Findings

Bench discovery raises hopes for therapy in spinal cord injuries

Scientists can regrow severed brain and spinal cord axons in the laboratory, but something in the adult central nervous system prevents their regeneration in humans. As a result, paralysis and other disabilities resulting from brain or spinal cord trauma are irreversible in most cases. Three separate research teams, including a group from Yale and Harvard, have identified a gene and its protein that appear to block axon regeneration. The discovery of what is termed “Nogo” raises the possibility of developing a therapeutic means of inhibiting its activity, increasing the hopes that brain and spinal cord injuries might one day be reversible.

Previous experiments have shown that the natural adult brain environment contains one or more substances that inhibit the regrowth of central nervous system axons, unlike nerve cell connections in other parts of the body. Three papers published in the...

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The "taste of temperature" not such an odd notion

What does a change in temperature taste like? According to a study by Yale investigators, the same salty, sweet or sour tastes that are normally caused by food, drink and other chemical substances on the tongue.“We’ve discovered that specific tastes can be produced by temperature stimulation, just as certain chemicals can evoke only certain taste qualities,” said Barry G. Green, Ph.D., professor of surgery in the...

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Animal model developed for Type I diabetes

Insulin-dependent, or Type I, diabetes is one of the most common and potentially devastating chronic diseases. Yale...

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A new form of Ras is identified

A Yale molecular biologist in collaboration with a colleague in Korea has identified a new type of Ras protein, a class...

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A drug that may reverse memory loss

Short-term, or working, memory is often lost due to age, mental illness and long-term treatment with antipsychotic...

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Protein plays a role in regulation of dopamine

Researchers at Yale and the Medical College of Georgia have taken an important step in unraveling the complex molecular...

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Molecular ‘ZIP coding’ system speeds proteins to their appointed destinations

From brain receptors to hormones, nearly half of the proteins in the body serve to transport biochemical information...

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Preventive factor may be a cause of heart disease

According to a Yale study, a key immune factor produced by white blood cells that was thought to prevent hardening of...

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A new twist on protein folding

As disordered, one-dimensional strings of amino acids, proteins cannot carry out their essential work in cells. In...

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Why are we so tasty to bugs? A genetic basis emerges in the lab.

Insects devour up to 40 percent of the world’s crops and spread disease to hundreds of millions of humans and livestock...

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