Alumni

Letter from Haiti

Online only Letter from Haiti

Public Health alum Amelia Shaw writes from a UN compound in Port-au-Prince.

Public Health alum Amelia Shaw writes from a U.N. compound in Port-au-Prince.

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Mental illness at the molecular level

Mental illness at the molecular level

When Eric J. Nestler, Ph.D. ’82, M.D. ’83, HS ’87, joined Yale’s Department of Psychiatry in 1987, he ordered a sign for his research space that read “Laboratory of Molecular Psychiatry.”“It was like a lightning rod,” he recalled. “A lot of people in psychiatry were offended because they believed that you can’t understand psychiatric phenomena at a molecular level.”But Nestler relished his status as a contrarian...

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A surgeon’s journey from the early days of chemotherapy and heart surgery

A surgeon’s journey from the early days of chemotherapy and heart surgery

During his 40 years as a practicing surgeon, Andrew J. Graham, M.D., FW ’65, HS ’66, witnessed the early use of...

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Spring Yale Service Tour to Mexico

Yale Service Tours provide a vehicle for Yale alumni, students, and their families to join in global service. Service...

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2009-2010 Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine

The Executive Committee of the Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine directs association activities, links the School of Medicine with its graduates, and helps alumni stay in touch with Yale.

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Notes

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1950s

Robert J.T. Joy, M.D. ’54, received an honorary doctor of military medicine degree from the Uniformed Services University (USU) of the Health Sciences at their 30th Commencement in May. Joy was honored for his contributions to the academic discipline of military medicine. Joy, who lives in Chevy Chase, Md., served in the U.S. Army from 1954 to 1981 and was founding commander of the Army Research...


Robert J.T. Joy, M.D. ’54, received an honorary doctor of military medicine degree from the Uniformed Services University (USU) of the Health Sciences at their 30th Commencement in May. Joy was honored for his contributions to the academic discipline of military medicine. Joy, who lives in Chevy Chase, Md., served in the U.S. Army from 1954 to 1981 and was founding commander of the Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine. He held senior staff positions in medical research in the office of the Army Surgeon General and in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. In 1981 he founded the Department of Medical History at USU and became professor emeritus in 1996.

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1960s

James S. Dalsimer, M.D. ’63, and Ellen Steinbaum, a poet and writer in Cambridge, Mass., were married on August 18 on Mount Desert Island, Maine. Dalsimer is a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst in private practice in Cambridge and a clinical instructor in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Steinbaum has written two books of poetry and until recently wrote a literary column for the Boston Globe.

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1970s
Howard Koh, M.D. ’77, M.P.H., has been named assistant secretary for health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The assistant secretary serves as the Secretary of Health and Human Services’ primary advisor on matters involving public health. Koh was previously the Harvey V. Fineberg Professor of the Practice of Public Health and associate dean for public health practice at the...
Howard Koh, M.D. ’77, M.P.H., has been named assistant secretary for health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The assistant secretary serves as the Secretary of Health and Human Services’ primary advisor on matters involving public health. Koh was previously the Harvey V. Fineberg Professor of the Practice of Public Health and associate dean for public health practice at the Harvard School of Public Health. He also served as the Massachusetts Commissioner of Public Health from 1997 to 2003.
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Eliot Sorel, M.D., FW ’75, was appointed a council member of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C., in June. And in October he was awarded an honorary degree by the Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy at the Romanian Athenaeum in Bucharest, Romania. Sorel is clinical professor of global health, health services management and leadership, and...
Eliot Sorel, M.D., FW ’75, was appointed a council member of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C., in June. And in October he was awarded an honorary degree by the Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy at the Romanian Athenaeum in Bucharest, Romania. Sorel is clinical professor of global health, health services management and leadership, and psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the George Washington University in Washington, D.C.
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1990s

Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Ph.D., FW ’77, Sc.D.H. ’91, the Morris Herzstein Professor of Biology and Physiology at the University of California, San Francisco, was one of three American scientists to share the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase.”

Blackburn began her research on telomerase while she was...


Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Ph.D., FW ’77, Sc.D.H. ’91, the Morris Herzstein Professor of Biology and Physiology at the University of California, San Francisco, was one of three American scientists to share the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase.”

Blackburn began her research on telomerase while she was a postdoctoral fellow at Yale. She shares the Nobel award with Carol W. Greider, Ph.D., of Johns Hopkins, and Jack W. Szostak, Ph.D., of Harvard, both of whom shared the Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award with her in 2006.

The citation from the Nobel Foundation stated, “This year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine is awarded to three scientists who have solved a major problem in biology: how the chromosomes can be copied in a complete way during cell divisions and how they are protected against degradation. The Nobel Laureates have shown that the solution is to be found in the ends of the chromosomes—the telomeres—and in an enzyme that forms them—telomerase.”

Blackburn earned her doctorate from the University of Cambridge in England in 1975 and did her postdoctoral work at Yale from 1975 to 1977 in molecular and cellular biology in the laboratory of another 2006 Lasker honoree, Joseph G. Gall, Ph.D. ’52.

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Samuel S. Myers, M.D. ’92, M.P.H., an instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and research associate at the Harvard University Center for the Environment, is the author of Global Environmental Change: The Threat to Human Health, a report published in November by the Worldwatch Institute and the United Nations Foundation. The report outlines a series of public health threats caused by...
Samuel S. Myers, M.D. ’92, M.P.H., an instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and research associate at the Harvard University Center for the Environment, is the author of Global Environmental Change: The Threat to Human Health, a report published in November by the Worldwatch Institute and the United Nations Foundation. The report outlines a series of public health threats caused by climate change—food and water scarcity, altered distribution of infectious diseases, increased air pollution, natural disasters, and population displacement—that threaten large segments of the human population. The report outlines the need for national-level risk assessments to identify the greatest threats in different regions, as well as unprecedented technical and financial assistance from the international community to help developing countries adapt to the health impacts of accelerating environmental change.
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2000s
Brian V. Nahed, M.D. ’05, was married in October to Vanessa B. Kerry, M.D., in Boston. Both are residents at Massachusetts General Hospital, where they met in 2005. He is in his fifth year of a residency in neurosurgery. Kerry, who is in her third year of a residency in internal medicine, is a daughter of Sen. John Kerry, a Democrat from Massachusetts.  Request Edit (DATE: )
Arvind Venkat, M.D. ’00, was promoted to associate professor of emergency medicine at the Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, effective July 1, 2009. Venkat is the director of research in the Department of Emergency Medicine and an ethics consultant at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, Penn. The hospital is a regional campus of Drexel.  Request Edit (DATE: )
 
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