C&MP 560b: Cellular and Molecular Physiology: From Fundamental Mechanisms to Human Disease

Course Listings

Cellular and Molecular Physiology: C&MP 560b
Molecular and Cellular Developmental Biology: MCDB 415b/560b

Classes

MWF 9:30-10:20 am

Location

Room: ML 104, Mason Laboratory, 9 Hillhouse Avenue

Course Directors

Fred Sigworth, Professor, Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Emile Boulpaep, Professor, Cellular and Molecular Physiology

Instructors

Emile Boulpaep, Professor, Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Michael Caplan, Professor, Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Barbara Ehrlich, Professor, Pharmacology & Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Bliss Forbush, Professor, Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Fred Sigworth, Professor, Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Peter Takizawa, Assistant Professor, Cell Biology

Course Description

Every cell devotes an enormous fraction of its resources to controlling the movement of substances into and out of its cytoplasm. The sequencing of the human genome has revealed that as many as 1,000 to 2,000 of our genes (3-4% of the genome) encode proteins that function in membrane transport. This course will focus on understanding the nature of membrane transport processes at the cellular, molecular, biophysical and physiologic levels. Students will learn about the different classes of molecular machines that mediate membrane transport and their mechanisms of action. Emphasis will be placed upon the relationship between the molecular structures of transport proteins and their individual functions. The interactions among transport proteins in determining the physiologic behaviors of cells and tissues will also be stressed. Molecular motors will be introduced and their mechanical relationship to membrane transport proteins will be explored. Students will read papers from the scientific literature that establish the connections between mutations in genes encoding transport proteins and a wide variety of human genetic diseases.