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Appointments & Promotions Committees

The process of receiving an appointment or a promotion at the Yale School of Medicine is lengthy, and each department maintains information about its own process, requirements and timetable. However, there are certain school-wide requirements that apply to everyone.

All appointments and promotions must be approved by one of two Appointments and Promotions Committees, which are composed of the dean or deputy dean of the Yale School of Medicine and senior faculty who represent a wide range of ladder faculty in relationship to department, academic, track, and areas of expertise. The Committees meet from February to June to discuss and vote on faculty proposals submitted by the departments.

Current appointment and promotions committee memberships are listed below:

Senior Appointments & Promotions Committee

  • Committee Chair

    Jean and David W. Wallace Dean of the Yale School of Medicine and C.N.H. Long Professor of Internal Medicine

    Dr. Brown graduated from Yale College, where she majored in molecular biophysics and biochemistry. She earned her medical degree from Harvard University. She completed internship and residency programs in medicine at Vanderbilt University, where she also did a fellowship in clinical pharmacology. Dr. Brown joined the faculty of Vanderbilt in 1992 and held a number of leadership positions, serving as chief of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology, associate dean for clinical and translational scientist development, and Robert H. Williams professor before becoming the Hugh J. Morgan Chair of Medicine and physician-in-chief of Vanderbilt University Hospital in 2010. 

    In 2020, she became Jean and David W. Wallace Dean of Medicine and C.N.H. Long Professor of Internal Medicine at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Brown has long been committed to medical education and mentorship. At Vanderbilt, she established the Elliot Newman Society to support the development of physician-scientists and co-founded the Vanderbilt Master of Science in Clinical Investigation program. Her research has defined the molecular mechanisms through which commonly prescribed blood pressure and diabetes drugs affect the risk of cardiovascular and kidney disease. In her clinical practice, she has treated patients with resistant and secondary forms of hypertension. Dr. Brown has served as a member of the NIH National Advisory Research Resources Council and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Advisory Council. She was president of the Association of Professors of Medicine. Her numerous awards include election to the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, and the National Academy of Medicine. In 2019, she was elected a Master of the American College of Physicians.  

  • Committee Co-Chair

    Harold W. Jockers Professor of Medicine, Deputy Dean for Academic Affairs

    Dr. Linda Bockenstedt is the Harold W. Jockers Professor of Medicine, Section of Rheumatology, and Deputy Dean for Faculty Affairs at Yale School of Medicine. She received her undergraduate degree in chemistry and physics from Harvard College and is a graduate of the Ohio State University School of Medicine. After completing residency training in medicine and serving as Chief Resident in Medicine at Yale, Dr. Bockenstedt obtained rheumatology clinical and research fellowship training at the University of California, San Francisco. She has been a faculty member at Yale School of Medicine since 1989, where she directs a research program devoted toward understanding the pathogenesis of Lyme disease, an infection-related rheumatic disease. Her research has been continually supported by the National Institutes of Health since 1990, and she is internationally recognized for her studies of the host immune response to spirochetal infection. She is also an active clinician and educator for medical trainees.

    Dr. Bockenstedt is an elected member of the Kunkel Society and the Interurban Clinical Club. She is a former standing member of the Immunity and Host Defense Study Section at NIH and former member of the Board of Directors for the American College of Rheumatology Research & Education Foundation. Since 2006 she has been active in faculty affairs at Yale School of Medicine, first as Director for Professional Development & Equity, then as an Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs at Yale School of Medicine, 

  • Term 2020-2023

    Professor, Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences; Director, Division of Reproductive Sciences, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences

    Dr Vikki Abrahams is a Professor and Director of the Division of Reproductive Sciences in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences.

    Dr Abrahams received her B.Sc. (hons) in Immunology in 1996, and was awarded a Ph.D. in Immunology in 2000, both from University College London. She continued her studies as a postdoctoral associate at Dartmouth Medical School and then at Yale University in the field of Reproductive Immunology. In 2004 she joined the faculty in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at Yale School of Medicine. Since 2006 she has also been an Honorary Lecturer in the Maternal and Fetal Health Research Center at The University of Manchester, UK. 

    Dr Abrahams' research focuses on understanding the role of innate immune Toll-like receptor and Nod-like receptor family members in placental and maternal-fetal immune responses, and their role in regulating pregnancy outcome, including those complicated by infections and by autoimmune diseases. Studies from the Abrahams laboratory has characterized the mechanisms by which Toll-like receptors, Nod-like receptors, and the inflammasome function in the placental trophoblast and fetal membranes in response to both infectious and non-infectious stimuli.

