Past Workshops

Facilitating Molecular Innovation: The Yale Center for Molecular Discovery

Friday, January 25, 2013, 2:00-4:00 pm
The Anylan Center Auditorium, N143
300 Cedar St., New Haven

A reception with refreshments will follow the Dean’s Workshop.

The Yale Center for Molecular Discovery (YCMD) provides ready access to
state-of-the-art technologies for small molecule screening, medicinal chemistry, computational chemistry, and siRNA screening. With its expert staff and cutting-edge instrumentation, YCMD helps with all aspects of projects, from experimental design to data analysis. Seed funds are available for new projects, as are opportunities for follow-up funding by commercial partners. This Dean’s Workshop will outline the capabilities of YCMD and describe four examples of successful projects.

Introduction

Carolyn W. Slayman, Ph.D.
Deputy Dean for Academic and Scientific Affairs
Sterling Professor of Genetics
Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Overview

The Yale Center for Molecular Discovery and Its Capabilities

Michael S. Kinch, Ph.D.
Managing Director, Yale Center for Molecular Discovery

Presentations

Combinatorial Drug Screening for Genotype-Selective Melanoma Therapies
David F. Stern, Ph.D.
Professor of Pathology; Associate Director, Shared Resources, Yale Cancer Center

Identification of Novel Lysosome-Based Mechanisms that Regulate Cellular Nutrient Homeostasis and Growth
Shawn M. Ferguson, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Cell Biology


Development of Small Molecule Inhibitors Against the NPP Family of Enzymes
Demetrios Braddock, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Pathology

Identifying Novel Inhibitors of DNA Repair
Peter M. Glazer, M.D., Ph.D.
Robert E. Hunter Professor of Therapeutic Radiology and Professor of Genetics; Chair, Department of Therapeutic Radiology

A reception with refreshments will follow the Dean's Workshop.

Sponsored by Office of the Dean, Yale School of Medicine

PDF Flyer


Tours of the Yale Center for Molecular Discovery are available by contacting: 
Michael S. Kinch, Ph.D.
Room 131, Molecular Innovations Center
600 West Campus Drive, West Haven, CT 06516 

Website: ycmd.yale.edu
Email: michael.kinch@yale.edu
Phone: 203-737-3147

Imaging the Brain at Work: Quantitative Neuroscience with Magnetic Resonance

Friday, September 23, 2011, 1:00 - 3:00 pm
The Anylan Center Auditorium, N143
300 Cedar St., New Haven

Contact Information

Website: http://qnmr.yale.edu
Email: qnmr@yale.edu
Phone: 203-785-6205
PDF Flyer

Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) allow non-invasive 3D imaging of the brain’s structure and function. These magnetic resonance methods play an increasingly important role in quantitative neuroscience studies, addressing fundamental issues in normal activity as well as pathophysiology. In combination with methods such as optical imaging and electrophysiology, MRI and MRS methods allow true multi-modal imaging of the brain at work. Because magnetic resonance is non-invasive, methods and insights developed in animal models can be directly translated to human studies. This Dean’s Workshop will feature several examples of how the working brain can be imaged by magnetic resonance in a variety of animal models and demonstrate how resources may be accessed to conduct new research initiatives in quantitative neuroscience with magnetic resonance.

Introduction

Carolyn W. Slayman, Ph.D.
Deputy Dean for Academic and Scientific Affairs
Sterling Professor of Genetics
Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Opening Remarks

Douglas L. Rothman, Ph.D.
Professor of Diagnostic Radiology & Biomedical Engineering
Co-Director of MRRC

Presentations

Brain Function with Multi-Modal MRI
D. S. Fahmeed Hyder, Ph.D.
Professor of Diagnostic Radiology & Biomedical Engineering
Director of QNMR Core Center

Neurochemistry with Multi-Nuclear MRS
Robin A. de Graaf, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Diagnostic Radiology & Biomedical Engineering


