Alumni

Medicine, community, and justice intersect

Medicine, community, and justice intersect

Jeffrey Lowell helps first responders, government officials, and health providers to prepare for disasters.

A few years after Jeffrey Lowell, M.D. ’85, joined the faculty at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis in 1994, the liver and kidney transplant surgeon transitioned from spending his...

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Alum promotes chronic disease meds against inflammatory response

Alum promotes chronic disease meds against inflammatory response

Statins. Metformin. Glitazones. Fibrates. Familiar drugs to clinicians who treat patients with cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. They tamp down inflammatory overreaction to the disease. Could...

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1950s

Herbert Kaplan, M.D., HS ’58, received the Presidential Gold Medal from the American College of Rheumatology in November. The award recognizes outstanding achievements in rheumatology over an entire career.

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Harry C. Miller Jr., M.D. ’54, received the William P. Didusch Art and History Award from the American Urological Association (AUA) at its 2013 annual meeting in San Diego in May. Miller was an editor of the Centennial History of the AUA, published in 2003.

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Sherwin B. Nuland, M.D. ’55, HS ’61, clinical professor of surgery emeritus, received the Jonathan E. Rhoads Gold Medal “for distinguished service to medicine” from the American Philosophical Society at its November 2011 meeting in Franklin Hall in Philadelphia.

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1970s

George J. Dohrmann, M.D., Ph.D., HS ’78, received the 2012 Career Achievement Award from the Chicago Neurological Society. Dohrmann was honored for expertise, knowledge, dedication, and recognition in neurosurgery and neurological research. Dohrmann is a member of the neurosurgery faculty at the University of Chicago Medical Center.

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Richard Kayne, M.D. ’76, received the Volunteerism and Community Service Award in November from the Connecticut Chapter of the American College of Physicians (ACP). Kayne’s son, a survivor of osteosarcoma, attended Paul Newman’s Hole in the Wall Gang Camp in Ashford, Conn., in 1995. The next year Kayne volunteered as a counselor for the camp, and he became a member of its board of directors in...


Richard Kayne, M.D. ’76, received the Volunteerism and Community Service Award in November from the Connecticut Chapter of the American College of Physicians (ACP). Kayne’s son, a survivor of osteosarcoma, attended Paul Newman’s Hole in the Wall Gang Camp in Ashford, Conn., in 1995. The next year Kayne volunteered as a counselor for the camp, and he became a member of its board of directors in 2002.

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Barbara R. Pober, M.D. ’78, M.P.H., has joined the founding faculty of the Frank H. Netter M.D. School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn. Pober will teach genetics at the medical school, which will open this fall. Pober, professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, is recognized as an international expert on Williams syndrome, a genetic disorder marked by cardiovascular...


Barbara R. Pober, M.D. ’78, M.P.H., has joined the founding faculty of the Frank H. Netter M.D. School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn. Pober will teach genetics at the medical school, which will open this fall. Pober, professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, is recognized as an international expert on Williams syndrome, a genetic disorder marked by cardiovascular disease, developmental delays, and learning disabilities.

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Eddie Reed, M.D. ’76, was named clinical director of the Intramural Research Program at the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) of the National Institutes of Health in January. Reed will oversee outpatient, inpatient, epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory-based investigations, and will build a multi- and interdisciplinary research program geared to translating...


Eddie Reed, M.D. ’76, was named clinical director of the Intramural Research Program at the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) of the National Institutes of Health in January. Reed will oversee outpatient, inpatient, epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory-based investigations, and will build a multi- and interdisciplinary research program geared to translating basic research into clinical trials and interventions.

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1980s

Brian K. Kobilka, M.D. ’81, professor of molecular and cellular physiology and of medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, won the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry in October. He shares the prize with Robert J. Lefkowitz, M.D., of Duke University Medical Center, for their work on sensors lodged in the cell membrane known as G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Their work has contributed...


Brian K. Kobilka, M.D. ’81, professor of molecular and cellular physiology and of medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, won the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry in October. He shares the prize with Robert J. Lefkowitz, M.D., of Duke University Medical Center, for their work on sensors lodged in the cell membrane known as G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Their work has contributed to improved understanding of the ways cells sense and respond to their environment—almost half of all medications achieve their effects through GPCRs.

Lefkowitz began using radio-actively labeled hormones to identify their receptors at Duke in 1968, and soon discovered the ß-adrenergic receptor, which binds adrenaline on the cell surface and sets off a biochemical cascade inside the cell. Kobilka joined Lefkowitz’s lab as a postdoctoral fellow in the 1980s.

In 2011, Kobilka’s team captured an image of the ß-adrenergic receptor at the moment that it is activated and sends a signal into its cell. In announcing the prize, the Nobel committee declared, “This image is a molecular masterpiece—the result of decades of research.”

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Steven Rasmussen, M.D., HS ’83, known for his research in developing circuit-based neuromodulatory treatments for psychiatric disorders, has been named chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

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1990s

Brian Adams, M.D. ’95, M.P.H., has been named interim chair of dermatology at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, where he completed his internship and residency. Adams joined the faculty of the Department of Dermatology in 1999 and serves as residency program director and director of medical student education.

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Keith von Eigen, M.D. ’90, M.P.H., Ph.D., received a Laureate Award from the Connecticut Chapter of the American College of Physicians (ACP) in November. The award is one of the chapter’s highest honors for distinguished service to patients and the profession.

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2000s

Vishal Agrawal, M.D. ’02, FW ’96, has been named president of the Harris Corporation’s Healthcare Solutions business. Agrawal has more than 15 years’ experience developing strategies for and advising government and commercial health care organizations in North America. At the School of Medicine he was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute research fellow and in the Department of Molecular Biophysics...


Vishal Agrawal, M.D. ’02, FW ’96, has been named president of the Harris Corporation’s Healthcare Solutions business. Agrawal has more than 15 years’ experience developing strategies for and advising government and commercial health care organizations in North America. At the School of Medicine he was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute research fellow and in the Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry.

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Rockman Ferrigno, M.D. ’01, HS ’04, has been named the interim chair of the emergency department of Connecticut’s Bridgeport Hospital, where he has worked for seven years.

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Rajesh C. Rao, M.D. ’07, a vitreoretinal surgery fellow in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, submitted one of 10 entries selected by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, for its Audacious Goals challenge. Rao’s proposal involves restoring vision in patients whose retinas have deteriorated...


Rajesh C. Rao, M.D. ’07, a vitreoretinal surgery fellow in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, submitted one of 10 entries selected by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, for its Audacious Goals challenge. Rao’s proposal involves restoring vision in patients whose retinas have deteriorated from diseases like age-related macular degeneration.

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