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From dead cells to live movies

From dead cells to live movies

New light microscopes developed by Yale cell biologists are helping researchers unravel the complexities of human biology.

In 1974, the late George E. Palade, Ph.D., chair of Yale’s newly formed cell biology department, shared a Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for using electron microscopy to elucidate the inner workings of cells—groundbreaking findings that some say ushered in the modern field of cell biology. But although the electron microscope opened new avenues of research, it had a huge drawback as a tool for studying life: it can observe cells only after they are dead, treated with special fixatives, and sliced into thin sections or coated in a layer of metal. The grayscale world pictured in such detail in electron micrographs, while powerful, is “a...

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Can brain scans reveal how we think?

Can brain scans reveal how we think?

Some people with alcoholism can change their behavior and remain abstinent, while others fight the...

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A new vision in the lab and in the clinic

A new vision in the lab and in the clinic

When Dennis Spencer, M.D., recalls his first days as a neurosurgeon in the early 1970s, he doesn’t...

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Inside the toolbox

Inside the toolbox

MRI/fMRIMagnetic resonance allows the study of systems-level processes in both brain and body by...

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