Although regrettably fewer of us made it back to this our 55th reunion, those of us who came enjoyed our usual camaraderie. Of our 35 known survivors, a significant number live far away. Those who attended were John Wolff, who traveled from Florida, Frank and Barbara Coughlin, who live in Connecticut, Jack Roberts, who came in from Philadelphia, Bob Gerety and Margie, who traveled from Vermont, and Bob Owen and Edie from St. Louis. Also, the Class of ’52 officially welcomed to our ranks Jocelyn Malkin, who had graduated with members of our class. She is also the incoming president of the Association of Yale Alumni in Medicine.

Several of us got to see each other and renew old friendships on Friday morning while registering in the entrance rotunda of the Sterling Hall of Medicine. That place for our first meeting seemed fitting, for, like the Medical Historical Library, its steadfast unchanging character is reassuring in the otherwise necessarily rapidly evolving environment of modern medicine.

Of course, there was a time for further fellowship at Dean Robert Alpern’s welcome cocktail reception and during the legendary New England-style clambake that followed. Jack Roberts, having also been a Yale undergrad, sang along with reverence and flawless memory when the Dixieland band struck up some old Yale songs.

The reunion symposium on Saturday presenting current research in neurotransmitter release and regulation of synaptic strength was very enlightening. The sherry buffet luncheon was another fine opportunity for fellowship among us, as well as for making new friends among alumni from other classes.

Our class dinner was held at the Graduate Club. Jack distributed copies of photographs from our senior class play; it had been a real spoof, and the pictures evoked many memories. Since we were a small group, there was opportunity for a lot of circulating conversation among us, rich with reminiscences. We covered many subjects, ranging from the sublime (the marvels of modern-day medicine) to the ridiculous (the lyrics of the Whiffenpoof Song). It was an enjoyable evening to be long remembered. It was also a reminder, along with the passing years, for us all to keep in touch.

Bob Owen