MRS Insights into the Pathophysiology of Mood Disorders
Gerard Sanacora, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor of Psychiatry
Director of Depression Research Program

Functional MRI of Cell Migration
Erik M. Shapiro, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Diagnostic Radiology & Biomedical Engineering

Neuroimaging of Impaired Consciousness in Epilepsy
Hal Blumenfeld, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Neurobiology
Director of Medical Studies in Clinical Neurosciences

Closing Remarks

Douglas L. Rothman, Ph.D.
Professor of Diagnostic Radiology & Biomedical Engineering
Co-Director of MRRC

Refreshments will be served during a Poster Session immediately after the workshop.

Sponsored by
Office of the Dean, Yale School of Medicine



Construction and Characterization of Genetically Engineered Mice

Friday, November 12, 2010, 1:30 - 3:30 pm
The Anylan Center Auditorium
300 Cedar St., New Haven

The ability to manipulate the mouse genome has revolutionized biology. The effects of genetic manipulation on mouse physiology and morphology allow us a more complete understanding of gene function in the whole animal. The Yale Animal Genomics Service offers a wide variety of genetic techniques to develop mice uniquely suited to individual research questions. In addition, technical and collaborative resources to assess altered phenotypes in genetically altered mice are available through the Yale Mouse Research Pathology Core. Join us for this Dean’s Workshop to hear how these Yale core resources design and characterize mouse models of human disease.

Contact Information

Yale Animal Genomics Services: http://ags.med.yale.edu/
Yale Mouse Research Pathology: http://www.mrp.yale.edu/

Introduction
Carolyn W. Slayman, Ph.D.
Deputy Dean for Academic and Scientific Affairs
Sterling Professor of Genetics
Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Opening Remarks
Timothy P. Nottoli, Ph.D.
Research Scientist in Comparative Medicine
 
Presentations
1:35 pm


Making Mice: Transgenics and Knockouts
Timothy P. Nottoli, Ph.D.
Research Scientist in Comparative Medicine

1:45 pm


Cryopreservation and In Vitro Fertilization
James M. McGrath, M.D., Ph.D.
Research Scientist in Comparative Medicine, Genetics, & Pediatrics
2:00 pm


What’s Wrong with My Mouse? Phenotypic Characterization of GEM
Caroline J. Zeiss, B.V. S.c., Dip. AVCP, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Comparative Medicine and Ophthalmology
2:20 pm


Beyond the Macrophage: An Improved Mouse Model of Gaucher’s Disease
Pramod Mistry, M.B.D.S., Ph.D.
Professor of Pediatrics, and Internal Medicine, Section Chief of Pediatric Gastroenterology

2:40 pm


The Quest for a Mouse Model of Syphilis
Dana Dunne, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine
3:10 pm


Genetic Analysis of Context-Dependent Cell Signaling by FGF Receptors
V.P. Eswarakumar, M.Sc., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics, and Pharmacology

Refreshments will be served

Sponsored by
Office of the Dean, Yale School of Medicine

Nanotechnologies in Medical Research

Friday, September 17, 2010, 1:30 - 3:30 pm
The Anylan Center Auditorium
300 Cedar St., New Haven

Recent advances in fabrication and characterization of materials and devices at the nanoscale are contributing to medical research in drug delivery, pathogen detection, cell separation methods, DNA sequencing, immunotherapy, and more. Nanotechnology facilities on the Yale campus and their application in Yale School of Medicine research will be the focus of this Dean’s Workshop.

