Steven B. Leder PhD, CCC-SLP

Professor of Surgery (Otolaryngology)

Research Interests

Speech and swallowing abilities of patients with head and neck cancer; Tracheotomy; Ventilator dependency; Dysphagia diagnostics and rehabilitation

Current Projects

Nasogastric tubes and Dysphagia
Dysphagia Screening in the Intensive Care Unit
Dysphagia Screening Post-Stroke
Vocal Fold Immobility: Voice and Swallowing Impact


Research Summary

Dr. Steven B. Leder's research focuses on speech and swallowing abilities of patients with head and neck cancer, tracheotomy and ventilator dependency, and swallowing diagnostic and rehabilitative strategies with both acute and long-term care patients, who receive all diagnoses. In his research, Dr. Leder works with patients of all ages in order to investigate the continuum of speech and swallowing problems and the impact of rehabilitative techniques aimed at improving these skills. Dr. Leder's studies are complemented by clinical expertise regarding voice restoration rehabilitation following total laryngectomy, and use of both videofluoroscopy and flexible fiberoptic endoscopy in the diagnosis and rehabilitation of dysphagia and voice disorders.

Extensive Research Description

Dr. Steven B. Leder's research focuses on speech and swallowing abilities of patients with head and neck cancer, tracheotomy and ventilator dependency, and swallowing diagnostic and rehabilitative strategies with both acute and long-term care patients, who receive all diagnoses. In his research, Dr. Leder works with patients of all ages in order to investigate the continuum of speech and swallowing problems and the impact of rehabilitative techniques aimed at improving these skills. Dr. Leder's studies are complemented by clinical expertise regarding voice restoration rehabilitation following total laryngectomy, and use of both videofluoroscopy and flexible fiberoptic endoscopy in the diagnosis and rehabilitation of dysphagia and voice disorders.


Selected Publications

  • Leder SB, Judson BL, Sliwinski E, Madson L. Promoting safe swallowing when puree Is swallowed without aspiration but thin liquid is aspirated: Nectar is enough. Dysphagia 2013;28:58-62. Leder SB, Suiter DM, Murray J, Rademaker AW. Can an oral mechanism examination contribute to the assessment of odds of aspiration? Dysphagia 2013;28:370-374.
  • Leder SB, Pauloski BR, Rademaker AW, Grammer T, Dikeman K, Kazandjian M, Mendes J, Logemann, JA. Verbal communication for the ventilator-dependent patient requiring an inflated tracheotomy tube cuff: A prospective, multi-center study on the Blom tracheotomy tube with speech inner cannula. Head & Neck (In Press).
  • Leder SB, Suiter DM, Duffey D, Judson BL. Vocal fold immobility and aspiration status: A direct replication study. Dysphagia 27:265-270, 2012.
  • Leder SB, Suiter DM, Warner HL, Acton LM, Siegel MD. Safe initiation of oral diets in hospitalized patients based on passing a 3-ounce (90 cc) water swallow challenge protocol. Quarterly Journal of Medicine 105:257-263, 2012.
  • Leder SB, Suiter DM, Warner HL, Acton LM, Swainson BA. Success of Recommending Oral Diets in Acute Stroke Patients Based on a 90-cc Water Swallow Challenge Protocol. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation 19:40-44, 2012.
  • Fattal M, Suiter DM, Warner HL, Leder SB*. Effect of presence/absence of a nasogastric tube in the same person on incidence of aspiration. Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery 145:796-800, 2011.
  • Leder SB, Suiter DM, Green BG. Silent aspiration risk is volume dependent. Dysphagia 26:304-309, 2011.

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