with her husband, Dennis Spencer, MD, former chair of neurosurgery. 

    Dr. Spencer came to Yale as a resident in neurology after undergraduate and medical school education at the University of Rochester. She joined the Yale faculty in 1980 and authored more than 200 manuscripts and chapters on epilepsy. Her research earned continuous National Institutes of Health (NIH) support, including several program projects. She was recognized by the American Epilepsy Society (AES) with a clinical research award in 2003. She served as president of the AES in 2000, vice-president of the American Neurological Society (ANA) in 2001 and on executive boards of ANA and the American Academy of Neurology. She co-founded and co-edited the journal, Epilepsy Currents.

    Dr. Spencer served on the Yale School of Medicine Admissions Committee and was thesis advisor for Yale medical students. She directed an epilepsy fellowship program that graduated dozens of experts who have gone on to leadership positions in the field.She was an outstanding and indefatigable clinician who cared for thousands of patients who traveled from all over the world to consult with her. Dr. Spencer was selfless, tireless, brilliant, passionate, and beloved by her family, friends, patients, and colleagues. She was a wonderful mentor to young women physicians, and she always approached teaching and mentoring with a gentle, encouraging manner and with unfailing good humor. She died in 2009.

  • Serena Spudich

    Dr. Harry M. Zimmerman and Dr. Nicholas and Viola Spinelli Professor of Neurology; Division Chief, Neurological Infections & Global Neurology; Co-director, Center for Neuroepidemiology and Clinical Neurological Research

    Years active at Yale: 2010-present

    Dr. Serena Spudich is being recognized for her seminal contributions to our current knowledge regarding the state of the central nervous system in individuals living with HIV. She is co-director of the International NeuroHIV Cure Consortium, chair ex-officio of the neurology committee of the International AIDS Clinical Trial Group network, and serves on the DHHS Guidelines Panel for Antiretroviral Therapy for Adults and Adolescents. Dr. Spudich is a beloved mentor of numerous trainees, as well as a compassionate clinician dedicated to the care of individuals with infections and other disorders of the central nervous system.

  • Nina Stachenfeld

    Senior Research Scientist in Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences

    Years active at Yale: 1993, 2004-Present

    Dr. Stachenfeld is being recognized for her accomplishments in science, for her mentorship, and for her efforts on behalf of women at YSM. She has served as chair/member of the diversity committee of YSM/Yale School of Public Health; as executive board member, Committee for the Status of Women in Medicine (SWIM) since 2010; and is serving as chair of SWIM. She has mentored students as a faculty member of Yale’s BioSTEP and Discovery to Cure and has served as a mentor for the Diversity Mentorship Program of the American Physiological Society.

    Her work focuses on cardiovascular disease as the leading cause of death among women. The goal of her research is to understand mechanisms of cardiovascular and metabolic function and risk in healthy women and in women with chronic illness, particularly the impact of estrogens, progesterone and androgens on cardiovascular function and control of blood pressure in women.

    Dr. Stachenfeld has been awarded numerous grants from the National Institutes of Health,  Women’s Health Research at Yale, U.S. Army Medical Research, and Materiel Command Defense Women’s Health, Pfizer and PepsiCo,.

  • Bonita Stanton

    Alumna

    Department: Pediatrics

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1976; 1979-1983

    Dr. Stanton is being recognized for a long and illustrious career, beginning at Yale. Along with a few other female faculty, she established the Phyllis Bodel Infant and Child Care Centerat the Yale School of Medicine. She is the founding dean of Seton Hall-Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, in New Jersey.

    Dr. Stanton lived and worked for five years in the squatter-slums in Dhaka, Bangladesh, which launched her dedication to community-based behavioral research, a passion that has carried her to multiple sites across the globe. She has been continuously funded as a principal investigator on one or more grants from the National Institutes of Health since 1990,and she has received numerous accolades for her research contributions in global HIV prevention.

    She has authored more than 300 peer-reviewed manuscripts and served as an editor of several textbooks,including Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. She is the consulting editor for “Pediatric Clinics of North America,”and is a member of the editorial board of Clinical Keys. She has served on the American Board of Pediatrics Global Task Force and Planning Committee and the Macy Conference on Pediatric Professional Education. She has been the president of the Association of Medical School Pediatric Department Chairsand has chaired Women in Pediatrics Federation of Pediatric Organizations Task Force on Women in Pediatrics.

  • Jeanne Steiner

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Medical Director, Connecticut Mental Health Center; Director, Yale Fellowship in Public Psychiatry; Co-Director, Yale Division of Public Psychiatry

    Years active at Yale: 1988- present

    Dr. Steiner is being recognized for her leadership, teaching,and mentoring roles. She serves as the medical director of the Connecticut Mental Health Center, which is a main teaching site for the Department of Psychiatry, and is the director of the Yale Fellowship in Public Psychiatry, which provides advanced training to psychiatrists who have an interest in pursuing careers in psychiatric administration within the public sector. In her role as medical director, Dr. Steiner oversees programs in quality improvement, clinical risk management, and medical staff affairs. Her scholarly work is focused on initiatives to improve the health of individuals with serious mental illness who are served by the center and throughout the public system in Connecticut. She is also the co-editor of the book Yale Textbook in Public Psychiatry, and co-director of the Yale Division of Public Psychiatry.

  • Joan Steitz

    Sterling Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

    Years active at Yale: 1970- present

    Dr. Steitz is being recognized as a pioneer in the study of small, noncoding RNA molecules, essential for gene expression in most cells. In 1979, her lab discovered small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). These tightly bound complexes of proteins and small noncoding RNAs are critical for the removal of introns—snippets of genetic material that interrupt a gene’s protein-coding sequence. Introns must be removed before RNA can be used as a template for protein synthesis. The removal process, called splicing, takes place in large snRNP-protein complexes called spliceosomes. After showing that snRNPs are essential for splicing, Steitz’s lab deciphered how particular snRNPs recognize intron splice sites.

    She has since identified other snRNPs that participate in splicing different types of introns and in developmentally controlled mRNA processing. Her lab has also discovered small nucleolar RNAs, which prepare ribosomal RNA as a building material for cells’ protein factories.

