2013 Summer Internship Summary

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During the summer of 2013, 107 students embarked for places near and far to complete their MPH internships in a wide range of governmental, non-profit and for-profit organizations in local, state, national and international settings.

Sixty-seven percent of the internships were in various parts of the United States. Of these, 39 percent were in Connecticut. Interns contributed to many important public health projects in 2013, enabling them to develop and demonstrate a wide range of cross-cutting competencies. Examples include working at a Washington, D.C. think tank to assess global food security; analysis of data collected for a community health assessment and translating findings into a document for the public in New Haven; evaluating the importance of salmon to subsistence fishing communities in remote areas of Alaska; analysis of data collected by the New York City health department for evaluation of a teen pregnancy prevention project; collection  and identification of mosquitoes in the Florida Everglades National Park to develop effective control measures of arbovirus spreading mosquitoes; and development of a plan to monitor quality measures aimed at reducing hospital re-admissions for Medicare patients  at a major New York City hospital.

The remaining 33 percent of the 2013 summer internships were international placements in Africa, Asia Europe, Central America, South America, and other parts of North America. Global student interns were engaged in projects such as identifying health conditions of indigenous and marginalized communities in Hidalgo, Mexico; data analysis of female homicide in Scotland with the objective of identifying communities most at risk of violence in order to initiate primary preventive measures; assessment of child health and nutrition through in-person surveys of mothers in an urban slum in Mumbai, India; study of indoor and outdoor air pollution and its impact on birth outcomes in China; participating in an ongoing hookworm study to define the molecular mechanism for the cause of the failure rate in deworming treatment in two different communities in Ghana.

The vast majority of students rated their overall internship experience as excellent or good. Six students rated their internship experience as fair and no students indicated a poor internship experience. Preceptors also rated student interns as excellent or good with rare exception.

 

AFRICA

SOUTH and CENTRAL AMERICA

 

EUROPE

NORTH AMERICA

 

ASIA

Ghana

Brazil

Switzerland

Barbados

China

Kenya

Ecuador

Netherlands

United States

India

Uganda

Mexico

Scotland

 

Iran

 

Nicaragua

Spain

 

Lebanon

 

 

United Kingdom

 

Turkey

 

 

 

 

Vietnam