Alumni

Spotlight falls on anthrax case

After the fifth fatal exposure last fall, alumni in Connecticut pieced together the clues behind death of woman, 94.

A case of inhalation anthrax discovered in a small Connecticut hospital in November gave Ramin Ahmadi, M.D., M.P.H. ’97, the scare of his life—and he was 7,000 miles away.Ahmadi, program director for internal medicine at the 160-bed Griffin Hospital in Derby, Conn., was spending a lonely evening in the small city of Maizuro, Japan, where he’d just arrived to teach a course on health and human rights at the local hospital. Ahmadi had settled down on the sofa with a book and an Asahi beer. He was half watching the news in Japanese when Patrick Charmel, M.P.H. ’83, his boss from back home, appeared on the screen. “I wondered,” said Ahmadi, “if...

Read more...

At “the game”

The latest installment of “The Game” brought almost 400 alumni, faculty, students and their guests...

Read more...

A Boston reunion

Over cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, about 50 Boston-area alumni and guests gathered at a reception...

Read more...

2001-2002 Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine

The Executive Committee of the Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine directs association activities, links the School of Medicine with its graduates, and helps alumni stay in touch with Yale.

Read more...

Notes

Submit Alumni Notes
Expand all Notes...
1940s

Aaron T. Beck, M.D. ’46, professor emeritus of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania, was named a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA) for 2002. APA fellows are selected for their contributions to the research, teaching or practice of psychology. The APA, headquartered in Washington, is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the...


Aaron T. Beck, M.D. ’46, professor emeritus of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania, was named a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA) for 2002. APA fellows are selected for their contributions to the research, teaching or practice of psychology. The APA, headquartered in Washington, is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States.

Request Edit
(DATE: )

Richard W. Finner, M.D., HS ’49, a psychiatrist from San Bernardino, Calif., writes to say that he has retired.

  Request Edit (DATE: )

Since retiring from the practice of internal medicine eight and a half years ago, David E. Morton, M.D. ’48, HS ’55, has been busy writing books, playing tennis, bowling, motorboating, and traveling around America and Japan. Morton writes that he misses his former patients, colleagues and nurses, but not the stresses of HMOs, malpractice, Medicare and Medicaid.

  Request Edit (DATE: )
1960s

Harold J. Alfert, M.D., HS ’65, retired in December from the faculty of the department of urology at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Alfert writes that he plans to do “gentleman farming” on a newly purchased farm in central Virginia.

  Request Edit (DATE: )

John D. Baxter, M.D. ’66, HS ’68, professor of medicine and director of the Metabolic Research Unit at the University of California, San Francisco, has endowed the John D. Baxter Lectureship in Endocrinology at the Yale Medical School. The Baxter Lectureship is given biannually to an individual who has made seminal contributions to the field of endocrinology.

  Request Edit (DATE: )

Laurence A. Boxer, M.D., HS ’68, professor and director of pediatric hematology/oncology at the University of Michigan, was named the Norman Kretchmer Professor in September at his alma mater, Stanford Medical School. Boxer was the Grover Powers Lecturer in Pediatrics at Yale in March 2000. His wife, Grace Jordison Boxer, M.D. ’68, is in the private practice of medical hematology/oncology. Their...


Laurence A. Boxer, M.D., HS ’68, professor and director of pediatric hematology/oncology at the University of Michigan, was named the Norman Kretchmer Professor in September at his alma mater, Stanford Medical School. Boxer was the Grover Powers Lecturer in Pediatrics at Yale in March 2000. His wife, Grace Jordison Boxer, M.D. ’68, is in the private practice of medical hematology/oncology. Their son, David, is on the staff at Columbia Teachers College and is engaged to be married this year.

Request Edit
(DATE: )
Alice Cobb Ipsen, M.P.H. ’67, who is retired and has lived in Denmark for the last 29 years, writes to say that “I draw, paint and make lithographs on stones—a far cry from public health.” During her career in public health, Ipsen was at the University of Pennsylvania and the University City Science Center in Philadelphia.  Request Edit (DATE: )

Eli H. Newberger, M.D. ’66, HS ’67, assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, child advocate and jazz musician, has been appointed to the Berklee College of Music board of trustees. Newberger plays piano but is best known as a jazz tuba player and has made over 40 recordings with the New Black Eagle Jazz Band and others.

  Request Edit (DATE: )

Neal Koss, M.D. ’66, HS ’74, of Palos Verdes, Calif., is still practicing plastic surgery part time, while pursuing his hobbies, which include computers, photography, tennis and travel. Koss also writes that he now has three grandchildren to add to his enjoyment.

