Features

Ten years on: a new genomic revolution

Ten years on: a new genomic revolution

A decade after the first human genome map, Yale’s new DNA sequencing facility provides a wealth of information at unprecedented speed

In June 2000, the human genome revolution began with a bang. At a White House ceremony, genome pioneers Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., and J. Craig Venter, Ph.D., joined then-president Bill Clinton and British Prime Minister Tony Blair to announce the completion of a “working draft” of the 3 billion base pairs of DNA that comprise our genetic endowment. That effort took 10 years, $3 billion, and the work of 900 automated DNA sequencing machines scattered in laboratories around the world. Ten

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Yale’s new Research Accelerator will bring scientists together

Yale’s new Research Accelerator will bring scientists together

As a pulmonologist who conducts a great deal of translational research on diseases of the airway and lungs, Geoffrey L. Chupp, M.D., associate professor of medicine and director of the Yale Center for Asthma and Airway Disease, often finds himself in unfamiliar scientific territory. “I’ll find a molecule that’s interesting or I’ll come upon some piece of data where I don’t really know what I’m dealing with,” Chupp...

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Homecoming for a top cell biologist

Homecoming for a top cell biologist

For several years, the School of Medicine’s Department of Cell Biology has invited a distinguished scientist to Yale each year to deliver the George Palade Lecture, named in honor of a beloved former Yale faculty member and Nobel Prize winner whose integration of electron...

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