Dr. Hafler Receives American Academy of Neurology's Highest Honor for Multiple Sclerosis Research

Yale Researcher Receives AAN’s Dystel Prize for Multiple Sclerosis Research

TORONTO – The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is awarding the 2010 John Dystel Prize for Multiple Sclerosis Research to David A. Hafler, MD, with Yale University. Hafler will receive the award during the AAN’s 62nd Annual Meeting in Toronto, held April 10 through April 17, 2010.

The John Dystel Prize recognizes a significant contribution to research in the understanding, treatment, or prevention of multiple sclerosis.

Hafler’s research focuses on the immunologic and genetic underpinnings of multiple sclerosis. He hopes that using the newly discovered findings of the genes that causes MS will lead to new therapies. “To effectively cure a disease, a basic understanding of the disease’s cause is required,” says Hafler. “The sequencing of the human genome has finally allowed us to identify the genetic basis of the disease, revealing a commonality with other autoimmune diseases.”

Hafler will highlight his research at the AAN Awards Plenary Session during the AAN Annual Meeting on Thursday, April 15. The award is presented by the American Academy of Neurology and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and made possible through a special contribution from the John Dystel Multiple Sclerosis Research Fund at the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

The 62nd Annual Meeting of the AAN is world’s largest gatherings of neurologists, taking place in the Metro Toronto Convention Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 22,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as Alzheimer’s disease, migraine, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease) and multiple sclerosis. For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit http://www.aan.com.

For more information regarding the award please visit the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.