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In Memoriam

Paul A. Bonner, M.P.H. ’68, of Dewitt, N.Y., died on August 8 at the age of 58. He had battled diabetes for more than 40 years. Bonner worked for the Salvation Army Harbor Light Centers, as director of grants and contracts management in Washington, and as associate program director in Boston. He was also executive director of the Addiction Treatment Center of New England in Brighton, Mass.

Thomas J. Brennan, M.D. ’82, died on July 11 at the age of 56, at his home in Vero Beach, Fla. Born in Richmond Hill, N.Y., Brennan graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1969. He was a captain in the Army and was awarded the Silver Star for Bravery. Brennan was an anesthesiologist in Dothan, Ala., until 1989, when he moved his practice to Vero Beach. He was also a member of...

Thomas J. Brennan, M.D. ’82, died on July 11 at the age of 56, at his home in Vero Beach, Fla. Born in Richmond Hill, N.Y., Brennan graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1969. He was a captain in the Army and was awarded the Silver Star for Bravery. Brennan was an anesthesiologist in Dothan, Ala., until 1989, when he moved his practice to Vero Beach. He was also a member of the Indian River County Medical Society.


Paul Calabresi, M.D. ’55, professor emeritus of medicine and founding faculty member of the Brown University School of Medicine, died on October 25 of cancer at the age of 73. One of the founding fathers of medical oncology and cancer clinical pharmacology at Yale, Calabresi was instrumental in shaping the field of modern chemotherapy. He developed approaches that led to the cure of such diseases...

Paul Calabresi, M.D. ’55, professor emeritus of medicine and founding faculty member of the Brown University School of Medicine, died on October 25 of cancer at the age of 73. One of the founding fathers of medical oncology and cancer clinical pharmacology at Yale, Calabresi was instrumental in shaping the field of modern chemotherapy. He developed approaches that led to the cure of such diseases as Hodgkins lymphoma. During his career Calabresi was president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, chair of the National Cancer Advisory Board and a member of the President’s Cancer Panel and the National Cancer Legislation Advisory Committee. The Paul Calabresi Lectureship has been created in his honor by the Yale School of Medicine.

Miriam McDonald Campbell, M.P.H. ’33, of Chilmark, Mass., died on July 21 after a short illness and complications from a fall. In 1980 Campbell co-founded the Hospice of Martha’s Vineyard, where she was admitted during her illness. Campbell taught at Smith College in Northampton, Mass.; Westbrook Junior College in Portland, Maine; and the University of Maine at Orono. She received the Health...

Miriam McDonald Campbell, M.P.H. ’33, of Chilmark, Mass., died on July 21 after a short illness and complications from a fall. In 1980 Campbell co-founded the Hospice of Martha’s Vineyard, where she was admitted during her illness. Campbell taught at Smith College in Northampton, Mass.; Westbrook Junior College in Portland, Maine; and the University of Maine at Orono. She received the Health Education Award of Distinction from the New England Health Education Consortium, the Ira V. Hiscock Award from the New England Public Health Association and the Maine Maternal and Child Health Council Health Education Award.


Irving Guttenberg, M.D. ’60, an otolaryngology surgeon from Rochester, N.Y., died on August 17 at the age of 69. After medical school and training, he served as a captain in the Air Force at Loring Air Force Base in Maine. Guttenberg was a clinical instructor in surgery (otolaryngology) at Yale from 1984 until his death and chief of surgery and chief of ear, nose and throat surgery at the VA...

Irving Guttenberg, M.D. ’60, an otolaryngology surgeon from Rochester, N.Y., died on August 17 at the age of 69. After medical school and training, he served as a captain in the Air Force at Loring Air Force Base in Maine. Guttenberg was a clinical instructor in surgery (otolaryngology) at Yale from 1984 until his death and chief of surgery and chief of ear, nose and throat surgery at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System in West Haven and at MidState Medical Center in Meriden. He retired from private practice in 2002.

William C. Harvey, M.P.H. ’65, of Tiverton, R.I., died on August 21 at the age of 71. Harvey was the owner/operator of a medical consulting firm, Hospital Executives, from which he retired in 1994. He was a hospital administrator in Rhode Island, New York and Massachusetts, and ran a home health care agency in Rhode Island.


Warren H. Knauer, M.D., HS ’54, an oncologic surgeon from Naples, Fla., died on June 21 at the age of 81. Knauer was co-director of the Wuester Tumor Clinic in Elizabeth, N.J., and chair of the division of malignant and allied diseases and of the cancer committee at the Elizabeth General Medical Center. He also developed a surgical oncology program for fourth-year surgical residents, the only one...

