Who’s in the in-crowd?

Photo credit: istockphoto.com

Being in with the in-crowd is the result of a couple of simple and well-established psychological principles that govern how we form allies and enemies, according to researchers at Yale and the University of North Carolina. We like people who are nice to us. And we like friends of our friends—and dislike our friends’ enemies. The researchers used a computer model—with just 80 lines of code—to show that these two ingredients form the recipe for “us versus them,” and published their findings in the journal Psychological Science. David Rand, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychology, economics and management, was a co-lead author of the study.


Other Roundup


Men’s fertility needs more respect

Men’s fertility needs more respect

When it comes to reproduction, men just don’t get the attention they deserve. How women’s health...

Read more...


50 years of anti-smoking efforts have saved lives

50 years of anti-smoking efforts have saved lives

Anti-smoking measures that began after U.S. Surgeon General Luther Terry warned of the dangers of...

Read more...


Easing pain with tarantula venom

Easing pain with tarantula venom

A protein in the venom of the Peruvian green velvet tarantula blunts activity in pain-transmitting...

Read more...

Download on the Apple App Store