Current PhD Students

Sappho Gilbert

Sappho Gilbert
Year started: 2017

E-mail: sappho.gilbert@yale.edu

Sappho Gilbert is a doctoral student in the Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology and a Pre-Doctoral Fellow of the Yale Climate Change and Health Initiative. Her research interests include mental wellness, community health, food security, nutrition, and climate change in the Arctic. Through her work in these areas, she aims to also address salient issues of humanitarian health, human rights, indigenous rights, and ethics. Prior to her studies at Yale, Sappho worked at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics on multi-year NIH and Wellcome Trust grants mapping the safe, ethical inclusion of pregnant women in the HIV/AIDS and Zika clinical research pipelines. Before that, she was a Lombard '53 Fellow at Dartmouth College based in Nunavut, Canada and partnered with a local suicide prevention organization exploring mental health practices in three communities. Sappho earned her Master’s in Public Health from Dartmouth and graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a Bachelor of Science in biology with a minor in political science.


Jaclyn White Hughto

Year started: 2014

E-mail:  jaclyn.white@yale.edu

Jaclyn White Hughto, MPH, is a doctoral student in Chronic Disease Epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health. Her research includes understanding the social, spatial, and individual-level risk factors driving health inequities in sexual and gender minorities. She is also interested in identifying strategies to increase the uptake of biomedical interventions and developing behavioral interventions to prevent adverse sexual and psychosocial health outcomes in at-risk populations. Mrs. White Hughto has worked with Fenway Health in Boston since 2010 managing and conducting research studies and intervention trials with diverse Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) populations. She earned her MPH in Behavioral Science and Health Education from the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University and a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Boston University. Her mentor is Dr. John Pachankis. 

Selected publications

  • White, J.M., Mimiaga, M. J., Krakower, D. S., & Mayer, K. H. (2012). Evolution of Massachusetts physician attitudes, knowledge and experience regarding the use of antiretrovirals for HIV prevention. AIDS Patient Care and STDs, 26(7), 395-405. 
  • White, J.M., Dunham, E., Rowley, B.R., Reisner, S.L., & Mimiaga, M.J. (2015) Sexually explicit racialised media targeting men who have sex with men online: A content analysis of high-risk behaviour depicted in online advertisements. Culture, Health and Sexuality, (ahead-of-print) 1-14. 

Website: http://cira.yale.edu/people/jaclyn-m-white-mph


Raul Ulises Hernandez-Ramirez, M.Sc.

Year started: 2013

E-mail: raul.hernandezramirez@yale.edu

Raul Ulises has been involved in epidemiology research for a decade. He is currently preparing his doctoral dissertation, with a focus on cancer epidemiology, and working as a graduate research assistant with Dr. Robert Dubrow. His current research focuses on cancer risk among people infected with HIV, particularly on examining patterns of cancer risk in the modern antiretroviral era, and evaluating associations of HIV markers and antiretroviral therapy with cancer risk. He has conducted part of his dissertation research as a summer visiting fellow in the National Cancer Institute. Before coming to Yale, he gained substantial research experience in nutrition, environment, and cancer at the National Institute of Public Health of Mexico. He also has been involved in teaching graduate courses in epidemiology and nutrition at Yale, and quantitative and research methods in Mexico. He holds a B.Sc. in Nutrition and a M.Sc. in Epidemiology, and received training in nutritional and exercise sciences, and nutritional and environmental epidemiology in different settings. In addition, Raul Ulises is a level 1 member of Mexico’s National Researchers System.
   
Selected publications:

  • Hernández-Ramírez RU, Shiels MS, Dubrow R, Engels EA. Cancer risk in HIV-infected people in the USA from 1996 to 2012: a population-based, registry-linkage study. Lancet HIV. 2017 Aug 10. [Epub ahead of print] 
  • Park LS, Hernández-Ramírez RU, Silverberg MJ, Crothers K, Dubrow R. Prevalence of non-HIV cancer risk factors in persons living with HIV/AIDS: a meta-analysis. AIDS. 2016;30(2):273-91

Website: LinkedIn


Margaret Mayer

Magge Mayer
Year started: 2016

E-mail: margaret.mayer@yale.edu

Margaret (Maggie) Mayer, MPH, is a doctoral student in the Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health. Her research aims to characterize the association between tobacco use and food insecurity by evaluating the relationship at the individual, household, and environmental (policy) level. In addition, Maggie works with the Yale Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science, investigating patterns of emerging tobacco product use among adolescents. More broadly, she is interested in cancer prevention and control. She earned her MPH in Chronic Disease Epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health in 2016, and her BS in Molecular and Cell Biology from the University of Connecticut in 2014. Her mentor is Dr. Marney White.


Phoebe Tran

Phoebe Tran
Year started: 2016

E-mail: phoebe.tran@yale.edu

Phoebe Tran, M.Sc. is a doctoral student in the Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health. Her research interests are exploring the impact of socioeconomic inequalities on health knowledge disparities in cardiovascular health outcomes using spatial methods and creating culturally appropriate interventions for communities who are at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Phoebe earned her M.Sc. in Epidemiology from Harvard and her BA in Biology with a minor in Mathematics from Emory University. 

Publications: 

  • Tran, Lam & Tran, Phoebe. (2017) Bootstrapping – a Second Line of Evidence for Statistical Inference in Environmental Epidemiological Studies. Environmental Research (accepted with minor revision). 
  • Tran, Phoebe & Mittleman, Murray. (2016). Assessing the Associations Between Awareness of Myocardial Infarction Symptoms, Socioeconomic Factors, and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Through Regression Models. Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities.