Alumni

Gut feeling

Gastroenterologist Juanita Merchant followed her intuition to a new view of how the stomach deals with acid.

Temperatures hit the 100-degree mark and just kept climbing on the summer day when Juanita Merchant tackled Lava, the most challenging rapid on her 8-day rafting trip through the Grand Canyon in 1993. Only the occasional splash of chilly river water offered relief as her oar dipped in and out of the churning froth. But the heat was hardly her main concern. Stroking in synchrony with her raft-mates, Merchant could only hope that they would slide into Lava at precisely the proper point and paddle at just the right moment to avoid crashing into boulders or flipping over. There was no turning back, no second-guessing. It was a matter of trusting their instincts, believing that the river would eventually smooth out and take them where they wanted to go.

Trusting one’s instincts is as important in research as in roiling rapids, says Merchant, a 1984 graduate of Yale’s M.D./Ph.D. program who is...

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For Nobelist educated at Yale, “It’s like winning the lottery”

Almost a century after mass spectrometry was first used to analyze small molecules, a Yale doctoral alumnus and former professor has shared in the 2002 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his pioneering efforts to apply the technique to large molecules, such as proteins.His discovery, electrospray ionization (ESI), allows scientists to gauge the weight of large molecules and determine quickly and accurately what proteins...

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A long life, steeped in science and medicine

Elizabeth R. Harrison, M.D. ’26, one of the first women to graduate from the School of Medicine and pediatrician to...

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A Yale connection to Thailand—and the King of Siam

When Kanya Suphapeetiporn, M.D., Ph.D. ’02, finishes her pediatrics residency in Brooklyn and heads home to her faculty...

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Cell biologist wins Lasker prize

James E. Rothman, Ph.D. ’71, the Paul A. Marks Chair of the Cellular Biochemistry and Biophysics Program and vice chair...

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2001-2002 Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine

OfficersFrancis R. Coughlin Jr., M.D. ’52 PresidentDonald E. Moore, M.D. ’81, M.P.H. ’81 Vice PresidentFrancis M. Lobo,...

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Calling all alumni who may be contemplating an attic-cleaning: we’d like your back issues of Yale Medicine. Of particular interest are copies of the Alumni Bulletin from the 1950s and 1960s. If you have copies to donate, please drop us a line at the address on the masthead on page 3 or phone 203-785-5824.

1940s

William G. Anlyan, M.D. ’49, chancellor emeritus of Duke University Medical Center, was awarded the Distinguished Meritorious Service Medal by Duke University at its Founder’s Day celebration in October. The award, the university’s highest honor, was presented for his 24 years of service and leadership as chancellor. Anlyan, an innovator in medical education and an exemplar in nurturing the...


William G. Anlyan, M.D. ’49, chancellor emeritus of Duke University Medical Center, was awarded the Distinguished Meritorious Service Medal by Duke University at its Founder’s Day celebration in October. The award, the university’s highest honor, was presented for his 24 years of service and leadership as chancellor. Anlyan, an innovator in medical education and an exemplar in nurturing the careers of colleagues, is also a trustee of The Duke Endowment and a board member for Research!America, an alliance for discoveries in health.

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The Yale Eye Center honored Rocko M. Fasanella, M.D. ’43, HS ’50, in June with a scientific program at the New Haven Lawn Club that highlighted new advances in his subspecialty, oculoplastic surgery. From 1951 to 1961 Fasanella was the chief of ophthalmology in the Department of Surgery.

His contributions to ocular surgery were the focus of a talk on Fasanella’s career offered by his son-in-law,...


The Yale Eye Center honored Rocko M. Fasanella, M.D. ’43, HS ’50, in June with a scientific program at the New Haven Lawn Club that highlighted new advances in his subspecialty, oculoplastic surgery. From 1951 to 1961 Fasanella was the chief of ophthalmology in the Department of Surgery.

His contributions to ocular surgery were the focus of a talk on Fasanella’s career offered by his son-in-law, Richard Petrelli, M.D., assistant clinical professor of ophthalmology. Fasanella was again feted at the evening Reunion and Commencement Banquet of the Yale Alumni in Ophthalmology, which was attended by his five children and three of his grandchildren, as well as many colleagues. The Fasanella family presented a portrait of Fasanella to hang in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science.

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1960s

Augustus A. White III, M.D., Ph.D., HS ’66, orthopaedic surgeon-in-chief emeritus at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the Ellen and Melvin Gordon Professor of Medical Education at Harvard Medical School and master in the Oliver Wendell Holmes Society, was awarded the 2002 Elmer and Rosemary Nix Ethics Award at the October annual meeting of the Clinical Orthopaedic Society (COS) in...


Augustus A. White III, M.D., Ph.D., HS ’66, orthopaedic surgeon-in-chief emeritus at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the Ellen and Melvin Gordon Professor of Medical Education at Harvard Medical School and master in the Oliver Wendell Holmes Society, was awarded the 2002 Elmer and Rosemary Nix Ethics Award at the October annual meeting of the Clinical Orthopaedic Society (COS) in Indianapolis. The COS is an invitational society established in 1912 that focuses on clinical practice. White was recognized for his life’s work in teaching the ethical practice of orthopaedics. In June, he was also named to the National Advisory Council on Minority Health and Health Disparities of the National Institutes of Health.

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1970s

After working on mixed radiological/chemical contamination issues for eight years at a Department of Energy facility, Peter J. Gorton, M.P.H. ’79, writes that he has spent the last six years as president of Panamerican Environmental Inc., a consulting firm in Buffalo, N.Y. The firm specializes in real estate due diligence, petroleum contamination remediation and forensic investigation, and...


After working on mixed radiological/chemical contamination issues for eight years at a Department of Energy facility, Peter J. Gorton, M.P.H. ’79, writes that he has spent the last six years as president of Panamerican Environmental Inc., a consulting firm in Buffalo, N.Y. The firm specializes in real estate due diligence, petroleum contamination remediation and forensic investigation, and brownfields assessment and remedial alternatives.

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Michael S. Siclari, M.D., M.P.H. ’78, left us a note on the alumni website to tell us that he is an assistant professor of clinical medicine at Brown and a staff physician in the emergency department at Roger Williams Medical Center in Providence, R.I. He is a member of the American Board of Internal Medicine and the Board of Certification in Emergency Medicine. Siclari is also an associate...


Michael S. Siclari, M.D., M.P.H. ’78, left us a note on the alumni website to tell us that he is an assistant professor of clinical medicine at Brown and a staff physician in the emergency department at Roger Williams Medical Center in Providence, R.I. He is a member of the American Board of Internal Medicine and the Board of Certification in Emergency Medicine. Siclari is also an associate medical director of Care Advantage Inc. for Blue chip of Rhode Island. He and his wife, Lynn, and three children, Stephen, Peter and Katherine, live in Providence.

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1980s

Susan R. Carter, M.D. ’89, has married fellow ophthalmologist Marco A.E. Zarbin, M.D., Ph.D. Carter was an associate professor and vice chair of ophthalmology at the University of California, San Francisco, Medical Center, and is relocating her practice to the New York metropolitan area. Zarbin is professor and chair of the Institute of Ophthalmology and Visual Science at the New Jersey Medical...


Susan R. Carter, M.D. ’89, has married fellow ophthalmologist Marco A.E. Zarbin, M.D., Ph.D. Carter was an associate professor and vice chair of ophthalmology at the University of California, San Francisco, Medical Center, and is relocating her practice to the New York metropolitan area. Zarbin is professor and chair of the Institute of Ophthalmology and Visual Science at the New Jersey Medical School at Newark. Carter and Zarbin were married on August 31 by a Presbyterian minister at the Yale Club of New York.

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Lynne Perry-Bottinger, M.D. ’86, an interventional cardiologist in private practice in New Rochelle, N.Y., and clinical assistant professor of medicine at Weill Medical College of Cornell University and at Columbia University, reports that she is “apparently one of only three African-American women who are interventional cardiologists in the United States, out of a pool of about 20,000...


Lynne Perry-Bottinger, M.D. ’86, an interventional cardiologist in private practice in New Rochelle, N.Y., and clinical assistant professor of medicine at Weill Medical College of Cornell University and at Columbia University, reports that she is “apparently one of only three African-American women who are interventional cardiologists in the United States, out of a pool of about 20,000 cardiologists overall.”

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Valerie E. Stone, M.D. ’84, recently joined the faculty at Harvard Medical School as an associate professor of medicine. She is also on the staff of the Massachusetts General Hospital, where her new roles include serving as associate chief of the General Medicine Unit, co-director of the Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency Program and senior scientist at the hospital’s John D. Stoekle Center...


Valerie E. Stone, M.D. ’84, recently joined the faculty at Harvard Medical School as an associate professor of medicine. She is also on the staff of the Massachusetts General Hospital, where her new roles include serving as associate chief of the General Medicine Unit, co-director of the Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency Program and senior scientist at the hospital’s John D. Stoekle Center for Primary Care.

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1990s

Neuroscientist Mark G. Barad, M.D. ’91, Ph.D. ’91, has been named the first Faculty Scholar by the Tennenbaum Family Interdisciplinary Center for Initiatives in Brain Research at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The center, established earlier this year with a four-year, $1 million gift from Michael E. and Suzanne Tennenbaum, created the scholar position to help spur unique,...


Neuroscientist Mark G. Barad, M.D. ’91, Ph.D. ’91, has been named the first Faculty Scholar by the Tennenbaum Family Interdisciplinary Center for Initiatives in Brain Research at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The center, established earlier this year with a four-year, $1 million gift from Michael E. and Suzanne Tennenbaum, created the scholar position to help spur unique, collaborative research into the brain’s plasticity, or adaptability, and to accelerate development of new treatments for brain damage and disease. Barad’s focus for the first two years of the program will include developmental delay in children, age-related memory loss, brain repair and regeneration after trauma or stroke, and psychotherapy, especially for anxiety disorders. Barad is an assistant professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at UCLA’s Neuropsychiatric Institute.

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Arani Bose, M.D., HS ’95, left, and Steven V. Pacia, M.D., HS ’91, FW ’93, are combining medical careers with the running of a fine arts gallery in Manhattan. Bose is assistant professor of radiology and neurology at New York University (NYU) and founder of Smart Therapeutics, a biotech company that produced the first intracranial stent. Pacia is director of the NYU Clinical Neurophysiology...


Arani Bose, M.D., HS ’95, left, and Steven V. Pacia, M.D., HS ’91, FW ’93, are combining medical careers with the running of a fine arts gallery in Manhattan. Bose is assistant professor of radiology and neurology at New York University (NYU) and founder of Smart Therapeutics, a biotech company that produced the first intracranial stent. Pacia is director of the NYU Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship, as well as director of research for the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at NYU and principal investigator for a site of a National Institutes of Health multicenter study of epilepsy surgery. Together, Bose and Pacia run Bose Pacia Modern, a gallery of contemporary Indian art that they launched with their wives in 1994, while still in medical training. The gallery, the first in North America to focus on the modern art of India, is located in the Chelsea art district and has mounted shows reviewed in The New York Times and fine arts magazines. (For a look at the current exhibition and past shows, see www.bosepaciamodern.com.)

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