Nanotechnology Facilities

  • nanoscale artificial structures, templates, and devices
  • images and chemistry of materials and devices
  • scanning microscopy of surfaces

Microfluidics

  • cell separation methods
  • inflammation diagnostics

Nanoparticles for Therapy

  • targeted drug delivery
  • antigen delivery

Nonlinear Biophotonics

  • fluorescence correlation microscopy
  • single molecule fluorescence
  
Introduction

Carolyn W. Slayman, Ph.D.
Deputy Dean for Academic and Scientific Affairs
Sterling Professor of Genetics
Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Opening Remarks

Paul A. Fleury, Ph.D.
Frederick W. Beinecke Professor of Engineering & Applied Physics
Professor of Physics
 
Presentations

Yale Facilities for Microscopy and Nanofabrication
Michael Rooks, Ph.D.
Senior Research Scientist
Associate Director of Research Facilities, Yale Institute for Nanoscience and Quantum Engineering

Degradable Polymer Nanoparticles for Treatment of Cancer
Mark Saltzman, Ph.D.,
Goizueta Foundation Professor of Chemical & Biomedical Engineering
Professor of Cellular & Molecular Physiology
Chair, Biomedical Engineering


Tiny Solutions to Big Problems: Seeing and Controlling Immunity With Nanotechnology
Tarek Fahmy, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering & Chemical Engineering

High-throughput Manipulation, Sorting and Separation of Cells via Ferro-microfluidics
Hur Koser, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

Single Cell Microfluidics for Systems Oncology
Rong Fan, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering


Biophotonic Measurement of Multimerization for von Willibrand Disease
Michael Levene, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering

Refreshments will be served

Sponsored by
Office of the Dean, Yale School of Medicine

Next Generation Genomics: The impact of high throughput DNA sequencing on genetic research

Friday, May 21, 2010, 1:30 - 3:30 pm
The Anylan Center Auditorium
300 Cedar St., New Haven

Recent inventions of genomic technologies are a major driving force for new discoveries in biology and biomedical research which have reshaped our understanding of how the genome functions. High-throughput DNA sequencing and other cutting-edge genomic technologies available through the Yale Center for Genome Analysis and their positive impact on research at Yale University will be the focus of this Dean’s Workshop at the School of Medicine.

 

Opening Remarks
Carolyn W. Slayman, Ph.D.
Deputy Dean for Academic and Scientific Affairs
Sterling Professor of Genetics
Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Presentations
The Continuing Revolution in Genomics: Next-Generation
DNA Sequencing and its Impact on Biomedical Research

Richard P. Lifton, M.D., Ph.D.
Chair, Department of Genetics
Sterling Professor of Genetics

Overview of Yale Center for Genome Analysis and Available Technologies
Shrikant Mane, Ph.D.
Director, Yale Center for Genome Analysis
Co-Director, Keck Biotechnology Resource Laboratory
Senior Research Scientist in Genetics

The Impact of Next-Generation Genomics from Genome-Wide Association to Whole Exome Sequencing: From 20,072 to 1
Murat Gunel, M.D.
Professor of Neurosurgery
Using Next-Generation Sequencing to Study Gene Regulation in Primate and Mouse Development
James Noonan, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Genetics

Uncovering Novel Processing Pathways for Small Regulatory RNAs Using Illumina High-Throughput Sequencing
Antonio J. Giraldez, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Genetics

Closing Remarks

Refreshments will be served

Sponsored by
Office of the Dean, Yale School of Medicine

Proteomics: Discovery to Validation

Friday, October 17, 2008, 1:30–3:30 pm
The Anlyan Center Auditorium
300 Cedar Street, New Haven

The complete sequencing of the human genome, and many other genomes has given rise to the field of proteomics, which seeks to extend genomic discoveries to the level of the corresponding proteins. New technologies are being rapidly developed to quantify the concentrations of individual proteins, along with their many post-translational modifications in vivo, and also to identify differentially expressed biomarker proteins that may enable the earlier diagnosis, improved prognosis, and more “personalized” treatment of disease. This workshop will highlight the impact of proteomics on biomedical research covering a range of disease applications from hypertension to drug addiction and to the effect of bioterrorism and infectious disease agents. The workshop will also describe the state-of-the-art proteomics technologies available at Yale’s W.M. Keck Foundation Biotechnology Resource Laboratory and its associated centers.

