Hepatology

Noninvasive Markers of Cirrhosis

Theme Leads: Professor W Rosenberg, UCL
Professor Mario Strazzabosco, Yale
Professor Guadalupe Garcia Tsao, Yale

Yale and UCL are collaborating in the investigation of serum markers of liver fibrosis as a non-invasive approach to assessing and monitoring liver disease in patients with cirrhosis. Patients are being recruited at both centres and will be investigated and followed according to a shared protocol developed at UCL by Brian Hogan, James O’Beirne, Tim Meyer and William Rosenberg.  The patients will then be assessed at UCL using non-invasive tests. These tests, developed by the Rosenberg Group, have been well validated in earlier stages of liver fibrosis and have the potential to be used in monitoring disease progression, refining prognosis and evaluating responses to therapeutic interventions.

Noninvasive Assessment of the Response to Sorafanib in the Treatment of Portal Hypertension

Theme Leads: Professor W Rosenberg, UCL 
Professor Mario Strazzabosco, Yale
Professor Guadalupe Garcia Tsao, Yale

Yale and UCL are evaluating the effect of treating portal hypertension with the tyrosine kinase and Raf inhibitor, sorafanib. Patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension are being randomized to treatments with sorafanib.  Their responses are being evaluated using hepatic venous pressure gradient measurement. Samples collected from these patients, who are recruited at Yale, will be tested at UCL.

The Inflammasome

Theme Leads: Professor W Rosenberg, UCL  
Professor Wajahat Mehal, Yale

Yale and UCL are investigating the role of adenosine in the regulation of inflammatory responses. Harsimran Singh is isolating human kupffer cells and replicating work conducted by Professor Mehal’s Group at Yale, using animal models of inflammation to confirm that basic mechanisms identified in the mouse translate to human subjects. It is hoped that this preliminary validation will lead to further collaboration with Professor Mehal’s innovative program.

Therapeutic Lentiviral Vaccines for Hepatitis B

Theme Leads: Professor M Collins, UCL
Professor W Rosenberg, UCL
Professor Michael Robek, Yale

Work in Professor Mary Collins' laboratory at UCL under joint supervision by William Rosenberg Douglas Macdonald has produced a number of potential therapeutic vaccines for the treatment of HBV infection. These vaccines, based on technology developed by Professor Collins, have the potential to stimulate sterilizing immune responses in infected individuals who are relatively tolerant of HBV infection. Dr. Macdonald and Professor Michael Robek are working together to test these vaccines through a preclinical animal model.