Letters

The early days of antibiotics

The early days of antibiotics

To the editor:

I read with great interest John Curtis’ recent article on the first use of penicillin in this country [“Fulton, Penicillin and Chance,” Capsule, Fall 1999/Winter 2000]. It brought back memories of my own role in that event.

Mrs. Miller was a private patient of Dr. John Bumstead in the old Isolation Building of the New Haven Hospital. As such she was under the direct care of Dr....

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Before penicillin, the sulfa drugs

Before penicillin, the sulfa drugs

To the editor:Your story on the first use of penicillin bought back memories of another first use, an earlier one, that of the first sulfa drug, which I administered to patients when I was an intern at the New Haven Hospital during 1936-1937. The first sulfa drug was called Prontosil; it was a red liquid and was given by intravenous infusion. I cannot claim I was the first to use it, but it was the first sulfa drug...

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Eyewitness to disaster

Eyewitness to disaster

To the editor:Thank you for the fine article about the circus fire of 1944 [“A Tragedy’s Medical Aftermath,” Capsule,...

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Other hands helped with healing

Other hands helped with healing

To the editor:At the proper interval after the Hartford circus fire several of the house staff and perhaps a few...

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Sorry to bug you

Sorry to bug you

To the editor:Oops! Someone pulled out the wrong slide. The image inside the cover of the spring 2000 issue of Yale...

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