Warren H. Knauer, M.D., HS ’54, an oncologic surgeon from Naples, Fla., died on June 21 at the age of 81. Knauer was co-director of the Wuester Tumor Clinic in Elizabeth, N.J., and chair of the division of malignant and allied diseases and of the cancer committee at the Elizabeth General Medical Center. He also developed a surgical oncology program for fourth-year surgical residents, the only one of its kind in New Jersey. Knauer volunteered for 28 years for the American Cancer Society (ACS) and received the Physicians Award and the highest National/Division Bronze Medal Award from the ACS.

Myra A. Lappin, M.P.H. ’71, M.D., of San Francisco, died from ovarian cancer on June 17 at the age of 57. Lappin was director of student health services at Cal State Hayward and later at San Francisco State University, where the program became a model for accessible, affordable health care for students. She promoted research in the fields of women’s health and sexually transmitted infections.


Dorothy J. Lewis, M.P.H. ’72, of Newtown, Conn., died on August 7 at the age of 71. Lewis was professor of dental hygiene at the University of Bridgeport. She retired in 1985, then joined the faculty at Tunxis Community College in Farmington, Conn., where she focused on community programs affecting dental care for underprivileged children in the local school systems.

Robert M. Macnab, Ph.D., professor of molecular biophysics and biochemistry at Yale, died on September 7 as a result of injuries sustained in a fall at his home. He was 63. Macnab, an expert on the bioenergetics of motility, joined the faculty at Yale in 1973 and served as chair of his department from 1992 until 1995.


George A. Nelson, M.D. ’57, of Glenview, Ill., and formerly of Northbrook, Ill., died on September 3 at the age of 72. Nelson served as chief of staff at Lutheran General Hospital and during a 45-year career practiced at the Fahey Clinic and Holy Family Medical Center in Del Plaines, Ill. He also served as a flight surgeon on the aircraft carrier USS Ranger.

David A. Page, M.D. ’56, of Skidaway Island, Ga., died on July 2 at the age of 75. Page was an ophthalmologist at the North Shore Medical Group in Huntington, N.Y., before retiring to Georgia in 1994. During World War II, he served in the Army occupation forces in Japan.


Robert J. Rice, M.D. ’56, of Punta Gorda, Fla., died on June 13 at the age of 74. Rice owned and directed Camp Montrose in New York state for emotionally disturbed children. He also served as a consultant to the Nassau County special schools and was director of child psychiatry inpatient services at the Nassau County Medical Center.

Benjamin R. Robinson Jr., M.D. ’43, died on June 15 at the University Retirement Community in Davis, Calif., at the age of 84. Robinson practiced for 30 years at the Woodland (Calif.) Clinic Medical Group and served as chief of staff of Woodland Memorial Hospital. He was a captain in the Army and was also in the National Guard Reserves.


Peter Safar, M.D., FW ’50, a pioneer in emergency medicine and the development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), died on August 3 of cancer at his home in Pittsburgh. He was 79. Safar was known as the father of modern-day CPR for developing, in the 1950s, a method of mouth-to-mouth resuscitation which he combined with chest compression. He was a founding member of the U.S. National Research...

Peter Safar, M.D., FW ’50, a pioneer in emergency medicine and the development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), died on August 3 of cancer at his home in Pittsburgh. He was 79. Safar was known as the father of modern-day CPR for developing, in the 1950s, a method of mouth-to-mouth resuscitation which he combined with chest compression. He was a founding member of the U.S. National Research Council’s committee on emergency medical service, establishing guidelines for ambulance design and emergency medical technician and paramedic training. Safar established anesthesiology departments in Baltimore, Pittsburgh and Lima, Peru. He was chair of anesthesiology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and established the International Resuscitation Research Center (now the Safar Center for Resuscitation Research).

Thomas E. Shaffer, M.D., HS ’37, of Columbus, Ohio, died on July 31 at the age of 94. Shaffer was a clinical instructor in pediatrics at Yale until 1942 and had a private practice in New Haven and Farmington, Conn. After serving in the Army Medical Corps during World War II, he joined the faculty at the Ohio State University Medical Center. Shaffer also was director of adolescent services at...

Thomas E. Shaffer, M.D., HS ’37, of Columbus, Ohio, died on July 31 at the age of 94. Shaffer was a clinical instructor in pediatrics at Yale until 1942 and had a private practice in New Haven and Farmington, Conn. After serving in the Army Medical Corps during World War II, he joined the faculty at the Ohio State University Medical Center. Shaffer also was director of adolescent services at Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, until 1983, and he was the medical director for the Juvenile Diagnostic Center in Columbus from 1960 until 1964.