Website: http://keck.med.yale.edu/

Tours of the Keck Proteomics facilities located at 300 George Street will be available immediately following the workshop. Sign-up sheets will be available in the lobby.

Opening Remarks

 

Carolyn W. Slayman, Ph.D.
Deputy Dean for Academic and Scientific Affairs
Sterling Professor of Genetics Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology

Presentations

 

Proteomics at the Keck Laboratory

Erol E. Gulcicek, PhD
Deputy Director, Keck Laboratory
Associate Research Scientist in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

Christopher M. Colangelo, PhD
Director, Keck Protein Profiling
Associate Research Scientist in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

New Mechanisms Controlling Cell Volume, Neuronal Excitability, and Blood Pressure Revealed via Quantitative Proteomic

Jesse Rinehart, PhD
Associate Research Scientist
Department of Genetics

Approaches and Challenges in Neuroproteomics

Angus C. Nairn, PhD
Charles B.G. Murphy Professor of Psychiatry and Professor of Pharmacology

Knowledge of the Influenza Virion Proteome Provides Insight into Virus-Host Interactions

Megan L. Shaw, PhD
Assistant Professor Department of Microbiology
Mount Sinai School of Medicine

 Closing Remarks 

Erol E. Gulcicek, PhD
Deputy Director, Keck Laboratory
Associate Research Scientist in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

Refreshments will be served.

Sponsored by
Office of the Dean, Yale School of Medicine

Unlocking the Genome to Personalized Medicine

New Fronties in Genomic Technologies at the Keck Laboratory

Friday September 12, 2008, 1:30- 3:30 pm
The Anlyan Center Auditorium
300 Cedar Street, New Haven

Cutting-edge genomic technologies available through the Keck Biotechnology Resource Laboratory and their positive impact on research at Yale University will be the focus of the next Dean’s Workshop at the School of Medicine. Come and hear researchers describe the impressive capabilities of microarray, next-generation DNA sequencing, and other genomic technologies and their role in reshaping our understanding of how the human genome functions.

Keck Lab Contact Information
Website: http://medicine.yale.edu/keck/ycga/microarrays/index.aspx
Email: microarrays@yale.edu

Tours of the Keck Genomic facilities located at 300 George Street will be available immediately following the workshop. Sign-up sheets will be available in the lobby.

 Opening Remarks

Robert J. Alpern, MD
Dean, Yale School of Medicine; Ensign Professor of Medicine

 Presentations

Current Genomic Technologies at Keck

Richard P. Lifton, MD, PhD
Chair of Genetics
Sterling Professor of Genetics, Medicine and Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry
Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Overview of Currently Available Genomic Technologies at Keck

Shrikant M. Mane, PhD
Director, Keck Microarray Resource
Research Scientist in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

Microarray Analysis and Clinical Trial For Skin Cancer Prevention

Allen E. Bale, MD
Professor of Genetics

Identification of Susceptibility Loci for Intracranial Aneurysms Using Genome-wide Association Studies

Murat Gunel, MD
Professor of Neurosurgery

Gene Expression in the Developing Cortex Using a Genome Analyzer

James Noonan, PhD
Assistant Professor of Genetics

 Closing Remarks

Shrikant M. Mane, PhD


REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED

SPONSORED BY
Office of the Dean, Yale School of Medicine

A Window into the Body

Molecular Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography

Friday November 30, 2007 1:30-3:30PM
The Anlyan Center Auditorium
300 Cedar Street, New Haven

Molecular imaging research at Yale has taken a major leap forward with the opening of the Positron Emission Tomography Center. Come and hear scientists describe the impressive capabilities of the new, state-of-the-art Yale PET Center and its research vision for the future. Learn about the unique role PET imaging is playing in research areas such as post-traumatic stress disorder, neurodegenerative disease, and schizophrenia. Website:  http://petcenter.yale.edu

