Angelique Bordey, PhD

Professor of Neurosurgery and of Cellular and Molecular Physiology

Research Interests

Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Malformations; Nervous System Diseases; Neurologic Manifestations; Diseases

Research Organizations

Cellular & Molecular Physiology

Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program

Neurosurgery

Stem Cell Center, Yale: Stem Cell Niche and Homing

Research Summary

The brain is a wonderful and mysterious machine, which makes us who we are. The activity of billions of neurons and glia orchestrate our thoughts and daily life. However, alterations in the number of neurons, their misplacement, or changes in the way they receive, handle, or send information can negatively impact our brain function and our lives. A mutation in a single gene can lead to such alterations resulting in a specific pathology and disorder. Our Mission is to understand how a mutated, dysfunctional protein will lead to abnormal brain formation and function.

Extensive Research Description

Our attention has been focused on the mammalian Target of Rapamycin, mTOR. mTOR is a converging point in cell signaling, or in other terms an intracellular hub, that receives signals from diverse intracellular routes and extracellular ligands. Importantly, mTOR is dysregulated in many neurological disorders. These disorders referred to as mTORopathies include (but are not limited to) Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC), autism, Alzheimer's disease, and Schizophrenia. We have focused on TSC, to better understand the circuit basis of mental retardation and autism.

Our work has the following three lines of research related to the following keywords: mTOR- Neural stem cell- Neurogenesis-Cognitive functions- mTORopathies

1. Understanding how a circuit is formed from neural stem cells to synaptic integration in health and in developmental mTORopathies.

2. Preventing lesion formations and associated neurological symptoms in TSC and other developmental mTORopathies.

3. Understanding the molecular basis of cognitive dysfunctions in TSC.

Selected Publications

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Angelique Bordey, PhD

Professor of Neurosurgery and of Cellular and Molecular Physiology

Research Interests

Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Malformations; Nervous System Diseases; Neurologic Manifestations; Diseases

Research Organizations

Cellular & Molecular Physiology

Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program

Neurosurgery

Stem Cell Center, Yale: Stem Cell Niche and Homing

Research Summary

The brain is a wonderful and mysterious machine, which makes us who we are. The activity of billions of neurons and glia orchestrate our thoughts and daily life. However, alterations in the number of neurons, their misplacement, or changes in the way they receive, handle, or send information can negatively impact our brain function and our lives. A mutation in a single gene can lead to such alterations resulting in a specific pathology and disorder. Our Mission is to understand how a mutated, dysfunctional protein will lead to abnormal brain formation and function.

Extensive Research Description

Our attention has been focused on the mammalian Target of Rapamycin, mTOR. mTOR is a converging point in cell signaling, or in other terms an intracellular hub, that receives signals from diverse intracellular routes and extracellular ligands. Importantly, mTOR is dysregulated in many neurological disorders. These disorders referred to as mTORopathies include (but are not limited to) Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC), autism, Alzheimer's disease, and Schizophrenia. We have focused on TSC, to better understand the circuit basis of mental retardation and autism.

Our work has the following three lines of research related to the following keywords: mTOR- Neural stem cell- Neurogenesis-Cognitive functions- mTORopathies

1. Understanding how a circuit is formed from neural stem cells to synaptic integration in health and in developmental mTORopathies.

2. Preventing lesion formations and associated neurological symptoms in TSC and other developmental mTORopathies.

3. Understanding the molecular basis of cognitive dysfunctions in TSC.

Selected Publications

Edit this profile

Contact Info

Angelique Bordey, PhD
Office Location
Farnam Memorial Building
310 Cedar Street, Ste Room 422A

New Haven, CT 06510
Mailing Address
NeurosurgeryPO Box 208082
New Haven, CT 06520-8082

Curriculum Vitae

Bordey Research

Contact Info

Angelique Bordey, PhD
Office Location
Farnam Memorial Building
310 Cedar Street, Ste Room 422A

New Haven, CT 06510
Mailing Address
NeurosurgeryPO Box 208082
New Haven, CT 06520-8082

Curriculum Vitae

Bordey Research