    Dr Abrahams is a member of the American Association of Immunologists, International Society for Immunology of Reproduction, Society for Reproductive Investigation, and the American Society of Reproductive Immunology. Dr Abrahams is the Associate Editor for Reviews of the American Journal of Reproductive Immunology and also serves on the editorial boards for a number of other journals within the Reproductive Sciences field.

  • Term 2020-2023

    John and Hope Furth Professor of Psychiatric Neuroscience and Professor of Psychiatry, and in the Child Study Center and of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging; Director, Mood Disorders Research Program

    Dr. Hilary Patricia Blumberg is the John and Hope Furth Professor of Psychiatric Neuroscience, Professor of Psychiatry, Radiology and Biomedical Imaging and in the Child Center, and Director of the Mood Disorders Research Program, at the Yale School of Medicine. She graduated summa cum laude in neuroscience from Harvard University and completed her medical degree, psychiatry training and specialty training in brain scanning research at Cornell University Medical College. Dr. Blumberg’s research is devoted to understanding the brain circuitry differences that underlie mood disorders across the lifespan, with a focus on bipolar disorder. She directs the Mood Disorders Research Program at Yale that brings together a multi-disciplinary group of scientists to study the genetic, developmental and environmental factors that cause mood disorders to develop new methods for early detection, more effective interventions, and prevention of the disorders and their associated high risk for suicide. This research includes the use of new state-of-the-art brain scanning methods. The program is also known for training young scientists to be new leaders in the field. Dr. Blumberg has served as principal investigator on awards from the National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Department of Veterans Affairs, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, International Bipolar Disorder Foundation, For the Love of Travis Foundation, MQ Foundation, Stanley Medical Research Institute and Women’s Health Research at Yale. She has received numerous awards including the 2017 Brain and Behavior Foundation Colvin Prize for Research Achievement in Mood Disorders and the 2018 American Psychiatric Association Blanche F. Ittleson Award for outstanding and published research in child and adolescent psychiatry. She is a fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and member of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology and Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  • Term 2020-2023

    Professor of Surgery (Thoracic); Division Chief, Thoracic Surgery; Clinical Director, Center for Thoracic Cancers

    Daniel J. Boffa, MD, is a Professor of Thoracic Surgery at Yale School of Medicine. He earned his medical degree from the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine and is a Board Certified Surgeon and a Board Certified Thoracic Surgeon. His international work includes traveling to Leuven, Belgium, for a presentation for the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the ASN/ISN World Congress of Nephrology. He has written many papers and publications in his field and has received numerous awards and recognitions, including the Dr. Charles H. Bryan Clinical Excellence Award, Thoracic and Cardiovascular Research Award, and the American Association of Thoracic Surgery Resident Traveling Fellowship.

    Dr. Boffa specializes in esophageal and lung cancer, achalasia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, hiatal hernia, esophageal diverticulum, and hyperhidrosis. As a highly skilled surgeon, Dr. Boffa performs the majority of his surgeries with minimally invasive procedures. Committed to increasing the survival rate of cancer patients, Dr. Boffa has focused his clinical research on the prevention of tumor metastasis and the early detection of lung cancer.

    Learn more about one of Yale Thoracic Surgery's surgeons.

  • Term 2018-2021

    Professor of Psychiatry; Director Schizophrenia Neuropharmacology Research Group at Yale (SNRGY); Director, Neurobiological Studies Unit, VACHS; Director, VA-CMHC Schizophrenia Research Clinic

    Deepak Cyril D’Souza, MD is a Professor of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine and a staff psychiatrist at VA Connecticut Healthcare System (VACHS).  He received his medical degree from John’s National Academy of Health Sciences, Bangalore, India in 1986 and completed his psychiatric residency at State University of New York Downstate in 1992 followed by a postdoctoral fellowship in Psychopharmacology and Neurosciences at Yale University School of Medicine. He then joined the faculty in the Dept. of Psychiatry at Yale and VA Connecticut Healthcare System.  He is an active clinician, teacher and researcher, with more than 25 years of experience. 

    He directs the Neuropsychiatry Program at VA Connecticut Healthcare System, the clinical service that cares for veterans with serious mental illnesses including psychotic disorders, mood disorders and personality disorders.  He also chairs the Research and Development Committee at VA Connecticut Healthcare System.

    He is actively involved in teaching residents.  In recognition of his contributions as a teacher, he received the Yale Psychiatry resident’s teaching award in 2008.  He also directs the VA Schizophrenia Research Fellowship program the training ground for a number of current researchers.