 Opening Remarks

Robert J. Alpern, MD
Dean, Yale School of Medicine; Ensign Professor of Medicine

 Presentations

Positron Emission Tomography: The Yale Experience

Richard E. Carson, PhD
Professor of Diagnostic Radiology and Biomedical Engineering
Director of the Yale PET Center

PET Imaging Agent Development: A Tango of Chemistry and Biology

Henry Yiyan Huang, PhD
Associate Professor of Diagnostic Radiology;
Co-Director of Radiochemistry, Yale PET Center

Translational Applications of Molecular Imaging with PET

Yu-Shin Ding, PhD
Professor of Diagnostic Radiology;
Director of Yale PET Radiochemistry;
Co-Director of Yale PET Center

Trauma, PTSD and Resilience: Insights from PET Imaging

Alexander Neumeister, MD
Associate Professor of Psychiatry;
Director, Molecular Imaging Program of the Clinical Neuroscience Division

Functional Imaging in the Nonhuman Primate: Cerebral Metabolic Markers to Assess Novel Cognitive Enhancers

Stacy Castner, PhD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Neurobiology

PET Imaging: A Tool for Viewing Axon Regeneration

Stephen Strittmatter, MD, PhD
Vincent Coates Professor, Department of Neurology


REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED

SPONSORED BY
Office of the Dean, Yale School of Medicine

Panning for Gold

High-Throughput Screening of Small Molecules at Yale

Friday November 10, 2006 1:30 - 3:30 PM
The Anlyan Center Auditorium
300 Cedar Street, New Haven

Small molecules can serve as valuable research tools and aid in the discovery of new therapeutics. They can mimic or disrupt cellular interactions, enzymatic activities and signaling pathways critical in development and disease. The Yale Chemical Genomics Screening Facility identifies small molecules with a desired biological activity by testing thousands of small molecule compounds individually in high-throughput biological assays. Hear Yale scientists describe their search for small molecules that regulate the activity of RNA riboswitches, facilitate neural repair, stop the cellular aging process and alter zebrafish development.

 Opening Remarks

Opening Remarks

Robert J. Alpern, MD
Dean, Yale School of Medicine; Ensign Professor of Medicine

 Presentations

Small Molecule Screening in Academia

Craig M. Crews, PhD
Associate Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology; Pharmacology; and Chemistry

Finding Active Small Molecules Through Yale’s Chemical Genomics Center

Janie Merkel, PhD
Director, Chemical Genomics Screening Facility

High-Throughput Screening to Discover Small Molecule Promoters of Neurite Outgrowth

Erik C. Gunther, PhD
Associate Research Scientist in Neurology

Combining Chemical and Mendelian Genetics to Study Zebrafish Development

Scott A. Holley, PhD
Assistant Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

High-Throughput Screening for the Discovery of Riboswitch-Targeting Antibacterial Compounds

Kenneth F. Blount, PhD
Associate Research Scientist in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

Cell-based Screening for Inhibitors of Cellular Senescence

Daniel C. DiMaio, MD, PhD
Waldemar Von Zedtwitz Professor of Genetics Professor of Therapeutic Radiology


REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED

SPONSORED BY
Office of the Dean, Yale School of Medicine

Sorting it All Out

New Directions in Flow Cytometry

Friday April 28, 2006 1:00 - 3:00 PM
The Anlyan Center Auditorium
300 Cedar Street, New Haven

Using the high-speed sorters, fluorescent tags and color analyzers of flow cytometry, biologists can count, sort and characterize the function of each of the millions of cells in a sample—at a rate as high as 30,000 cells per second. Flow cytometry has been a mainstay of immunology research since it was first introduced in the 1970s, but with recent advances in photonics, tagging and computational horsepower, the technique is making inroads into many other fields, including stem cell biology and cancer research. New refinements are allowing scientists to precisely quantify and characterize cell-cycle phase, cell proliferation, calcium signaling and intracellular molecular interactions.