    Internationally renowned, Dr. Steitz has won multiple awards for her scientific achievements. She is the recipient of the 2018 Lasker-Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science, one of the highest forms of recognition that a scientist can receive. She has received 11 honorary degrees, the Rosalind E. Franklin Award for Women in Science from the National Cancer Institute, the Gairdner Foundation International Award, the RNA Society Lifetime Achievement Award, the Excellence in Science Award from the Federation of American Societies of Experimental Biology, UNESCO-L'Oréal Award for Women in Science, the National Medal of Science from the National Science Foundation, and membership in the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • Rosemary Stevens

    Alumna and former faculty member

    Years active at Yale: YSPH Class of 1963, PhD Class of 1968; 1968-1976

    Dr. Stevens is being recognized for teaching and mentoring. She pursued graduate studies in epidemiology and public health at Yale, receiving her PhD in 1968. Upon graduation, she taught at Yale for eight years, followed by appointments at Tulane University and the University of Pennsylvania where she served as chair of the Department of History and Sociology and later was the first woman dean of Penn's School of Arts and Sciences.

    As a research associate at Yale, Dr. Stevens started a major research project on a comparative study of specialization in medicine in the United Kingdom and the United States. The project developed into three separate studies, one on the United Kingdom, one dealing with the United States, and the third on comparative aspects of healthcare organization in the two countries. Her research resulted in two publications: Medical Practice in Modern England: The Impact of Specialization and State Medicine (1966) and American Medicine and the Public Interest (1971). In 1974, in conjunction with Robert B. Stevens, she published Welfare Medicine in America: A Case Study of Medicaid. This was followed by In Sickness and in Wealth: American Hospitals in the Twentieth Century (1989), her third major publication on American medicine. Her ongoing research on English medicine resulted in National Health Service in England in 1980: Notes on Comparisons and Stresses in 1981.

    Besides numerous teaching, research, and administrative positions, Dr. Stevens has been on the boards of the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates and the Milbank Memorial Fund. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Science, History of Science Society, American Association for History of Medicine, College of Physicians of Philadelphia, and the Cosmopolitan Club.

  • Kathleen Stoessel

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science; Director, Retina Fellowship Program

    Dr. Stoessel is a full-time retina faculty, specializing in Medical Retina and Director of the Retina Fellowship Program. She graduated from the College of New Rochelle and received her medical degree (MD) from the State University of New York – Downstate Medical Center . She completed her ophthalmology residency training at the Yale University School of Medicine , followed by a vitreoretinal fellowship, also at Yale. Dr. Stoessel joined the Yale Eye Center as a full time faculty in Retina.
    Dr. Stoessel is board certified in Ophthalmology.

    Dr. Stoessel is an Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at Yale University in Retinal Disease and is in charge of the Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) program in which premature infants have retina evaluations, monitoring, and laser treatment when indicated to lower the risk of vision loss.

    Dr. Stoessel is the Retina Co-investigator at Yale for the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) Trial.

  • Elsa Stone

    Years active at Yale: 1975-present

    Dr. Stone is being recognized for her excellence in pediatric clinical care both at Yale and in the greater New Haven community, where she has been a leading voice for patients too young to speak for themselves. 

    Dr. Stone joined the clinical faculty in 1975 after completing a residency at Yale New Haven Hospital and a fellowship at the Yale Child Study Center. She has served in numerous leadership roles at the hospital, including a stint as president of the medical staff representing community physicians. Dr. Stone also served on the hospital’s board of trustees and its patient safety and quality committee. She launched a solo practice and later founded and owned a group practice known as Pediatrics Plus, which helps train Yale medical students. 

    As president of the New Haven Independent Practice Association, Dr. Stone has lobbied on behalf of her patients when insurance rules threatened the quality of their care. She remains active with the Connecticut chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the New Haven County Medical Association.

  • Virginia Stuermer
    Years active at Yale: 1954-2003

    Dr. Stuermer is being recognized as a pioneering physician in women’s health. She is associate clinical professor emerita of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive sciences. A Nebraska native, Dr. Stuermer is the daughter of a prairie nurse who visited patients by horseback, she made up her mind to become a doctor at age 4 and trained in her home state as well as New Jersey and Iowa before joining Yale’s Ob/Gyn department in 1954. Despite such obstacles as no break room with beds for women physicians attending childbirths, she gained a sterling reputation at Yale. She later became medical director of Planned Parenthood for Connecticut. Years before the Supreme Court’s landmark Roe v. Wade ruling in 1973, Dr. Stuermer joined a committee of New Haven providers and clergy that had decided to set up an outpatient abortion clinic. She offered to allow the clinic to be run out of her own private offices at 2 Church Street South. It was the city’s first freestanding abortion clinic, and quite illegal. Regardless, she practiced unchallenged, and even after other area clinics opened when abortion was legalized, she continued to provide the service until she retired at age 79.

  • Joann Sweasy

    Emeritus Faculty of Therapeutic Radiology; Vice-Chair for Basic Research; Associate Director, Basic Science, Yale Cancer Center

    Years active at Yale: 1993- present

    Dr. Sweasy is being recognized for her research into DNA repair and cancer and for her mentorship at Yale. After working in the private sector as a research scientist, Sweasy earned her PhD from the Waksman Institute of Microbiology at Rutgers University in 1989. Sweasy is a professor of genetics, and in 2016 she was named the Ensign Professor of Therapeutic Radiology. Since 2015, Sweasy has served as associate director for basic sciences at the Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, where she is also co-leader of the Radiobiology and Radiotherapy Program. Her area of expertise is the genetics and cell biology of DNA repair and how it relates to cancer. Her lab focuses on the role of DNA repair in genetic instability and warding off disease. Her work has discovered roles for DNA repair in the prevention of lupus.

    Sweasy has received numerous awards and continuous NIH funding for her research. She was inducted into the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering in 2009, where she is now vice president-elect. She is principal investigator of the American Cancer Society Institutional Research grant, which provides pilot funding for new investigators at Yale. Thanks to her work with—and dedicated advocacy for—young scholars in her lab, the provost’s office awarded Sweasy the Postdoctoral Mentoring Prize in 2017.