    He directs the Schizophrenia Neuropharmacology Research Group at Yale (SNRGY). He has employed three approaches to his work. He has been using psychopharmacological probes such as ketamine, amphetamine, THC, nicotine, salvinorin A to evaluate the contributions of various neurotransmitter systems to the pathophysiology of psychosis, cognitive deficits, and reward dysfunction. He also uses in vivo neuroreceptor imaging to study schizophrenia and cannabis use disorder. In parallel to these studies of pathophysiology, he has conducted phase 1 - 4 clinical trials to develop new treatments schizophrenia, MDD and cannabis use disorder.  More recently he has been investigating the therapeutic potential of psychedelic compounds in the treatment of neuropsychiatric conditions including depression and migraine. His research is funded by the U.S. National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Institute of Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse (NIAAA), VA R&D and several foundations. His work has been published in the highest impact Psychiatry journals including Molecular Psychiatry, Lancet Psychiatry, Biological Psychiatry, American Journal of Psychiatry and Neuropsychopharmacology (https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=qDmD8DsAAAAJ&hl=en). He is a principal editor of the journal Psychopharmacology.

    He is involved in public outreach – he serves on the Physicians Advisory Board for Connecticut’s Medical Marijuana Program.   He is recognized as a leading expert on the relationship between cannabinoids and psychosis, and has been involved educating the general public about the relationship between cannabis and psychosis.

     



  • Term 2018-2021

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and of Genetics; Faculty, Investigative Medicine Program, Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

    Dr. Gruen received his BS and his MD degrees from Tulane University in New Orleans. He has been at Yale since beginning internship training in pediatrics in 1981, which was followed by subspecialty training in neonatology and research training in molecular genetics with Dr. Sherman Weissman. Dr. Gruen formally joined the faculty at Yale in 1988, splitting his time as a neonatology attending in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Yale-New Haven Hospital and his lab where he initially mapped the gene for hemochromatosis. By 2000, the focus of his lab turned to mapping and identifying the reading disability (dyslexia) gene locus on chromosome 6 (DYX2). His lab was the first to generate high-resolution genetic markers, genetic association maps, and gene expression maps of DYX2. These studies led to the identification of DCDC2, a dyslexia gene that was cited by the journal Science as the 5th top breakthrough of 2005. The lab performed an NIH funded clinical study of DCDC2 and other genes related to reading and language in the ALSPAC birth cohort of 10,000 children and mothers. These studies identified the transcriptional control element called READ1, and READ1 alleles that are detrimental and protective for reading disability and language impairment. Dr. Gruen is the principal investigator for the Yale Genes, Reading and Dyslexia (GRaD) Study, a ground-breaking case-control study of dyslexia in 1,400 Hispanic American and African American children recruited from seven sites across North America. He was the Yale site PI for the NIH Pediatric Imaging NeuroGenetics (PING) Data Resource Study of 1,575 normal children, ages 3-20 years. Most recently, Dr. Gruen started the New Haven Lexinome Project, a new six-year longitudinal study of the genetics of response-to-intervention spanning the entire 2015 and 2016 New Haven Public Schools first grade classes. The goals of the New Haven Lexinome Project are to determine risk for learning disabilities conferred by specific genetic variants for presymptomatic diagnosis, and to determine how genetic variants inform intervention for precision/personal education. In addition to his research, Dr. Gruen continues to attend 8 weeks each year in the NICU at the Children’s Hospital at Yale-New Haven.

    How genes can change language. Short video showing how our genes could account for a substantial amount of the diversity of languages around the world

    How genes can change language. Short video showing how our genes could account for a substantial amount of the diversity of languages around the world

  • Term 2018-2021

    Professor of Pathology; Director, Thoracic Pathology; Director of Medical Studies; Director, Medical Student Course Module

    My major interests are in diagnostic and experimental lung pathology. As the lead thoracic pathologist at Yale since 2004, I have experience in diagnosing and classifying the full range of histopathology of lung disease.

    I entered the MD-PhD program at Yale School of Medicine in 1979. My PhD with Donal Murphy described a novel antigenic structure within the murine MHC. Upon graduation I trained in Anatomic Pathology under the supervision of Dr. Juan Rosai and simultaneously completed a post-doctoral fellowship with Richard Flavell, chair of the section of immunobiology, with a focus on T cell tolerance. Lung specific pathology training mentors included Drs. G. J. Walker Smith, Darryl Carter and Raymond Yesner. I inherited from Dr. Smith a portion of the collection of Drs. Averill Leibow and Charles Carrington, two of the founders of modern surgical pathology of the lung.

    For many years, I worked on various murine models of inflammatory lung disease, ran an NIH funded morphology core for the Yale pulmonary section and ran a laboratory at West Haven VA looking at murine models of pulmonary fibrosis. I now still consult on various experimental models of lung disease and work with collaborators analyzing human fibrotic and neoplastic disease.

