Expand all Obituaries...

In Memoriam

Lane Ameen, M.D., associate clinical professor of psychiatry, died at his home in New Haven on June 13 after a brief illness. He was 85. Ameen was also a fellow of Jonathan Edwards College at Yale and medical director and CEO of a private psychiatric hospital. He came to Yale in the 1950s and remained for his entire career. His early research focused on schizophrenia, psychosomatic disorders, and...

Lane Ameen, M.D., associate clinical professor of psychiatry, died at his home in New Haven on June 13 after a brief illness. He was 85. Ameen was also a fellow of Jonathan Edwards College at Yale and medical director and CEO of a private psychiatric hospital. He came to Yale in the 1950s and remained for his entire career. His early research focused on schizophrenia, psychosomatic disorders, and traditional psychotherapeutic methods of the Freudian era. He was later influenced by emerging psychopharmacological studies and contemporary treatments.

Ronald W. Cooke, M.D. ’43, HS ’49, died on August 16 in Castine, Maine. He was 90. After a pediatrics residency at Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, N.Y., Cooke entered the Army and served at Walter Reed Hospital and on a hospital ship. He practiced pediatric surgery for 30 years at Hartford Hospital, Newington Children’s Hospital, and the University of Connecticut Health Center.


Lloyd M. Felmly, M.D. ’50, died on September 3 in Carrollton, Ga. He was 89. Felmly began medical school at Yale in 1941 but enlisted in the U.S. Navy in January 1942. Following World War II, Felmly returned to medical school. He practiced briefly in New Jersey before moving to upstate New York, where he practiced for more than 40 years.

Angela R. Holder, J.D., LL.M. ’75, former clinical professor of pediatrics (law) at the School of Medicine, the Institution for Social and Policy Studies at Yale, and Yale Law School, died on April 22 at her home in Durham, N.C. She was 71. Holder’s research and teaching focused on ethical and legal issues in human subjects research, pediatrics, adolescent medicine, and human reproduction. Among...

Angela R. Holder, J.D., LL.M. ’75, former clinical professor of pediatrics (law) at the School of Medicine, the Institution for Social and Policy Studies at Yale, and Yale Law School, died on April 22 at her home in Durham, N.C. She was 71. Holder’s research and teaching focused on ethical and legal issues in human subjects research, pediatrics, adolescent medicine, and human reproduction. Among her publications is The Meaning of the Constitution, a text for undergraduates currently in its sixth edition. Holder spent her first year of law school as an exchange student at King’s College, London, and received her law degree from Tulane Law School. From 1975 to 1977, she was executive director of the Program in Law, Science, and Medicine at Yale Law School. From 2001 until her retirement in 2007, she was professor of the practice of medical ethics and humanities in the Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities, and History of Medicine at Duke University Medical Center. She authored four books and numerous published articles. One of the most meaningful honors she received, according to her son, John, was being selected by the medical school Class of 1988 as their Commencement speaker. She also enjoyed impersonations of her in the annual second-year show.


Ruth S. Kempe, M.D. ’46, HS ’49, a former professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and an advocate for abused children, died on July 24 in Denver. She was 87. With her husband, the late C. Henry Kempe, M.D., HS ’49, she worked at the Kempe Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect. Kempe and her husband were co-authors of...

Ruth S. Kempe, M.D. ’46, HS ’49, a former professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and an advocate for abused children, died on July 24 in Denver. She was 87. With her husband, the late C. Henry Kempe, M.D., HS ’49, she worked at the Kempe Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect. Kempe and her husband were co-authors of several books, including Healthy Babies; Happy Parents.

Raymond Mark, M.D. ’59, died on September 16 of natural causes at his home in Royersford, Penn. He was 78. After medical school, Mark completed a fellowship in pathology and immunology at Duke University Medical School and a residency in pathology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. As an immunologist he was involved in the university’s early heart transplant program.


C.P. Noel McCarthy, M.D., M.P.H. ’70, former associate clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology, died on July 22 in New Haven. He was 73. McCarthy was an integral part of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences since 1967. He performed his medical internship and residency in obstetrics and gynecology at the Hospital of St. Raphael in New Haven and was a fellow...

C.P. Noel McCarthy, M.D., M.P.H. ’70, former associate clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology, died on July 22 in New Haven. He was 73. McCarthy was an integral part of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences since 1967. He performed his medical internship and residency in obstetrics and gynecology at the Hospital of St. Raphael in New Haven and was a fellow in infertility and gynecologic infertility at Yale-New Haven Hospital. In 1968 he became a clinical instructor. He later became an associate clinical professor, a position he held until his retirement in 2004. During that period, McCarthy also served as assistant chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Hospital of St. Raphael.

Warwick Potter, M.D. ’53, died on August 5 of complications of emphysema in Wellesley, Mass. He was 82. After a residency at Children’s Hospital in Boston, Potter was a pediatrician in Ipswich, Mass., and an emergency room physician at Parkland Medical Center in Derry, N.H., and Marlborough Hospital in Massachusetts.


Marcus E. Sanford, M.D. ’43, died on September 3 in Somerville, N.J. He was 91. During World War II Sanford was a captain in the Army Medical Corps. He was a prominent physician in Somerville for 45 years. He retired in 1991.

Julie K. Staley-Gottschalk, Ph.D., associate professor of psychiatry and director of the Department of Psychiatry’s SPECT Imaging program, died on July 25 of cancer in New Haven. She was 44. Staley-Gottschalk came to Yale in 1997 to complete a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in neurochemical brain imaging in the Department of Psychiatry at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System in West Haven. Her...

Julie K. Staley-Gottschalk, Ph.D., associate professor of psychiatry and director of the Department of Psychiatry’s SPECT Imaging program, died on July 25 of cancer in New Haven. She was 44. Staley-Gottschalk came to Yale in 1997 to complete a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in neurochemical brain imaging in the Department of Psychiatry at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System in West Haven. Her research focused on the use of neuroimaging to understand the molecular causes and consequences of nicotine dependence, alcoholism, depression, and other psychiatric disorders. Her contributions were recognized by the Society of Biological Psychiatry and the Dana Clinical Hypothesis Program in Brain and Immuno-Imaging Award.