  • Tamar Taddei

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases)

    Years active at Yale: 2007- present

    Dr. Taddei is being recognized for her excellence in teaching, mentoring, clinical care and clinical research. She is an associate program director of the MD/PhD program. Her main focus in this role is to help students remain clinically active while in the PhD years and to ease their transition back to clinical medicine. She has developed clinical longitudinal electives and a re-entry elective to facilitate this process. Dr. Taddei’s efforts in teaching clinical skills have been recognized by Yale School of Medicine with the Alvan R. Feinstein Award (2017). Her research focuses on improving outcomes in patients with liver cancer. She is the co-PI of the VA multi-center VOCAL study (Veterans Outcomes and Costs Associated with Liver disease). She is also a co-PI with Michal Rose, MD, and Cindy Brandt, MD, MPH, of the VA Patient Safety Center of Inquiry on Cancer Coordination, a study that involves development and dissemination of EMR-linked software for the early detection and longitudinal follow-up of patients with cancer, as well as developing systems of care that facilitate patient navigation through the cancer diagnosis/treatment/survivorship process. She has served on the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Women’s Committee and she currently serves on the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Nominating Committee and Public Policy Committee. She is an AGA fellow and a fellow of the AASLD. She has been volunteering for the American Liver Foundation since 2005, and currently serves as the president of the Board of Directors of the Connecticut division.

  • Lynn Tanoue

    Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary); Clinical Chief, Section of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine; Director, Yale Lung Screening and Nodule Program; Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs, Department of Internal Medicine

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1982; 1988-present

    Dr. Tanoue is being recognized for her multifaceted skills as a doctor, researcher, mentor, administrator, and even as an impresario. A professor of medicine in the section of pulmonary and critical care medicine, Dr. Tanoue has also served as vice-chair for clinical affairs in the internal medicine department since 2010 and as clinical chief in the section of pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine since 2013. She is also president of the medical staff at Yale New Haven Hospital. 

    In 1996, Dr. Tanoue founded the hospital’s Tuberculosis Outreach Program. She sits on national committees charged with developing screening guidelines and examinations. She has received numerous honors—both within and outside Yale—for her work as a clinician and mentor. These include the Dean’s Mentor’s Award, the Educator Award from the American Thoracic Society, the Department of Internal Medicine Faculty Achievement Award for Clinical Care, and the Leah M. Lowenstein Award. 

    Dr. Tanoue is also known for founding the Yale Medical Symphony Orchestra, a volunteer group of more than 50 musicians from Yale’s medical community. She serves as president of the board of directors and plays the violin with the symphony.

  • Fattaneh Tavassoli

    Professor Emeritus of Pathology

    Years active at Yale: 2003-present

    Dr. Tavassoli is being recognized for her excellent contributions to patient care, clinical science, and teaching. Dr. Tavassoli obtained her MD at St. Louis University School of Medicine; completed her residency at Barnes Hospital, Washington University; and, did her fellowship at St. John’s, Mercy Medical Center. An internationally recognized expert and an authority in breast and gynecologic pathology, Dr. Tavassoli is the author of two editions of Pathology of the Breast, a comprehensive textbook on breast pathology and a gold standard on the topic. She is also co-editor of the World Health Organization Atlas on Tumours of the Breast and Female Genital Tract: Pathology and Genetics, a global standard for classification of tumors. Her most recent work, the AFIP fascicle on Tumors of the Breast, 4th Series, was published in 2009. She has published over 200 articles in peer reviewed journals and numerous chapters in addition to the books noted above. A strong advocate of education in pathology, Dr. Tavassoli has organized and taught a variety of courses and slide seminars worldwide; she is a sought-after speaker and educator around the world. Currently she continues to lecture at national and international conferences.

  • Jane Taylor

    Charles B. G. Murphy Professor of Psychiatry, of Psychology and of Neuroscience

    Years active at Yale: 1985-2000, 2006-present

    Dr. Taylor is being recognized for her work that has had a substantial impact on behavioral/cognitive neuroscience. She has an international reputation as a leading researcher whose findings play an important role in both basic and translational research in psychiatry and psychology. 

    Dr. Taylor came to YSM as a post-doctoral researcher and has risen to her current position as the Charles B. G. Murphy Professor of Psychiatry and professor of psychology. She received her PhD in experimental psychology/neuroscience from the University of Cambridge in 1985. Her research focuses on dysfunction of limbic cortico-striatal neuronal circuits. Functional alterations in these pathways result in deficits in motivation, memory and decision-making as well as alterations in reward-related learning that have relevance to psychiatric disorders such as alcoholism, drug addiction and depression, schizophrenia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Her work has also focused on neurobiological bases of sex differences in the etiology of psychopathologies by studying the selective modulation of behavior by sex chromosome genes, independent of gonadal hormones status, using a mouse model that segregates sex chromosomes from gonadal phenotype. 

    As associate director of the Division of Molecular Psychiatry, she is an active collaborator and mentor for junior investigators and for women and minorities. She is a member of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering and has received honors, such as the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression Distinguished Investigator Award.

  • Ruth J. Temple

    Alumna

    Years active at Yale: YSPH Class of 1942

    Pioneer Woman Physician, Educator, and Public Health Practitioner

    Dr. Temple is being recognized as a pioneering woman physician, educator, and public health practitioner. She was a community health crusader and the first African American female graduate of Loma Linda University. Her many accomplishments and medical interests include the foundation of a health study club to educate the community on nutrition, sex education, immunization, and substance abuse. Pushing the barriers placed on African American women of the time, Dr. Temple committed herself to community health issues in the city of Los Angeles. Dr. Temple graduated from the College of Medical Evangelists (Loma Linda University) with her MD in 1918. When she began her career, there was not a single medical clinic in East Los Angeles. She and her husband, Otis Lawrence Banks, purchased a six-room house on Central Avenue and turned it into a free health clinic, later naming it the Temple Health Institute. Overcoming the prejudices of the time, Dr. Temple was on the faculty of White Memorial Hospital, teaching white medical students. In 1941, the Los Angeles City Health department gave her a scholarship to attend Yale for a master’s degree in public health. She went on to pioneer the city's public health program and helped to establish the Southeast District Health Center. She was appointed the first health officer of Los Angeles City in 1942 and was recognized as an authority in the field of obstetrics.

    In 1983, the East Los Angeles Health Center was renamed the Dr. Ruth Temple Health Center. Dr. Temple died in 1984 at the age of 91.

  • Jeanette Tetrault

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medicine); Program Director, Addiction Medicine Fellowship, Internal Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 2007-present

    Dr. Tetrault is being recognized for her excellence in clinical care, teaching, and mentoring,along with the important leadership roles she holds within Yale General Internal Medicine for which she has demonstrated exemplary dedication.

    She is the program director for the Yale Addiction Medicine Fellowship, as well as the co-director of the Addiction Recovery Clinic, which serves a dual mission of clinical care and graduate medical education to Yale primary care residents. Nationally she serves on the board of directors for the Addiction Medicine Foundation and the Addiction Medicine Fellowship Directors Association. Since 2008, she has served as the Internal Medicine Team Leader for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)-funded Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) educational intervention at Yale. For the past decade, Dr. Tetrault has worked tirelessly as a staff physician at the APT Foundation Central Medical Unit, where she cares for underserved patients. She has directed several educational initiatives for medical students, nursing students, and medical residents rotating at the APT Foundation. Her teaching focuses on exposing trainees to patients in all phases of recovery and providing compassionate, evidence-based care while role-modeling the importance of reducing stigma as an important component to breaking down barriers in access to care. 

    Dr. Tetrault's scholarly output is remarkable as evidenced by over 50 publications in the peer-reviewed literature, as well as numerous book chapters and invited reviews and commentaries. Dr. Tetrault is a highly-regarded mentor for numerous students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty. Additionally, she has been recognized for her tremendous contributions to medical education through a remarkable portfolio of trainee evaluations, local and regional accolades, and recent recognition as a Macy Foundation Faculty Scholar.

  • Mary Tinetti

    Gladys Phillips Crofoot Professor of Medicine (Geriatrics) and Professor in the Institution for Social and Policy Studies; Section Chief, Geriatrics

    Years active at Yale: 1984-present

    Dr. Tinetti is being recognized for excellence in clinical science, mentoring, and her leadership, including her role as section chief of geriatrics since 2012. As the Gladys Phillips Crofoot Professor of Medicine and Public Health and the co-founding director of the interdisciplinary Yale Program on Aging, she is the leading expert in falls and fall injury risk factors identification and prevention. Her current research focus is on clinical decision-making for older adults in the face of multiple health conditions. She initiated the concept of multifactorial geriatric syndromes and pioneered multifactorial intervention trials leading to innovations and the study and understanding of many health conditions in older adults. 

    Dr. Tinetti is also active in health policy and is a frequent advisor to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. As a sought-after mentor, Dr.Tinetti has served as the primary mentor to more than 40 medical students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty and has helped mentor dozens more, both at Yale and at institutions throughout the country. Dr. Tinetti has received many awards, and is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (previously the Institute of Medicine).

  • Irene  Trowell-Harris

    Alumna

    Years active at Yale: YSPH Class of 1973

    Dr. Trowell-Harris is being recognized as a public health practitioner. She knew what she wanted to do from a very young age. While working on her parent’s Ohio farm with her 10 siblings, she watched planes as they passed overhead and dreamed that someday she would fly for a living. Her mother, however, wanted her to be a nurse. She earned a nursing diploma from the Columbia Hospital School of Nursing. Her dream of flying would not die and in 1963, she was commissioned as a first lieutenant in the Air National Guard. She advanced quickly, earning promotion to flight nurse instructor in 1966 and then to chief nurse. During her 30 years with the Guard, she excelled at academics, earning her MPH from Yale in 1973 and a Doctorate in Health Education from Columbia in 1983. In 1986, she was appointed commander of the 105th USAF Clinic in NY, making her the first Air National Guard nurse to command a medical clinic. She was appointed director of the Center for Women Veterans in October 2001.

  • Alina Tsyrulnik

    Assistant Professor

    Years active at Yale: 2012-present

    Dr. Tsyrulnik is being recognized for her leadership role in enhancing resident education and helping to transform the learning environment to one of caring, with a focus on wellness and innovation. She has been an invaluable role model to residents, exemplifying how to successfully balance a demanding career with home life. She is currently working with residents to develop an Educational Certificate of Distinction for those who meet specific criteria in several educational areas. This is a motivational tool and a teaching method to help with the development of our residents as future educators.

  • Yetsa Tuakli-Wosornu

    Years active at Yale: 2017-present

    Dr. Tuakli-Wosornu is being recognized for her excellence in clinical care. She specializes in interventional spine and sports medicine treatments, helping people achieve high physical and athletic performance at all stages of life through “holistic mind-body development” and therapies. She approaches her work with a sense of compassion and innovation. She is skilled in such innovative treatments as image-guided joint and spine injections, as well as platelet-rich plasma (PRP), a cutting-edge therapy that helps many athletes heal from injuries faster and better. 

    When she works with patients, Dr. Tuakli-Wosornu often draws upon her personal experience as an athlete. She is a long jumper who represented the Ghana National Team until 2016. She also represents Ghana as part of the 8-member International Paralympic Committee medical committee. 

    Dr. Tuakli-Wosornu has also done extensive community work and serves as the International Paralympic Committee’s inaugural welfare officer. In addition to caring for Yale Medicine patients, she also treats people in her native West Africa, traveling there about twice per year.

  • Elisabetta  Ullu

    Former faculty

    Department: Internal Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and Cell Biology

    Years active at Yale: 1982-2014

    Dr. Ullu is being recognized not only for her seminal contributions in RNA biology and parasitology, but as a teacher and mentor who supported the career development of junior scientists, especially women scientists. She died in September 2014 after a battle with breast cancer. 

    After training in Rome and Heidelberg, she came to Yale in 1982, where she determined the nucleotide sequence of the human 7SL RNA, characterized its relationship to the Alu family of repetitive sequences, and identified the genes responsible for transcribing this RNA. In 1985 Dr. Ullu began studying Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite that causes sleeping sickness. In 1998 she discovered RNA interference (RNAi) in trypanosomes. RNAi is a phenomenon in which not proteins, but small, noncoding RNA molecules regulate gene expression. This discovery revolutionized the field of trypanosome biology, allowing investigators to use RNAi as a tool to explore the functions of hundreds of genes. It also made it possible to validate potential drug targets to combat trypanosome infection.

    Among the many honors she received was election in 2011 as a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology. She was also the inaugural recipient of the American Society for Biochemistry’s Alice and C.C. Wang Award, which recognizes established investigators who make seminal contributions to the field of molecular parasitology,

  • Flora Vaccarino

    Harris Professor in the Child Study Center; Professor in the Department of Neuroscience

    Years active at Yale: 1987-present

    Dr. Vaccarino is being recognized for her accomplishments in research and as a strong supporter of women’s rights. She was a member of the executive committee of the Committee on the Status of Women in Medicine (SWIM) for many years, until 2016. She is a leader in the field of stem cell research in neuroscience. 

    Dr. Vaccarino received her MD from the University of Padua and completed her residency at YSM. Her lab has derived hundreds of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from patients with developmental disorders as a window into normal and abnormal neuronal development. Her laboratory established a new protocol for converting iPSCs into models of developing brain tissue known as organoids that reflect the human cerebral cortex at mid-fetal stages of development, including the main 5 classes of excitatory cortical neurons and inhibitory interneurons. Using this tool, the group recently contributed fundamental work on neurodevelopmental alterations in autism spectrum disorders. 

    Dr. Vaccarino’s studies of children with idiopathic autism and unaffected family members indicate alterations in cell proliferation, overproduction of synapses,and a striking increase in inhibitory neuron lines, caused in part by an aberrant increase in FOXG1 gene expression.As part of the PsychENCODE collaborative multi-site project, the lab will generate a genome-scale catalog of coding and noncoding RNAs and functional DNA elements in iPSC-derived organoids. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of PsychoENCODE and the Brain Somatic Mosaicism Constoria.

  • Gertrude Van Wagenen

    Former faculty

    Years active at Yale: 1935-1975 

    Dr. Van Wagenen is being recognized for her excellence as a scientist. She started the Yale Primate Colony in the 1930s. Her atlas of the macaque ovary was the first to document the number of oocytes in the ovary. The "morning after" pill was developed using the monkeys in collaboration with Professor John Morris. Primate colonies throughout the United States are descended from the Yale colony and have been instrumental in the development of oral contraceptives.

  • Alumna

    Years Active at Yale: YSM Class of 1949

    Dr. Vaughan is being recognized for her immense contributions to the field of biochemistry. During her over 60 years at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute (NHLBI), Dr. Vaughan held many administrative appointments and served as chief of NHLBI’s Laboratory of Cellular Metabolism.

    Dr. Vaughan’s work increased the understanding of how cells undertake the many processes that enable them to adapt to changing physiological conditions and explained the rudimentary mechanisms of cell metabolism, regulation, and signaling, and the proteins required. She authored or co-authored more than 365 papers and book chapters and served in editorial positions with several research journals, including more than 20 years with the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

    She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1985 and served as a member of its Committee on Human Rights, and in 1991 was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Vaughan mentored many prominent scientists at the NIH, including a Nobel Laureate. She passed away in September 2018 at age 92.

  • Marietta Vazquez

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics); Pediatric Global Health Track Director

    Years active at Yale: 1997-present

    Dr. Vazquez is being recognized for her amazing career as a pioneer woman physician. She has supported and guided those who pursue a career in academic medicine. She is an inspiration to many and provides mentorship to those starting a career path in science and medicine. She is admired for her passionate advocacy on behalf of her patients, especially those from underrepresented communities. Most recently, she led grassroots efforts to help her native Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria, successfully delivering the first shipment of medical supplies from the U.S. mainland to the archipelago. She is a true leader and role model who demonstrates that Latina women can be successful leaders and physicians.

  • Merceditas Villanueva

    Associate Professor of Medicine (AIDS)

    Years active at Yale: 1988-present

    Dr. Villanueva is being recognized as a clinician, educator, and scholar. She first came to Yale as an infectious disease fellow in 1988. After spending several years as a clinical faculty member at Waterbury Hospital, she joined the Yale faculty full time as director of the AIDS Care Program. She oversees clinical, educational, and clinical trial efforts in the outpatient Nathan Smith Clinic, as well as the inpatient Donaldson Firm where she serves as firm chief. In all her work, she exemplifies organization, dedication, equanimity, and hard work.

  • Eugenia Vining

    Assistant Professor of Surgery

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1987; 1993-present

    Dr. Vining is being recognized for excellence in clinical care, teaching, and mentoring, and for leadership in the field of otolaryngology and at Yale New Haven Hospital. She is currently the president-elect of the medical board of YNHH. After graduating from YSM in 1987 and completing her residency in otolaryngology at YNHH, she left New Haven for a fellowship in rhinology, sinus, and skull base surgery at University of Pennsylvania Medical Center. Returning to New Haven enabled her to begin practicing with many clinicians she knew and respected. 

    She helped develop the resident curriculum in rhinology and sinus surgery and taught in both the operating room and dissection lab locally and at more than 70 national and international sinus and skull base courses. She has been awarded the Resident Teaching Award in Otolaryngology twice, served as president of the Connecticut State ENT Society, and served in various roles for the American Rhinologic Society, American Academy of Otolaryngology. Dr. Vining is currently poised to assume the presidency of the medical board of YNHH. Her passion remains clinical care and the complex and collaborative management of patients suffering from sinonasal Disease.

  • Research Scientist in Medicine (General Medicine)

    Years active at Yale: PhD ’90; 1981-present

    Dr.Viscoli is being recognized for her mentorship and excellence in science. She came to Yale in 1981 as an associate in research at the Institute for Social and Policy Studies. She later transferred to the Department of Internal Medicine, where she demonstrated extraordinary capability in research design, data management, and field execution. While working full time in research, she obtained her Master’s Degree in economics and then her PhD in epidemiology from the Yale School of Public Health. After a postdoctoral appointment during which she conducted influential research on beta blocker therapy after myocardial infarction, treatment adherence, and the association between bladder cancer and coffee consumption, she joined the faculty as an associate research scientist in 1993.

    Dr. Viscoli has had a profound influence on research in the Department of Internal Medicine and the careers of many investigators at all stages of academic advancement. She is known to her collaborators for her brilliance in science, her unmatched commitment to her work, her writing skill, and her integrity. As she leads or supports her colleagues through difficult challenges in research design and analysis, one has the sense that research participants are gathered at her side in council — her commitment to them is evident. The work she has created, directed, or influenced has appeared in top-tier journals. She directed both the Women's Estrogen for Stroke Trial and the Insulin Resistance Intervention after Stroke Trial. As is typical for Dr. Viscoli, her expansive role in these projects included management of large research staffs, field implementation, data management, much of the data analysis, and publication of the findings. Her scientific achievements and her profound influence on Yale School of Medicine is well-known to her colleagues, but as much to the broader school community.

  • Christine Walsh

    Alumna

    Department: Pediatric Cardiology

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1973

    Dr. Walsh is being recognized as an outstanding pediatric cardiologist, teacher, and mentor. She is known for her clinical excellence, compassionate care, and excellence in teaching. She is a pediatric cardiologist at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore, a co-director of the Montefiore/Einstein Center of CardioGenetics, and has been named as one of the top one percent of pediatric cardiologists in America by U.S. News & World Report. She was awarded the Lewis M. Fraad Award for Excellence in Teaching, was named a Master Teacher, and was elected to the Leo M. Davidoff Society of Distinguished Teachers. She has held office in professional organizations, including as president of the Pediatric Cardiology Society of Greater New York, president of the Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine, and executive officer of the Association of Yale Alumni Board of Governors. She and her daughter are the first mother-daughter pediatric cardiologists in the United States.

  • Emily Wang

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medicine)

    Years active at Yale: 2008-present

    Dr. Wang is being recognized for leadership, clinical science, and clinical care in her work with people with a history of incarceration. She is an associate professor in the Department of Internal Medicine and directs the Health Justice Lab, a collaborative, innovative, interdisciplinary team focused on improving the health of individuals and communities who are affected by mass incarceration. Dr. Wang has cared for thousands of people recently released from prison and is co-founder of the Transitions Clinic Network (TCN), a growing consortium of 23 community health centers nationwide dedicated to caring for recently released prisoners and defining best practices for the health care of individuals leaving correctional facilities. In 2012, the Transitions Clinic Network( TCN) was awarded the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation Award to provide care to more than 2,000 patients returning from prison, and to train and employ people with a history of incarceration as community health workers. The Health Justice Lab has received continual funding by the National Institutes of Health with projects ranging from the epidemiology of incarceration and cardiovascular health to mitigating the community impact of gun violence using a participatory-and assets-based framework. 

    Dr. Wang has served on the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine’s Health and Incarceration Workshop, Means of Violence Workshop, and the Steering Committee on Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data programs. Her work has been published in the Lancet, JAMA, American Journal of Public Health, and Health Affairs, and showcased in national outlets, including The New York Times, NPR, and CNN.

  • Priscilla Wang

    Alumna

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 2017

    Priscilla Wang, MD, is a first-year internal medicine / primary care resident at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Stemming from her medical school history of medicine thesis, her current research examines the modern residency work hour debate and the gendered conceptions of medical professionalism that it reveals.

    Her other interests include advancing health equity via legislative advocacy and addressing the social determinants of health. She is the current co-leader of the Legislative Advocacy branch of the Brigham and Women’s Internal Medicine Social Justice Committee. Her past work includes organizing national resistance against health reform repeal via the #ProtectOurPatients campaign, co-founding a Yale patient navigator program, and working in the national Office of Health Reform and Office of the Surgeon General as a medical student.

    She graduated cum laude in 2017 from the Yale School of Medicine with an MD, and summa cum laude from Harvard College with a BA. Her recognitions include the Louis G. Welt Thesis Prize and Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award from the Yale School of Medicine, as well as the Thomas T. Hoopes Thesis Prize and Lawrence J. Henderson Prize from Harvard College.

  • Merle Waxman

    Associate Dean, Ombudsperson and Director, Women in Medicine; Associate Dean and Ombudsperson

    Years at Yale: 1986-present

    Merle Waxman is being recognized for her efforts not only on behalf of women, but as a mentor and advisor to faculty, students, and staff throughout the Yale School of Medicine. She came to Yale in 1986 from Stanford School of Medicine, where she was a speech and hearing therapist. (Training in active listening, she says, has served her well in her current position as ombudsperson.) She was assistant ombudsman at the Stanford Medical School. 

    At Yale, she took on the position of director of the Office of Women in Medicine, which had been established in 1975 to address concerns of women on the faculty. The office provides women at YSM — students, trainees, fellows, and faculty — access to advisors and mentors. It also brings distinguished women in the medical sciences to YSM as role models and mentors. And the office sponsors workshops and seminars on professional development and career opportunities. 

    In 1990, Ms. Waxman was appointed to the newly created position of ombudsperson at YSM. In that role, she provides a confidential, neutral, informal, and independent framework for resolving conflicts. She describes the ombudsperson as an active listener who is trained to frame an issue in ways that provide multiple options for resolution. 

    At YSM, she is an associate dean and one of the medical school’s Deputy Title IX coordinator.

  • Alumna

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 2002

    Dr. Webb is being recognized for her vision and leadership in establishing a clear connection between human and environmental health. In 1993, while studying orangutans at Gunung Palung National Park in Borneo, Kinari Webb had a vision that encompassed not just providing health care for an underserved population but saving the natural environment as well. In the park she found a threatened rain forest and people in dire need of health care. This experience led her to become a physician and return to Indonesia to work with local communities to improve both their health and preserve the natural environment. 

    After her graduation from YSM, Dr. Webb completed her residency in family medicine at Contra Costa Regional Medical Center in Martinez, Calif. In 2005, she founded Health in Harmony to support human and environmental work in Indonesia. She spent a year traveling throughout Indonesia in search of a site that would encompass the elements of her program—unmet health care needs, forest that could still be saved, and a responsive government—before settling on the park in West Kalimantan. Dr. Webb currently divides her time between Indonesia and the United States.

  • Myrna Weissman

    Former YSM faculty

    Department: Psychiatry,Epidemiology

    Years active at Yale: 1974-1987

    Dr. Weissman is being recognized as a clinical psychologist known for her research on the prevalence of psychological disorders and psychiatric epidemiology as it pertains to rates and risks of anxiety and mood disorders across generations. Some of her most influential works are longitudinal studies of the impact of parental depression on their children. 