    I am heavily involved in medical school curriculum development as Director of Medical Studies for Pathology, am on the curriculum committee and am Co-Director of one of the new master courses for the new (starting 2015) pre-clinical curriculum for YSM.

    I have been Director of Anatomic Pathology at West Haven VA since 1994. 

  • Term 2018-2021

    C.N.H. Long Professor of Medicine (General Medicine) and Professor of Public Health (Health Policy)

    Dr. Justice is a Clinical Epidemiologist who has developed multiple large national cohorts based on data from the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System Electronic Medical Record enhanced with National Death Index and CMS data, patient completed surveys, DNA and tissue repositories, and stored pathology samples. She has two decades of experience in the processes required to clean, validate, and standardize raw EMR data and in its analysis using standard statistical methods, machine learning techniques, and cross cohort validations. The oldest and best known of her projects is the Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS). VACS is an ongoing, longitudinal study of >170,000 United States veterans with and without HIV infection continuously funded by National Institutes of Health (NIH) since 1996. She has developed and validated widely used indices including a prognostic index, the VACS Index, and a patient reported symptom index, the HIV Symptom Index. She is the principal investigator of the National Cancer Institute provocative questions grant HIV and Aging Mechanisms for Hepatocellular Cancer, has published over 400 peer reviewed manuscripts, and has presented work at the United Nations, The International AIDS Society, The Royal Medical College in London, the White House, and Congress. She is a member of the National Cancer Institute Ad hoc Subcommittee on HIV and AIDS Malignancy and the HIV and Aging Working Group, NIH Office of AIDS Research. She has recently joined the International Advisory Boards of Lancet HIV and Journal of the International AIDS Society.  

  • Term 2020-2023

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiology); Director, Cardiology; Director of Yale UCLP Clinical Research Program Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, The Barts Heart Center and Queen Mary University of London, Cardiology

    Alexandra J. Lansky, MD, is Professor of Medicine in the section of Cardiology at the Yale School of Medicine and a practicing cardiologist at Yale-New Haven Hospital, in New Haven, CT. Dr. Lansky joined Yale in 2010 as Director of the Yale Heart and Vascular Clinical Research Program and the Cardiovascular Research Center (YCRC), which specializes in the conduct of national and international cardiovascular clinical trials with specific expertise in the evaluation of interventional devices. She most recently received a dual appointment as Chair of Cardiovascular Research at Queen Mary University in London as part of the Yale and London based Barts Heart Center transatlantic research collaboration. From 2004 to 2010 Dr. Lansky was Associate Professor of Medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Director of Clinical Services at the Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, a practicing cardiologist at New York-Presbyterian, and Chief Scientific Officer of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation Clinical Trials Center.Prior to that she was an interventional cardiologist on faculty at Washington Hospital Center in Washington, DC, and at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York, NY.

    She has dedicated her career to leading clinical and angiographic evaluations of more than 500 clinical trials in a broad range of ischemic cardiovascular therapeutic areas, including pharmacologic and interventional device trials, many of which are landmark trials in the field and/or leading to FDA approval in the United States. She has served as the principal investigator on numerous national and international imaging studies, device, DES and neuroprotection trials. Dr. Lansky has authored and coauthored over 500 academic peer-reviewed manuscripts in the fields of interventional cardiology, angiography, and women’s cardiovascular health. She chaired the American Heart Association Statement on Interventions in Women and most recently the Academic Research Consortium defining Neurologic Endpoints in clinical cardiovascular trials.

    Dr. Lansky has been recognized for her outstanding clinical research contributions with several prestigious awards including: Masters of Arts Privatim from Yale University in 2017; Thompson Reuter’s 2014 and 2016 “Most influential Scientific Minds for Clinical Medicine”; 2012 Wenger Award of Clinical Excellence in Women’s health, Visiting Professor at Fu Wai Hospital, Bejing, China and Honorary Professor, University College London.

    Dr. Lansky is board certified in cardiovascular diseases. A graduate of the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond, VA, she received her residency training in internal medicine, cardiology, and interventional cardiology at Washington Hospital Center, Washington DC. Dr. Lansky is a Fellow of the European Society of Cardiology,the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association and the Society of Cardiac Angiography and Interventions.