 Opening Remarks

Robert J. Alpern, MD
Dean, Yale School of Medicine; Ensign Professor of Medicine

 Presentations

Presentation slides

Flow Cytometry at Yale: Many Things to Many People

Mark J. Shlomchik, MD, PhD 
Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Immunobiology

Presentation slides

Investigating Human T Cells Using Multicolor Flow Cytometry

Insoo Kang, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine (Rheumatology)

Presentation slides

Flow Cytometric Analysis of FRET to Study the Interaction Between CFP- and YFP-Tagged Proteins

David Stepensky, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow, Section of Immunobiology; Associate, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Presentation slides

Use of FACS in the Isolation and Characterization of Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Cells

Mark S. Kidd, PhD
Associate Research Scientist in Surgery (Gastroenterology)

Employing the Power of Multicolor Flow Cytometry in Identifying Dendritic Cell Subsets That Initiate Antiviral Immunity

Akiko Iwasaki, PhD
Assistant Professor of Immunobiology

Presentation slides

Functional Analysis of Ionic Flux in Isolated Endosomes Using Flow Cytometry

Michael Carrithers, MD, PhD 
Assistant Professor of Neurology

SPONSORED BY
Office of the Dean, Yale School of Medicine

Mending the Human Machine

Biomedical Engineering at Yale

Friday February 24, 2006 1:30 - 3:30 PM
The Anlyan Center Auditorium
300 Cedar Street, New Haven

Biomedical Engineering, one of Yale’s youngest and most dynamic departments, stands at the center of diverse research partnerships that are combining insights from engineering, basic biology and the clinic to bring novel treatments to the bedside. Hear Yale scientists describe innovative vaccine strategies, the application of state-of-the-art microscopy in the clinic, and techniques for guiding stem cells to build new blood vessels and nerves.

Opening Remarks

 

Carolyn W. Slayman, PhD
Deputy Dean for Academic and Scientific Affairs

 Presentations

 

 


Presentation slides

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING AT YALE:
COLLABORATIONS AND TRANSLATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS

 

W. Mark Saltzman, PhD
Goizueta Foundation Professor of Chemical Biomedical Engineering and of Cellular and Molecular Physiology

 

 


Presentation slides



Presentation slides

TOWARDS THE CONSTRUCTION OF NEW GENERATION VACCINE SYSTEMS BASED ON BIOLOGICAL-DRIVEN DESIGNS

 

Tarek Fahmy, PhD
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering

 

Ira S. Mellman, PhD
Sterling Professor of Cell Biology and Professor of Immunobiology

 

 

 

Presentation slides

 

Presentation slides

 

BRINGING MULTIPHOTON MICROSCOPY TO THE CLINIC: ASSESSMENT OF WOUND HEALING WITH ARTIFICIAL SKIN GRAFTS AND OTHER APPLICATIONS

 

Michael J. Levene, PhD
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering

 

Jordan S. Pober, MD, PhD 
Professor of Pathology, Immunobiology and Dermatology

 

 


Presentation slides

ARCHITECTURAL HYDROGELS: SCAFFOLDS FOR VASCULAR AND NEURAL PROGENITOR CELL CONSTRUCTS FOR THE NERVOUS SYSTEM

 

Erin Lavik, ScD
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering

 

Joseph A. Madri, MD, PhD
Professor of Pathology and of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED

SPONSORED BY
Office of the Dean, Yale School of Medicine

Electron Microscopy in the Molecular Era

A World Inside the World You See

Friday November 4, 2005 1:30 - 3:30 PM
The Anlyan Center Auditorium
300 Cedar Street, New Haven

Given the remarkable progress in the fields of molecular biology and genome sequencing, there is a greater need than ever for high-resolution imaging techniques such as electron microscopy to study the sub-cellular localization and function of the thousands of new proteins that have been identified.