  Request Edit (DATE: )

Charles T. Post Jr., M.D. ’68, an ophthalmologist, writes to say that he and his wife, Bonnie, spent three months sailing around Central America last winter. “Too many pals getting heart attacks and cancer, so I took the winter off from ophthalmology, bought a Little Harbor 58 named Flight—and away we went. I kept a journal of my impressions, one of which describes our visit with former classmate ...


Charles T. Post Jr., M.D. ’68, an ophthalmologist, writes to say that he and his wife, Bonnie, spent three months sailing around Central America last winter. “Too many pals getting heart attacks and cancer, so I took the winter off from ophthalmology, bought a Little Harbor 58 named Flight—and away we went. I kept a journal of my impressions, one of which describes our visit with former classmate Rodrigo Martinez, M.D. ’68, in Honduras. We are both pilots, hence the name of my boat.”

Request Edit
(DATE: )
1980s

David A. Cottrell, D.M.D., HS ’88, was named chair of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMS) at Boston University School of Dental Medicine (BUSDM) in January. He is also the director of the OMS Residency Program and of OMS Resident Research at BUSDM.

  Request Edit (DATE: )

Robert V. Levine, M.P.H. ’80, president and CEO of Peninsula Hospital Center in Far Rockaway, N.Y., received the Award of Distinction from the Metropolitan Health Administrators’ Association (MHAA) in collaboration with the American College of Healthcare Executives at the MHAA annual dinner held in June in Queens, N.Y.

  Request Edit (DATE: )

David R. Marks, M.D. ’89, a health reporter for WVIT Channel 30 in Connecticut for the past four years, is now a health reporter on The Today Show on NBC. In 2001, while at Channel 30, Marks won a statewide journalism award from the Connecticut Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. The award, the Best In-Depth Television Report of the Year, was for his story about the influence of...


David R. Marks, M.D. ’89, a health reporter for WVIT Channel 30 in Connecticut for the past four years, is now a health reporter on The Today Show on NBC. In 2001, while at Channel 30, Marks won a statewide journalism award from the Connecticut Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. The award, the Best In-Depth Television Report of the Year, was for his story about the influence of pharmaceutical representatives on doctors’ prescription writing.

Request Edit
(DATE: )
1990s

Brian G. Cole, M.D., M.P.H. ’95, is an internist with the Maui Medical Group in Hawaii, where he runs the Lahaina Clinic on the island of Maui. Cole says that he loves his job, which includes working closely with the board-certified neurosurgeon on the island. He plans to open his own practice this winter in the town of Kihei. Cole lives in Maui, has a second home in Paris and likes to travel.

  Request Edit (DATE: )

Alberto Perez Morell, M.D., FW ’98, writes to say “that thanks to [his] visiting research fellowship in plastic surgery at Yale with John A. Persing, M.D., and colleagues, [he is] able to share the knowledge with [his] fellows and students working in reconstructive microsurgery at Padre Rachads Oncology Hospital in Caracas.” While at Yale, Morell completed a research project, Further...


Alberto Perez Morell, M.D., FW ’98, writes to say “that thanks to [his] visiting research fellowship in plastic surgery at Yale with John A. Persing, M.D., and colleagues, [he is] able to share the knowledge with [his] fellows and students working in reconstructive microsurgery at Padre Rachads Oncology Hospital in Caracas.” While at Yale, Morell completed a research project, Further Investigations on the Effect of Prolonged Clamping and Vascular Stasis on the Patency of Arterial and Venous Microanastomoses, which was presented at the New England Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

Request Edit
(DATE: )

Paula I. Watnick, M.D. ’91, Ph.D., assistant professor at Tufts University School of Medicine and New England Medical Center in Boston, received the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy Young Investigator Award from the American Society for Microbiology in December in Chicago. Watnick was given the award, which is sponsored by Merck U.S. Human Health, for her research...


Paula I. Watnick, M.D. ’91, Ph.D., assistant professor at Tufts University School of Medicine and New England Medical Center in Boston, received the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy Young Investigator Award from the American Society for Microbiology in December in Chicago. Watnick was given the award, which is sponsored by Merck U.S. Human Health, for her research on the environmental survival of Vibrio cholerae, the infectious agent responsible for cholera. Her genetic analysis of V. cholerae has advanced the understanding of bacterial evolution and the emergence of new pathogens and has defined environmental signals and regulatory genes that control the way V. cholerae attaches to surfaces, a process known as biofilm formation.

Request Edit
(DATE: )
 
Download on the Apple App Store