  • Term 2018-2021

    Professor of Medicine (Rheumatology)

    Dr. Mamula’s received degrees from UCLA, the University of Notre Dame and the University of Oklahoma.  Dr. Mamula’s central research interests are in investigating the early events involved with breaking immune tolerance to self proteins, both in autoimmune disease and in tumor biology.  Overall, it is the goal of Dr. Mamula's laboratory to understand the mechanisms that may shift this balance toward the initiation of anti-self immune responses.  Seminal work from the Mamula lab elucidated the biochemical forms of autoantigens capable of breaking immunologic tolerance to intracellular autoantigens in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and type 1 diabetes (T1D).  Simply put, Dr. Mamula examines posttranslational protein modifications that alter cellular biology and immunity.  These studies have now been applied to the development of novel therapeutic approaches in developing anti-tumor vaccines in breast cancer and colon cancer.  In addition, studies from the Mamula laboratory first demonstrated the ability of B cells to present autoantigens in the triggering of T cell autoimmunity and in the phenomenon of epitope spreading in lupus autoimmunity.  This work preceded more recent studies illustrating the how B cells transfer autoantigens to other antigen presenting cells, including dendritic cells and macrophages. 

  • Term 2018-2021

    Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) and of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology); Professor of Cellular & Molecular Physiology; Director of Yale Lysosomal Disease Center and Gaucher Disease Treatment Center

    I was born in Kenya and grew up in England. At College I majored in Biochemistry and for my PhD project, I focused on effects of dietary cholesterol on LDL receptor activity in healthy individuals. I was deeply inspired by the research from Brown and Goldstein lab, that set me on path to a career as a physician/scientist doing translational research. My clinical, research and educational activities center around inherited metabolic liver diseases and in particular on Gaucher disease. Yale has provided me with a rich environment to develop a nationally recognized clinical program for Gaucher disease and exciting collaborations that have led to the first authentic conditional KO mouse model of Gaucher disease, first GWAS/WES studies and delineation of metablic inflmmation as well as neuroinflammation in search for genetic modifiers of this extraordinary diverse Mendelian disease. I am proud for the opportunity to serve this patient population through membership of the advisory boards of National Gaucher Foundation (USA) and Project Hope's Humanitarian Program for children of the world suffering from Gaucher disease.

  • Term 2020-2023

    Professor of Surgery (Transplant); Section Chief, Transplantation Surgery and Immunology

    David C. Mulligan, MD, is an abdominal organ transplant surgeon performing both living and deceased donor liver, kidney, and pancreas transplants.

    He currently serves as professor and chair of transplantation and immunology in the Department of Surgery at Yale School of Medicine/Yale New Haven Health System.

    His clinical and academic focus surrounds living donor liver transplantation, expanding donation, and working on ways to utilize ex-vivo organ perfusion systems to increase transplantation in the United States.

    Dr. Mulligan and his team are testing novel strategies in immunosuppression; improved biomechanical organ preservation methods to reduce ischemia/reperfusion injury and promote regeneration; and working in the field of 3D bioprinting to collaborate in finding ways to grow new organs from stem cell precursors.

    He has performed more than 200 living donor transplants and has authored more that 180 publications. He also has served on numerous editorial review boards and presented across the U.S. and internationally.

    Dr. Mulligan’s leadership in solid organ transplantation across national and international platforms has grown considerably and he now serves as president of the United Network of Organ Sharing (UNOS)/Organ Procurement Transplant Network (OPTN), member at-large on the Governing Board of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, chair of the Advisory Council on Transplantation (ACOT) to the Secretary of HHS, special government employee for FDA Medical Device Advisory Committee and chair of the Business Practice Committee of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

    In these visionary roles, he has led major changes in organ allocation and distribution and will hopefully culminate in substantial increases in organ transplants. Passionate about patient-centered care and building more resilient teams, he makes time to share his enjoyment of spending time in nature, especially near the ocean, with his wife and three children.

  • Term 2020-2023

    Professor of Psychiatry; Chief of Psychiatry, VA Connecticut Healthcare System

    Dr. Petrakis is a Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine and the Director of the Mental Health Service Line at VA Connecticut Healthcare System (VACHS) since July 2010. Dr. Petrakis completed residency training at Yale School of Medicine and then a NIDA-funded addiction psychiatry clinical/research fellowship. She joined the faculty in 1992. Prior to July 2010, she was the Director of the Substance Abuse Treatment Program of the VACHS since 1996.

    Dr. Petrakis is also the Director of the Addiction Psychiatry Residency at Yale, an ACGME-accredited program and the PI of both an NIAAA-funded and a NIDA-funded training grant (T32).

    Her research interests are predominately two-fold: (1) finding appropriate treatments for dually diagnosed individuals and (2) understanding the neurobiological mechanisms underlying alcohol dependence. She has received funding from the Department of Defense, NIH-NIAAA, the VA, NARSAD and the Stanley Foundation.