 Opening Remarks

Robert J. Alpern, M.D.
Dean, Yale School of Medicine, Ensign Professor of Medicine

 Presentations

General Overview

Ira S. Mellman, PhD
Chair and Sterling Professor of Cell Biology
Professor of Immunobiology


Marc Pypaert, PhD
Director of the Electron Microscopy Facility
Research Scientist in Cell Biology

From Golgi Vesicles to Golgi Stacks

Graham B. Warrn, PhD
Professor of Cell Biology

Endocytic Mechanisms at the Neuronal Synapse

Pietro De Camilli, MD
Eugene Higgins Professor of Cell Biology

Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Type 2 Diabetes

Gerald I. Shulman, MD, PhD
Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)
Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology

Imaging Macromolecules in their Cellular Context

John Heuser, MD
Professor of Biophysics, Department of Cell Biology and Physiology
Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri
Visiting Scientist, Yale School of Medicine 2005-2006

Tour

A brief tour of the Electron Microscopy facility will follow

REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED

SPONSORED BY Office of the Dean, Yale School of Medicine

Cool Science

Cryoelectron Microscopy and Structural Biology at the Near-Atomic Scale

Friday June 10, 2005 1:30 - 3:30 PM
The Anlyan Center Auditorium
300 Cedar Street, New Haven

Combining supercooled samples with computational muscle, cryoEM is providing an unprecedented window on cell structure. See Yale scientists' stunningly detailed pictures of the "molecular machines" of structural biology and learn how cryoEM is being used in a variety of studies.


 Opening Remarks

Robert J. Alpern, MD
Dean, Yale School of Medicine
Ensign Professor of Medicine

 Presentations

Presentation slides

Molecular Microscopy - Past and Present Overview

Vinzenz M. Unger, PhD
Assistant Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

Electron Crystallographic Studies of Copper Transport

Stephen G. Aller
Fifth-year graduate student in the Unger lab,
Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

Presentation slides

Protein Structures Without Crystals: Single-particle Cryoelectron Microscopy

Frederick J. Sigworth, PhD
Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology

Presentation slides

What the CryoEM Structure of the InsP3 Receptor Can Tell Us About Intracellular Calcium Signaling

Barbara E. Ehrlich, PhD
Professor of Pharmacology and Cellular and Molecular Physiology

Presentation slides

Structure and Dynamics of Type III Secretion Needle Complex

Jorge E Galan, PhD, DVM
The Lucille P. Markey Professor of Microbiology and
Professor of Microbial Pathogenesis and Cell Biology

REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED

SPONSORED BY
Office of the Dean, Yale School of Medicine

General Clinical Research Center

A Resource for Clinical Investigation

FRIDAY MARCH 11, 2005 2:00 - 4:00 PM
The Anlyan Center Auditorium
300 Cedar Street, New Haven

 Opening Remarks

Robert J. Alpern, MD
Dean, Yale University School of Medicine, Ensign Professor of Medicine
GCRC Principal Investigator

The New GCRC: A Resource for Clinical Investigation

Robert S. Sherwin, MD
C.N.H. Long Professor of Medicine
GCRC Program Director

Barbara I. Gulanski, MD, MPH
Assistant Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)
GCRC Assistant Program Director, Operations

Training and Education on the GCRC: Future Directions

Harlan M. Krumholz, MD
Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) and Public Health
Director, Clinical Scholars Program
GCRC Associate Program Director, Education

Scientific Presentations of GCRC Investigators


A Connecticut Family with Dense Bones Provides
New Insights into Skeletal Anabolism

Karl Insogna, MD
Professor of Medicine

Indomethacin, Gender and the Developing Brain

Laura R. Ment, MD

Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology

Cortical GABA and the Recovery from Alcohol Dependence

John H. Krystal, MD

 

Robert L. McNeil, Jr., Professor of Clinical Pharmacology and
Professor of Psychiatry
Deputy Chair for Research, Psychiatry

SPONSORED BY
Office of the Dean, Yale School of Medicine