    Her work to develop interpersonal psychotherapy as a short-term treatment for depression led to her co-authoring an influential book, Interpersonal Psychotherapy of Depression: A Brief, Focused, Specific Strategy. She later extended the approach for adolescents, co-authoring the book Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Adolescents. She and her co-author and husband, Gerald Klerman, were jointly honored by the National Academy of Medicine in 1994 as recipients of the Rhoda and Bernard Sarnat Award, established by the American Psychopathological Association for seminal contributions to psychopathology research. 

    Other awards Dr.Weissman has received include the Rema Lapouse Award for significant contributions to pediatric epidemiology; the Joseph Zubin Award for lifetime achievement from the Society for Research in Psychopathology; the Distinguished Service Award from the American Psychiatric Association; the Gold Medal Award from the Society of Biological Psychiatry; and the Thomas William Salmon Medal from the New York Academy of Medicine. 

    Today, Dr. Weissman is the Diane Goldman Kemper Family Professor of Epidemiology in Psychiatry at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at the Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, and chair of the Department of Epidemiology at the New York State Psychiatric Institute.

  • Li Wen

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology); Director of Core Laboratory of Yale Center for Clinical Investigation (YCCI)

    Years active at Yale: 1993 - present

    Dr. Wen is being recognized for her excellence in basic science research, in particular for her seminal contributions to our understanding of the immunological basis of type 1 diabetes. The most significant contributions of her research are the identification of the function of a novel T cell subset, gamma/delta T cells; establishing the first mouse model that carried the human type 1 diabetes susceptibility HLA-DQ8 and DR4 transgenes — these mice went on to develop spontaneous type 1 diabetes; the successful preclinical study of the efficacy of B cell depletion using anti-CD20 in prevention and treatment of type 1 diabetes; the discovery of the critical role for gut microbiota in regulating diabetes development; and the discovery that diabetes can be accelerated by specific commensal bacteria in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes, implicating molecular mimicry as one of the mechanisms for the pathogenesis of diabetes. Each of the above contributions has launched significant additional research in the field, and some of these contributions, such as the discovery of gut microbiota in the regulation of diabetes, has promoted new lines of research in almost every field in medicine, health, and disease. 

    Dr. Wen also serves as the director of the core laboratory of the Yale Center for Clinical Investigation, which provides services for scores of investigators and hundreds of clinical research protocols.

  • Marney White

    Associate Professor of Public Health (Social and Behavioral Sciences); Associate Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases) and of Psychiatry

    Years active at Yale: 2003-present; YSPH MS Class of 2009

    Dr. White is being recognized for her teaching excellence, which has been formally recognized by the Yale School of Public Health, where she was Teacher of the Year in 2014. She was also elected as the YSPH representative in the inaugural year of Inspiring Yale. A clinical psychologist, she provides clinical supervision to junior faculty and postdoctoral associates in the Department of Psychiatry and has provided classroom instruction and clinical supervision to multiple cohorts of predoctoral trainees through the Department of Psychology. She teaches multiple courses each year at the graduate level, while maintaining an active research program in eating and weight disorders. In Yale College, she teaches the only undergraduate course in epidemiology, which is consistently lauded in course evaluations as the best class at Yale. Her courses are described as innovative and highly applied, and she was recently featured by the Yale Center for Teaching and Learning for her work in case-based education. Dr. White has implemented a novel and effective wellness program for graduate trainees in the context of a core course taught at the Yale School of Public Health, and she disseminated this classroom-based intervention through a 2017 publication in The American Journal of Health Education. Dr. White also mentors junior colleagues and students about work-life balance, and has published op-eds on issues relevant to women in academia in such national media outlets as The Washington Post and The Chronicle of Higher Education.

  • Laura M. Whitman

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (General Medicine)

    Years active at Yale: 1992-present

    Dr. Whitman is being recognized for her excellence in clinical science, and as a dedicated teacher and mentor. She has also distinguished herself in leadership roles as associate program director in the Internal Medicine Traditional Residency Program and as interim medical director of the Primary Care Center at Yale New Haven Hospital. She has been a strong advocate for women and women's health, as well as for the care of disadvantaged, vulnerable populations.

  • Ruth Whittemore

    Former faculty

    Years active at Yale: 1942-1944; 1947-2001 

    Dr. Whittemore is being recognized for her pioneering role at Yale in the field of pediatric cardiology. She first came to Yale as an intern and resident in pediatrics in 1942. At Johns Hopkins, where she continued her training, she served as Helen B. Taussig’s senior fellow and first assistant. She was part of the team that performed the first “blue baby” operation in 1944. In 1947, she was invited to return to the Department of Pediatrics at Yale as the director of the first pediatric rheumatic fever and cardiac clinic in New England. This diagnostic clinic, available to children up to age 21, was located in Grace-New Haven Hospital and was supported by local city, state, and national public health agencies. As rheumatic fever declined, Dr. Whittemore focused ties with the Department of Surgery. She evaluated children for congenital cardiac abnormalities, and if they required surgery, she provided the cardiac care before and after. Her most significant research contribution was a long-term study of her former cardiac patients to determine the incidence of cardiac anomalies in the next generation. Through her clinics, she trained a number of cardiac fellows at Yale who became leading pediatric cardiologists. Dr. Whittemore remained a clinical member of the Department of Pediatrics until her retirement; she became full clinical professor in 1966. She was a member of the American Pediatric Society, a fellow of the American College of Cardiology, and one of the first pediatricians to be certified by the American Board of Pediatric Cardiology.

  • Kirsten Wilkins

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry; Co-Director for Psychiatry

    Years active at Yale: 2005-2008, 2011- present

    Dr. Wilkins is being recognized for her important teaching roles as the psychiatry clerkship director and also the director of clerkships (all clinical clerkships) for Yale School of Medicine. She is actively involved in the supervision and education of Yale medical students, PA students, and psychiatry residents and fellows. On a national level, she has long been involved with the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry (AAGP), having served as the chair of the Scholars Program for trainees and currently serving as chair of the Teaching and Training Committee. She is a member of the Association for Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry (ADMSEP) and is co-chair of the ADMSEP Geriatrics Task Force. She is also holds an important administrative role as the director of the Primary Care Mental Health Integration Clinic at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System in West Haven, Connecticut. Her scholarly research interests include the integration of primary care and psychiatry in medical education, geriatric psychiatry education for medical students, the integration of basic and clinical science in the psychiatry clerkship, and medical student mental health.

  • Donna Windish

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medicine); Director, ACES Faculty Development Program, Internal Medicine; Director, Resident Research, Yale Primary Care Residency Program, Internal Medicine; Program Director, General Internal Medicine Medical Education Fellowship, Internal Medicine

    Years active at Yale: 2005- present 

    Dr. Windish is being recognized as a clinician-educator and mentor. She has been on the faculty since 2005 and has made substantial contributions in leadership, mentoring, scholarship, and teaching. In leadership, she had been a core member of the Yale Primary Care Residency Program for 13 years, she served as associate program director for the Yale Primary Care Residency Program for eight years, she became the inaugural program director fora new internal medicine residency co-sponsored by Yale New Haven Hospital and Waterbury Hospital, she has overseen the Research in Residency program for our primary care residents since 2007, and is now the founding director of the Yale General Internal Medicine Medical Education fellowship, which is designed to produce future leaders in medical education. Dr. Windish has made substantial contributions as a mentor, serving as a primary research mentor for both residents and junior faculty. Her mentees have all benefited greatly from her advice, with many being recognized nationally for their work by receiving research awards and having successful publications. She has published her work in leading journals, including JAMA, the Archives of Internal Medicine, the Journal of General Internal Medicine (JGIM), and Academic Medicine. For her unique qualities as an educator, scholar, and mentor, Dr. Windish received the 2011 Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) New England Region Medical Educator of the Year Award and the 2014 national SGIM Frederick L. Brancati Mentorship and Leadership Award.

  • Sandra L. Wolin

    Professor Emeritus

    Departments: Cell Biology, Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

    Years active at Yale: YSM Class of 1985; 1978-2017

    Dr. Wolin is being recognized for her studies of noncoding RNAs and their functions, RNA surveillance pathways, RNA-binding proteins, RNA damage, autoimmune disease, and autoantigens. 

    She received her MD and her PhD from Yale, but moved to the University of California, San Francisco, for a postdoctoral fellowship. She returned to Yale in 1991 as an assistant professor and became professor in the departments of cell biology and molecular biophysics and biochemistry. From 2014-2017, she was the director of the Yale Center for RNA Science and Medicine. 

    In 2017, she joined the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Cancer Research as chief of its newly formed RNA Biology Laboratory. Her laboratory has identified two pathways that recognize misfolded and otherwise defective RNAs. One of these pathways involves RNA-protein complexes that are clinically important targets of autoantibodies in patients suffering from the autoimmune disease systemic autoimmune erythematosus. 

    She is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Academy of Microbiology.

  • Kimberly Yonkers

    Professor of Psychiatry, of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases) and of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences; Director, Division of Psychological Medicine; Director, Center for Wellbeing of Women and Mothers

    Years active at Yale: 1999-present

    Dr. Yonkers is being recognized for her work with female patients with psychiatric disorders. Dr. Yonkers focuses on illnesses in pregnancy and postpartum, as well as during the menstrual cycle. Her lab is also seeking to determine how best to screen for and treat women who are pregnant or postpartum and struggling with substance use problems. Dr. Yonkers’ area of study transcends disciplines, requiring expertise in psychiatry, neuroscience, and reproductive biology. She has been named one of the best doctors in the United States by US News and World Report every year since 2009.

  • Yawei Zhang

    Section Chief and Associate Professor Tenure; Co-Assistant Director of Global Oncology, Yale Cancer Center; Chief, Section of Surgical Outcomes and Epidemiology, Department of Surgery

    Years active at Yale: MPH Class of 2003, PhD Class of 2004, 2004- present

    Dr. Zhang is being recognized for being an internationally renowned epidemiologist and a profoundly influential and treasured mentor to many trainees and colleagues. Dr. Zhang's scholarship is both prolific and impactful. She has co-authored over 200 publications and has been continuously funded by the NIH since 2012. She is a sought-after speaker and shares her expertise around the globe. Most recently, Dr. Zhang authored the widely publicized "Effects of prenatal exposure to ambient air pollutant PM10 on ultrasound-measured fetal growth” in the prestigious International Journal of Epidemiology. She is currently tenured associate professor of environmental health sciences and surgery. She is also chief of the Section of Surgical Outcomes and Epidemiology in the Department of Surgery and has been instrumental in the research success of her fellows, residents, and junior faculty alike. Despite being phenomenally accomplished, Dr. Zhang is humble, approachable, and embraces humanism in her words and actions. She is a true role model for those lucky enough to have collaborated with her.

  • Paula Zimbrean

    Associate Professor Term; Director, Transplant Psychiatry Services at Yale New Haven Hospital; Associate Director, Psychosomatic Medicine Fellowship, Yale New Haven Hospital

    Years active at Yale: 2005-present

    Dr. Zimbrean is being recognized for her research and clinical care in psychiatry and for her advocacy for women both at Yale and within the profession. A member of the Yale faculty since 2005, she is now an associate professor in the psychiatry department. Dr. Zimbrean’s specialty is psychiatry as it pertains to organ transplantation, for both donors and recipients. In 2006, she launched a psychiatric consultation service for transplant candidates and recipients at Yale New Haven Hospital. This service provides mental health assistance for patients as they prepare for, and recover from, transplant surgery. Since 2013, Dr. Zimbrean has served as director of Transplant Psychiatry Services at YNNH, and since 2016 she has been the hospital’s associate training director of psychosomatic medicine. 

    From 2009 to 2011, Dr. Zimbrean was physician leader at YNNH’s Behavioral Intervention Team.

    Nationally, Dr. Zimbrean is a co-chair of the Transplant Psychiatry Special Interest Group for the Academy of Consultation Liaison Psychiatry. She has contributed to practice guidelines regarding mental health of transplantation patients. Since 2016, she has been the department’s liaison to Yale’s Committee on the Status of Women in Medicine, which works on gender equality issues at the school. She has also mentored international students through the Exchange Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates and organized a mentorship program for psychiatry residents.