Trace Kershaw PhD

Associate Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases)

Research Interests

HIV/STD prevention; Reproductive epidemiology; Maternal-child health epidemiology

Current Projects

Understanding Cell Phone Networks Using Cell Phones: This project uses Mobile Spy (www.mobilespy.com) software to document all cell phone calls, text messages, and GPS coordinates that members of social networks make to each other to better understand how communication and information flow within networks influences health.


Research Summary

Professor Kershaw's research is in the area of HIV/STD prevention and reproductive and maternal-child health epidemiology. Specifically, he is interested in 1) the role of heterosexual men and relationships on sexual risk and reproductive health of young couples; 2) social, psychological, and biological influences on health and sexual behavior before, during, and after pregnancy; and 3) integrating HIV/STD and unwanted pregnancy prevention with prenatal and postnatal care for young couples. Currently, he is involved in several research projects assessing the influence of behavioral interventions aimed to reduce the occurrence of HIV/STD and negative perinatal and postnatal outcomes for young women in the United States and abroad.

Additionally, Professor Kershaw is interested in methodological and quantitative issues related to designing, implementing, and evaluating applied behavioral interventions. He is particularly interested in quantitative methods to identify high-risk groups for development of targeted interventions and the development and evaluation of dyadic interventions. Professor Kershaw has participated in several research projects assessing the influence of dyadic interventions on the quality of life and health of couples. He plans to extend this methodology to the area of HIV/STD-prevention among pregnant women and their partners.

Extensive Research Description



Selected Publications

  • Kershaw, T.S., Lewis, J.B., Westdahl, C., Wang, Y.F., Rising, S.S., Massey, Z., and Ickovics, J.R. Using Clinical Decision Trees to Prevent Sexually Transmitted Infections during Pregnancy. Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, in press.
  • Kershaw, T.S., Milan, S., Westdahl, C., Lewis, J.B., Rising, S.S., Fletcher, R., and Ickovics, J.R. Avoidance, Anxiety, and Sex: The Influence of Romantic Attachment on HIV-risk among Pregnant Women. AIDS and Behavior 11: 299-311, 2007.
  • Kershaw, T.S., Milan, S., Westdahl, C., Lewis, J.B., Rising, S.S., Fletcher, R., and Ickovics, J.R. Avoidance, Anxiety, and Sex: The Influence of Romantic Attachment on HIV-risk among Pregnant Women. AIDS and Behavior, in press, 2006.
  • Kershaw, T.S., Small, M., Joseph, G., Theodore, M., Bateau, R. and Frederic, R. The Influence of Power on HIV Risk among Pregnant Women in Rural Haiti. AIDS and Behavior 10: 309-318, 2006.
  • Magee, E., Small, M., Frederic, R., Joseph, G., and Kershaw, T.S. Determinants of HIV/AIDS Risk Behaviors in Expectant Fathers in Haiti. Journal of Urban Health 83: 625-636, 2006.
  • Kershaw, T.S., Ickovics, J.R., Lewis, J.B., Niccolai L.M., Milan, S., and Ethier, K.A. Sexual Risk Following a Sexually Transmitted Disease Diagnosis: The More Things Change the More They Stay the Same. Journal of Behavioral Medicine 24: 445-461, 2004.
  • Kershaw, T.S., Niccolai, L.M., Ickovics, J.R., Lewis, J.B., Meade, C., and Ethier, K.A. Short and Long-term Impact of Adolescent Pregnancy on Postpartum Contraceptive Use: Implications for Prevention of Repeat Pregnancy. Journal of Adolescent Health 33: 359-365, 2003.
  • Kershaw, T.S., Ethier, K.A., Niccolai, L.M., Lewis, J.B., and Ickovics, J.R. Misperceived Risk among Female Adolescents: Social and Psychological Factors Associated with Sexual Risk Accuracy. Health Psychology 22: 523-532, 2003.
  • Kershaw, T.S., Niccolai, L.M., Ethier, K.A., Lewis, J.B., and Ickovics, J.R. Perceived Susceptibility to Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Disease among Pregnant and Non-pregnant Adolescents. Journal of Community Psychology 31: 419-434, 2003.

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