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In Memoriam

James R. Brayshaw, M.D., HS ’57, a retired internist from Deltaville, Va., died on May 15 at the age of 75. During his career, Brayshaw was president of Alexandria Hospital; medical director of Goodwin House East and West, a continuing care retirement community; and resident physician at Episcopal High School.

Jonathan M. Clive, Ph.D. ’73, a biostatistician from Farmington, Conn., died on February 27 at the age of 58. In the 1970s Clive was on the faculty at Duke University. He later served as director of biostatistical research at the University of Connecticut Health Center, where he helped medical and dental researchers design studies and interpret data.


Edmund S. Crelin Jr., Ph.D. ’51, professor emeritus of surgery (anatomy) at Yale, who was instrumental in creating the neonatal and ultrasound units at Yale-New Haven Hospital, died on June 21 in Branford, Conn., at the age of 81. Crelin also pioneered the Physician Associate Program at the school and was chair of the Human Growth and Development Study Unit. After his retirement in 1991, he...

Edmund S. Crelin Jr., Ph.D. ’51, professor emeritus of surgery (anatomy) at Yale, who was instrumental in creating the neonatal and ultrasound units at Yale-New Haven Hospital, died on June 21 in Branford, Conn., at the age of 81. Crelin also pioneered the Physician Associate Program at the school and was chair of the Human Growth and Development Study Unit. After his retirement in 1991, he received an honorary appointment to the Yale Society of Distinguished Teachers.

Donald J. Ferguson, M.D. ’42, of Minneapolis, died on January 9 at the age of 87. Ferguson was an Army captain in the European Theater of Operations during World War II. A professor of surgery at the University of Chicago until 1987 and former chief of surgery at the Minneapolis Veteran’s Hospital, he researched and wrote papers on surgery and breast cancer.


Ann Gomez, M.P.H. ’67, of Largo, Fla., died on May 22 in Naperville, Ill. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Gomez was a retired administrator at Bridgeport Hospital in Connecticut. She was also executive director of Presbyterian Village North, a continuing care retirement community in Dallas.

James N. Harten, M.D. ’46, of Wareham, Mass., died on May 4 at the age of 81. Harten had a family practice for 54 years and was a diplomate of the American Board of Family Practice. During World War II and the Korean Conflict, he served as an officer and general surgeon in the U.S. Army and as a major in the U.S. Air Force.


Robert D. King, M.D. ’51, HS ’53, of Indianapolis, died on April 25 at the age of 79. King served as a surgeon for the Reserve Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service in Seattle. He was a professor of surgery and a cardiothoracic surgeon at the Indiana University Medical Center until he retired in 1995.

William McBride, M.D. ’73, medical director of Merck & Co., died on April 17 of kidney cancer at home in Radnor, Pa. He was 56. McBride was a gastroenterologist at Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., until 1983, when he started a private practice in Atlanta. He was also a professor at the medical schools at Morehouse College and Emory University.


Lowell E. Olson, M.D. ’54, of North Haven, Conn., died on March 23 at the age of 75. Early in his career Olson joined the faculty at Yale as an instructor in obstetrics and gynecology. He stayed for 41 years and at his death was an associate clinical professor. From 1965 until his retirement in 1998, he was also in private practice.

Frederick L. Richardson, M.D., of North Baltimore, Md., died on March 5 in an automobile accident in Maryland at the age of 77. Richardson was a lecturer in neurology on the Yale faculty from 1993 until 2003. As a medical student he was stricken with polio but recovered after one year. He devoted his life to helping sick children in countries all over the world.


William B. Seaman, M.D., HS ’47, of Tequesta, Fla., died at home on June 7 at the age of 88. Seaman was a major and flight surgeon in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. He was professor of radiology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and later became chair and director of radiology at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University.

John M. Sherwin, M.D., HS ’65, of Manchester, N.H., died of cancer on February 11 at the age of 74. Sherwin joined the staff at Elliot Hospital in Manchester in 1965 and founded New Hampshire Orthopaedic Surgery, P.A. He performed the first total hip replacement surgery at Elliot Hospital and holds a U.S. patent for the Sherwin Knee Retractor.


A. Thomas Snoke, M.D. ’64, of Glendale, Ariz., died on February 28 at the age of 65. Snoke served in the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) from 1965 to 1989. He was the general medical officer at the PHS Indian Hospital and was later promoted to service unit director. He also worked as a staff physician in family practice at the Phoenix Indian Medical Center.

Nicholas M. Stahl, M.D. ’43, of Charlestown, R.I., died on April 13 at the Westerly Nursing Home. He was 87. Stahl had a private practice in pediatric surgery in Syracuse, N.Y., and was an instructor at Syracuse University Medical School. He served as a lieutenant in the Army Medical Corps during World War II and attained the rank of major in 1947.


Howard W. Telson, M.D. ’80, died of cancer on April 5 at the age of 49. Telson was a clinical associate professor of psychiatry and a faculty member for 20 years at New York University School of Medicine. He developed innovative programs at Bellevue Hospital to improve the mental health systems and New York’s outpatient commitment program that was expanded by Kendra’s Law, which allows courts to...

Howard W. Telson, M.D. ’80, died of cancer on April 5 at the age of 49. Telson was a clinical associate professor of psychiatry and a faculty member for 20 years at New York University School of Medicine. He developed innovative programs at Bellevue Hospital to improve the mental health systems and New York’s outpatient commitment program that was expanded by Kendra’s Law, which allows courts to order some people with brain disorders to adhere to treatment while they live in the community.

Herbert P. Ungricht, M.D. ’51, of Salt Lake City, died on March 14 at the age of 86. Ungricht was a pilot with the rank of lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. He practiced ophthalmology in Salt Lake City until he was 82.