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Cell biology chair receives Nobel Prize

Cell biology chair receives Nobel Prize

Nobelist elucidated how information is conveyed in and between cells

James E. Rothman, Ph.D., the Fergus F. Wallace Professor of Biomedical Sciences, chair of the Department of Cell Biology, professor of chemistry, and director of the Nanobiology Institute on Yale’s West Campus, is one of three winners of the 2013 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. Rothman is one of the world’s foremost experts on membrane trafficking, the means by which proteins and other materials are transported within and between cells. The prize highlights his contributions to the understanding of exocytosis, a form of trafficking in which spherical sacs called vesicles fuse with cell membranes to deliver their contents outside the cell.

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Cell biology chair receives Nobel Prize

A boost for research, and a fitting tribute to two strong women

Norma Weinberg Spungen and the late Joan Lebson Bildner knew each other as loving in-laws: Spungen’s daughter Elisa and Bildner’s son Robert, both Yale College graduates, married in 1982 and raised a family together. But the two women had more in common than family. Elisa Spungen Bildner describes both as “extremely strong leaders and matriarchs.”

Now, the two women have something else in common: their children have...

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‘Love and respect’ for library prompt an alumnus’s gift

‘Love and respect’ for library prompt an alumnus’s gift

At 85, Stanley Simbonis, M.D., a 1957 graduate of Yale School of Medicine (YSM), can recall his medical school days with enviably sharp precision. Of his experience with the “Yale System” of medical education, which prizes students’ independence and their original research, he...

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