Bladder Cancer

Why Yale Urology

At Yale Urology, we understand that a diagnosis of bladder cancer can profoundly impact your life and leave you and your loved ones with many questions about your journey ahead. Our team is dedicated to providing the compassionate care, support, and information you need to move forward confidently with your treatment process. 

We will help you fully understand your diagnosis, and the treatment and management options available. We are committed to offering our patients with early- and late-stage bladder cancer the most advanced diagnostic technologies and treatment strategies available. Our surgeons meet regularly with the multidisciplinary specialists of Yale-New Haven Hospital and Smilow Cancer Hospital to discuss every patient's care and develop a comprehensive treatment plan unique to each patient. This level of collaboration brings the medical management of our cancer patients to the highest level.

Innovative Methods

Yale Urology surgeons are at the forefront of cancer research, driving the search for new treatments and cures and staying current on the most advanced and effective techniques. We continually integrate the latest in science-based medicine and innovative approaches into our practice to offer patients safer and more effective treatments. 

Using the most advanced techniques, such as minimally invasive and robotic-assisted surgery, our surgeons can tailor their approach to each patient, resulting in shorter hospital stays and faster recovery times.

About Bladder Cancer

Bladder cancer is the formation of malignant cells originating in the tissue lining the bladder or the urothelium. Bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer in men and the eighth most common cancer in women. There are three types of bladder cancer: 
  • Transitional cell carcinoma – Transitional cell carcinoma originates from the bladder’s inner lining or urothelium and is the most common form of bladder cancer. 
  • Squamous cell carcinoma – This type of bladder cancer involves the thin, flat cells of the bladder. This form of bladder cancer is not as common in the United States. 
  • Adenocarcinoma – Adenocarcinoma originates in the cells that release mucus and other fluids. It can also originate from remnants of the umbilical cord.

Additional information about bladder cancer: