It was an eventful spring for Charles J. Lockwood, M.D., the Anita O’Keefe Young Professor of Women’s Health and chair of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences. Lockwood was named president of the Society for Gynecological Investigation (SGI) at their annual meeting in March, and he received his second Jesse H. Neal National Business Journalism Award from American Business Media (ABM) for opinion pieces he has written as editor-in-chief of Contemporary OB/GYN magazine.

With approximately 1,200 basic scientists and clinical researchers as members, the SGI is the world’s leading scientific organization in reproductive sciences and obstetrics and gynecology. As president, Lockwood will preside over the 2008 annual meeting in San Diego along with his School of Medicine colleague Hugh S. Taylor, M.D., associate professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences, who will serve as program director for the meeting. Lockwood previously served as secretary treasurer for the society.

Lockwood received his writing award from ABM for his recent editorials in Contemporary OB/GYN, including articles on how the Internet has affected obstetrics and gynecology practices, the politics of emergency contraception and the effectiveness of prenatal care in at-risk populations.

Since Lockwood became chair of Yale’s Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences in 2002, the department has doubled both its National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant dollars and its clinical revenue. In addition to his duties as chair, Lockwood also serves on numerous administrative committees for the School of Medicine, Yale-New Haven Hospital and Yale University, including the Dean’s Advisory Board, the Comprehensive Cancer Center Steering Committee, the Executive Committee of the Hospital Medical Board and the Provost’s Budget Committee. He has been a regular member and recently served as acting chair of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Reproductive Health Drugs Advisory Committee.

Lockwood’s laboratory research, supported by three NIH grants, focuses on the molecular mechanisms of menstruation, contraceptive-associated uterine bleeding, preterm deliveries and the pathogenesis of many adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, he maintains a busy faculty practice in high-risk obstetrics. He has been cited annually as a “Best Doctor” by New York magazine and the Castle and Connolly Survey since 1995.